What does Shock mean?

Definitions for Shock
ʃɒkShock

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Shock.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. daze, shock, stupornoun

    the feeling of distress and disbelief that you have when something bad happens accidentally

    "his mother's death left him in a daze"; "he was numb with shock"

  2. shock, impactnoun

    the violent interaction of individuals or groups entering into combat

    "the armies met in the shock of battle"

  3. electric shock, electrical shock, shocknoun

    a reflex response to the passage of electric current through the body

    "subjects received a small electric shock when they made the wrong response"; "electricians get accustomed to occasional shocks"

  4. shocknoun

    (pathology) bodily collapse or near collapse caused by inadequate oxygen delivery to the cells; characterized by reduced cardiac output and rapid heartbeat and circulatory insufficiency and pallor

    "loss of blood is an important cause of shock"

  5. shock, seismic disturbancenoun

    an instance of agitation of the earth's crust

    "the first shock of the earthquake came shortly after noon while workers were at lunch"

  6. shock, blownoun

    an unpleasant or disappointing surprise

    "it came as a shock to learn that he was injured"

  7. shocknoun

    a pile of sheaves of grain set on end in a field to dry; stalks of Indian corn set up in a field

    "corn is bound in small sheaves and several sheaves are set up together in shocks"; "whole fields of wheat in shock"

  8. shocknoun

    a bushy thick mass (especially hair)

    "he had an unruly shock of black hair"

  9. jolt, jar, jounce, shocknoun

    a sudden jarring impact

    "the door closed with a jolt"; "all the jars and jolts were smoothed out by the shock absorbers"

  10. shock absorber, shock, cushionverb

    a mechanical damper; absorbs energy of sudden impulses

    "the old car needed a new set of shocks"

  11. shock, floor, ball over, blow out of the water, take abackverb

    surprise greatly; knock someone's socks off

    "I was floored when I heard that I was promoted"

  12. shock, offend, scandalize, scandalise, appal, appall, outrageverb

    strike with disgust or revulsion

    "The scandalous behavior of this married woman shocked her friends"

  13. shockverb

    strike with horror or terror

    "The news of the bombing shocked her"

  14. shockverb

    collide violently

  15. shockverb

    collect or gather into shocks

    "shock grain"

  16. shockverb

    subject to electrical shocks

  17. traumatize, traumatise, shockverb

    inflict a trauma upon

Wiktionary

  1. shocknoun

    Sudden, heavy impact.

    The train hit the buffers with a great shock.

    Etymology: From schokken or choquer; both from schokken, from *, from skukkanan. Of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to skakanan, from (s)kAg'-; see shake. Cognate with schocken, scoc, schocken, skykkr, skykkjun, schiggen. More at shog.

  2. shocknoun

    An arrangement of sheaves for drying, a stook.

    Etymology: From schokken or choquer; both from schokken, from *, from skukkanan. Of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to skakanan, from (s)kAg'-; see shake. Cognate with schocken, scoc, schocken, skykkr, skykkjun, schiggen. More at shog.

  3. shockverb

    To cause to be emotionally shocked.

    The disaster shocked the world.

    Etymology: From schokken or choquer; both from schokken, from *, from skukkanan. Of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to skakanan, from (s)kAg'-; see shake. Cognate with schocken, scoc, schocken, skykkr, skykkjun, schiggen. More at shog.

  4. shockverb

    To give an electric shock.

    Etymology: From schokken or choquer; both from schokken, from *, from skukkanan. Of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to skakanan, from (s)kAg'-; see shake. Cognate with schocken, scoc, schocken, skykkr, skykkjun, schiggen. More at shog.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Shocknoun

    a pile or assemblage of sheaves of grain, as wheat, rye, or the like, set up in a field, the sheaves varying in number from twelve to sixteen; a stook

    Etymology: [OE. schokken; cf. D. schokken, F. choquer, Sp. chocar. 161. Cf. Chuck to strike, Jog, Shake, Shock a striking, Shog, n. & v.]

  2. Shocknoun

    a lot consisting of sixty pieces; -- a term applied in some Baltic ports to loose goods

    Etymology: [OE. schokken; cf. D. schokken, F. choquer, Sp. chocar. 161. Cf. Chuck to strike, Jog, Shake, Shock a striking, Shog, n. & v.]

  3. Shockverb

    to collect, or make up, into a shock or shocks; to stook; as, to shock rye

    Etymology: [OE. schokken; cf. D. schokken, F. choquer, Sp. chocar. 161. Cf. Chuck to strike, Jog, Shake, Shock a striking, Shog, n. & v.]

  4. Shockverb

    to be occupied with making shocks

    Etymology: [OE. schokken; cf. D. schokken, F. choquer, Sp. chocar. 161. Cf. Chuck to strike, Jog, Shake, Shock a striking, Shog, n. & v.]

  5. Shocknoun

    a quivering or shaking which is the effect of a blow, collision, or violent impulse; a blow, impact, or collision; a concussion; a sudden violent impulse or onset

    Etymology: [OE. schokken; cf. D. schokken, F. choquer, Sp. chocar. 161. Cf. Chuck to strike, Jog, Shake, Shock a striking, Shog, n. & v.]

  6. Shocknoun

    a sudden agitation of the mind or feelings; a sensation of pleasure or pain caused by something unexpected or overpowering; also, a sudden agitating or overpowering event

    Etymology: [OE. schokken; cf. D. schokken, F. choquer, Sp. chocar. 161. Cf. Chuck to strike, Jog, Shake, Shock a striking, Shog, n. & v.]

  7. Shocknoun

    a sudden depression of the vital forces of the entire body, or of a port of it, marking some profound impression produced upon the nervous system, as by severe injury, overpowering emotion, or the like

    Etymology: [OE. schokken; cf. D. schokken, F. choquer, Sp. chocar. 161. Cf. Chuck to strike, Jog, Shake, Shock a striking, Shog, n. & v.]

  8. Shocknoun

    the sudden convulsion or contraction of the muscles, with the feeling of a concussion, caused by the discharge, through the animal system, of electricity from a charged body

    Etymology: [OE. schokken; cf. D. schokken, F. choquer, Sp. chocar. 161. Cf. Chuck to strike, Jog, Shake, Shock a striking, Shog, n. & v.]

  9. Shock

    to give a shock to; to cause to shake or waver; hence, to strike against suddenly; to encounter with violence

    Etymology: [OE. schokken; cf. D. schokken, F. choquer, Sp. chocar. 161. Cf. Chuck to strike, Jog, Shake, Shock a striking, Shog, n. & v.]

  10. Shock

    to strike with surprise, terror, horror, or disgust; to cause to recoil; as, his violence shocked his associates

    Etymology: [OE. schokken; cf. D. schokken, F. choquer, Sp. chocar. 161. Cf. Chuck to strike, Jog, Shake, Shock a striking, Shog, n. & v.]

  11. Shockverb

    to meet with a shock; to meet in violent encounter

    Etymology: [OE. schokken; cf. D. schokken, F. choquer, Sp. chocar. 161. Cf. Chuck to strike, Jog, Shake, Shock a striking, Shog, n. & v.]

  12. Shocknoun

    a dog with long hair or shag; -- called also shockdog

    Etymology: [OE. schokken; cf. D. schokken, F. choquer, Sp. chocar. 161. Cf. Chuck to strike, Jog, Shake, Shock a striking, Shog, n. & v.]

  13. Shocknoun

    a thick mass of bushy hair; as, a head covered with a shock of sandy hair

    Etymology: [OE. schokken; cf. D. schokken, F. choquer, Sp. chocar. 161. Cf. Chuck to strike, Jog, Shake, Shock a striking, Shog, n. & v.]

  14. Shockadjective

    bushy; shaggy; as, a shock hair

    Etymology: [OE. schokken; cf. D. schokken, F. choquer, Sp. chocar. 161. Cf. Chuck to strike, Jog, Shake, Shock a striking, Shog, n. & v.]

Freebase

  1. Shock

    Circulatory shock, commonly known simply as shock, is a life-threatening medical condition that occurs due to inadequate substrate for aerobic cellular respiration. In the early stages this is generally an inadequate tissue level of oxygen. The typical signs of shock are low blood pressure, a rapid heartbeat and signs of poor end-organ perfusion or "decompensation/peripheral shut down". There are times that a person's blood pressure may remain stable, but may still be in circulatory shock, so it is not always a sign. Circulatory shock is not related to the emotional state of shock. Circulatory shock is a life-threatening medical emergency and one of the most common causes of death for critically ill people. Shock can have a variety of effects, all with similar outcomes, but all relate to a problem with the body's circulatory system. For example, shock may lead to hypoxemia or cardiac arrest. One of the key dangers of shock is that it progresses by a positive feedback mechanism. Once shock begins, it tends to make itself worse, so immediate treatment of shock is critical to the survival of the sufferer.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Shock

    shok, n. a violent shake: a sudden dashing of one thing against another: violent onset: an offence: a condition of prostration of voluntary and involuntary functions caused by trauma, a surgical operation, or excessive sudden emotional disturbance: (coll.) a sudden attack of paralysis, a stroke: an electrical stimulant to sensory nerves, &c.: any very strong emotion.—v.t. to shake by violence: to offend: to disgust: to dismay.—v.i. to collide with violence.—n. Shock′er (coll.), a very sensational tale.—adj. Shock′ing, offensive, repulsive.—adv. Shock′ingly.—n. Shock′ingness. [Prof. Skeat explains M. E. schokken, to shock, as from O. Fr. choc, a shock, choquer, to give a shock—Old High Ger. scoc, a shock, shaking movement. Cf. A.S. scóc, pa.t. of sceacan, to shake.]

  2. Shock

    shok, n. a heap or pile of sheaves of corn.—v.t. to make up into shocks or stooks.—n. Shock′er. [M. E. schokke—Old Dut. schocke.]

  3. Shock

    shok, n. a dog with long, shaggy hair: a mass of shaggy hair.—n. Shock′-dog, a rough-haired dog, a poodle.—adjs. Shock′-head, -ed, having a thick and bushy head of hair. [A variant of shag.]

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Shock

    A pathological condition that can suddenly affect the hemodynamic equilibrium, usually manifested by failure to perfuse or oxygenate vital organs.

Suggested Resources

  1. shock

    Song lyrics by shock -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by shock on the Lyrics.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Shock' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #2487

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Shock' in Written Corpus Frequency: #2743

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Shock' in Nouns Frequency: #1021

How to pronounce Shock?

How to say Shock in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Shock in Chaldean Numerology is: 2

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Shock in Pythagorean Numerology is: 2

Examples of Shock in a Sentence

  1. Los Angeles:

    I was completely in shock, when I saw someone else in a costume, my first reaction wasn't' Oh ! It's Alec Wells !' My reaction was' Oh ! Some other weirdo dressed up in the streets ! It's a Halloween miracle !' I figured it out pretty quickly, though, and when I did, I was so completely overwhelmed. It hit me that Alec Wells created an incredibly magical moment for me, and all because Alec Wells wanted to spend the rest of Alec Wells life with me.

  2. Tomasz Sekielski:

    This film has been like a shock to Polish society and has managed to create real social awareness of a subject that has been very taboo in Poland.

  3. Peyton Lofton:

    Exposed sign and tweets from YALexposed Before that alleged doxxing attempt, he says signs were posted near campus, calling YAL a racist and misogynistic organization and exposing some of its members. Its not clear yet if the three people arrested were behind the @YALexposed Twitter handle. Peyton Lofton said hes also had previous altercations with a student, but didnt want to make anyone a target until all the facts are out. After the alleged arson attack, residents were let back in the building at 1:20 a.m.and 40 minutes later the first officer arrived on the scene. Peyton Lofton says Detective David Harris came to their dorm around 2:00 a.m. on Saturday morning and informed the two Detective David Harris was assigned to the case. They say Peyton Lofton took the burnedsign that was previously on the dooras evidence and was reviewing security footage. Its not clear if the footage Peyton Lofton reviewed helped officers arrest the three suspects. Peyton Lofton says the initial shock is wearing off and that Peyton Lofton family lives20 minutes away in case Peyton Lofton ever feels unsafe. Peyton Lofton says Peyton Lofton wont back down to people trying to spread fear. I dont want to let them win, so I plan on staying on campus and not backing down and work twice as hard i trust that Tulane Police will handle the problem ; Im not nave and still aware of the danger and trying to be as safe as possible. LOUISIANA FIREFIGHTER SAVES PREGNANT WOMAN FROM BURNING VEHICLE : GOD HAS SOMETHING MAJOR FOR YOU ! Charlie Kirk, founder of the conservative advocacygroup Turning Point USA, tweeted about the incident. Kirk told Fox its a sick and sad day that someone would attemptan arson attack on another because of their beliefs.

  4. Noam Kitrey:

    There is no scientific evidence to support shock wave therapy for patients with other causes of erectile dysfunction – neurological problems, psychological erectile dysfunction, or patients after major pelvic surgery such as a radical prostatectomy or pelvic irradiation.

  5. Nathan Jensen:

    The good news is, [ these are ] much bigger metro areas, which makes it a lot easier to absorb, for the Austins, the Columbuses, the Nashvilles, this would have been much more of a shock.

Images & Illustrations of Shock

  1. ShockShockShockShockShock

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Shock#1#4602#10000

Translations for Shock

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