What does Rabbi mean?

Definitions for Rabbi
ˈræb aɪRab·bi

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Rabbi.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. rabbinoun

    spiritual leader of a Jewish congregation; qualified to expound and apply Jewish law

  2. Rabbinoun

    a Hebrew title of respect for a Jewish scholar or teacher

Wiktionary

  1. rabbinoun

    A Jewish spiritual teacher.

  2. Etymology: From rabbi, and its source ῥαββί, from (post-biblical) רבי, from rebbe "master" plus -i "my".

Wikipedia

  1. Rabbi

    A rabbi is a spiritual leader or religious teacher in Judaism. One becomes a rabbi by being ordained by another rabbi, following a course of study of Jewish texts such as the Talmud. The basic form of the rabbi developed in the Pharisaic and Talmudic era, when learned teachers assembled to codify Judaism's written and oral laws. The title "rabbi" was first used in the first century CE. In more recent centuries, the duties of a rabbi became increasingly influenced by the duties of the Protestant Christian minister, hence the title "pulpit rabbis", and in 19th-century Germany and the United States rabbinic activities including sermons, pastoral counseling, and representing the community to the outside, all increased in importance. Within the various Jewish denominations, there are different requirements for rabbinic ordination, and differences in opinion regarding who is recognized as a rabbi. For example, most Orthodox Jewish communities do not accept nor ordain women rabbis. Non-Orthodox movements have chosen to do so for what they view as halakhic reasons (Conservative Judaism) as well as ethical reasons (Reform and Reconstructionist Judaism).

Webster Dictionary

  1. Rabbinoun

    master; lord; teacher; -- a Jewish title of respect or honor for a teacher or doctor of the law

  2. Etymology: [L., fr. Gr. "rabbi`, Heb. rab my master, from rab master, lord, teacher, akin to Ar. rabb.]

Freebase

  1. Rabbi

    In Judaism, a rabbi is a teacher of Torah. This title derives from the Hebrew word רַבִּי rabi, meaning "My Master", which is the way a student would address a master of Torah. The word "master" רב rav literally means "great one". The basic form of the rabbi developed in the Pharisaic and Talmudic era, when learned teachers assembled to codify Judaism's written and oral laws. In more recent centuries, the duties of the rabbi became increasingly influenced by the duties of the Protestant Christian minister, hence the title "pulpit rabbis", and in 19th century Germany and the United States rabbinic activities including sermons, pastoral counseling, and representing the community to the outside, all increased in importance. Within the various Jewish denominations there are different requirements for rabbinic ordination, and differences in opinion regarding who is to be recognized as a rabbi. All types of Judaism except for Orthodox Judaism and some conservative strains ordain women and openly lesbian and gay people as rabbis and cantors.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Rabbi

    rab′i, or rab′ī, Rabbin, rab′in, n. Jewish title of a doctor or expounder of the law:—pl. Rabbis (rab′īz), Rabb′ins.—ns. Rabb′an ('our master'), a title of greater honour than rabbi; Rabb′inate, the dignity of a rabbi.—adjs. Rabbin′ic, -al, pertaining to the rabbis or to their opinions, learning, and language.—n. Rabbin′ic, the later Hebrew.—adv. Rabbin′ically.—ns. Rabb′inism, the doctrine or teaching of the rabbis: a rabbinical peculiarity of expression: the late Jewish belief which esteemed the oral law equally with the written law of God; Rabb′inist, Rabb′inite, one who adheres to the Talmud and traditions of the rabbis; Rabbō′ni, my great master. [Gr.,—Heb. rabbírab, great, master—rābab, to be great. Cf. Ar. rabb, master, the Lord.]

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Rabbi

    an appellation of honour applied to a teacher of the Law among the Jews, in frequent use among them in the days of Christ, who was frequently saluted by this title.

Etymology and Origins

  1. Rabbi

    The title of a Jewish expounder of the Law. The word is Greek for “My Master,” through the Hebrew rabi, from the root rab, lord, chief.

Matched Categories

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Rabbi in Chaldean Numerology is: 8

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Rabbi in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

Examples of Rabbi in a Sentence

  1. Bent Lexner:

    In 1961 Ben-Gurion, the first Israeli prime minister, came to Denmark and said the same thing, the chief rabbi went out in the media and said, 'This is not the way to come here, Prime Minister, and tell people to leave.'.

  2. Esther Herzfeld:

    Teaneck is a small town, and our rabbi called to tell us his phone was ringing off the hook— people were calling to ask how they can help.

  3. Rafael Peretz:

    I honor everyone as people. I admit that I, personally - I am a rabbi of Israel. Our Torah tells us other things. But that does not mean that I look about now and give them grades.

  4. Mehmet Murat ildan:

    If I see any politician or a priest or an imam or a rabbi in the Paradise, I will give up believing in God!

  5. Rabbi David Wolpe:

    A number of years ago, I heard Rabbi Wolpe tell a story of a man asking God when God would send someone to save their city. God replied I did. I sent you. What is this story? and who was talking to God?

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Translations for Rabbi

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