What does back mean?

Definitions for back
bækback

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word back.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. back, dorsumnoun

    the posterior part of a human (or animal) body from the neck to the end of the spine

    "his back was nicely tanned"

  2. rear, backnoun

    the side that goes last or is not normally seen

    "he wrote the date on the back of the photograph"

  3. back, rearnoun

    the part of something that is furthest from the normal viewer

    "he stood at the back of the stage"; "it was hidden in the rear of the store"

  4. backnoun

    (football) a person who plays in the backfield

  5. spinal column, vertebral column, spine, backbone, back, rachisnoun

    the series of vertebrae forming the axis of the skeleton and protecting the spinal cord

    "the fall broke his back"

  6. binding, book binding, cover, backnoun

    the protective covering on the front, back, and spine of a book

    "the book had a leather binding"

  7. backnoun

    the part of a garment that covers the back of your body

    "they pinned a `kick me' sign on his back"

  8. back, backrestnoun

    a support that you can lean against while sitting

    "the back of the dental chair was adjustable"

  9. backadjective

    (American football) the position of a player on a football team who is stationed behind the line of scrimmage

  10. back(a)adjective

    related to or located at the back

    "the back yard"; "the back entrance"

  11. back(a), hind(a), hinder(a)adjective

    located at or near the back of an animal

    "back (or hind) legs"; "the hinder part of a carcass"

  12. back(a)verb

    of an earlier date

    "back issues of the magazine"

  13. back, endorse, indorse, plump for, plunk for, supportverb

    be behind; approve of

    "He plumped for the Labor Party"; "I backed Kennedy in 1960"

  14. backverb

    travel backward

    "back into the driveway"; "The car backed up and hit the tree"

  15. second, back, endorse, indorseverb

    give support or one's approval to

    "I'll second that motion"; "I can't back this plan"; "endorse a new project"

  16. backverb

    cause to travel backward

    "back the car into the parking spot"

  17. backverb

    support financial backing for

    "back this enterprise"

  18. backverb

    be in back of

    "My garage backs their yard"

  19. bet on, back, gage, stake, game, puntverb

    place a bet on

    "Which horse are you backing?"; "I'm betting on the new horse"

  20. backverb

    shift to a counterclockwise direction

    "the wind backed"

  21. back, back upverb

    establish as valid or genuine

    "Can you back up your claims?"

  22. backadverb

    strengthen by providing with a back or backing

  23. backadverb

    in or to or toward a former location

    "she went back to her parents' house"

  24. back, backward, backwards, rearward, rearwardsadverb

    at or to or toward the back or rear

    "he moved back"; "tripped when he stepped backward"; "she looked rearward out the window of the car"

  25. backadverb

    in or to or toward an original condition

    "he went back to sleep"

  26. back, backwardadverb

    in or to or toward a past time

    "set the clocks back an hour"; "never look back"; "lovers of the past looking fondly backward"

  27. backadverb

    in reply

    "he wrote back three days later"

  28. backadverb

    in repayment or retaliation

    "we paid back everything we had borrowed"; "he hit me and I hit him back"; "I was kept in after school for talking back to the teacher"

Wiktionary

  1. backnoun

    The rear of body, especially the part between the neck and the end of the spine and opposite the chest and belly.

    Could you please scratch my back?

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  2. backnoun

    The spine and associated tissues.

    I hurt my back lifting that dictionary.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  3. backnoun

    The side of any object which is opposite the front or useful side.

    Turn the book over and look at the back.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  4. backnoun

    The reverse side; the side that is not normally seen.

    I hung the clothes on the back of the door.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  5. backnoun

    That which is farthest away from the front.

    He sat in the back of the room.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  6. backnoun

    Area behind, such as the backyard of a house

    We'll meet out in the back of the library.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  7. backnoun

    The part of something that goes last.

    The car was near the back of the train.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  8. backnoun

    The side of a blade opposite the side used for cutting.

    Tap it with the back of your knife.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  9. backnoun

    The part of a piece of clothing which covers the back.

    I still need to finish the back of your dress.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  10. backverb

    To go in the reverse direction.

    The train backed into the station.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  11. backverb

    To support.

    I back you all the way.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  12. backverb

    to change direction contrary to its normal pattern (anticlockwise in the northern hemisphere, clockwise in the southern)

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  13. backverb

    to brace the yards so that the wind presses on the front of the sail, to slow the ship

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  14. backverb

    to lay out a second, smaller anchor to provide additional holding power

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  15. backnoun

    The edge of a book which is bound.

    The titles are printed on the backs of the books.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  16. backnoun

    The backrest, the part of a piece of furniture which receives the human back.

    Can you fix the back of this chair?

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  17. backnoun

    Upper part of a natural object which is considered to resemble an animal's back.

    The small boat raced over the backs of the waves.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  18. backnoun

    That part of the body that bears clothing.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  19. backnoun

    In some team sports, a position behind most players on the team.

    The backs were lined up in an I formation.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  20. backnoun

    The keel and keelson of a ship.

    The ship's back broke in the pounding surf.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  21. backnoun

    The inside margin of a page.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  22. backnoun

    The roof of a horizontal underground passage.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  23. backnoun

    Effort, usually physical.

    Put some back into it!

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  24. backnoun

    Large and attractive buttocks.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  25. backnoun

    A non-alcoholic drink (often water or a soft drink), to go with hard liquor or a cocktail.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  26. backadverb

    To or in a previous condition or place.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  27. backadverb

    Away from the front or from an edge.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  28. backadverb

    In a manner that impedes.

    Fear held him back.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  29. backadverb

    In a reciprocal manner.

    If you hurt me, I'll hurt you back.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  30. backadjective

    Near the rear.

    Go in the back door of the house.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  31. backadjective

    Not current.

    I'd like to find a back issue of that magazine.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  32. backadjective

    Far from the main area.

    They took a back road.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

  33. backadjective

    Produced in the back of the mouth.

    "U" in "rude" is a back vowel.

    Etymology: bak, from bæc, from bakan (cf. Old Saxon bak (Middle Low German bak), West Frisian beklingling 'chair back', Old High German bah, Swedish bak), possibly from bʰogo 'bending'. The adverb represents an aphetic form of aback.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Backnoun

    a large shallow vat; a cistern, tub, or trough, used by brewers, distillers, dyers, picklers, gluemakers, and others, for mixing or cooling wort, holding water, hot glue, etc

  2. Backnoun

    a ferryboat. See Bac, 1

  3. Backnoun

    in human beings, the hinder part of the body, extending from the neck to the end of the spine; in other animals, that part of the body which corresponds most nearly to such part of a human being; as, the back of a horse, fish, or lobster

  4. Backnoun

    an extended upper part, as of a mountain or ridge

  5. Backnoun

    the outward or upper part of a thing, as opposed to the inner or lower part; as, the back of the hand, the back of the foot, the back of a hand rail

  6. Backnoun

    the part opposed to the front; the hinder or rear part of a thing; as, the back of a book; the back of an army; the back of a chimney

  7. Backnoun

    the part opposite to, or most remote from, that which fronts the speaker or actor; or the part out of sight, or not generally seen; as, the back of an island, of a hill, or of a village

  8. Backnoun

    the part of a cutting tool on the opposite side from its edge; as, the back of a knife, or of a saw

  9. Backnoun

    a support or resource in reserve

  10. Backnoun

    the keel and keelson of a ship

  11. Backnoun

    the upper part of a lode, or the roof of a horizontal underground passage

  12. Backnoun

    a garment for the back; hence, clothing

  13. Backadjective

    being at the back or in the rear; distant; remote; as, the back door; back settlements

  14. Backadjective

    being in arrear; overdue; as, back rent

  15. Backadjective

    moving or operating backward; as, back action

  16. Backverb

    to get upon the back of; to mount

  17. Backverb

    to place or seat upon the back

  18. Backverb

    to drive or force backward; to cause to retreat or recede; as, to back oxen

  19. Backverb

    to make a back for; to furnish with a back; as, to back books

  20. Backverb

    to adjoin behind; to be at the back of

  21. Backverb

    to write upon the back of; as, to back a letter; to indorse; as, to back a note or legal document

  22. Backverb

    to support; to maintain; to second or strengthen by aid or influence; as, to back a friend

  23. Backverb

    to bet on the success of; -- as, to back a race horse

  24. Backverb

    to move or go backward; as, the horse refuses to back

  25. Backverb

    to change from one quarter to another by a course opposite to that of the sun; -- used of the wind

  26. Backverb

    to stand still behind another dog which has pointed; -- said of a dog

  27. Backadverb

    in, to, or toward, the rear; as, to stand back; to step back

  28. Backadverb

    to the place from which one came; to the place or person from which something is taken or derived; as, to go back for something left behind; to go back to one's native place; to put a book back after reading it

  29. Backadverb

    to a former state, condition, or station; as, to go back to private life; to go back to barbarism

  30. Backadverb

    (Of time) In times past; ago

  31. Backadverb

    away from contact; by reverse movement

  32. Backadverb

    in concealment or reserve; in one's own possession; as, to keep back the truth; to keep back part of the money due to another

  33. Backadverb

    in a state of restraint or hindrance

  34. Backadverb

    in return, repayment, or requital

  35. Backadverb

    in withdrawal from a statement, promise, or undertaking; as, he took back0 the offensive words

  36. Backadverb

    in arrear; as, to be back in one's rent

Freebase

  1. Back

    Back is a district and a village on the Isle of Lewis on the coast of Broadbay, in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland. The road through Back commences at a road junction in Newmarket, north of Stornoway. It is a little touristed part of the Hebrides despite having some of the best beaches in Lewis, but remain popular with surfers, windsurfers and kite surfers. Also along the Back road, is the Coll Pottery - open to the public and also the cairn at Gress.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Back

    bak, n. a brewer's or dyer's tub or trough. [Dut. bak.]

  2. Back

    bak, n. the hinder part of the body in man, and the upper part in beasts, extending from the neck and shoulders to the extremity of the backbone: put for the whole body in speaking of clothes: the hinder part, or the part opposite to the front side: the convex part of a book, opposite to the opening of the leaves: the thick edge of a knife or the like: the upright hind part of a chair: the surface of the sea, or of a river: the keel and keelson of a ship: (football) one of the players stationed behind the 'forwards,' the full back's duty being merely to guard the goal: (mining) that side of an inclined mineral lode which is nearest the surface of the ground—the back of a level is the ground between it and the level above.—adv. to the place from which one came: to a former state or condition: behind: behind in time: in return: again.—v.t. to get upon the back of: to help, as if standing at one's back: to force back: to support one's opinion by a wager or bet—'to back a horse,' to bet money on his winning in a race, 'to back the field,' to bet upon all the horses in a field, against one in particular: to countersign a warrant, or indorse a cheque or bill; to write or print at the back of, as a parliamentary bill, or the like: to put or propel backward, or in the opposite direction, by reversing the action, as of an engine or a boat—hence the phrases, To back the oars, To back water.—v.i. to move or go back.—n. Back′-band, a broad strap or chain passing over the cart saddle, and serving to keep up the shafts of a vehicle.—v.t. Back′bite, to speak evil of any one behind his back or in his absence.—ns. Back′biter; Back′biting; Back′-board, a board placed at the back of a cart, boat, &c.: a board fastened across the back to straighten the figure; Back′bond (Scots law), a deed attaching a qualification or condition to the terms of a conveyance or other instrument—used when particular circumstances render it necessary to express in a separate form the limitations or qualifications of a right; Back′bone, the bone of the back, the vertebral column: the main support of anything: mainstay: firmness, reliableness; Back′-door, a door in the back part of a building: (attrib.) unworthily secret: clandestine.—adj. Backed, as in humpbacked.—ns. Back′-end, the later part of a season: the late autumn; Back′er, one who backs or supports another in a contest: one who bets on a horse or the like; Back′-fall, a fall on the back in wrestling—also figuratively: a lever in the coupler of an organ; Back′friend (obs.), a pretended friend: a backer, a friend who stands at one's back; Back′ground, ground at the back: a place of obscurity: the space behind the principal figures of a picture; Back′-hair, the long hair at the back of a woman's head; Back′-hand, the hand turned backwards in making a stroke: handwriting with the letters sloped backwards.—adj. Back′-hand′ed, with the hand turned backward (as of a blow): indirect.—ns. Back′-hand′er, a blow with the back of the hand: an extra glass of wine out of turn, the bottle being passed back; Back′ing, support at the back: mounting of a horse: the action of putting back: a body of helpers: anything used to form a back or line the back; Back′ing-down, shirking; Back′-lash, the jarring reaction of a wheel in a machine when the motion is not uniform; Back′-log, a log at the back of a fire.—adj. Back′most, farthest to the back.—ns. Back′-piece, Back′-plate, a piece or plate of armour for the back; Back′-set, a setting back, reverse: an eddy or counter-current; Back′side, the back or hinder side or part of anything: the hinder part of an animal; Back′-sight, in surveying, a sight taken backwards: the sight of a rifle nearer the stock; Back′-slang, slang in which every word is pronounced backwards.—v.t. Backslide′, to slide or fall back in faith or morals:—pa.p. backslid′, or backslid′den.—ns. Backslid′er; Backslid′ing.—n.pl. Back′stairs, back or private stairs of a house.—adj. secret or underhand.—n.pl. Back′stays, ropes or stays extending from the topmast-heads to the sides of a ship, and slanting a little backward, to second the shrouds in supporting the mast when strained by a weight of sail in a fresh wind: any stay or support at the back.—ns. Back′stitch, a method of sewing in which, for every new stitch, the needle enters behind, and comes out in front of, the end of the previous one; Back′sword, a sword with a back or with only one edge: a stick with a basket-handle; Backsword′man (Shak.); Back′-wash, a backward current.—v.t. to affect with back-wash: to clean the oil from wool after combing.—n. Back′water, water held back in a mill-stream or river by the obstruction of a dam below—a pool or belt of water connected with a river, but not in the line of its course or current: water thrown back by the turning of a water-wheel: a backward current of water: the swell of the sea formed by the paddles of a steamship.—n.pl. Back′woods, the forest or uncultivated part of a country beyond the cleared country, as in North American Backwoods′man.—Back! go back, turn back (imperatively).—At the back of (in U.S. often Back of), in support or pursuit; On, Upon the back of, weighing down as a burden.—To and back (Shak.), forward and backward.—To back down, to abandon one's opinion or position; To back out, to recede from an engagement or promise; To back up, to give support to; To be on one's back, to have come to the end of one's resources; To break the back of, to overburden, to complete the hardest part of a task; To cast behind the back (B.), to forgive; To set or put up the back, to arouse to resentment; To the backbone, thoroughly. [A.S. bæc, Sw. bak, Dan. bag.]

The Roycroft Dictionary

  1. back

    1. That part of the body to which your friend directs his remarks when he tells you the truth. 2. A smooth surface composed of skin and bones which stretches between Land's End and John O'Groat's.

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. back

    To back an anchor. To carry a small anchor ahead of the one by which the ship rides, to partake of the strain, and check the latter from coming home.--To back a ship at anchor. For this purpose the mizen top-sail is generally used; a hawser should be kept ready to wind her, and if the wind falls she must be hove apeak.--To back and fill. To get to windward in very narrow channels, by a series of smart alternate boards and backing, with weather tides.--To back a sail. To brace its yard so that the wind may blow directly on the front of the sail, and thus retard the ship's course. A sailing vessel is backed by means of the sails, a steamer by reversing the paddles or screw-propeller.--To back astern. To impel the water with the oars contrary to the usual mode, or towards the head of the boat, so that she shall recede.--To back the larboard or starboard oars. To back with the right or left oars only, so as to round suddenly.--To back out. (See Back a Sail.) The term is also familiarly used for retreating out of a difficulty.--To back a rope or chain, is to put on a preventer when it is thought likely to break from age or extra strain.--To back water. To impel a boat astern, so as to recede in a direction opposite to the former course.--Backing the worming. The act of passing small yarn in the holidays, or crevices left between the worming and edges of the rope, to prevent the admission of wet, or to render all parts of equal diameter, so that the service may be smooth.--Wind backing. The wind is said to back when it changes contrary to its usual circuit. In the northern hemisphere on the polar side of the trades, the wind usually changes from east, by the south, to west, and so on to north. In the same latitudes in the southern hemisphere the reverse usually takes place. When it backs, it is generally supposed to be a sign of a freshening breeze.

  2. back

    The outside or convex part of compass-timber. Also a wharf.

Editors Contribution

  1. back

    Another word for the spine

    The young woman moved through the air on the highjump and landed on her back so easily and safely

    Submitted by MaryC on May 3, 2021  

Suggested Resources

  1. BACK

    What does BACK stand for? -- Explore the various meanings for the BACK acronym on the Abbreviations.com website.

Entomology

  1. Back

    the dorsum or upper surface.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'back' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #111

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'back' in Written Corpus Frequency: #125

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'back' in Nouns Frequency: #166

  4. Verbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'back' in Verbs Frequency: #427

  5. Adverbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'back' in Adverbs Frequency: #14

  6. Adjectives Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'back' in Adjectives Frequency: #642

How to pronounce back?

How to say back in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of back in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of back in Pythagorean Numerology is: 8

Examples of back in a Sentence

  1. Amanda Bray:

    Priorities get put into perspective really quickly, we’ve changed our way of life, and I don’t think I’ll go back.

  2. Craig Fehr:

    It was solid, but I wouldn't say it was overly inspiring of confidence, so we're seeing some investors rotate back into some of those names where they might feel more comfortable with if the Fed isn't going to hike sooner rather than later.

  3. Tatiana Orlova:

    They tried to switch to a floating foreign exchange regime and it hasn't worked, will they admit that the float has failed and go back to the peg? The main task ... will be to restore credibility of the central bank.

  4. Nigel Farage:

    This isn't about disliking anyone else it's about saying we should put our own people first every single time, i want back our democracy, and crucially I want back control of our borders (from the EU).

  5. Litsa Zarkada:

    It's like we've been born again and finally feel some hope, we were thrown into the street just before we could take our pension. We have been through so much. The new government faces an immediate cash shortage, with a dwindling primary surplus, upcoming loan repayments, and limits on the money it can raise using treasury bill auctions. Megan Greene, chief economist at Manulife Asset Management, said the government will be unable to afford to run its day-to-day operations and pay back debt that falls due in March in the absence of additional cash from international creditors.

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    To make worse
    • A. lucubrate
    • B. huff
    • C. exacerbate
    • D. knead

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