What does Legion mean?

Definitions for Legion
ˈli dʒənLe·gion

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Legion.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. host, legion(noun)

    archaic terms for army

  2. legion(noun)

    association of ex-servicemen

    "the American Legion"

  3. legion(noun)

    a large military unit

    "the French Foreign Legion"

  4. horde, host, legion(adj)

    a vast multitude

  5. numerous, legion(p)(adj)

    amounting to a large indefinite number

    "numerous times"; "the family was numerous"; "Palomar's fans are legion"

Wiktionary

  1. legion(Noun)

    The major unit or division of the Roman army, usually comprising 3000 to 6000 infantry soldiers and 100 to 200 cavalry troops.

    Etymology: Attested (in , as legioun) around 1200, from legion, from legio, legionem, from legere; akin to legend, lecture.

  2. legion(Noun)

    A large military or semimilitary unit trained for combat; any military force; an army, regiment; an armed, organized and assembled militia.

    Etymology: Attested (in , as legioun) around 1200, from legion, from legio, legionem, from legere; akin to legend, lecture.

  3. legion(Noun)

    (often Legion or the Legion) A national organization or association of former servicemen, such as the American Legion, founded in 1919.

    Etymology: Attested (in , as legioun) around 1200, from legion, from legio, legionem, from legere; akin to legend, lecture.

  4. legion(Noun)

    A large number of people; a multitude.

    Etymology: Attested (in , as legioun) around 1200, from legion, from legio, legionem, from legere; akin to legend, lecture.

  5. legion(Noun)

    (often plural) A great number.

    Where one sin has entered, legions will force their way through the same breach. u2014 John Rogers (1679-1729)

    Etymology: Attested (in , as legioun) around 1200, from legion, from legio, legionem, from legere; akin to legend, lecture.

  6. legion(Noun)

    A group of orders inferior to a class; in scientific classification, a term occasionally used to express an assemblage of objects intermediate between an order and a class.

    Etymology: Attested (in , as legioun) around 1200, from legion, from legio, legionem, from legere; akin to legend, lecture.

  7. legion(Adjective)

    Numerous; vast; very great in number; multitudinous.

    Russia's labor and capital resources are woefully inadequate to overcome the state's needs and vulnerabilities, which are legion.

    Etymology: Attested (in , as legioun) around 1200, from legion, from legio, legionem, from legere; akin to legend, lecture.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Legion(noun)

    a body of foot soldiers and cavalry consisting of different numbers at different periods, -- from about four thousand to about six thousand men, -- the cavalry being about one tenth

    Etymology: [OE. legioun, OF. legion, F. lgion, fr. L. legio, fr. legere to gather, collect. See Legend.]

  2. Legion(noun)

    a military force; an army; military bands

    Etymology: [OE. legioun, OF. legion, F. lgion, fr. L. legio, fr. legere to gather, collect. See Legend.]

  3. Legion(noun)

    a great number; a multitude

    Etymology: [OE. legioun, OF. legion, F. lgion, fr. L. legio, fr. legere to gather, collect. See Legend.]

  4. Legion(noun)

    a group of orders inferior to a class

    Etymology: [OE. legioun, OF. legion, F. lgion, fr. L. legio, fr. legere to gather, collect. See Legend.]

Freebase

  1. Legion

    Legion are a group of demons referred to in the Christian Bible. The New Testament outlines an encounter where Jesus healed a man from Gadarenes possessed by demons while traveling, known as Exorcising the Gerasenes demonic.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Legion

    lē′jun, n. in ancient Rome, a body of soldiers of from three to six thousand: a military force: a great number: in French history, the name of several military bodies, more esp. one which distinguished itself in Algeria and in the Crimea.—v.t. to form into legions.—adj. Lē′gionary, relating to, or consisting of, a legion or legions: containing a great number.—n. a soldier of a legion.—Legion of Honour, an order of merit instituted in France in 1802 by Napoleon I.; Thundering Legion, the name in Christian tradition for a body of soldiers under Marcus Aurelius, whose prayers for rain once brought down a thunderstorm and destroyed the enemy. [Fr.,—L. legion-emlegĕre, to levy.]

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Legion

    among the ancient Romans a body of soldiers consisting of three lines, the hastati, the principes, and the triarii, ranged in order of battle one behind the other, each divided into ten maniples, and the whole numbering from 4000 to 6000 men; to each legion was attached six military tribunes, who commanded in rotation, each for two months; under Marius the three lines were amalgamated, and the whole divided into ten cohorts of three maniples each; under the original arrangement the hastati were young or untrained men, the principes men in their full manhood, and the triarii veterans.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. legion

    (Lat. legio). A corps of soldiers in the Roman armies, first formed by Romulus, about 750 B.C., when it consisted of 3000 foot and 300 horse. When Hannibal was in Italy, 216 B.C., the legion consisted of 5200 soldiers; and under Marius, in 88 B.C., it was 6200 foot besides 700 horse. There were 10, and sometimes as many as 18 legions kept at Rome. Augustus had a standing army of 45 legions, together with 25,000 horse and 37,000 light-armed troops, about 5 B.C.; and the peace establishment of Adrian was 30 of these formidable brigades. A legion was divided into 10 cohorts, and every cohort into 6 centuries, with a vexillum, or standard, guarded by 10 men. The peace of Britain was protected by 3 legions. The French army was divided into legions subsequent to the reign of Francis I. See Thundering Legions.

Suggested Resources

  1. legion

    Song lyrics by legion -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by legion on the Lyrics.com website.

How to pronounce Legion?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say Legion in sign language?

  1. legion

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Legion in Chaldean Numerology is: 6

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Legion in Pythagorean Numerology is: 8

Examples of Legion in a Sentence

  1. Henry Howard:

    The American Legion constitution includes 'to preserve the memories and incidents of our associations in the great wars,' if we don't share these stories, they'll be gone.

  2. Larry Wilmore:

    Stephen was so funny and so unique, he had such a legion of fans and he's a special performer. The way I look at it is I have to be myself and do my own thing and do something different. Stephen is going to be off doing something new himself (on CBS). I'll be more in competition with myself than with Stephen. I'll be more in competition with the new Stephen, to be honest.

  3. Kevin Brady:

    The super rich? They don't pay this tax. They have a legion of lawyers and tax planners. They have charitable trusts and foundations, these are family-owned, hard-working, risk-taking, determined Americans who are building their business, their farm, their ranch. These are not, as we will hear today, the Paris Hiltons and robber barons of the Teddy Roosevelt days.

  4. Richard Stuart:

    None of us figured that it would be as big as American Legion Post was, every veteran has the right to have a funeral like this. You're showing honor to a veteran who has passed away.

  5. French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve:

    It (France) will show again its respect for him (Hammouchi) by awarding him this time Les Insignes d'Officier de la Legion d'honneur.

Images & Illustrations of Legion

  1. LegionLegionLegionLegionLegion

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Legion#10000#14046#100000

Translations for Legion

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