What does Flanders mean?

Definitions for Flanders
ˈflæn dərzFlan·ders

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Flanders.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. Flandersnoun

    a medieval country in northern Europe that included regions now parts of northern France and Belgium and southwestern Netherlands

Wiktionary

  1. Flandersnoun

    The Countship of Flanders, of varying extent.

    Etymology: From Flandres, from Vlaanderen (pl.), from Vlander, from Old Frisian, from flaumdra ‘waterlogged land’, from ‘flowing, current (water)’ (compare Old High German weraltweraltfloum ‘transitoriness of life’, Old Norse flaumr ‘eddy’), from plow-m- ‘flow’ (compare Ancient Greek ‘dishwater, washing water’). More at flow. "Waterlogged" refers to the mudflats and salt marshes common to coastal Flanders.

  2. Flandersnoun

    A subnational state in the north of federal Belgium, the institutional merger of a territorial region and the Dutch language 'community' which also has/shares some authority in the capital region Brussels.

    Etymology: From Flandres, from Vlaanderen (pl.), from Vlander, from Old Frisian, from flaumdra ‘waterlogged land’, from ‘flowing, current (water)’ (compare Old High German weraltweraltfloum ‘transitoriness of life’, Old Norse flaumr ‘eddy’), from plow-m- ‘flow’ (compare Ancient Greek ‘dishwater, washing water’). More at flow. "Waterlogged" refers to the mudflats and salt marshes common to coastal Flanders.

  3. Flandersnoun

    Two provinces in Belgian Flanders: (West-Flanders and East-Flanders).

    Etymology: From Flandres, from Vlaanderen (pl.), from Vlander, from Old Frisian, from flaumdra ‘waterlogged land’, from ‘flowing, current (water)’ (compare Old High German weraltweraltfloum ‘transitoriness of life’, Old Norse flaumr ‘eddy’), from plow-m- ‘flow’ (compare Ancient Greek ‘dishwater, washing water’). More at flow. "Waterlogged" refers to the mudflats and salt marshes common to coastal Flanders.

  4. Flandersnoun

    Short for French Flanders, a former province of the French kingdom on territory taken from the above countship, now constituting the French department Nord.

    Etymology: From Flandres, from Vlaanderen (pl.), from Vlander, from Old Frisian, from flaumdra ‘waterlogged land’, from ‘flowing, current (water)’ (compare Old High German weraltweraltfloum ‘transitoriness of life’, Old Norse flaumr ‘eddy’), from plow-m- ‘flow’ (compare Ancient Greek ‘dishwater, washing water’). More at flow. "Waterlogged" refers to the mudflats and salt marshes common to coastal Flanders.

  5. Flandersnoun

    The principal railway station in Lille, capital of the above.

    Etymology: From Flandres, from Vlaanderen (pl.), from Vlander, from Old Frisian, from flaumdra ‘waterlogged land’, from ‘flowing, current (water)’ (compare Old High German weraltweraltfloum ‘transitoriness of life’, Old Norse flaumr ‘eddy’), from plow-m- ‘flow’ (compare Ancient Greek ‘dishwater, washing water’). More at flow. "Waterlogged" refers to the mudflats and salt marshes common to coastal Flanders.

Freebase

  1. Flanders

    Flanders today refers to the Dutch-speaking northern part of Belgium. It is one of the regions and communities of Belgium. Historically, the name referred to a region located in the north-western part of present-day Belgium and adjacent parts of France and the Netherlands. Both in the historical and the contemporary meaning, the demonym associated with Flanders is Fleming, while the corresponding adjective is Flemish. Brussels is the capital of Flanders, though not fully under its jurisdiction. Over the course of history, the geographical territory that was called "Flanders" has varied. From around 1000 AD, Flanders historically meant to English-speaking peoples the land situated along the North Sea from the Strait of Dover to the Scheldt estuary with ill-defined southern borders. It came to refer specifically to the County of Flanders, lasting from 862 to 1795, whose territory was situated in the northwestern part of what is now Belgium, with extensive portions in what is now northern France, and a small area that is now part of the Netherlands. Through marriage, the County of Flanders was joined with most of the rest of the Low Countries around 1400 AD, and it lost its independence. Most of the county's territory became part of an independent Belgium in 1830, and during the 19th and 20th centuries, it became increasingly commonplace to refer to the entire Dutch-speaking and northern part of Belgium as "Flanders", including the Belgian parts of the Duchy of Brabant and Limburg. In the late 20th century, Belgium became a federal state in which the Dutch-speaking part was given autonomy as the Flemish Community and the Flemish Region; these two entities were effectively merged, and Flanders now refers to the territory of the Flemish Community, which has partial jurisdiction over Brussels, its capital.

The Nuttall Encyclopedia

  1. Flanders

    the land of the Flemings, borders upon the North Sea, formerly extended from the Scheldt to the Somme, and included, besides the present Belgian provinces of East and West Flanders, part of Zealand, and also of Artois, in France; the ancient county dates from 862, in which year Charles the Bold of France, as suzerain, raised it to the status of a sovereign county, and bestowed it upon his son Baldwin I.; it has successively belonged to Spain and Austria, and in Louis XIV.'s reign a portion of it was ceded to France, now known as French Flanders, while Zealand passed into the hands of the Dutch; the remainder was in 1714 made the Austrian Netherlands, and in 1831 was incorporated with the new kingdom of Belgium (q. v.).

Military Dictionary and Gazetteer

  1. flanders

    The principal part of the ancient Belgium, which was conquered by Julius Cæsar, 51 B.C. It became part of the kingdom of France in 843, and was governed by counts subject to the king, from 862 till 1369. Flanders was subjected successively to Burgundy (1384), Austria (1477), and Spain (1555). In 1580 it declared its independence, but afterwards returned to its allegiance to the house of Austria. In 1792 the French invaded imperial Flanders, and occupied it till 1814. In 1814 a portion of Flanders was given to the king of the Netherlands. Since the revolution of 1831, it has belonged to Belgium.

Suggested Resources

  1. flanders

    Song lyrics by flanders -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by flanders on the Lyrics.com website.

Etymology and Origins

  1. Flanders

    From the native name Vländergau, the country of the Vländer, who from the earliest period of their history were ruled by counts.

Matched Categories

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Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Flanders in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Flanders in Pythagorean Numerology is: 7

Examples of Flanders in a Sentence

  1. John McCrae:

    If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow In Flanders fields.

  2. Jill Biden:

    War and conflict, death and loss are not relics of our American history; they're a part of Americans' story. Here in Arlington lie heroes who gave what President Lincoln called ‘the last full measure of devotion,’ they did not only die at Gettysburg or in Flanders Field or on the beaches of Normandy, but in the mountains of Afghanistan, the deserts of Iraq in the last 20 years.

  3. John McCrae, "In Flanders Fields":

    If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow In Flanders fields.

Images & Illustrations of Flanders

  1. FlandersFlandersFlandersFlandersFlanders

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Translations for Flanders

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    To cause to become
    • A. elate
    • B. abase
    • C. render
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