What does appoint mean?

Definitions for appoint
əˈpɔɪntap·point

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word appoint.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. appoint, name, nominate, constituteverb

    create and charge with a task or function

    "nominate a committee"

  2. appoint, chargeverb

    assign a duty, responsibility or obligation to

    "He was appointed deputy manager"; "She was charged with supervising the creation of a concordance"

  3. appointverb

    furnish

    "a beautifully appointed house"

Wiktionary

  1. appointverb

    To fix with power or firmness; to establish; to mark out.

    When he appointed the foundations of the earth. --Prov. viii. 29.

    Etymology: apointen, from apointier ( appointer), from appunctare; Latin ad + punctum. See point.

  2. appointverb

    To fix by a decree, order, command, resolve, decision, or mutual agreement; to constitute; to ordain; to prescribe; to fix the time and place of.

    Etymology: apointen, from apointier ( appointer), from appunctare; Latin ad + punctum. See point.

  3. appointverb

    To assign, designate, or set apart by authority.

    Etymology: apointen, from apointier ( appointer), from appunctare; Latin ad + punctum. See point.

  4. appointverb

    To furnish in all points; to provide with everything necessary by way of equipment; to equip; to fit out.

    The English, being well appointed, did so entertain them that their ships departed terribly torn. --Hayward.

    Etymology: apointen, from apointier ( appointer), from appunctare; Latin ad + punctum. See point.

  5. appointverb

    To set, fix or determine by authority or agreement.

    His Royal Highness called to pay his respects to her Majesty; but, from the unexpected nature of his visit, her Majesty was not in a state then to receive him; but soon after sent a letter to Prince Leopold, to appoint one o'clock this day for an interview.

    Etymology: From Middle English apointen, borrowed from Old French apointier ("to prepare, arrange, lean, place") (French appointer ("to give a salary, refer a cause") ), from Late Latin appunctare ("to bring back to the point, restore, to fix the point in a controversy, or the points in an agreement") ; Latin ad + punctum ("a point") . See point.

  6. appointverb

    To name.

    Aaron and his shall go in, and appoint them every one to his service.

    Etymology: From Middle English apointen, borrowed from Old French apointier ("to prepare, arrange, lean, place") (French appointer ("to give a salary, refer a cause") ), from Late Latin appunctare ("to bring back to the point, restore, to fix the point in a controversy, or the points in an agreement") ; Latin ad + punctum ("a point") . See point.

  7. appointverb

    To furnish or equip completely; to provide with all the equipment or furnishings necessary; to fit out.

    The hotel is beautifully designed and beautifully appointed in a classic, modern style that manages to be both serene and luxurious at the same time.

    Etymology: From Middle English apointen, borrowed from Old French apointier ("to prepare, arrange, lean, place") (French appointer ("to give a salary, refer a cause") ), from Late Latin appunctare ("to bring back to the point, restore, to fix the point in a controversy, or the points in an agreement") ; Latin ad + punctum ("a point") . See point.

  8. appointverb

    To equip with; to assign authoritatively.

    after mature Deliberation, he appointed them a Ship of seventy Tons,

    Etymology: From Middle English apointen, borrowed from Old French apointier ("to prepare, arrange, lean, place") (French appointer ("to give a salary, refer a cause") ), from Late Latin appunctare ("to bring back to the point, restore, to fix the point in a controversy, or the points in an agreement") ; Latin ad + punctum ("a point") . See point.

  9. appointverb

    To fix the disposition of by designating someone to take use of.

    If the donee of a power appoint the fund to one of the objects of the power, under an understanding that the latter is to lend the fund to tho former, although on good security, the appointment is bad.

    Etymology: From Middle English apointen, borrowed from Old French apointier ("to prepare, arrange, lean, place") (French appointer ("to give a salary, refer a cause") ), from Late Latin appunctare ("to bring back to the point, restore, to fix the point in a controversy, or the points in an agreement") ; Latin ad + punctum ("a point") . See point.

  10. appointverb

    To fix with power or firmness by decree or command; to ordain or establish.

    When he gave to the sea his decree, that the waters should not pass his commandment: when he appointed the foundations of the earth:

    Etymology: From Middle English apointen, borrowed from Old French apointier ("to prepare, arrange, lean, place") (French appointer ("to give a salary, refer a cause") ), from Late Latin appunctare ("to bring back to the point, restore, to fix the point in a controversy, or the points in an agreement") ; Latin ad + punctum ("a point") . See point.

  11. appointverb

    To resolve; to determine; to ordain.

    For the LORD had appointed to defeat the good counsel of Ahithophel.

    Etymology: From Middle English apointen, borrowed from Old French apointier ("to prepare, arrange, lean, place") (French appointer ("to give a salary, refer a cause") ), from Late Latin appunctare ("to bring back to the point, restore, to fix the point in a controversy, or the points in an agreement") ; Latin ad + punctum ("a point") . See point.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Appointverb

    to fix with power or firmness; to establish; to mark out

    Etymology: [OE. appointen, apointen, OF. apointier to prepare, arrange, lean, place, F. appointer to give a salary, refer a cause, fr. LL. appunctare to bring back to the point, restore, to fix the point in a controversy, or the points in an agreement; L. ad + punctum a point. See Point.]

  2. Appointverb

    to fix by a decree, order, command, resolve, decision, or mutual agreement; to constitute; to ordain; to prescribe; to fix the time and place of

    Etymology: [OE. appointen, apointen, OF. apointier to prepare, arrange, lean, place, F. appointer to give a salary, refer a cause, fr. LL. appunctare to bring back to the point, restore, to fix the point in a controversy, or the points in an agreement; L. ad + punctum a point. See Point.]

  3. Appointverb

    to assign, designate, or set apart by authority

    Etymology: [OE. appointen, apointen, OF. apointier to prepare, arrange, lean, place, F. appointer to give a salary, refer a cause, fr. LL. appunctare to bring back to the point, restore, to fix the point in a controversy, or the points in an agreement; L. ad + punctum a point. See Point.]

  4. Appointverb

    to furnish in all points; to provide with everything necessary by way of equipment; to equip; to fit out

    Etymology: [OE. appointen, apointen, OF. apointier to prepare, arrange, lean, place, F. appointer to give a salary, refer a cause, fr. LL. appunctare to bring back to the point, restore, to fix the point in a controversy, or the points in an agreement; L. ad + punctum a point. See Point.]

  5. Appointverb

    to point at by way, or for the purpose, of censure or commendation; to arraign

    Etymology: [OE. appointen, apointen, OF. apointier to prepare, arrange, lean, place, F. appointer to give a salary, refer a cause, fr. LL. appunctare to bring back to the point, restore, to fix the point in a controversy, or the points in an agreement; L. ad + punctum a point. See Point.]

  6. Appointverb

    to direct, designate, or limit; to make or direct a new disposition of, by virtue of a power contained in a conveyance; -- said of an estate already conveyed

    Etymology: [OE. appointen, apointen, OF. apointier to prepare, arrange, lean, place, F. appointer to give a salary, refer a cause, fr. LL. appunctare to bring back to the point, restore, to fix the point in a controversy, or the points in an agreement; L. ad + punctum a point. See Point.]

  7. Appointverb

    to ordain; to determine; to arrange

    Etymology: [OE. appointen, apointen, OF. apointier to prepare, arrange, lean, place, F. appointer to give a salary, refer a cause, fr. LL. appunctare to bring back to the point, restore, to fix the point in a controversy, or the points in an agreement; L. ad + punctum a point. See Point.]

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Appoint

    ap-point′, v.t. to fix: to settle: assign, grant: to name to an office: to destine, devote: to equip (obs. except in pa.p..).—p.adj. Appoint′ed, established: furnished.—n. Appoint′ment, settlement: engagement: direction: situation: arrangement: (obs.) allowance paid to a public officer: (pl.) equipments. [O. Fr. apointer, Low L. appunctare—L. ad, to, punctum, a point. See Point.]

Editors Contribution

  1. appoint

    To create using authority or agreement.

    They did appoint a Director to ensure they had the best possible results for the business.

    Submitted by MaryC on March 1, 2020  

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Verbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'appoint' in Verbs Frequency: #278

How to pronounce appoint?

  1. Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Indian

How to say appoint in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of appoint in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of appoint in Pythagorean Numerology is: 1

Examples of appoint in a Sentence

  1. Hillary Clinton:

    We need to appoint Supreme Court justiceswho will get money out of politics.

  2. Rod Rosenstein:

    You view it as an issue of principle that I need to commit to appoint a special counsel in a manner that I don't even know if it's being investigated, but my view is that I have a responsibility when I take that oath, if I become deputy attorney general. I cannot take it conditioned upon having committed how I'm going to handle a particular case.

  3. John Roberts:

    The commission can say, 'Don't blame us. We didn't do it.' The president can say, 'Don't blame me. I didn't appoint them,'.

  4. Russell Moore:

    I don't think a candidate is going to be able to get very far simply by using evangelical lingo or by pointing to his or her personal faith, i think a candidate is going to have to explain how he or she would protect religious liberty and would appoint justices and judges who will maintain the common good.

  5. Ruth Bader Ginsburg:

    If I resign any time this year, he could not successfully appoint anyone I would like to see in the court, [The Senate Democrats] took off the filibuster for lower federal court appointments, but it remains for this court. So anybody who thinks that if I step down, Obama could appoint someone like me, they're misguided.

Images & Illustrations of appoint

  1. appointappointappointappointappoint

Popularity rank by frequency of use

appoint#10000#12149#100000

Translations for appoint

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

  • предписвам, оборудвам, определям, назначавам, установявам, предназначавамBulgarian
  • jmenovatCzech
  • penodiWelsh
  • udnævneDanish
  • ausstatten, ausrüsten, festsetzen, benennen, ernennen, festlegen, bestimmen, berufenGerman
  • fijar, equipar, designar, determinar, nombrarSpanish
  • désigner, nommer, poser, déterminer, attribuer, fixer, choisirFrench
  • 任命するJapanese
  • დანიშვნაGeorgian
  • scisco, addīcōLatin
  • kopouMāori
  • benoemen, beschikken, bepalen, vaststellenDutch
  • oppnevneNorwegian
  • назначитьRussian
  • utnämna, utseSwedish
  • مقررUrdu

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    declare untrue; contradict
    • A. acclaim
    • B. deny
    • C. observe
    • D. interrogate

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