What does Tribune mean?

Definitions for Tribune
ˈtrɪb yun, trɪˈbyuntri·bune

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Tribune.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. tribunenoun

    (ancient Rome) an official elected by the plebeians to protect their interests

  2. tribunenoun

    the apse of a Christian church that contains the bishop's throne

Wiktionary

  1. tribunenoun

    an elected official in ancient Rome

  2. tribunenoun

    a protector of the people

  3. tribunenoun

    the domed or vaulted apse in a Christian church that houses the bishop's throne

  4. tribunenoun

    a place or an opportunity to speak, to express one's opinion, a platform

    this new magazine's goal is to give a tribune to unmarried mothers

  5. Etymology: From tribunus.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. Tribunenoun

    Etymology: tribun, tribunus, Lat.

    These are the tribunes of the people,
    The tongues o’ th’ common mouth: I do despise them. William Shakespeare, Coriolanus.

Wikipedia

  1. Tribune

    Tribune (Latin: Tribunus) was the title of various elected officials in ancient Rome. The two most important were the tribunes of the plebs and the military tribunes. For most of Roman history, a college of ten tribunes of the plebs acted as a check on the authority of the senate and the annual magistrates, holding the power of ius intercessionis to intervene on behalf of the plebeians, and veto unfavourable legislation. There were also military tribunes, who commanded portions of the Roman army, subordinate to higher magistrates, such as the consuls and praetors, promagistrates, and their legates. Various officers within the Roman army were also known as tribunes. The title was also used for several other positions and classes in the course of Roman history.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Tribunenoun

    an officer or magistrate chosen by the people, to protect them from the oppression of the patricians, or nobles, and to defend their liberties against any attempts that might be made upon them by the senate and consuls

  2. Tribunenoun

    anciently, a bench or elevated place, from which speeches were delivered; in France, a kind of pulpit in the hall of the legislative assembly, where a member stands while making an address; any place occupied by a public orator

Freebase

  1. Tribune

    Tribune was a title shared by elected officials in the Roman Republic. Tribunes had the power to convene the Plebeian Council and to act as its president, which also gave them the right to propose legislation before it. They were sacrosanct, in the sense that any assault on their person was prohibited. They had the power to veto actions taken by magistrates, and specifically to intervene legally on behalf of plebeians. The tribune could also summon the Senate and lay proposals before it. The tribune's power, however, was only in effect while he was within Rome. His ability to veto did not affect regional governors. Because it was legally impossible for a patrician to be a tribune of the plebeians, the first Roman emperor, Augustus, was offered instead all of the powers of the tribunate without actually holding the office. This formed one of the two main constitutional bases of Augustus' authority. It gave him the authority to convene the Senate. Also, he was sacrosanct, had the authority to veto, and could exercise capital punishment in the course of the performance of his duties. Most emperors' reigns were dated by their assumption of tribunicia potestas, though some emperors, such as Tiberius, Titus, Trajan and Marcus Aurelius had already received it during their predecessor's reign. Marcus Agrippa and Drusus II, though never emperors, also received tribunicia potestas.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Tribune

    trib′ūn, n. a magistrate elected by the Roman plebeians to defend their rights: a champion of popular rights: the raised platform from which speeches were delivered, any platform or pulpit.—ns. Trib′unāte, Trib′uneship.—adjs. Tribuni′tial, Tribuni′cian, Tribuni′tian. [L. tribunustribus, a tribe.]

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. tribune

    In Roman antiquity, an officer or magistrate chosen by the people, to protect them from the oppression of the patricians or nobles, and to defend their liberties against any attempts that might be made upon them by the senate and consuls. The tribunes were at first two, but their number was increased ultimately to ten. There were also military tribunes, officers of the army, of whom there were from four to six in each legion.

Matched Categories

Anagrams for Tribune »

  1. tuberin

  2. turbine

How to pronounce Tribune?

How to say Tribune in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Tribune in Chaldean Numerology is: 7

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Tribune in Pythagorean Numerology is: 8

Examples of Tribune in a Sentence

  1. Bruce Goldfarb:

    It is difficult to wage a successful' withhold' campaign, however, in the case of Tribune Publishing, the' withhold' ratio was really high.

  2. Bruce Goldfarb:

    However, in the case of Tribune Publishing Co, the' withhold' ratio was really high.

  3. Bruce Goldfarb:

    However, in the case of Tribune Publishing, the' withhold' ratio was really high.

  4. Chicago Tribune:

    My colleagues across the country in Tribune Publishing have warned about Alden buying our company since November 2019. We are near the end, chicago, we need help to save Chicago Tribune.

  5. Bruce Goldfarb:

    It is difficult to wage a successful' withhold' campaign, however, in the case of Tribune Publishing Co, the' withhold' ratio was really high.

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Translations for Tribune

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