What does MOON mean?

Definitions for MOON
munMOON

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word MOON.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Moon, moonnoun

    the natural satellite of the Earth

    "the average distance to the Moon is 384,400 kilometers"; "men first stepped on the moon in 1969"

  2. moonnoun

    any object resembling a moon

    "he made a moon lamp that he used as a night light"; "the clock had a moon that showed various phases"

  3. lunar month, moon, lunation, synodic monthnoun

    the period between successive new moons (29.531 days)

  4. moonlight, moonshine, Moonnoun

    the light of the Moon

    "moonlight is the smuggler's enemy"; "the Moon was bright enough to read by"

  5. Moon, Sun Myung Moonnoun

    United States religious leader (born in Korea) who founded the Unification Church in 1954; was found guilty of conspiracy to evade taxes (born in 1920)

  6. moonverb

    any natural satellite of a planet

    "Jupiter has sixteen moons"

  7. daydream, moonverb

    have dreamlike musings or fantasies while awake

    "She looked out the window, daydreaming"

  8. moon, moon around, moon onverb

    be idle in a listless or dreamy way

  9. moonverb

    expose one's buttocks to

    "moon the audience"

GCIDE

  1. Moonverb

    To expose one's naked buttocks to (a person); -- a vulgar sign of contempt or disrespect, sometimes done as a prank.

Wiktionary

  1. moonnoun

    The largest satellite of Earth.

  2. moonnoun

    Any natural satellite of a planet.

  3. moonnoun

    A month, particularly a lunar month.

  4. moonverb

    To display one's buttocks to, typically as a jest, insult, or protest

  5. moonverb

    (usually followed by over or after) To fuss over something adoringly; to be infatuated with someone.

  6. Moonnoun

    The Earth's moon; the sole natural satellite of the Earth, represented in astronomy and astrology by u263E.

  7. Moonnoun

    The god of the Moon in Heathenry.

Wikipedia

  1. Moon

    The Moon, occasionally distinguished as Luna, is an astronomical body that orbits the Earth as its only permanent natural satellite. It is the fifth-largest satellite in the Solar System, and the largest among planetary satellites relative to the size of the planet that it orbits (its primary). The Moon is, after Jupiter's satellite Io, the second-densest satellite in the Solar System among those whose densities are known. The Moon is thought to have formed about 4.51 billion years ago, not long after Earth. The most widely accepted explanation is that the Moon formed from the debris left over after a giant impact between Earth and a Mars-sized body called Theia. New research of moon rocks, although not rejecting the Theia hypothesis, suggests that the moon may be older than previously thought.The Moon is in synchronous rotation with Earth, and thus always shows the same side to Earth, the near side. The near side is marked by dark volcanic maria that fill the spaces between the bright ancient crustal highlands and the prominent impact craters. After the Sun, the Moon is the second-brightest regularly visible celestial object in Earth's sky. Its surface is actually dark, although compared to the night sky it appears very bright, with a reflectance just slightly higher than that of worn asphalt. Its gravitational influence produces the ocean tides, body tides, and the slight lengthening of the day. The Moon's average orbital distance is 384,402 km (238,856 mi), or 1.28 light-seconds. This is about thirty times the diameter of Earth. The Moon's apparent size in the sky is almost the same as that of the Sun, since the star is about 400 times the lunar distance and diameter. Therefore, the Moon covers the Sun nearly precisely during a total solar eclipse. This matching of apparent visual size will not continue in the far future because the Moon's distance from Earth is gradually increasing. The Moon was first reached in September 1959 by the Soviet Union's Luna 2, an unmanned spacecraft, followed by the first successful soft landing by Luna 9 in 1966. The United States' NASA Apollo program achieved the only manned lunar missions to date, beginning with the first manned orbital mission by Apollo 8 in 1968, and six manned landings between 1969 and 1972, with the first being Apollo 11 in July 1969. These missions returned lunar rocks which have been used to develop a geological understanding of the Moon's origin, internal structure, and the Moon's later history. Since the 1972 Apollo 17 mission the Moon has been visited only by unmanned spacecraft. Both the Moon's natural prominence in the earthly sky and its regular cycle of phases as seen from Earth have provided cultural references and influences for human societies and cultures since time immemorial. Such cultural influences can be found in language, lunar calendar systems, art, and mythology.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Moonnoun

    the celestial orb which revolves round the earth; the satellite of the earth; a secondary planet, whose light, borrowed from the sun, is reflected to the earth, and serves to dispel the darkness of night. The diameter of the moon is 2,160 miles, its mean distance from the earth is 240,000 miles, and its mass is one eightieth that of the earth. See Lunar month, under Month

    Etymology: [OE. mone, AS. mna; akin to D. maan, OS. & OHG. mno, G. mond, Icel. mni, Dan. maane, Sw. mne, Goth. mna, Lith. men, L. mensis month, Gr. mh`nh moon, mh`n month, Skr. ms moon, month; prob. from a root meaning to measure (cf. Skr. m to measure), from its serving to measure the time. 271. Cf. Mete to measure, Menses, Monday, Month.]

  2. Moonnoun

    a secondary planet, or satellite, revolving about any member of the solar system; as, the moons of Jupiter or Saturn

    Etymology: [OE. mone, AS. mna; akin to D. maan, OS. & OHG. mno, G. mond, Icel. mni, Dan. maane, Sw. mne, Goth. mna, Lith. men, L. mensis month, Gr. mh`nh moon, mh`n month, Skr. ms moon, month; prob. from a root meaning to measure (cf. Skr. m to measure), from its serving to measure the time. 271. Cf. Mete to measure, Menses, Monday, Month.]

  3. Moonnoun

    the time occupied by the moon in making one revolution in her orbit; a month

    Etymology: [OE. mone, AS. mna; akin to D. maan, OS. & OHG. mno, G. mond, Icel. mni, Dan. maane, Sw. mne, Goth. mna, Lith. men, L. mensis month, Gr. mh`nh moon, mh`n month, Skr. ms moon, month; prob. from a root meaning to measure (cf. Skr. m to measure), from its serving to measure the time. 271. Cf. Mete to measure, Menses, Monday, Month.]

  4. Moonnoun

    a crescentlike outwork. See Half-moon

    Etymology: [OE. mone, AS. mna; akin to D. maan, OS. & OHG. mno, G. mond, Icel. mni, Dan. maane, Sw. mne, Goth. mna, Lith. men, L. mensis month, Gr. mh`nh moon, mh`n month, Skr. ms moon, month; prob. from a root meaning to measure (cf. Skr. m to measure), from its serving to measure the time. 271. Cf. Mete to measure, Menses, Monday, Month.]

  5. Moonverb

    to expose to the rays of the moon

    Etymology: [OE. mone, AS. mna; akin to D. maan, OS. & OHG. mno, G. mond, Icel. mni, Dan. maane, Sw. mne, Goth. mna, Lith. men, L. mensis month, Gr. mh`nh moon, mh`n month, Skr. ms moon, month; prob. from a root meaning to measure (cf. Skr. m to measure), from its serving to measure the time. 271. Cf. Mete to measure, Menses, Monday, Month.]

  6. Moonverb

    to act if moonstruck; to wander or gaze about in an abstracted manner

    Etymology: [OE. mone, AS. mna; akin to D. maan, OS. & OHG. mno, G. mond, Icel. mni, Dan. maane, Sw. mne, Goth. mna, Lith. men, L. mensis month, Gr. mh`nh moon, mh`n month, Skr. ms moon, month; prob. from a root meaning to measure (cf. Skr. m to measure), from its serving to measure the time. 271. Cf. Mete to measure, Menses, Monday, Month.]

Freebase

  1. Moon

    The Moon is the only natural satellite of the Earth, and the fifth largest satellite in the Solar System. It is the largest natural satellite of a planet in the Solar System relative to the size of its primary, having 27% the diameter and 60% the density of Earth, resulting in ¹⁄81 its mass. The Moon is the second densest satellite after Io, a satellite of Jupiter. The Moon is in synchronous rotation with Earth, always showing the same face with its near side marked by dark volcanic maria that fill between the bright ancient crustal highlands and the prominent impact craters. It is the brightest object in the sky after the Sun, although its surface is actually very dark, with a reflectance similar to that of coal. Its prominence in the sky and its regular cycle of phases have, since ancient times, made the Moon an important cultural influence on language, calendars, art and mythology. The Moon's gravitational influence produces the ocean tides and the minute lengthening of the day. The Moon's current orbital distance, about thirty times the diameter of the Earth, causes it to appear almost the same size in the sky as the Sun, allowing it to cover the Sun nearly precisely in total solar eclipses. This matching of apparent visual size is a coincidence. The Moon's linear distance from the Earth is currently increasing at a rate of 3.82±0.07cm per year, but this rate is not constant.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Moon

    mōōn, n. the secondary planet or satellite which revolves round the earth monthly, shining with reflected light: a satellite revolving about any other planet; a month: anything in the shape of a moon or crescent: (fort.) a crescent-shaped outwork.—v.t. to adorn with moons or crescents.—v.i. to wander about or gaze vacantly at anything.—n. Moon′beam, a beam of light from the moon.—adj. Moon′-blind, dim-sighted, purblind.—ns. Moon′calf, a monster, a deformed creature: a dolt.—n.pl. Moon′-culminā′tions, times of culmination of the limb of the moon with certain neighbouring stars, formerly used in determining longitude.—adj. Mooned, of or like the moon: having the figure of the moon marked upon it.—ns. Moon′er, one who moons about; Moon′eye, a disease affecting horses' eyes: a name of several American fishes; Moon′face, a full, round face—a point of beauty in the East.—adj. Moon′faced.—ns. Moon′-fish, a name applied to various fishes; Moon′-flower, the ox-eye daisy; Moon′-glade, the track of moonlight on water.—adj. Moon′ish, like the moon: variable: inconstant.—n. Moon′-knife, a crescent-shaped knife used by leather-workers in shaving off the fleshy parts of skins.—adj. Moon′less, destitute of moonlight.—n. Moon′light, the light of the moon—sunlight reflected from the moon's surface.—adj. lighted by the moon: occurring during moonlight.—ns. Moon′lighter, one of a band of cowardly ruffians in Ireland who committed agrarian outrages by night about 1880: a moonshiner; Moon′lighting.—adjs. Moon′lit, lit or illumined by the moon; Moon′-loved, loved by the moon.—ns. Moon′-mad′ness, lunacy, supposed to be caused by sleeping in full moonlight; Moon′-rak′er, a silly person; Moon′-rak′ing, the following of crazy fancies; Moon′-sail, a small sail, sometimes carried above the sky-scraper; Moon′-set, the setting of the moon; Moon′shine, the shining of the moon: (fig.) show without reality: poached eggs with sauce: a month: (U.S.) smuggled spirits; Moon′shiner, a smuggler or illicit distiller of spirits.—adj. Moon′shiny, lighted by the moon: visionary, unreal.—n. Moon′-stone, a variety of feldspar presenting a pearly reflection from within.—adj. Moon′struck, affected by the moon, lunatic, crazed.—n. Moon′wort, any fern of the genus Botrychium.—adj. Moon′y, relating to, or like, the moon or a crescent, bearing a crescent: round, as a shield: like moonlight, lighted by the moon: silly: sickly: tipsy.—n. a noodle.—Moonlight flitting, a removal of one's furniture, &c., during night, to prevent it being seized for rent or debt. [A.S. móna; cf. Ger. mond, L. mensis, Gr. mēnē.]

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Moon

    the satellite of the earth, from which it is distant 238,800 m., and which revolves round it in 27-1/3 days, taking the same time to rotate on its own axis, so that it presents always the same side to us; is a dark body, and shines by reflection of the sun's light, its diameter 2165 m.; it has a rugged surface of mountains and valleys without verdure; has no water, no atmosphere, and consequently no life.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Moon

    The natural satellite of the planet Earth. It includes the lunar cycles or phases, the lunar month, lunar landscapes, geography, and soil.

The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

  1. MOON

    The only lighting monopoly that never made money.

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. moon

    Our satellite; she performs her revolution in 27 days, 7 hours, 43 minutes. (See FULL MOON and NEW MOON.) A hazy or pale colour of the moon, revealing the state of our atmosphere, is supposed to forebode rain, and a red or copper colour to forebode wind.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. moon

    A crescent-formed outwork. See Half-moon.

Editors Contribution

  1. moon

    A type of planet.

    Jupiter and Pluto both have a moon that moves around their planet.

    Submitted by MaryC on January 23, 2017  

Suggested Resources

  1. moon

    The moon symbol -- In this Symbols.com article you will learn about the meaning of the moon symbol and its characteristic.

  2. moon

    Song lyrics by moon -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by moon on the Lyrics.com website.

  3. MOON

    What does MOON stand for? -- Explore the various meanings for the MOON acronym on the Abbreviations.com website.

Mythology

  1. Moon

    The moon was, by the ancients, called Hecate before and after setting; Astarte when in crescent form; Diana when in full.

    “Soon as the evening shades prevail The moon takes up her wondrous tale, And nightly to the list’ning earth Repeats the story of her birth.” (Addison.)

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'MOON' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #3515

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'MOON' in Written Corpus Frequency: #2517

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'MOON' in Nouns Frequency: #1365

How to pronounce MOON?

How to say MOON in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of MOON in Chaldean Numerology is: 5

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of MOON in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Examples of MOON in a Sentence

  1. Gary George:

    . NASA admitted in 2006 that no one could find the original video recordings of the historic moon landing. The U.S. space agency did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the upcoming auction. In 2008, Gary George was vacationing with a NASA friend who told Gary George Gary George was tasked with locating the lost videotapes. Gary George said,' It seems we've lost our original tapes of the Apollo 11 EVA,' quite frankly, I was sitting at the table drinking a beer and I said,' Well damn, I have those,'.

  2. Moon Express:

    The company does not see anything, including the Outer Space Treaty, as being a barrier to our initial operations on the moon.

  3. Teen Wolf:

    Three things that cannot be hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth.

  4. Bruce Schneier:

    It's hard but it's not go-to-the-moon hard, it's you-just-gotta-do-it hard.

  5. Mike Edmunds:

    It confirms that the mechanism displayed planets as well as showing the position of the sun and the moon in the sky.

Images & Illustrations of MOON

  1. MOONMOONMOONMOONMOON

Popularity rank by frequency of use

MOON#1#2801#10000

Translations for MOON

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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