What does LITTER mean?

Definitions for LITTER
ˈlɪt ərLITTER

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word LITTER.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. litternoun

    the offspring at one birth of a multiparous mammal

  2. litternoun

    rubbish carelessly dropped or left about (especially in public places)

  3. litternoun

    conveyance consisting of a chair or bed carried on two poles by bearers

  4. bedding material, bedding, litterverb

    material used to provide a bed for animals

  5. litterverb

    strew

    "Cigar butts littered the ground"

  6. litterverb

    make a place messy by strewing garbage around

  7. litterverb

    give birth to a litter of animals

Wiktionary

  1. litternoun

    A platform mounted on two shafts, or a more elaborate construction, designed to be carried by two (or more) people to transport one (in luxury models sometimes more) third person(s) or (occasionally in the elaborate version) a cargo, such as a religious idol.

    Etymology: From litière, from lit, ‘bed’, from lectus; confer Greek λέκτρον. Had the sense ‘bed’ in very early English, but then came to mean ‘portable couch’, ‘bedding’, ‘strewn rushes (for animals)’, ...

  2. litternoun

    The offspring of a mammal born in one birth.

    Etymology: From litière, from lit, ‘bed’, from lectus; confer Greek λέκτρον. Had the sense ‘bed’ in very early English, but then came to mean ‘portable couch’, ‘bedding’, ‘strewn rushes (for animals)’, ...

  3. litternoun

    Material used as bedding for animals.

    Etymology: From litière, from lit, ‘bed’, from lectus; confer Greek λέκτρον. Had the sense ‘bed’ in very early English, but then came to mean ‘portable couch’, ‘bedding’, ‘strewn rushes (for animals)’, ...

  4. litternoun

    Collectively, items discarded on the ground.

    Etymology: From litière, from lit, ‘bed’, from lectus; confer Greek λέκτρον. Had the sense ‘bed’ in very early English, but then came to mean ‘portable couch’, ‘bedding’, ‘strewn rushes (for animals)’, ...

  5. litternoun

    Absorbent material used in an animal's litter tray

    Etymology: From litière, from lit, ‘bed’, from lectus; confer Greek λέκτρον. Had the sense ‘bed’ in very early English, but then came to mean ‘portable couch’, ‘bedding’, ‘strewn rushes (for animals)’, ...

  6. litternoun

    Layer of fallen leaves and similar organic matter in a forest floor.

    Etymology: From litière, from lit, ‘bed’, from lectus; confer Greek λέκτρον. Had the sense ‘bed’ in very early English, but then came to mean ‘portable couch’, ‘bedding’, ‘strewn rushes (for animals)’, ...

  7. litterverb

    To drop or throw trash without properly disposing of it (as discarding in public areas rather than trash receptacles).

    Etymology: From litière, from lit, ‘bed’, from lectus; confer Greek λέκτρον. Had the sense ‘bed’ in very early English, but then came to mean ‘portable couch’, ‘bedding’, ‘strewn rushes (for animals)’, ...

  8. litterverb

    To give birth to, used of animals.

    Etymology: From litière, from lit, ‘bed’, from lectus; confer Greek λέκτρον. Had the sense ‘bed’ in very early English, but then came to mean ‘portable couch’, ‘bedding’, ‘strewn rushes (for animals)’, ...

  9. litterverb

    To be supplied with litter as bedding; to sleep or make one's bed in litter.

    Etymology: From litière, from lit, ‘bed’, from lectus; confer Greek λέκτρον. Had the sense ‘bed’ in very early English, but then came to mean ‘portable couch’, ‘bedding’, ‘strewn rushes (for animals)’, ...

  10. litterverb

    To produce a litter of young.

    Etymology: From litière, from lit, ‘bed’, from lectus; confer Greek λέκτρον. Had the sense ‘bed’ in very early English, but then came to mean ‘portable couch’, ‘bedding’, ‘strewn rushes (for animals)’, ...

Webster Dictionary

  1. Litternoun

    a bed or stretcher so arranged that a person, esp. a sick or wounded person, may be easily carried in or upon it

    Etymology: [F. litire, LL. lectaria, fr. L. lectus couch, bed. See Lie to be prostrated, and cf. Coverlet.]

  2. Litternoun

    straw, hay, etc., scattered on a floor, as bedding for animals to rest on; also, a covering of straw for plants

    Etymology: [F. litire, LL. lectaria, fr. L. lectus couch, bed. See Lie to be prostrated, and cf. Coverlet.]

  3. Litternoun

    things lying scattered about in a manner indicating slovenliness; scattered rubbish

    Etymology: [F. litire, LL. lectaria, fr. L. lectus couch, bed. See Lie to be prostrated, and cf. Coverlet.]

  4. Litternoun

    disorder or untidiness resulting from scattered rubbish, or from thongs lying about uncared for; as, a room in a state of litter

    Etymology: [F. litire, LL. lectaria, fr. L. lectus couch, bed. See Lie to be prostrated, and cf. Coverlet.]

  5. Litternoun

    the young brought forth at one time, by a sow or other multiparous animal, taken collectively. Also Fig

    Etymology: [F. litire, LL. lectaria, fr. L. lectus couch, bed. See Lie to be prostrated, and cf. Coverlet.]

  6. Litterverb

    to supply with litter, as cattle; to cover with litter, as the floor of a stall

    Etymology: [F. litire, LL. lectaria, fr. L. lectus couch, bed. See Lie to be prostrated, and cf. Coverlet.]

  7. Litterverb

    to put into a confused or disordered condition; to strew with scattered articles; as, to litter a room

    Etymology: [F. litire, LL. lectaria, fr. L. lectus couch, bed. See Lie to be prostrated, and cf. Coverlet.]

  8. Litterverb

    to give birth to; to bear; -- said of brutes, esp. those which produce more than one at a birth, and also of human beings, in abhorrence or contempt

    Etymology: [F. litire, LL. lectaria, fr. L. lectus couch, bed. See Lie to be prostrated, and cf. Coverlet.]

  9. Litterverb

    to be supplied with litter as bedding; to sleep or make one's bed in litter

    Etymology: [F. litire, LL. lectaria, fr. L. lectus couch, bed. See Lie to be prostrated, and cf. Coverlet.]

  10. Litterverb

    to produce a litter

    Etymology: [F. litire, LL. lectaria, fr. L. lectus couch, bed. See Lie to be prostrated, and cf. Coverlet.]

Freebase

  1. Litter

    Litter consists of waste products that have been disposed improperly, without consent, in an inappropriate location. Litter can also be used as a verb. To litter means to throw objects onto the ground and leave them as opposed to disposing of them properly. Larger hazardous items such as tires, appliances, electronics and large industrial containers are often dumped in isolated locations, such as National Forests and other public land. It is a human impact on the environment and is a serious environmental issue in many countries. Litter can exist in the environment for long periods of time before degrading and be transported large distances into the world's oceans. Litter can affect quality of life. Cigarette butts are the most littered item in the world, with 4.5 trillion discarded annually. Cigarette butts can take up to five years to completely break down. Statistics in 2003 showed metal/aluminum drink cans as the least littered item.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Litter

    lit′ėr, n. a heap of straw, &c., for animals to lie upon: materials for a bed: any scattered collection of objects, esp. of little value: a vehicle containing a bed for carrying about, a hospital stretcher: a brood of small quadrupeds.—v.t. to cover or supply with litter: to scatter carelessly about: to give birth to (said of small animals).—v.i. to produce a litter or brood.—p.adj. Litt′ered. [O. Fr. litiere—Low L. lectaria—L. lectus, a bed.]

Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

  1. litter

    A basket or frame utilized for the transport of injured persons.

Dictionary of Nautical Terms

  1. litter

    A sort of hurdle bed, on which to carry wounded men from the field to the boats.

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. litter

    (Lat. lectica, from lectus, “bed”). According to Rees’s Cyclopædia, a kind of vehicle borne upon shafts, anciently esteemed the most easy and genteel way of carriage. It was much in use among the Romans, among whom it was borne by slaves kept for that purpose, as it still continues to be in the East, where it is called a palanquin. The invention of litters, according to Cicero, was owing to the kings of Bithynia. In the time of Tiberius they had become very frequent at Rome, as appears from Seneca. Horse-litters were much used in Europe prior to the introduction of coaches. In the military service the litter is a species of hurdle bed, on which the wounded are sometimes carried from the field of battle. What is known as the hand-litter or stretcher is used to carry men from where they fall in battle to field hospitals. The hand-litter or stretcher is generally constructed with canvas about 61⁄2 feet long by 3 feet wide, the sides securely fastened to two hard-wood poles about 8 feet in length; the two cross-pieces should be constructed so that the litter can be rolled up. Small outlying bodies of troops, especially detachments of cavalry, are not always provided with them; for these the hand-litter, made with guns and blankets, has been extemporized; for this purpose the edges of the blanket are rolled over the guns, and tied firmly with twine, and two stout sticks are also tied across at the head and foot, serving as handles for the bearers. This being laid on the ground, the wounded man is placed upon it, with his knapsack under his head. The Indian litter is made by taking two stout saplings, and attaching to them three cross-pieces, about 21⁄2 or 3 feet apart, by cords and notches; the sick or wounded man being placed on his blanket, this frame-work is placed over him, and the blanket knotted to it. By three bent twigs and an additional blanket, a kind of top can be made to this in case of a storm. Several kinds of horse or mule litters for frontier service have been invented, but none seem so well adapted for all purposes as the one invented by Surgeon J. C. Baily, U.S.A. Ambulance litters are so constructed as to be drawn from the ambulance and taken to the wounded man, who is by it conveyed to the vehicle. It is then slid into place on rollers, and steadied by loops and guys.

How to pronounce LITTER?

How to say LITTER in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of LITTER in Chaldean Numerology is: 1

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of LITTER in Pythagorean Numerology is: 3

Examples of LITTER in a Sentence

  1. Swati Singh:

    Single use plastics are a major problem, as such items( cups, straws, plates) are disposed of. They either litter drains and roads, or wind up in dumpsites -- or worse, are put on fire, kerala is the first state in Katy WongDelhi , India that has banned one-time disposable products in the entire state. Maharashtra, too, recently banned multi-layered packaging, and disposable products. Katy WongDelhi , India still has a long way to curb the issue of single-use plastics.

  2. Musa Bukar:

    Dead bodies litter the bushes in the area and it is still no?t safe to go and pick them (up) for burial, some people who hid in their homes were burned alive.

  3. Chandra Kishore Mishra:

    There is no new ban order being issued, now, it's a question of telling people about the ill-effects of plastic, of collecting and sending for recycling so people don't litter.

  4. Adrienne Crosier:

    Seeing Rosalie successfully care for this litter -- her first -- with confidence is very rewarding.

  5. Brad Mays:

    One foot on Mount Olympus, the other in the kitty litter.

Images & Illustrations of LITTER

  1. LITTERLITTERLITTERLITTERLITTER

Popularity rank by frequency of use

LITTER#10000#12134#100000

Translations for LITTER

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

  • بعثر, نقالةArabic
  • toradBreton
  • mrť, nosítkaCzech
  • kuldDanish
  • Abfall wegwerfen, Streu, Sänfte, Abfall, Trage, Bahre, Wurf, ferkelnGerman
  • parir, cama, detritus, letiera, litera, colchón de hojas, camadaSpanish
  • varisEstonian
  • kantotuoli, karike, poikue, poikia, roskata, pesue, roska, kuivikeFinnish
  • portée, litière, détritusFrench
  • מטהHebrew
  • alom, kölykezikHungarian
  • samburi, got, rusl, drasl, ungiIcelandic
  • palanchino, lettiera, immondizia, portantina, spazzatura, rifiuti, lettigaItalian
  • ごみを すてる, [[一]][[腹]]の[[子]], ごみJapanese
  • lecticaLatin
  • vada, šiukšlės, pabirosLithuanian
  • vaislaLatvian
  • parahanga, kauamo, whataamoMāori
  • seperinduk, perindukMalay
  • kullNorwegian
  • strooisel, sluikstorten, draagbaar, vuil, worp, zwerfvuil, draagbed, afval, draagstoel, zwerfafval, werpen, vuilnisDutch
  • kullNorwegian Nynorsk
  • miot, ściółka, śmieci, lektyka, żwirekPolish
  • lixo, ninhada, macaPortuguese
  • lectică, făta, litieră, puiRomanian
  • паланкин, подстилка, насорить, сорить, помёт, выводок, носилки, сор, приплод, мусор, мусоритьRussian
  • nosiljka, legloSerbo-Croatian
  • nosilnica, legloSlovene
  • strö, skräp, bår, skräpa ner, avfall, bärstol, sopor, kullSwedish

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    prevent from being seen or discovered
    • A. emerge
    • B. restore
    • C. acclaim
    • D. conceal

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