What does Nurse mean?

Definitions for Nurse
nɜrsNurse

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Nurse.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. nurse(noun)

    one skilled in caring for young children or the sick (usually under the supervision of a physician)

  2. nanny, nursemaid, nurse(verb)

    a woman who is the custodian of children

  3. nurse(verb)

    try to cure by special care of treatment, of an illness or injury

    "He nursed his cold with Chinese herbs"

  4. harbor, harbour, hold, entertain, nurse(verb)

    maintain (a theory, thoughts, or feelings)

    "bear a grudge"; "entertain interesting notions"; "harbor a resentment"

  5. nurse(verb)

    serve as a nurse; care for sick or handicapped people

  6. nurse(verb)

    treat carefully

    "He nursed his injured back by lying in bed several hours every afternoon"; "He nursed the flowers in his garden and fertilized them regularly"

  7. breastfeed, suckle, suck, nurse, wet-nurse, lactate, give suck(verb)

    give suck to

    "The wetnurse suckled the infant"; "You cannot nurse your baby in public in some places"

Wiktionary

  1. nurse(Noun)

    A wet-nurse.

    Etymology: Variant form of the archaic nourice, from norrice, from nutricius, from nutrix, from nutrire.

  2. nurse(Noun)

    A person (usually a woman) who takes care of other people's young.

    They hired a nurse to care for their young boy

    Etymology: Variant form of the archaic nourice, from norrice, from nutricius, from nutrix, from nutrire.

  3. nurse(Noun)

    A person trained to provide care for the sick.

    The nurse made her rounds through the hospital ward

    Etymology: Variant form of the archaic nourice, from norrice, from nutricius, from nutrix, from nutrire.

  4. nurse(Verb)

    to breast feed

    She believes that nursing her baby will make him strong and healthy.

    Etymology: Variant form of the archaic nourice, from norrice, from nutricius, from nutrix, from nutrire.

  5. nurse(Verb)

    to care for the sick

    She nursed him back to health.

    Etymology: Variant form of the archaic nourice, from norrice, from nutricius, from nutrix, from nutrire.

  6. nurse(Verb)

    to treat kindly and with extra care

    She nursed the rosebush and that season it bloomed.

    Etymology: Variant form of the archaic nourice, from norrice, from nutricius, from nutrix, from nutrire.

  7. nurse(Verb)

    to drink slowly

    Etymology: Variant form of the archaic nourice, from norrice, from nutricius, from nutrix, from nutrire.

  8. nurse(Verb)

    to foster, to nourish

    Many nurse this humanitarian idea which is not specifically Christian.

    Etymology: Variant form of the archaic nourice, from norrice, from nutricius, from nutrix, from nutrire.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Nurse(noun)

    one who nourishes; a person who supplies food, tends, or brings up; as: (a) A woman who has the care of young children; especially, one who suckles an infant not her own. (b) A person, especially a woman, who has the care of the sick or infirm

    Etymology: [OE. nourse, nurice, norice, OF. nurrice, norrice, nourrice, F. nourrice, fr. L. nutricia nurse, prop., fem. of nutricius that nourishes; akin to nutrix, -icis, nurse, fr. nutrire to nourish. See Nourish, and cf. Nutritious.]

  2. Nurse(noun)

    one who, or that which, brings up, rears, causes to grow, trains, fosters, or the like

    Etymology: [OE. nourse, nurice, norice, OF. nurrice, norrice, nourrice, F. nourrice, fr. L. nutricia nurse, prop., fem. of nutricius that nourishes; akin to nutrix, -icis, nurse, fr. nutrire to nourish. See Nourish, and cf. Nutritious.]

  3. Nurse(noun)

    a lieutenant or first officer, who is the real commander when the captain is unfit for his place

    Etymology: [OE. nourse, nurice, norice, OF. nurrice, norrice, nourrice, F. nourrice, fr. L. nutricia nurse, prop., fem. of nutricius that nourishes; akin to nutrix, -icis, nurse, fr. nutrire to nourish. See Nourish, and cf. Nutritious.]

  4. Nurse(noun)

    a peculiar larva of certain trematodes which produces cercariae by asexual reproduction. See Cercaria, and Redia

    Etymology: [OE. nourse, nurice, norice, OF. nurrice, norrice, nourrice, F. nourrice, fr. L. nutricia nurse, prop., fem. of nutricius that nourishes; akin to nutrix, -icis, nurse, fr. nutrire to nourish. See Nourish, and cf. Nutritious.]

  5. Nurse(noun)

    either one of the nurse sharks

    Etymology: [OE. nourse, nurice, norice, OF. nurrice, norrice, nourrice, F. nourrice, fr. L. nutricia nurse, prop., fem. of nutricius that nourishes; akin to nutrix, -icis, nurse, fr. nutrire to nourish. See Nourish, and cf. Nutritious.]

  6. Nurse(verb)

    to nourish; to cherish; to foster

    Etymology: [OE. nourse, nurice, norice, OF. nurrice, norrice, nourrice, F. nourrice, fr. L. nutricia nurse, prop., fem. of nutricius that nourishes; akin to nutrix, -icis, nurse, fr. nutrire to nourish. See Nourish, and cf. Nutritious.]

  7. Nurse(verb)

    to nourish at the breast; to suckle; to feed and tend, as an infant

    Etymology: [OE. nourse, nurice, norice, OF. nurrice, norrice, nourrice, F. nourrice, fr. L. nutricia nurse, prop., fem. of nutricius that nourishes; akin to nutrix, -icis, nurse, fr. nutrire to nourish. See Nourish, and cf. Nutritious.]

  8. Nurse(verb)

    to take care of or tend, as a sick person or an invalid; to attend upon

    Etymology: [OE. nourse, nurice, norice, OF. nurrice, norrice, nourrice, F. nourrice, fr. L. nutricia nurse, prop., fem. of nutricius that nourishes; akin to nutrix, -icis, nurse, fr. nutrire to nourish. See Nourish, and cf. Nutritious.]

  9. Nurse(verb)

    to bring up; to raise, by care, from a weak or invalid condition; to foster; to cherish; -- applied to plants, animals, and to any object that needs, or thrives by, attention

    Etymology: [OE. nourse, nurice, norice, OF. nurrice, norrice, nourrice, F. nourrice, fr. L. nutricia nurse, prop., fem. of nutricius that nourishes; akin to nutrix, -icis, nurse, fr. nutrire to nourish. See Nourish, and cf. Nutritious.]

  10. Nurse(verb)

    to manage with care and economy, with a view to increase; as, to nurse our national resources

    Etymology: [OE. nourse, nurice, norice, OF. nurrice, norrice, nourrice, F. nourrice, fr. L. nutricia nurse, prop., fem. of nutricius that nourishes; akin to nutrix, -icis, nurse, fr. nutrire to nourish. See Nourish, and cf. Nutritious.]

  11. Nurse(verb)

    to caress; to fondle, as a nurse does

    Etymology: [OE. nourse, nurice, norice, OF. nurrice, norrice, nourrice, F. nourrice, fr. L. nutricia nurse, prop., fem. of nutricius that nourishes; akin to nutrix, -icis, nurse, fr. nutrire to nourish. See Nourish, and cf. Nutritious.]

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Nurse

    nurs, n. a woman who nourishes an infant: a mother while her infant is at the breast: one who has the care of infants or of the sick: (hort.) a shrub or tree which protects a young plant.—v.t. to tend, as an infant or a sick person: to bring up: to cherish: to manage with care and economy: to play skilfully, as billiard-balls, in order to get them into the position one wants.—adj. Nurse′like (Shak.), like or becoming a nurse.—ns. Nurse′maid, a girl who takes care of children; Nurs′er, one who nurses: one who promotes growth; Nurs′ery, place for nursing: an apartment for young children: a place where the growth of anything is promoted: (hort.) a piece of ground where plants are reared; Nurs′ery-gov′erness; Nurs′erymaid, a nurse-maid; Nurs′eryman, a man who owns or works a nursery: one who is employed in cultivating plants, &c., for sale; Nurs′ing-fa′ther (B.), a foster-father; Nurs′ling, that which is nursed: an infant. [O. Fr. norrice (Fr. nourrice)—L. nutrixnutrīre, to nourish.]

The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

  1. NURSE

    One who keeps setting up the drinks after you're all in. Out of the frying-pan into the face--Mothers' doughnuts. O Many hands make light work--also a good Jackpot. OAR A popular device for catching crabs.

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. nurse

    An able first lieutenant, who in former times had charge of a young boy-captain of interest, but possessing no knowledge for command. Also, a small kind of shark with a very rough skin; a dog-fish.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. nurse

    A person whose whole business is to attend the sick in hospital. In the U. S. service, nurses are detailed in post hospitals from the companies who are serving at the post, and are exempt from other duty, but have to attend the parades for weekly inspections and the musters of their companies, unless especially excused by the commanding officer. Ordinarily one nurse is allowed to every ten persons sick in hospital. In the British service there are sergeants, orderly men, and nurses (generally women) in hospitals of regiments of the line.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Nurse' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #3215

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Nurse' in Written Corpus Frequency: #2753

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Nurse' in Nouns Frequency: #820

Anagrams for Nurse »

  1. Nuers, runes, urnes

  2. Nuers

  3. Runes

  4. Urnes

How to pronounce Nurse?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say Nurse in sign language?

  1. nurse

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Nurse in Chaldean Numerology is: 3

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Nurse in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

Examples of Nurse in a Sentence

  1. Sarah Paulson:

    I mean [ Fletcher ] won an Academy Award doing it, so there's no where to go but down, i absolutely feel that pressure because I have an enormous reverence for Louis Fletcher and for Louise Fletcher portrayal in that movie and for the movie itself. This story stands on its own in Sixth Sense that we are starting many years prior to when we meet Nurse Ratched in the movie' Cuckoos Nest,' so I know that I'm not going to be trying to emulate what she did because this is prior to her doing what she did in the movie. I have a little bit of leeway there, but I'm certainly thinking about it.

  2. Nataly Pasklinsky:

    He would ask the nurses questions about patient care and what it takes to become a nurse. My colleagues and I encouraged him to follow his dream.

  3. Nina Pham:

    I was the last person beside Mr. Duncan to find out he was positive, you'd think the primary nurse would be the first to know.

  4. Janet Frank:

    In general, Utah Valley Hospital is an advocate for skin-to-skin contact between a mother and newborn directly after birth. Skin-to-skin is a best practice with proven benefits for both mom and baby. We do everything possible to allow skin-to-skin after both vaginal and C-section births, in the case of a C-section, where the bedside caregiver is occupied caring for the mother during surgery, an additional nurse is brought into the OR to allow the infant to remain in the OR suite with the mother. This is to ensure both patients remain safe. There is an additional charge associated with bringing an extra caregiver into the OR. The charge is not for holding the baby, but for the additional caregiver needed to maintain the highest levels of patient safety.

  5. Sharon Cooper:

    I’m sorry if some nurse gets her license suspended and that’s her livelihood.

Images & Illustrations of Nurse

  1. NurseNurseNurseNurseNurse

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Nurse#1#4200#10000

Translations for Nurse

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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1 Comment

  • Nurses do not render care under the supervision of a Physician/Doctor. That's a myth that is now in extinction. Upgrade!
    LikeReplyReport3 years ago

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