What does Plasma mean?

Definitions for Plasma
Plas·ma

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Plasma.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. plasma, plasm, blood plasma(noun)

    the colorless watery fluid of the blood and lymph that contains no cells, but in which the blood cells (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and thrombocytes) are suspended

  2. plasma(noun)

    a green slightly translucent variety of chalcedony used as a gemstone

  3. plasma(noun)

    (physical chemistry) a fourth state of matter distinct from solid or liquid or gas and present in stars and fusion reactors; a gas becomes a plasma when it is heated until the atoms lose all their electrons, leaving a highly electrified collection of nuclei and free electrons

    "particles in space exist in the form of a plasma"

GCIDE

  1. Plasma(n.)

    same as blood plasma.

  2. Plasma(n.)

    (physics) a state of matter in which charged particles such as electrons and atomi nuclei have sufficiently high energy to move freely, rather than be bound in atoms as in ordinary matter; it has some of the properties of a gas, but is a conductor of electricity. In a typical plasma, the number of positive and negative particles are approximately equal. Plasmas are found naturally in the atmosphere of stars, and can be created in special laboratory apparatus.

  3. Origin: [See Plasm.]

Wiktionary

  1. plasma(Noun)

    A state of matter consisting of partially ionized gas

  2. plasma(Noun)

    A clear component of blood or lymph containing fibrin

  3. plasma(Noun)

    Blood plasma, free of suspended cells, used in transfusions

  4. plasma(Noun)

    A variety of green quartz, used in ancient times for making engraved ornaments.

  5. plasma(Noun)

    A mixture of starch and glycerin, used as a substitute for ointments.

  6. plasma(Noun)

    A visual effect in which cycles of changing colours are warped in various ways to give the illusion of liquid organic movement.

  7. Origin: From πλάσμα

Webster Dictionary

  1. Plasma(noun)

    a variety of quartz, of a color between grass green and leek green, which is found associated with common chalcedony. It was much esteemed by the ancients for making engraved ornaments

  2. Plasma(noun)

    the viscous material of an animal or vegetable cell, out of which the various tissues are formed by a process of differentiation; protoplasm

  3. Plasma(noun)

    unorganized material; elementary matter

  4. Plasma(noun)

    a mixture of starch and glycerin, used as a substitute for ointments

  5. Origin: [See Plasm.]

Freebase

  1. Plasma

    Plasma is one of the four fundamental states of matter. Heating a gas may ionize its molecules or atoms, thus turning it into a plasma, which contains charged particles: positive ions and negative electrons or ions. Ionization can be induced by other means, such as strong electromagnetic field applied with a laser or microwave generator, and is accompanied by the dissociation of molecular bonds, if present. Plasma can also be created by the application of an electric field on a gas, where the underlying process is the Townsend avalanche. The presence of a non-negligible number of charge carriers makes the plasma electrically conductive so that it responds strongly to electromagnetic fields. Plasma, therefore, has properties quite unlike those of solids, liquids, or gases and is considered a distinct state of matter. Like gas, plasma does not have a definite shape or a definite volume unless enclosed in a container; unlike gas, under the influence of a magnetic field, it may form structures such as filaments, beams and double layers. Some common plasmas are found in stars and neon signs. In the universe, plasma is the most common state of matter for ordinary matter, most of which is in the rarefied intergalactic plasma and in stars. Much of the understanding of plasmas has come from the pursuit of controlled nuclear fusion and fusion power, for which plasma physics provides the scientific basis.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Plasma

    plas′ma, n. a green variety of translucent quartz or silica.—adj. Plas′mic. [Gr.,—plassein, to form.]

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Plasma

    The residual portion of BLOOD that is left after removal of BLOOD CELLS by CENTRIFUGATION without prior BLOOD COAGULATION.

Editors Contribution

  1. plasma

    A type of matter.

    The blood plasma levels were accurate and she was healthy.

    Submitted by MaryC on March 20, 2020  
  2. plasma

    Is an elementary particle.

    Plasmas are by far the most common phase of ordinary matter in the universe, both by mass and by volume. Essentially, all of the visible light from space comes from stars, which are plasmas with a temperature such that they radiate strongly at visible wavelengths.

    Submitted by MaryC on October 15, 2015  

Anagrams for Plasma »

  1. lampas, Palmas, palmas

How to pronounce Plasma?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say Plasma in sign language?

  1. plasma

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Plasma in Chaldean Numerology is: 2

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Plasma in Pythagorean Numerology is: 8

Examples of Plasma in a Sentence

  1. Nick Pope:

    In speculating about exotic atmospheric plasma phenomena the report's author had made the classic mistake of trying to explain one mystery in terms of another.

  2. Ed Stone:

    This has really been a wonderful journey that began with the launch of two spacecraft in 1977 to explore Jupiter and Saturn, our journey has expanded deeper and deeper into space. We had no quantitative idea of how big this bubble is that the sun creates around itself with its supersonic solar wind, made of ionized plasma, which is speeding away from the sun in all directions. And we didn't know the spacecraft could live long enough to reach the edge of the bubble, leave it and enter nearby interstellar space.

  3. Reza Sanaye:

    Basics of Macro-systems' Behavior Prediction 1 .The Macro-systems with their sometimes stochastic behavior may be (good) indicators of the dispersal of information from a holistic standpoint as well as [to be discussed later on] from a regionally molecular anisotropic zone. 2. The data scattering as for systems with quasi-vector behavior on liquids, on gases, and amongst solids, when observed from an epi-phenomenological perspective versus a phenomenological one, can show that a number of classical views on mechanistic behavior of Macro-systems may be substituted with some “machinic” view.¬ 3. The abandonment of the purely mechanistic view of interfacial forces and the adoption of thermodynamic and probabilistic concepts such as free energy and entropy have been two of the most important steps towards getting out of the worn-out mechanistic notions into more abstract conceptualization of information dispersal, working instead of causality. 4. Comparison also has to be made between hermeneutics of the notion of entropic forces within and without the framework of established thermodynamics. The very word “force” is itself a bit too collocated with entropy already. What we are after is to make it next of kin to ideas of data, information, topology of data, and mereology of stochasticity. 5. The physico-chemical potentiality inside a variety of equilibrium states can be used as a platform for anisotropic configurations whereby not only the entropy of confinement, but also the entropy of dispersal find their true meaning. 6. Within contexts of classical accumulation and energy-growth models, the verifiability of any anisotropic reversal is also demonstrable, if not by means of a set of axioms, at least by multiplicities of interfacial behavior in which experimental data find their mereotopological ratios one in the neighborhood of the other (considering first, for the sake of simplicity, our state spaces to be of metric nature). 7. Thus, there remains the reciprocity of interfacial tensions calculations where surface tension gives rise to internal polarization of those data systems by which we should like to derive either axiomatic or multiple manifoldic regionalization of PREDICTION. 8. This, with a number of Chaotic and Strange-Attractors modifications, can potentially be applied even to the whole matrix of the Universe. 9. Most of the literature on systems (information) entropy regard mesoscopic level as THE one with highest aptitude for (physicalistic) data analysis. However, there are clues to indicate that some of the main streams of structuration and dynamics are EITHER in common amongst microscopic, mesoscopic, and macroscopic systems OR holistic patterns of the said structurations and dynamics can be derived one from the other two. For example, we shall show later—in the course of the unfolding of present notions—that density functional theory (DFT) which has become the physicists’ methodology for describing solids’ electronic structure, can also be extended to other methods or systems. Few-atom systems can implicate the already explicated order of, say, biomolecules if rigorous analyses are carried out over the transition phases (translational data mappings). 10. The level of likelihood of information dispersal in any nano- and pico-systems with/without (full) attachment to and/or dependence upon chemical energy exchange, relates to dynamics of differentials of those multiplicities of tubing interconnector manifolds which potentially have the capacity to harness thermal energy. This spells that consumption of chemical energy does not necessarily always act against the infusion of energy. Here, delineation has to be made over the minutiae of the differences between Micro- and Macro-systems. Any movement of lines of demarcation throughout the said systems over the issue of (non-)interdependency of data mereotopology on chemical energy exchange, may be predicted if classical nucleation and growth theories give their place to an even more rigorous science of Differences. Repetition of (observation) of such Differences makes it possible to see through some of the most “macro” levels of systematicity [we have already run some simulations of micro-spaces’ state mappings for purposes of clarifying how many of the plasma macro jet streams inside stars or in the inter-galaxial space move. Even magneticity has turned out, with all due caution, to be comparable]. The above-said Differences actually refer to potentialities within lines of thermodynamic exchanges based upon anisotropy of information. Such exchanges nominate themselves as MO exchanges when “micro” but as some the most specific gravito-convectional currents in usages for astrology, earth science, and ecology. Thence, the science will be brought out of prognosing the detailed balance of mesoscopic (ir-)reversibility in terms of data neighborhoods connectivity. On any differentiable manifold with its own ring of universal differentiable functions, we may determine to have the “installing” of modules of Kähler spaces where demarcation could be represented by: d(a+b)=da+db, d(ab)=adb+bda, and: dλ=0(a,b∈A,λ∈k)d(a+b)=da+db,d(ab)=adb+bda,dλ=0(a,b∈A,λ∈k) Where any one module has the formalism: dbdb (b∈Ab∈A). All these having been said, again we have the problematics of still remaining within the realm of classic calculus. It is likely that for Macrosystems we may decide not to apply the classical version.

  4. Wes Anderson:

    It was like traveling back in time, it was like a Wes Anderson movie. But then you see mobile phones, and plasma TVs, and you realize it is the present day.

  5. Musin Almat Zhumabekovich:

    1. The universal mind The universal mind is a great constellation of thoughts of a single mind, thoughts and ideas of the living and the dead, all worlds and dimensions. 2. Chemistry of thinking Picturesque images of the chemistry of thinking in art sometimes use exotic elements from distant corners of the subconscious. 3. Horror smile A cunning smile of awareness and a psychic laugh. Horror smile in the soul of loneliness. We are particles of the cult era of laughter in the cult of cruel humor of reality. We are in the great psychological, comical game of society. 4. The first hundred years of life, the body and spirit perceive everything as an immature illusion, where closer to the end of the century all dreams melt and disappear, but if a person lives longer, he feels how life turns into reality with which it becomes one whole, like a ghost. 5. The plasma ball of thoughts is a thought process, the heart of life is plasma lightning - this is the fire of the universe - this is a disco of feelings that responds to understanding. 6. Time is a pawnshop of nostalgia and spiritual values. 7. In nature, instincts are a cycle associated with universal mechanisms. In the world of people, instincts directed against each other are selfish deception egoism, all this gives rise to vices and inner flaws, all this creates an internal chaos of dirty, sinful thoughts of hypocritical egoism. 8. Communication is a space probe for the inner worlds. Author: Musin Almat Zhumabekovich

Images & Illustrations of Plasma

  1. PlasmaPlasmaPlasmaPlasmaPlasma

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