What does Watch mean?

Definitions for Watch
wɒtʃwatch

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Watch.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. watch, tickernoun

    a small portable timepiece

  2. watchnoun

    a period of time (4 or 2 hours) during which some of a ship's crew are on duty

  3. watch, vigilnoun

    a purposeful surveillance to guard or observe

  4. watchnoun

    the period during which someone (especially a guard) is on duty

  5. lookout, lookout man, sentinel, sentry, watch, spotter, scout, picketnoun

    a person employed to keep watch for some anticipated event

  6. vigil, watchverb

    the rite of staying awake for devotional purposes (especially on the eve of a religious festival)

  7. watchverb

    look attentively

    "watch a basketball game"

  8. watch, observe, follow, watch over, keep an eye onverb

    follow with the eyes or the mind

    "Keep an eye on the baby, please!"; "The world is watching Sarajevo"; "She followed the men with the binoculars"

  9. watch, view, see, catch, take inverb

    see or watch

    "view a show on television"; "This program will be seen all over the world"; "view an exhibition"; "Catch a show on Broadway"; "see a movie"

  10. watch, look onverb

    observe with attention

    "They watched as the murderer was executed"

  11. watch, look out, watch outverb

    be vigilant, be on the lookout or be careful

    "Watch out for pickpockets!"

  12. watchverb

    observe or determine by looking

    "Watch how the dog chases the cats away"

  13. determine, check, find out, see, ascertain, watch, learnverb

    find out, learn, or determine with certainty, usually by making an inquiry or other effort

    "I want to see whether she speaks French"; "See whether it works"; "find out if he speaks Russian"; "Check whether the train leaves on time"

Wiktionary

  1. watchnoun

    A portable or wearable timepiece.

    More people today carry a watch on their wrists than in their pockets.

  2. watchnoun

    A particular time period when guarding is kept.

    The second watch of the night began at midnight.

  3. watchnoun

    A person or group of people who guard.

    The watch stopped the travelers at the city gates.

  4. watchnoun

    A group of sailors and officers aboard a ship or shore station with a common period of duty: starboard watch, port watch.

  5. watchnoun

    A period of time on duty, usually four hours in length; the officers and crew who tend the working of a vessel during the same watch. (FM 55501).

  6. watchnoun

    The act of seeing, or viewing, for a period of time.

  7. watchverb

    To be awake.

  8. watchverb

    To look at, see, or view for a period of time.

  9. watchverb

    To observe over a period of time; to notice or pay attention.

  10. watchverb

    To mind, attend, or guard.

  11. watchverb

    To be wary or cautious of.

    You should watch that guy. He has a reputation for lying.

  12. watchverb

    To attend to dangers to or regarding.

  13. watchverb

    To remain awake with a sick or dying person; to maintain a vigil

  14. watchverb

    To be vigilant or on one's guard

    For some must watch, while some must sleep: So runs the world away.

  15. watchverb

    To act as a lookout

  16. watchnoun

    Plural form of watchman.

  17. Etymology: wacchen, from wæccan, wæcce.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. WATCHnoun

    Etymology: wæcce , Saxon.

    All the long night their mournful watch they keep,
    And all the day stand round the tomb and weep. Addison.

    In my school-days, when I had lost one shaft,
    I shot his fellow, of the self-same flight,
    The self-same way, with more advised watch,
    To find the other forth; by vent’ring both,
    I oft found both. William Shakespeare, Merchant of Venice.

    Still, when she slept, he kept both watch and ward. F. Q.

    Hie thee to thy charge;
    Use careful watch, chuse trusty centinels. William Shakespeare, R. III.

    Love can find entrance not only into an open heart, but also into a heart well fortified, if watch be not well kept. Francis Bacon.

    Before her gate, high God did sweat ordain,
    And wakeful watches ever to abide. Fairy Queen.

    Such stand in narrow lanes,
    And beat our watch, and rob our passengers. William Shakespeare.

    The ports he did shut up, or at least kept a watch on them, that none should pass to or fro that was suspected. Francis Bacon.

    The tow’rs of heav’n are fill’d
    With armed watch, that render all access
    Impregnable. John Milton, Paradise Lost.

    An absurdity our Saviour accounted it for the blind to lead the blind, and to put him that cannot see to the office of a watch. Robert South, Sermons.

    He upbraids Iago, that he made him
    Brave me upon the watch. William Shakespeare, Othello.

    As I did stand my watch upon the hill,
    I look’d toward Birnam, and anon methought
    The wood began to move. William Shakespeare, Macbeth.

    Your fair daughter,
    At this odd, even, and dull watch o’ th’ night,
    Is now transported with a gondalier,
    To the gross clasps of a lascivious Moor. William Shakespeare, Othello.

    All night he will pursue; but his approach
    Darkness defends between, ’till morning watch. John Milton.

    The latter watch of wasting night,
    And setting stars, to kindly sleep invite. John Dryden, Æn.

    A watch, besides the hour of the day, gives the day of the month, and the place of the sun in the zodiack. Matthew Hale.

    On the theatre we are confined to time; and though we talk not by the hour-glass, yet the watch often drawn out of the pocket warns the actors that their audience is weary. Dryd.

    That Cloe may be serv’d in state,
    The hours must at her toilet wait;
    Whilst all the reasoning fools below
    Wonder their watches go so slow. Matthew Prior.

  2. To Watchverb

    Flaming ministers watch and tend their charge. John Milton.

    Saul sent messengers unto David’s house to watch him, and to slay him. 1 Sa. xix. 11.

    He is bold, and lies near the top of the water, watching the motion of any water-rat that swims betwixt him and the sky. Izaak Walton.

    They under rocks their food
    In jointed armour watch. John Milton.

    Paris watched the flocks in the groves of Ida. William Broome.

  3. To Watchverb

    Etymology: wacian , Saxon.

    I have two nights watch’d with you; but can perceive no truth in your report. William Shakespeare, Macbeth.

    Watching care will not let a man slumber, as a sore disease breaketh sleep. Ecclus xxxi. 2.

    Sleep, list’ning to thee, will watch. John Milton.

    I will watch over them for evil, and not for good. Jer. xliv.

    In our watching we have watched for a nation that could not save us. Lam. iv. 17.

    He gave signal to the minister that watch’d. John Milton.

    My soul waiteth for the Lord, more than they that watch for the morning. Ps. cxxx. 6.

    Watch thou in all things, endure afflictions. 2 Tim. iv. 5.

    Watch over thyself, counsel thyself, judge thyself impartially. Taylor.

    He somewhere nigh at hand
    Watches, no doubt, with greedy hope to find
    His wish, and best advantage us asunder,
    Hopeless to circumvent us join’d. John Milton.

Wikipedia

  1. Watch

    A watch is a portable timepiece intended to be carried or worn by a person. It is designed to keep a consistent movement despite the motions caused by the person's activities. A wristwatch is designed to be worn around the wrist, attached by a watch strap or other type of bracelet, including metal bands, leather straps or any other kind of bracelet. A pocket watch is designed for a person to carry in a pocket, often attached to a chain. Watches were developed in the 17th century from spring-powered clocks, which appeared as early as the 14th century. During most of its history the watch was a mechanical device, driven by clockwork, powered by winding a mainspring, and keeping time with an oscillating balance wheel. These are called mechanical watches. In the 1960s the electronic quartz watch was invented, which was powered by a battery and kept time with a vibrating quartz crystal. By the 1980s the quartz watch had taken over most of the market from the mechanical watch. Historically, this is called the quartz revolution (also known as quartz crisis in Switzerland). Developments in the 2010s include smartwatches, which are elaborate computer-like electronic devices designed to be worn on a wrist. They generally incorporate timekeeping functions, but these are only a small subset of the smartwatch's facilities. In general, modern watches often display the day, date, month, and year. For mechanical watches, various extra features called "complications," such as moon-phase displays and the different types of tourbillon, are sometimes included. Most electronic quartz watches, on the other hand, include time-related features such as timers, chronographs and alarm functions. Furthermore, some modern watches (like smartwatches) even incorporate calculators, GPS and Bluetooth technology or have heart-rate monitoring capabilities, and some of them use radio clock technology to regularly correct the time. Most watches that are used mainly for timekeeping have quartz movements. However, expensive collectible watches, valued more for their elaborate craftsmanship, aesthetic appeal, and glamorous design than for simple timekeeping, often have traditional mechanical movements, despite being less accurate and more expensive than their electronic counterparts. As of 2018, the most expensive watch ever sold at auction was the Patek Philippe Henry Graves Supercomplication, the world's most complicated mechanical watch until 1989, fetching US$24 million (CHF 23,237,000) in Geneva on 11 November 2014. As of December 2019, the most expensive watch ever sold at auction (and wristwatch) was the Patek Philippe Grandmaster Chime Ref. 6300A-010, fetching US$31.19 million (CHF 31,000,000) in Geneva on 9 November 2019.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Watchverb

    the act of watching; forbearance of sleep; vigil; wakeful, vigilant, or constantly observant attention; close observation; guard; preservative or preventive vigilance; formerly, a watching or guarding by night

  2. Watchverb

    one who watches, or those who watch; a watchman, or a body of watchmen; a sentry; a guard

  3. Watchverb

    the post or office of a watchman; also, the place where a watchman is posted, or where a guard is kept

  4. Watchverb

    the period of the night during which a person does duty as a sentinel, or guard; the time from the placing of a sentinel till his relief; hence, a division of the night

  5. Watchverb

    a small timepiece, or chronometer, to be carried about the person, the machinery of which is moved by a spring

  6. Watchnoun

    an allotted portion of time, usually four hour for standing watch, or being on deck ready for duty. Cf. Dogwatch

  7. Watchnoun

    that part, usually one half, of the officers and crew, who together attend to the working of a vessel for an allotted time, usually four hours. The watches are designated as the port watch, and the starboard watch

  8. Watchverb

    to be awake; to be or continue without sleep; to wake; to keep vigil

  9. Watchverb

    to be attentive or vigilant; to give heed; to be on the lookout; to keep guard; to act as sentinel

  10. Watchverb

    to be expectant; to look with expectation; to wait; to seek opportunity

  11. Watchverb

    to remain awake with any one as nurse or attendant; to attend on the sick during the night; as, to watch with a man in a fever

  12. Watchverb

    to serve the purpose of a watchman by floating properly in its place; -- said of a buoy

  13. Watchverb

    to give heed to; to observe the actions or motions of, for any purpose; to keep in view; not to lose from sight and observation; as, to watch the progress of a bill in the legislature

  14. Watchverb

    to tend; to guard; to have in keeping

  15. Etymology: [OE. wacche, AS. wcce, fr. wacian to wake; akin to D. wacht, waak, G. wacht, wache. 134. See Wake, v. i. ]

Freebase

  1. Watch

    A watch is a timepiece, typically worn either around the wrist or attached on a chain and carried in a pocket. Wristwatches are the most common type of watch used today. Watches evolved in the 17th century from spring powered clocks, which appeared in the 15th century. The first watches were strictly mechanical. As technology progressed, the mechanisms used to measure time have, in some cases, been replaced by use of quartz vibrations or electronic pulses. The first digital electronic watch was developed in 1970. Before wristwatches became popular in the 1920s, most watches were pocket watches, which often had covers and were carried in a pocket and attached to a watch chain or watch fob. In the early 1900s, the wristwatch, originally called a Wristlet, was reserved for women and considered more of a passing fad than a serious timepiece. Men, who carried pocket watches, were quoted as saying they would "sooner wear a skirt as wear a wristwatch". This changed in World War I, when soldiers on the battlefield found pocket watches to be impractical and attached their watches to their wrist by a cupped leather strap. It is also believed that Girard-Perregaux equipped the German Imperial Navy with wristwatches in a similar fashion as early as the 1880s, to be used while synchronizing naval attacks and firing artillery.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Watch

    woch, n. act of looking out: close observation: guard: one who watches or those who watch: a sentry: a pocket timepiece: the place where a guard is kept: a division of the night: time of watching, esp. in a ship, a division of a ship's crew into two or three sections, so that one set of men may have charge of the vessel while the others rest. (The day and night are divided into watches of four hours each, except the period from 4 to 8 P.M., which is divided into two dog-watches of two hours' duration each).—v.i. to look with attention: to keep guard: to look out: to attend the sick by night: to inspect, keep guard over (with over).—v.t. to keep in view: to give heed to: to have in keeping: to guard: to wait for, detect by lying in wait: (Shak.) to keep from sleep.—ns. Watch′-bill, a list of the officers and crew of a ship, as divided into watches, with their several stations; Watch′-box, a sentry-box; Watch′case, the outer case of a watch: (Shak.) a sentry-box; Watch′-clock, a watchman's clock; Watch′-dog, a dog kept to guard premises and property; Watch′er, one who watches; Watch′-fire, a night-fire acting as a signal: a fire for the use of a watching-party, sentinels, scouts, &c.—adj. Watch′ful, careful to watch or observe: attentive: circumspect: cautious.—adv. Watch′fully.—ns. Watch′fulness; Watch′-glass, a sand-glass: the glass covering of the face of a watch; Watch′-guard, a watch-chain of any material; Watch′-gun, a gun fired at the changing of the watch, as on a ship; Watch′-house, a house in which a guard is placed: a lock-up, detaining office; Watch′-jew′el, a jewel used in the works of a watch for lessening friction; Watch′-key, a key for winding a watch; Watch′-light, a light used for watching or sitting up in the night; Watch′-māk′er, one who makes and repairs watches; Watch′-māk′ing; Watch′man, a man who watches or guards, esp. the streets of a city at night; Watch′-meet′ing, a religious meeting to welcome in the New Year, held on the night before, called the Watch′-night; Watch′-off′icer, the officer in charge of the ship during a watch, also called Officer of the watch; Watch′-pā′per, a round piece of paper, often decorated, put inside the outer case of a watch to prevent rubbing; Watch′-pock′et, a small pocket for holding a watch; Watch′-spring, the mainspring of a watch; Watch′-tow′er, a tower on which a sentinel is placed to watch or keep guard against the approach of an enemy; Watch′word, the password to be given to a watch or sentry: any signal: a maxim, rallying-cry.—Watch and ward, the old custom of watching by night and by day in towns and cities: uninterrupted vigilance.—The Black Watch, the 42d and 73d Regiments, now the 1st and 2d Battalions of the Black Watch or Royal Highlanders. [A.S. wæccewacan, wake.]

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. watch

    The division of the ship's company into two parties, one called the starboard, and the other the larboard or port watch, alluding to the situation of their hammocks when hung up; these two watches are, however, separated into two others, a first and second part of each, making four in all. The crew can also be divided into three watches. The officers are divided into three watches, in order to lighten their duty; but it is to be borne in mind that the watch may sleep when their services are not demanded, whereas it is a crime, liable to death, for an officer to sleep on his watch. In a ship of war the watch is generally commanded by a lieutenant, and in merchant ships by one of the mates. The word is also applied to the time during which the watch remains on deck, usually four hours, with the exception of the dog-watches.--Anchor-watch. A quarter watch kept on deck while the ship rides at single anchor, or remains temporarily in port.--Dog-watches. The two reliefs which take place between 4 and 8 o'clock P.M., each of which continues only two hours, the intention being to change the turn of the night-watch every twenty-four hours.--First watch. From 8 P.M. till midnight.--Middle-watch. From midnight till 4 A.M.--Morning-watch. From 4 to 8 A.M.--Watch is also a word used in throwing the deep-sea lead, when each man, on letting go the last turn of line in his hand, calls to the next abaft him, "Watch, there, watch!" A buoy is said to watch when it floats on the surface of the water.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. watch

    The non-commissioned officers and men on board of transports are divided into three watches, one of which is constantly to be on deck, with at least one subaltern officer in charge of the watch.

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Watch' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #1935

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Watch' in Written Corpus Frequency: #583

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Watch' in Nouns Frequency: #1343

  4. Verbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Watch' in Verbs Frequency: #113

How to pronounce Watch?

How to say Watch in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Watch in Chaldean Numerology is: 1

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Watch in Pythagorean Numerology is: 1

Examples of Watch in a Sentence

  1. Mike DeWine:

    Reasonable people may disagree about a lot, but we can all agree that we must keep our children in the classroom so they don't fall behind and so their parents can go to work and not take time off to watch their kids at home.

  2. Toby Bateman:

    Keep it simple and timeless with classic design, something that would look good with a suit or your weekend clothes, if you follow this advice then you are unlikely to see your watch 'go out of fashion.

  3. Bubba Wallace:

    You're getting both sides, a lot of positive outreach and gaining new fans as we go, then you got your fans who will never watch NASCAR again, the same fans who will never watch the NFL after the kneeling, the same fans that were crying out that we're ruining their lives and just throwing a pity party.

  4. Joe Scarborough:

    People very close to him told us that he feared he was pre-dementia, that he had changed. You watch Donald Trump in the late 1980s, even in the 90s, you watch him now, he is completely changed, can we talk about the media again doing their own self-diagnosis of the problem?Like, youre not allowed to make any jokes right now about Jerry Nadler having an issue, but people like Joe Scarborough are allowed to go on national television and say that people have told Joe Scarborough without actually naming anybody, that the president is pre-dementia.

  5. Jamie Erlicht:

    We want to make it easy for the user to find all the things that they watch.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Watch#1#871#10000

Translations for Watch

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

  • horlosie, wagAfrikaans
  • حارس, ساعة, رصد, شاهد, حرس, حذر, راقبArabic
  • qol saatıAzerbaijani
  • нару́чны гадзіннік, гадзіннік, глядзець, паглядзецьBelarusian
  • часо́вник, гледам, наблюдавамBulgarian
  • ঘড়িBengali
  • rellotge, guarda, guardià, mirarCatalan, Valencian
  • hlídka, hodinky, dávat pozor, dívat se, sledovat, hlídatCzech
  • oriadur, gwylio, edrychWelsh
  • vagt, armbåndsur, holde øje med, vogte på, se, se efter, iagttageDanish
  • Wache, Uhr, Armbanduhr, zusehen, beobachten, ansehen, überwachen, sehen, aufpassenGerman
  • φρουρός, βάρδια, ρολόι, σκοπός, παρακολουθώ, προσέχωGreek
  • brakhorloĝo, spektiEsperanto
  • reloj, mirar, tener cuidado, observar, vigilarSpanish
  • käekell, kell, vaatamaEstonian
  • erloju, ordulariBasque
  • ساعت, نگهبان, پاس, دیده‌بان, نگاه کردن, تماشا‌کردن, پاییدن, نگاه‌کردنPersian
  • vahti, kello, rannekello, vartio, taskukello, katsella, tarkkailla, vahtia, katsoa, olla varuillaanFinnish
  • urFaroese
  • montre, garde, poste, regarder, faire attention, prendre garde, observer, surveiller, faire gaffeFrench
  • uaireadóir, fairIrish
  • uaireadair, faire, freiceadan, coimheadScottish Gaelic
  • reloxo, mirar, vixiarGalician
  • אשמורת, שָׁעוֹןHebrew
  • घड़ी, देखनाHindi
  • óra, figyel, vigyáz, nézHungarian
  • ժամ, ժամացույց, դիտել, նայելArmenian
  • jam tanganIndonesian
  • horlojeto, regardarIdo
  • úrIcelandic
  • sorveglianza, guardia, orologio, osservare, tenere d'occhio, vigilare, guardare, sorvegliareItalian
  • 腕時計, 時計, 警戒, 懐中時計, 見る, 見張る, 観察, 見守るJapanese
  • მაჯის საათი, ყურებაGeorgian
  • នាឡិកាដៃ, មើលKhmer
  • ಗಡಿಯಾರKannada
  • 시계, 時計, 관찰하다Korean
  • demjimêr, کات ژمێر, saet, سه‌عات, ته‌مه‌شاکردن, ته‌ماشاکردن, بینینKurdish
  • horologium armillare, spectō, specio, aspicio, teneo, cōnspiciōLatin
  • WuechtLuxembourgish, Letzeburgesch
  • ໂມງLao
  • laikrodis, žiūrėtiLithuanian
  • pulkstenis, laikrādis, meklētLatvian
  • watiMāori
  • гледаMacedonian
  • കാവല്‍ നില്‍ക്കുക, കാണുകMalayalam
  • jam tanganMalay
  • လက်ပတ်နာရီ, နာရီBurmese
  • armbåndsurNorwegian
  • wacht, horloge, opletten, uitkijken, kijkenDutch
  • vakt, klokke, ur, observere, passe på, se påNorwegian
  • zegarek, wachta, straż, oglądać, obserwować, pilnowaćPolish
  • relógio de bolso, vigia, guarda, relógio, relógio de pulso, ver, observar, vigiar, [[tomar]]/[[ter]] [[cuidado]], assistirPortuguese
  • qhawayQuechua
  • ceas, strajă, străjer, gardă, tură, urmări, veghea, avea grijă, păzi, priviRomanian
  • ва́хта, дежу́рство, дозо́р, сто́рож, нару́чные часы́, часы́, стра́жа, карау́л, карау́льный, часово́й, смотреть, наблюдать, сторожить, бдеть, глядеть, следить, охранятьRussian
  • dežurstvo, vreme, dežuranje, часовник, časovnik, čas, straža, гледати, gledatiSerbo-Croatian
  • hodinky, dívať, pozerať, hľadať, sledovaťSlovak
  • zapestna ura, ura, gledati, opazovatiSlovene
  • orë dore, orë, shoh, shikojAlbanian
  • vaktpatrull, armbandsur, vakt, klocka, vaktpass, betrakta, iaktta, vara försiktig, se på, observera, ta sig i aktSwedish
  • kutazamaSwahili
  • చేతి గడియారం, కాపలాదారు, కాపు ఉండుTelugu
  • นาฬิกา, ชมThai
  • relosTagalog
  • bekçi, kol saatı, nöbetçi, gözlemlemek, göz kulak olmak, seyretmek, izlemek, dikkat etmek, bakmak, gözetmekTurkish
  • нару́чний годи́нник, годи́нник, дивитисяUkrainian
  • گھڑیUrdu
  • đồng hồ đeo tay, đồng hồ, cái đồng hồ, xemVietnamese
  • זייגערלYiddish

Get even more translations for Watch »

Translation

Find a translation for the Watch definition in other languages:

Select another language:

  • - Select -
  • 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified)
  • 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional)
  • Español (Spanish)
  • Esperanto (Esperanto)
  • 日本語 (Japanese)
  • Português (Portuguese)
  • Deutsch (German)
  • العربية (Arabic)
  • Français (French)
  • Русский (Russian)
  • ಕನ್ನಡ (Kannada)
  • 한국어 (Korean)
  • עברית (Hebrew)
  • Gaeilge (Irish)
  • Українська (Ukrainian)
  • اردو (Urdu)
  • Magyar (Hungarian)
  • मानक हिन्दी (Hindi)
  • Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Italiano (Italian)
  • தமிழ் (Tamil)
  • Türkçe (Turkish)
  • తెలుగు (Telugu)
  • ภาษาไทย (Thai)
  • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese)
  • Čeština (Czech)
  • Polski (Polish)
  • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian)
  • Românește (Romanian)
  • Nederlands (Dutch)
  • Ελληνικά (Greek)
  • Latinum (Latin)
  • Svenska (Swedish)
  • Dansk (Danish)
  • Suomi (Finnish)
  • فارسی (Persian)
  • ייִדיש (Yiddish)
  • հայերեն (Armenian)
  • Norsk (Norwegian)
  • English (English)

Word of the Day

Would you like us to send you a FREE new word definition delivered to your inbox daily?

Please enter your email address:


Discuss these Watch definitions with the community:

0 Comments

    Citation

    Use the citation below to add this definition to your bibliography:

    Style:MLAChicagoAPA

    "Watch." Definitions.net. STANDS4 LLC, 2023. Web. 6 Feb. 2023. <https://www.definitions.net/definition/Watch>.

    Are we missing a good definition for Watch? Don't keep it to yourself...

    Image or illustration of

    Watch

    Credit »

    Browse Definitions.net

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Chrome

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Free, no signup required:

    Add to Firefox

    Get instant definitions for any word that hits you anywhere on the web!

    Quiz

    Are you a words master?

    »
    an unpleasant or disastrous destiny
    • A. moan
    • B. doom
    • C. emerge
    • D. aggravate

    Nearby & related entries:

    Alternative searches for Watch: