What does Credit mean?

Definitions for Credit
ˈkrɛd ɪtCred·it

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Credit.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. recognition, creditnoun

    approval

    "give her recognition for trying"; "he was given credit for his work"; "give her credit for trying"

  2. creditnoun

    money available for a client to borrow

  3. credit, credit entrynoun

    an accounting entry acknowledging income or capital items

  4. creditnoun

    used in the phrase `to your credit' in order to indicate an achievement deserving praise

    "she already had several performances to her credit";

  5. credit, deferred paymentnoun

    arrangement for deferred payment for goods and services

  6. credit, course creditnoun

    recognition by a college or university that a course of studies has been successfully completed; typically measured in semester hours

  7. citation, cite, acknowledgment, credit, reference, mention, quotationnoun

    a short note recognizing a source of information or of a quoted passage

    "the student's essay failed to list several important citations"; "the acknowledgments are usually printed at the front of a book"; "the article includes mention of similar clinical cases"

  8. creditnoun

    an entry on a list of persons who contributed to a film or written work

    "the credits were given at the end of the film"

  9. credit rating, creditverb

    an estimate, based on previous dealings, of a person's or an organization's ability to fulfill their financial commitments

  10. creditverb

    give someone credit for something

    "We credited her for saving our jobs"

  11. accredit, creditverb

    ascribe an achievement to

    "She was not properly credited in the program"

  12. creditverb

    accounting: enter as credit

    "We credit your account with $100"

  13. creditverb

    have trust in; trust in the truth or veracity of

Wiktionary

  1. creditnoun

    Recognition and respect.

    Etymology: For verb: from creditus, past participle of credere

  2. creditnoun

    Acknowledgement of a contribution, especially in the performing arts.

    She received a singing credit in last year's operetta.

    Etymology: For verb: from creditus, past participle of credere

  3. creditnoun

    A written title shown with a film or video.

    They kissed, and then the credits rolled.

    Etymology: For verb: from creditus, past participle of credere

  4. creditnoun

    A privilege of delayed payment extended to a buyer or borrower on the seller's or lender's belief that what is given will be repaid.

    In view of your payment record, we are happy to extend further credit to you.

    Etymology: For verb: from creditus, past participle of credere

  5. creditnoun

    A person's credit rating or creditworthiness, as represented by their history of borrowing and repayment (or non payment).

    What do you mean my credit is no good?

    Etymology: For verb: from creditus, past participle of credere

  6. creditnoun

    An addition to certain accounts.

    Etymology: For verb: from creditus, past participle of credere

  7. creditnoun

    A reduction in taxes owed, or a refund for excess taxes paid.

    Didn't you know that the IRS will refund any excess payroll taxes that you paid if you use the 45(B) general business credit?

    Etymology: For verb: from creditus, past participle of credere

  8. creditnoun

    A source of value, distinction or honour.

    That engineer is a credit to the team.

    Etymology: For verb: from creditus, past participle of credere

  9. creditnoun

    An arbitrary unit of value, used in many token economies.

    Etymology: For verb: from creditus, past participle of credere

  10. creditverb

    To believe.

    Someone said there had been over 100,000 people there, but I can't credit that.

    Etymology: For verb: from creditus, past participle of credere

  11. creditverb

    To add to an account (confer debit.)

    Etymology: For verb: from creditus, past participle of credere

  12. creditverb

    To acknowledge a contribution.

    Etymology: For verb: from creditus, past participle of credere

  13. creditnoun

    Recognition for having taken a course (class).

    If you do not come to class, you will not get credit for the class, regardless of how well you do on the final.

    Etymology: For verb: from creditus, past participle of credere

  14. creditnoun

    A , a credit hour – used as measure if enough courses have been taken for graduation.

    Dude, I just need 3 more credits to graduate u2013 I can take socio-linguistics of Swahili if I want.

    Etymology: For verb: from creditus, past participle of credere

Wikipedia

  1. Credit

    Credit (from Latin credit, "(he/she/it) believes") is the trust which allows one party to provide money or resources to another party wherein the second party does not reimburse the first party immediately (thereby generating a debt), but promises either to repay or return those resources (or other materials of equal value) at a later date. In other words, credit is a method of making reciprocity formal, legally enforceable, and extensible to a large group of unrelated people. The resources provided may be financial (e.g. granting a loan), or they may consist of goods or services (e.g. consumer credit). Credit encompasses any form of deferred payment. Credit is extended by a creditor, also known as a lender, to a debtor, also known as a borrower.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Creditnoun

    reliance on the truth of something said or done; belief; faith; trust; confidence

    Etymology: [F. crdit (cf. It. credito), L. creditum loan, prop. neut. of creditus, p. p. of credere to trust, loan, believe. See Creed.]

  2. Creditnoun

    reputation derived from the confidence of others; esteem; honor; good name; estimation

    Etymology: [F. crdit (cf. It. credito), L. creditum loan, prop. neut. of creditus, p. p. of credere to trust, loan, believe. See Creed.]

  3. Creditnoun

    a ground of, or title to, belief or confidence; authority derived from character or reputation

    Etymology: [F. crdit (cf. It. credito), L. creditum loan, prop. neut. of creditus, p. p. of credere to trust, loan, believe. See Creed.]

  4. Creditnoun

    that which tends to procure, or add to, reputation or esteem; an honor

    Etymology: [F. crdit (cf. It. credito), L. creditum loan, prop. neut. of creditus, p. p. of credere to trust, loan, believe. See Creed.]

  5. Creditnoun

    influence derived from the good opinion, confidence, or favor of others; interest

    Etymology: [F. crdit (cf. It. credito), L. creditum loan, prop. neut. of creditus, p. p. of credere to trust, loan, believe. See Creed.]

  6. Creditnoun

    trust given or received; expectation of future playment for property transferred, or of fulfillment or promises given; mercantile reputation entitling one to be trusted; -- applied to individuals, corporations, communities, or nations; as, to buy goods on credit

    Etymology: [F. crdit (cf. It. credito), L. creditum loan, prop. neut. of creditus, p. p. of credere to trust, loan, believe. See Creed.]

  7. Creditnoun

    the time given for payment for lands or goods sold on trust; as, a long credit or a short credit

    Etymology: [F. crdit (cf. It. credito), L. creditum loan, prop. neut. of creditus, p. p. of credere to trust, loan, believe. See Creed.]

  8. Creditnoun

    the side of an account on which are entered all items reckoned as values received from the party or the category named at the head of the account; also, any one, or the sum, of these items; -- the opposite of debit; as, this sum is carried to one's credit, and that to his debit; A has several credits on the books of B

    Etymology: [F. crdit (cf. It. credito), L. creditum loan, prop. neut. of creditus, p. p. of credere to trust, loan, believe. See Creed.]

  9. Creditverb

    to confide in the truth of; to give credence to; to put trust in; to believe

    Etymology: [F. crdit (cf. It. credito), L. creditum loan, prop. neut. of creditus, p. p. of credere to trust, loan, believe. See Creed.]

  10. Creditverb

    to bring honor or repute upon; to do credit to; to raise the estimation of

    Etymology: [F. crdit (cf. It. credito), L. creditum loan, prop. neut. of creditus, p. p. of credere to trust, loan, believe. See Creed.]

  11. Creditverb

    to enter upon the credit side of an account; to give credit for; as, to credit the amount paid; to set to the credit of; as, to credit a man with the interest paid on a bond

    Etymology: [F. crdit (cf. It. credito), L. creditum loan, prop. neut. of creditus, p. p. of credere to trust, loan, believe. See Creed.]

Freebase

  1. Credit

    Credit is the trust which allows one party to provide resources to another party where that second party does not reimburse the first party immediately, but instead arranges either to repay or return those resources at a later date. The resources provided may be financial, or they may consist of goods or services. Credit encompasses any form of deferred payment. Credit is extended by a creditor, also known as a lender, to a debtor, also known as a borrower. Credit does not necessarily require money. The credit concept can be applied in barter economies as well, based on the direct exchange of goods and services. However, in modern societies credit is usually denominated by a unit of account. Unlike money, credit itself cannot act as a unit of account. Movements of financial capital are normally dependent on either credit or equity transfers. Credit is in turn dependent on the reputation or creditworthiness of the entity which takes responsibility for the funds. Credit is also traded in financial markets. The purest form is the credit default swap market, which is essentially a traded market in credit insurance. A credit default swap represents the price at which two parties exchange this risk – the protection "seller" takes the risk of default of the credit in return for a payment, commonly denoted in basis points of the notional amount to be referenced, while the protection "buyer" pays this premium and in the case of default of the underlying, delivers this receivable to the protection seller and receives from the seller the par amount.

The Roycroft Dictionary

  1. credit

    The lifeblood of commerce.

The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

  1. CREDIT

    Something for nothing. CREDITOR Something with nothing.

British National Corpus

  1. Spoken Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Credit' in Spoken Corpus Frequency: #1460

  2. Written Corpus Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Credit' in Written Corpus Frequency: #2165

  3. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Credit' in Nouns Frequency: #612

  4. Verbs Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Credit' in Verbs Frequency: #1103

Anagrams for Credit »

  1. triced

  2. direct

How to pronounce Credit?

How to say Credit in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Credit in Chaldean Numerology is: 1

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Credit in Pythagorean Numerology is: 5

Examples of Credit in a Sentence

  1. President Barack Obama:

    I continue to hold out the prospect of Russia taking a diplomatic offering from what they've done in Ukraine. I think, to their credit, they've been able to compartmentalize and continue to work with us on issues like Iran's nuclear program.

  2. Kamala Harris:

    And in the coming weeks I'll announce new investments to support black entrepreneurs and business owners by increasing access to credit and capital.

  3. The Minister:

    I think there is a widespread sense across the House and beyond that yesterday, the House did itself no credit, there was an atmosphere in the chamber worse than any I've known in my 22 years in the House. On both sides, passions were inflamed, angry words were uttered. The culture was toxic.

  4. William Dudley:

    Let me be clear, there is no Fed equity market put. To put it another way, we do not care about the level of equity prices, or bond yields or credit spreads per se, instead, we focus on how financial market conditions influence the transmission of monetary policy to the real economy.

  5. Brian Reynolds:

    We are in a massive bull market that is being generated by credit-led financial engineering.

Images & Illustrations of Credit

  1. CreditCreditCreditCreditCredit

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Credit#1#437#10000

Translations for Credit

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

  • ائتمانArabic
  • кредит, вяра, доверие, вярвамBulgarian
  • připsatCzech
  • Kredit, KreditwürdigkeitGerman
  • créditoSpanish
  • کردیتPersian
  • opintopiste, piste, luottotiedot, tunnustuspalkinto, suorituspiste, hyvitys, tunnustus, luottokelpoisuus, kunniamaininta, vahvuus, kunnia, lopputekstit, palautus, luottamus, krediitti, suoritus, voimavara, luotto, pisteet, vähennys, usko, maksuaika, uskoa, hyvittää, antaa tunnustusFinnish
  • crédit, mérite, reconnaissanceFrench
  • creideasScottish Gaelic
  • אשראיHebrew
  • hitelHungarian
  • credito, riconoscimentoItalian
  • 信用, 単位, クレジット, クレジットタイトル, 奥付Japanese
  • lof, saldo, lofbetuiging, kredietwaardigheid, krediet, betalingsuitstel, geloven, crediteren, toedenken, geloof hechten aan, toeschrijvenDutch
  • kreditereNorwegian
  • acreditar, créditoPortuguese
  • creditRomanian
  • дове́рие, заслу́га, ве́ра, креди́т, зачёт, очко́, приписа́ть, доверя́ть, дове́рить, кредитова́ть, ве́рить, припи́сывать, пове́ритьRussian
  • vjerovatiSerbo-Croatian
  • erkännande, kredit, krediteraSwedish
  • పరపతిTelugu
  • tín dụngVietnamese
  • 信用Chinese

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    • A. transpire
    • B. abduct
    • C. abase
    • D. efface

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