What does Proof mean?

Definitions for Proof
prufProof

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Proof.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. proof, cogent evidence(noun)

    any factual evidence that helps to establish the truth of something

    "if you have any proof for what you say, now is the time to produce it"

  2. proof(noun)

    a formal series of statements showing that if one thing is true something else necessarily follows from it

  3. proof(noun)

    a measure of alcoholic strength expressed as an integer twice the percentage of alcohol present (by volume)

  4. proof, test copy, trial impression(noun)

    (printing) an impression made to check for errors

  5. proof(noun)

    a trial photographic print from a negative

  6. validation, proof, substantiation(adj)

    the act of validating; finding or testing the truth of something

  7. proof(p)(verb)

    (used in combination or as a suffix) able to withstand

    "temptation-proof"; "childproof locks"

  8. proof(verb)

    make or take a proof of, such as a photographic negative, an etching, or typeset

  9. proof(verb)

    knead to reach proper lightness

    "proof dough"

  10. proofread, proof(verb)

    read for errors

    "I should proofread my manuscripts"

  11. proof(verb)

    activate by mixing with water and sometimes sugar or milk

    "proof yeast"

  12. proof(verb)

    make resistant (to harm)

    "proof the materials against shrinking in the dryer"

Wiktionary

  1. proof(Noun)

    An effort, process, or operation designed to establish or discover a fact or truth; an act of testing; a test; a trial.

    Etymology: From proof, from prove, from proba, from probare; see prove.

  2. proof(Noun)

    The degree of evidence which convinces the mind of any truth or fact, and produces belief; a test by facts or arguments which induce, or tend to induce, certainty of the judgment; conclusive evidence; demonstration.

    Etymology: From proof, from prove, from proba, from probare; see prove.

  3. proof(Noun)

    The quality or state of having been proved or tried; firmness or hardness which resists impression, or doesn't yield to force; impenetrability of physical bodies.

    Etymology: From proof, from prove, from proba, from probare; see prove.

  4. proof(Noun)

    Experience of something.

    Etymology: From proof, from prove, from proba, from probare; see prove.

  5. proof(Noun)

    Firmness of mind; stability not to be shaken.

    Etymology: From proof, from prove, from proba, from probare; see prove.

  6. proof(Noun)

    A proof sheet; a trial impression, as from type, taken for correction or examination.

    Etymology: From proof, from prove, from proba, from probare; see prove.

  7. proof(Noun)

    A sequence of statements consisting of axioms, assumptions, statements already demonstrated in another proof, and statements that logically follow from previous statements in the sequence, and which concludes with a statement that is the object of the proof.

    Etymology: From proof, from prove, from proba, from probare; see prove.

  8. proof(Noun)

    A process for testing the accuracy of an operation performed. Compare prove, transitive verb, 5.

    Etymology: From proof, from prove, from proba, from probare; see prove.

  9. proof(Noun)

    Armour of excellent or tried quality, and deemed impenetrable; properly, armour of proof.

    Etymology: From proof, from prove, from proba, from probare; see prove.

  10. proof(Verb)

    To proofread.

    Etymology: From proof, from prove, from proba, from probare; see prove.

  11. proof(Verb)

    To make resistant, especially to water.

    Etymology: From proof, from prove, from proba, from probare; see prove.

  12. proof(Verb)

    To knead, as in bread dough.

    Etymology: From proof, from prove, from proba, from probare; see prove.

  13. proof(Noun)

    A measure of the alcohol content of liquor. Originally, in Britain, 100 proof was defined as 57.1% by volume (not used anymore). In the US, 100 proof means that the alcohol content is 50% of the total volume of the liquid, and thus, absolute alcohol would be 200 proof.

    Etymology: From proof, from prove, from proba, from probare; see prove.

  14. proof(Adjective)

    Used in proving or testing.

    a proof load; a proof charge

    Etymology: From proof, from prove, from proba, from probare; see prove.

  15. proof(Adjective)

    Firm or successful in resisting.

    Etymology: From proof, from prove, from proba, from probare; see prove.

  16. proof(Adjective)

    Being of a certain standard as to alcohol content.

    Etymology: From proof, from prove, from proba, from probare; see prove.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Proof(noun)

    any effort, process, or operation designed to establish or discover a fact or truth; an act of testing; a test; a trial

  2. Proof(noun)

    that degree of evidence which convinces the mind of any truth or fact, and produces belief; a test by facts or arguments that induce, or tend to induce, certainty of the judgment; conclusive evidence; demonstration

  3. Proof(noun)

    the quality or state of having been proved or tried; firmness or hardness that resists impression, or does not yield to force; impenetrability of physical bodies

  4. Proof(noun)

    firmness of mind; stability not to be shaken

  5. Proof(noun)

    a trial impression, as from type, taken for correction or examination; -- called also proof sheet

  6. Proof(noun)

    a process for testing the accuracy of an operation performed. Cf. Prove, v. t., 5

  7. Proof(verb)

    armor of excellent or tried quality, and deemed impenetrable; properly, armor of proof

  8. Proof(adj)

    used in proving or testing; as, a proof load, or proof charge

  9. Proof(adj)

    firm or successful in resisting; as, proof against harm; waterproof; bombproof

  10. Proof(adj)

    being of a certain standard as to strength; -- said of alcoholic liquors

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Proof

    prōōf, n. that which proves or establishes the truth of anything: test: (obs.) experience: experiment: any process to discover or establish a truth: that which convinces: demonstration: evidence which convinces the mind: state of having been proved: (pl.) in equity practice, the instruments of evidence in their documentary form: (Scots law) the taking of evidence by a judge upon an issue framed in pleading: a test, hence 'Armour of proof,' armour proved to be trustworthy: (arith.) an operation checking the accuracy of a calculation: firmness of mind: a certain strength of alcoholic spirits: (print.) an impression taken for correction, also 'proof-sheet:' an early impression of an engraving—'proof before letter'=one taken before the title is engraved on the plate: (phot.) the first print from a negative.—adj. firm in resisting: noting alcoholic liquors having the specific gravity 0.920:—pl. Proofs.—ns. Proof′-arm′our, armour proved to be able to resist ordinary weapons; Proof′-charge, an extraordinary amount of powder and shot put into a gun to test its strength; Proof′-house, a house fitted up for proving the barrels of firearms; Proof′-leaf (same as Proof-sheet).—adj. Proof′less, wanting proof or evidence.—ns. Proof′-mark, a mark stamped on a gun to show that it has stood the test; Proof′-read′er, a person who reads printed proofs to discover and correct errors; Proof′-sheet, an impression taken on a slip of paper for correction before printing finally; Proof′-spir′it, a mixture containing fixed proportions of alcohol and water—nearly half its weight and fully half its volume of alcohol; Proof′-text, a passage of Scripture held to prove a certain doctrine.—Artist's proof, a first impression from an engraved plate or block; Burden of proof (see Burden); India proof (see Indian). [O. Fr. prove (Fr. preuve)—L. probāre, to prove.]

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. proof

    The trial of the quality of arms, ammunition, &c., before their reception for service. Guns are proved by various examinations, and by the firing of prescribed charges; powder by examinations, and by carefully measured firings from each batch.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. proof

    A term applied to the testing of powder, and also of ordnance, which are always fired with a regulated charge of powder and shot, to test their strength and soundness.

  2. proof

    Conclusive evidence.

  3. proof

    Capable of withstanding; as, bomb-proof, shot-proof.

Editors Contribution

  1. proof

    A process and data to prove.

    The proof of what's occurring is vital.

    Submitted by MaryC on February 12, 2020  

Suggested Resources

  1. proof

    Song lyrics by proof -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by proof on the Lyrics.com website.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Proof' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #3664

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Proof' in Written Corpus Frequency: #3410

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Proof' in Nouns Frequency: #1415

How to pronounce Proof?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say Proof in sign language?

  1. proof

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Proof in Chaldean Numerology is: 5

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Proof in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of Proof in a Sentence

  1. Naked Gun From the Files of Police Squad:

    Frank oh, say can you see, buy the dawn's early light, what so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming. who's bright strips and broad stars, in the parelious night, o'er the rampart's we watched, as the da da, da, da, da, da, and the rocket's red glare, lots of bombs in the air, gave proof to the night, that we still had a flag, oh say does that spangle banner wave, over all-l-l-l-l that's free, over the home, of the land, and the land of the free

  2. Rainer Maria Rilke:

    For one human being to love another; that is perhaps the most difficult of all our tasks, the ultimate, the last test and proof, the work for which all other work is but preparation.

  3. Katherine Ornstein:

    We’ve known that families are involved, but here’s proof. They’re especially involved at the end of life. What can we do to make it easier so they can do their jobs ?

  4. Richard Blumenthal:

    According to the Attorney General, The Special Counsel concluded that the evidence fell short of a prosecutable criminal conspiracy, which involves a high bar of proof beyond a reasonable doubt -- but reached no such conclusion on the obstruction of justice issue. On obstruction of justice, The Special Counsel tossed a jump ball, and the Attorney General tipped it to President Donald Trump, but shared none of the information supporting his conclusion.

  5. Caroline Cederquist:

    There isn't much of a difference between 80-proof hard liquors, they all have around the same amount of calories and carbohydrates.

Images & Illustrations of Proof

  1. ProofProofProofProofProof

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Proof#1#2957#10000

Translations for Proof

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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