What does Memory mean?

Definitions for Memory
ˈmɛm ə riMem·o·ry

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Memory.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. memorynoun

    something that is remembered

    "search as he would, the memory was lost"

  2. memory, rememberingnoun

    the cognitive processes whereby past experience is remembered

    "he can do it from memory"; "he enjoyed remembering his father"

  3. memory, retention, retentiveness, retentivitynoun

    the power of retaining and recalling past experience

    "he had a good memory when he was younger"

  4. memory, computer memory, storage, computer storage, store, memory boardnoun

    an electronic memory device

    "a memory and the CPU form the central part of a computer to which peripherals are attached"

  5. memorynoun

    the area of cognitive psychology that studies memory processes

    "he taught a graduate course on learning and memory"

Wiktionary

  1. memorynoun

    The ability of an organism to record information about things or events with the facility of recalling them later at will.

    Memory is a facility common to all animals.

  2. memorynoun

    A record of a thing or an event stored and available for later use by the organism.

    I have no memory of that event.

  3. memorynoun

    The part of a computer that stores variable executable code or data (RAM) or unalterable executable code or default data (ROM).

    This data passes from the CPU to the memory.

  4. memorynoun

    The time within which past events can be or are remembered.

    in recent memory; in living memory

  5. Etymology: From memorie, memoire etc., from memoria, from memor, related to μνήμη μέρμερος, μέριμνα.

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary

  1. MEMORYnoun

    Etymology: memoire, Fr. memoria, Latin..

    Memory is the power to revive again in our minds those ideas which after imprinting have disappeared, or have been laid aside out of sight. John Locke.

    The memory is perpetually looking back, when we have nothing present to entertain us: it is like those repositories in animals that are filled with stores of food, on which they may ruminate, when their present pasture fails. Joseph Addison, Spectator.

    That ever-living man of memory,
    Henry the Fifth! William Shakespeare, Henry VI.

    Thy request think now fulfill’d, that ask’d
    How first this world, and face of things, began,
    And what, before thy memory, was done. John Milton.

    Be better suited;
    These weeds are memories of those worser hours:
    I pr’ythee put them off. William Shakespeare, King Lear.

    A swan in memory of Cycnus shines;
    The mourning sisters weep in wat’ry signs. Addison.

    When Duncan is asleep, his two chamberlains
    Will I with wine and wassel so convince,
    That memory, the warder of the brain,
    Shall be a fume. William Shakespeare, Macbeth.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Memorynoun

    the faculty of the mind by which it retains the knowledge of previous thoughts, impressions, or events

  2. Memorynoun

    the reach and positiveness with which a person can remember; the strength and trustworthiness of one's power to reach and represent or to recall the past; as, his memory was never wrong

  3. Memorynoun

    the actual and distinct retention and recognition of past ideas in the mind; remembrance; as, in memory of youth; memories of foreign lands

  4. Memorynoun

    the time within which past events can be or are remembered; as, within the memory of man

  5. Memorynoun

    something, or an aggregate of things, remembered; hence, character, conduct, etc., as preserved in remembrance, history, or tradition; posthumous fame; as, the war became only a memory

  6. Memorynoun

    a memorial

Freebase

  1. Memory

    In psychology, memory is the process by which information is encoded, stored, and retrieved. Encoding allows information that is from the outside world to reach our senses in the forms of chemical and physical stimuli. In this first stage we must change the information so that we may put the memory into the encoding process. Storage is the second memory stage or process. This entails that we maintain information over periods of time. Finally the third process is the retrieval of information that we have stored. We must locate it and return it to our consciousness. Some retrieval attempts may be effortless due to the type of information. From an information processing perspective there are three main stages in the formation and retrieval of memory: ⁕Encoding or registration: receiving, processing and combining of received information ⁕Storage: creation of a permanent record of the encoded information ⁕Retrieval, recall or recollection: calling back the stored information in response to some cue for use in a process or activity The loss of memory is described as forgetfulness, or as a medical disorder, amnesia.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Memory

    mem′o-ri, n. the power of retaining and reproducing mental or sensory impressions: a having or keeping in the mind: time within which past things can be remembered: that which is remembered: commemoration: remembrance.—n.pl. Memorabil′ia, things worth remembering: noteworthy points.—adj. Mem′orable, deserving to be remembered: remarkable.—adv. Mem′orably.—n. Memoran′dum, something to be remembered: a note to assist the memory: (law) a brief note of some transaction: (diplomacy) a summary of the state of a question:—pl. Memoran′dums, Memoran′da.—adjs. Mem′orātive, pertaining to memory: aiding the memory; Mem&##x14D;′rial, bringing to memory: contained in memory.—n. that which serves to keep in remembrance: a monument: a note to help the memory: a written statement forming the ground of a petition, laid before a legislative or other body: (B.) memory.—v.t. Memō′rialise, to present a memorial to: to petition by a memorial.—n. Memō′rialist, one who writes, signs, or presents a memorial.—v.t. Mem′orise, to commit to memory: (Shak.) to cause to be remembered.—adv. Memor′iter, from memory: by heart.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Memory

    Complex mental function having four distinct phases: (1) memorizing or learning, (2) retention, (3) recall, and (4) recognition. Clinically, it is usually subdivided into immediate, recent, and remote memory.

Editors Contribution

  1. memory

    A component, device, unit or element of an application, computer, equipment, device, laptop, machine, network or server.

    The memory of a computer or other type of device is a vital part of its composition.


    Submitted by MaryC on January 16, 2020  


  2. memory

    An element of our mind that functions accurately and has the ability, action and power to remember, think, connect, recognize, remember data, facts, information and statistics, use language and function as a human being.

    Our memory is an amazing part of our mind.


    Submitted by MaryC on January 16, 2020  


  3. memory

    An experience remembered.

    My memory of that moment was so joyous together we chose to wed.


    Submitted by MaryC on January 16, 2020  

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Memory' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #1367

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Memory' in Written Corpus Frequency: #1721

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Memory' in Nouns Frequency: #433

How to pronounce Memory?

How to say Memory in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Memory in Chaldean Numerology is: 5

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Memory in Pythagorean Numerology is: 8

Examples of Memory in a Sentence

  1. Roy Hodgson:

    When we analyze this game tomorrow there will be a lot of things we will want to take forward, and hopefully we'll be able to put the memory of this last-minute goal behind us.

  2. Ken Johnson:

    There is sort of a nostalgia among many for rural America, i think that sometimes, places are often better in memory than in reality. But for others, I think some of the return migration of older adults in a rural area is about that (sense of) community they may have felt as young people.

  3. Johannes Ramaekers:

    This study showed that cannabis increased the number of false memories across all three memory paradigms.

  4. Drew Hutchison:

    I was excited to be back in the majors, but nothing that affected my performance, all I can do is wipe this out of my memory and move forward.

  5. Thomas Fuller:

    Memory depends very much on the perspicuity, regularity, and order of our thoughts. Many complain of the want of memory, when the defect is in the judgment; and others, by grasping at all, retain nothing.

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Memory#1#556#10000

Translations for Memory

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    • C. busy
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