What does Conscience mean?

Definitions for Conscience
ˈkɒn ʃənsCon·science

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word Conscience.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. conscience, scruples, moral sense, sense of right and wrongnoun

    motivation deriving logically from ethical or moral principles that govern a person's thoughts and actions

  2. consciencenoun

    conformity to one's own sense of right conduct

    "a person of unflagging conscience"

  3. consciencenoun

    a feeling of shame when you do something immoral

    "he has no conscience about his cruelty"

Wiktionary

  1. consciencenoun

    The moral sense of right and wrong, chiefly as it affects one's own behaviour; inwit.

    Etymology: From conscience, from conscientia, from consciens, present participle of conscire, from com- + scire.

  2. consciencenoun

    A personification of the moral sense of right and wrong, usually in the form of a person, a being or merely a voice that gives moral lessons and advices.

    Etymology: From conscience, from conscientia, from consciens, present participle of conscire, from com- + scire.

  3. consciencenoun

    Consciousness; thinking; awareness, especially self-awareness.

    Etymology: From conscience, from conscientia, from consciens, present participle of conscire, from com- + scire.

Webster Dictionary

  1. Consciencenoun

    knowledge of one's own thoughts or actions; consciousness

    Etymology: [F. conscience, fr. L. conscientia, fr. consciens, p. pr. of conscire to know, to be conscious; con- + scire to know. See Science.]

  2. Consciencenoun

    the faculty, power, or inward principle which decides as to the character of one's own actions, purposes, and affections, warning against and condemning that which is wrong, and approving and prompting to that which is right; the moral faculty passing judgment on one's self; the moral sense

    Etymology: [F. conscience, fr. L. conscientia, fr. consciens, p. pr. of conscire to know, to be conscious; con- + scire to know. See Science.]

  3. Consciencenoun

    the estimate or determination of conscience; conviction or right or duty

    Etymology: [F. conscience, fr. L. conscientia, fr. consciens, p. pr. of conscire to know, to be conscious; con- + scire to know. See Science.]

  4. Consciencenoun

    tenderness of feeling; pity

    Etymology: [F. conscience, fr. L. conscientia, fr. consciens, p. pr. of conscire to know, to be conscious; con- + scire to know. See Science.]

Freebase

  1. Conscience

    Conscience is an aptitude, faculty, intuition or judgment of the intellect that distinguishes right from wrong. Moral judgment may derive from values or norms. In psychological terms conscience is often described as leading to feelings of remorse when a human commits actions that go against his/her moral values and to feelings of rectitude or integrity when actions conform to such norms. The extent to which conscience informs moral judgment before an action and whether such moral judgments are or should be based in reason has occasioned debate through much of the history of Western philosophy. Religious views of conscience usually see it as linked to a morality inherent in all humans, to a beneficent universe and/or to divinity. The diverse ritualistic, mythical, doctrinal, legal, institutional and material features of religion may not necessarily cohere with experiential, emotive, spiritual or contemplative considerations about the origin and operation of conscience. Common secular or scientific views regard the capacity for conscience as probably genetically determined, with its subject probably learned or imprinted as part of a culture.

Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

  1. Conscience

    kon′shens, n. the knowledge of our own acts and feelings as right or wrong: sense of duty: scrupulousness: (Shak.) understanding: the faculty or principle by which we distinguish right from wrong.—adjs. Con′science-proof, unvisited by any compunctions of conscience; Con′science-smit′ten, stung by conscience; Conscien′tious, regulated by a regard to conscience: scrupulous.—adv. Conscien′tiously.—n. Conscien′tiousness.—adj. Con′scionable, governed or regulated by conscience.—n. Con′scionableness.—adv. Con′scionably.—Conscience clause, a clause in a law, affecting religious matters, to relieve persons of conscientious scruples, esp. one to prevent their children being compelled to undergo particular religious instruction; Conscience money, money given to relieve the conscience, by discharging a claim previously evaded; Case of conscience, a question in casuistry.—Good, or Bad, conscience, an approving or reproving conscience.—In all conscience, certainly: (coll.) by all that is right and fair.—Make a matter of conscience, to act according to conscience: to have scruples about.—My conscience! a vulgar exclamation of astonishment, or an asseveration.—Speak one's conscience (Shak.), to speak frankly: to give one's opinion. [Fr.,—L. conscientia, knowledge—conscīre, to know well—con, and scīre, to know.]

The Roycroft Dictionary

  1. conscience

    1. The muzzle of the will. 2. The Pecksniffian mask of the fundamental Bill Sykes. 3. The aspiration of Rosinante to be Pegasus.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Conscience

    The cognitive and affective processes which constitute an internalized moral governor over an individual's moral conduct.

The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

  1. CONSCIENCE

    The fear of being found out.

Editors Contribution

  1. conscience

    The act, fact, quality, and ability to use our mind, soul, spirit, passion and consciousness as a form of sane, logical and rational power and motivation and a form of ethical and moral principles that govern our thoughts and actions.

    Our conscience is an important element of our mind and soul and contributes to our sense of justness, fairness, actions, motivation and authority.

    Submitted by MaryC on April 3, 2020  

Matched Categories

British National Corpus

  1. Nouns Frequency

    Rank popularity for the word 'Conscience' in Nouns Frequency: #2352

How to pronounce Conscience?

  1. Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Indian

How to say Conscience in sign language?

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of Conscience in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of Conscience in Pythagorean Numerology is: 9

Examples of Conscience in a Sentence

  1. Roseanne Barr:

    I mean, everybody had to choose for themselves, according to their own conscience, who they felt was the lesser of two evils.

  2. Marzieh Amiri:

    He asked me to tell everyone that he was innocent. He was saying his conscience was clear.

  3. Philip Luther:

    This is a farcical verdict which strikes at the heart of freedom of expression in Egypt, today's verdict must be overturned immediately -- Mohamed Fahmy and Baher Mohamed should be allowed to walk free without conditions. We consider them to be prisoners of conscience, jailed solely for exercising their right to freedom of expression.

  4. Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal:

    I don't think anyone should have to choose between following their conscience and religious beliefs and giving up their job and facing financial sanctions. I think it's wrong to force Christian individuals or business owners, we are seeing government today discriminate against whether it's clerks, florists, musicians or others. I think that's wrong. I think you should be able to keep your job and follow your conscience.

  5. Riccardo Molinari:

    The longer we govern with 5-Star, the more it enters the public conscience and it would be hard to understand why the League would run with the center-right.

Images & Illustrations of Conscience

  1. ConscienceConscienceConscienceConscienceConscience

Popularity rank by frequency of use

Conscience#10000#12397#100000

Translations for Conscience

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