What does COLOR mean?

Definitions for COLOR
ˈkʌl ərCOLOR

Here are all the possible meanings and translations of the word COLOR.

Princeton's WordNet

  1. color, colour, coloring, colouring(noun)

    a visual attribute of things that results from the light they emit or transmit or reflect

    "a white color is made up of many different wavelengths of light"

  2. color, colour, vividness(noun)

    interest and variety and intensity

    "the Puritan Period was lacking in color"; "the characters were delineated with exceptional vividness"

  3. color, colour, coloration, colouration(noun)

    the timbre of a musical sound

    "the recording fails to capture the true color of the original music"

  4. color, colour, people of color, people of colour(noun)

    a race with skin pigmentation different from the white race (especially Blacks)

  5. semblance, gloss, color, colour(noun)

    an outward or token appearance or form that is deliberately misleading

    "he hoped his claims would have a semblance of authenticity"; "he tried to give his falsehood the gloss of moral sanction"; "the situation soon took on a different color"

  6. coloring material, colouring material, color, colour(noun)

    any material used for its color

    "she used a different color for the trim"

  7. color, colour(noun)

    (physics) the characteristic of quarks that determines their role in the strong interaction

    "each flavor of quarks comes in three colors"

  8. color, colour(adj)

    the appearance of objects (or light sources) described in terms of a person's perception of their hue and lightness (or brightness) and saturation

  9. color, colour(verb)

    having or capable of producing colors

    "color film"; "he rented a color television"; "marvelous color illustrations"

  10. color, colorize, colorise, colourise, colourize, colour, color in, colour in(verb)

    add color to

    "The child colored the drawings"; "Fall colored the trees"; "colorize black and white film"

  11. tinge, color, colour, distort(verb)

    affect as in thought or feeling

    "My personal feelings color my judgment in this case"; "The sadness tinged his life"

  12. color, colour(verb)

    modify or bias

    "His political ideas color his lectures"

  13. color, colour, emblazon(verb)

    decorate with colors

    "color the walls with paint in warm tones"

  14. color, colour, gloss(verb)

    give a deceptive explanation or excuse for

    "color a lie"

  15. discolor, discolour, colour, color(verb)

    change color, often in an undesired manner

    "The shirts discolored"

Wiktionary

  1. color(Noun)

    The spectral composition of visible light.

    Humans and birds can perceive color.

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

  2. color(Noun)

    A particular set of visible spectral compositions, perceived or named as a class; blee.

    Most languages have names for the colors black, white, red, and green.

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

  3. color(Noun)

    Hue as opposed to achromatic colors (black, white and greys).

    He referred to the white flag as one "drained of all color".

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

  4. color(Noun)

    Human skin tone, especially as an indicator of race or ethnicity.

    Color has been a sensitive issue in many societies.

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

  5. color(Noun)

    interest, especially in a selective area.

    a bit of local color.

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

  6. color(Noun)

    In corporate finance, details on sales, profit margins, or other financial figures, especially while reviewing quarterly results when an officer of a company is speaking to investment analysts.

    Could you give me some color with regards to which products made up the mix of revenue for this quarter?

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

  7. color(Noun)

    A property of quarks, with three values called red, green, and blue, which they can exchange by passing gluons.

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

  8. color(Noun)

    Any of the colored balls excluding the reds.

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

  9. color(Noun)

    A front or facade: an ostensible truth actually false.

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

  10. color(Verb)

    To give something color.

    We could color the walls red.

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

  11. color(Verb)

    To draw within the boundaries of a line drawing using colored markers or crayons.

    My kindergartener loves to color.

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

  12. color(Verb)

    To become red through increased blood flow.

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

  13. color(Verb)

    To affect without completely changing.

    That interpretation certainly colors my perception of the book.

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

  14. color(Verb)

    To attribute a quality to.

    Color me confused.

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

  15. color(Verb)

    To assign colors to the vertices of (a graph) or the regions of (a map) so that no two adjacent ones have the same color.

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

  16. color(Noun)

    An appearance of right or authority.

    Under color of law, he managed to bilk taxpayers of millions of dollars.

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

  17. color(Noun)

    Skin color noted as: normal, jaundice, cyanotic, flush, mottled, pale, or ashen as part of the skin signs assessment

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

  18. color(Adjective)

    Conveying color, as opposed to shades of gray.

    Color television and movies were considered a great improvement over black and white.

    Etymology: color, from colur, from colour, color, from color, from colos "covering", from kel-. Akin to Latin celo. See usage note below. Displaced Middle English blee, from Old English bleo. More at blee.

Wikipedia

  1. Color

    Color (American English), or colour (Commonwealth English), is the characteristic of visual perception described through color categories, with names such as red, orange, yellow, green, blue, or purple. This perception of color derives from the stimulation of photoreceptor cells (in particular cone cells in the human eye and other vertebrate eyes) by electromagnetic radiation (in the visible spectrum in the case of humans). Color categories and physical specifications of color are associated with objects through the wavelength of the light that is reflected from them. This reflection is governed by the object's physical properties such as light absorption, emission spectra, etc. By defining a color space, colors can be identified numerically by coordinates, which in 1931 were also named in global agreement with internationally agreed color names like mentioned above (red, orange, etc.) by the International Commission on Illumination. The RGB color space for instance is a color space corresponding to human trichromacy and to the three cone cell types that respond to three bands of light: long wavelengths, peaking near 564–580 nm (red); medium-wavelength, peaking near 534–545 nm (green); and short-wavelength light, near 420–440 nm (blue). There may also be more than three color dimensions in other color spaces, such as in the CMYK color model, wherein one of the dimensions relates to a color's colorfulness). The photo-receptivity of the "eyes" of other species also varies considerably from that of humans and so results in correspondingly different color perceptions that cannot readily be compared to one another. Honeybees and bumblebees for instance have trichromatic color vision sensitive to ultraviolet but is insensitive to red. Papilio butterflies possess six types of photoreceptors and may have pentachromatic vision. The most complex color vision system in the animal kingdom has been found in stomatopods (such as the mantis shrimp) with up to 12 spectral receptor types thought to work as multiple dichromatic units.The science of color is sometimes called chromatics, colorimetry, or simply color science. It includes the study of the perception of color by the human eye and brain, the origin of color in materials, color theory in art, and the physics of electromagnetic radiation in the visible range (that is, what is commonly referred to simply as light).

Webster Dictionary

  1. Color(noun)

    a property depending on the relations of light to the eye, by which individual and specific differences in the hues and tints of objects are apprehended in vision; as, gay colors; sad colors, etc

    Etymology: [OF. color, colur, colour, F. couleur, L. color; prob. akin to celare to conceal (the color taken as that which covers). See Helmet.]

  2. Color(noun)

    any hue distinguished from white or black

    Etymology: [OF. color, colur, colour, F. couleur, L. color; prob. akin to celare to conceal (the color taken as that which covers). See Helmet.]

  3. Color(noun)

    the hue or color characteristic of good health and spirits; ruddy complexion

    Etymology: [OF. color, colur, colour, F. couleur, L. color; prob. akin to celare to conceal (the color taken as that which covers). See Helmet.]

  4. Color(noun)

    that which is used to give color; a paint; a pigment; as, oil colors or water colors

    Etymology: [OF. color, colur, colour, F. couleur, L. color; prob. akin to celare to conceal (the color taken as that which covers). See Helmet.]

  5. Color(noun)

    that which covers or hides the real character of anything; semblance; excuse; disguise; appearance

    Etymology: [OF. color, colur, colour, F. couleur, L. color; prob. akin to celare to conceal (the color taken as that which covers). See Helmet.]

  6. Color(noun)

    shade or variety of character; kind; species

    Etymology: [OF. color, colur, colour, F. couleur, L. color; prob. akin to celare to conceal (the color taken as that which covers). See Helmet.]

  7. Color(noun)

    a distinguishing badge, as a flag or similar symbol (usually in the plural); as, the colors or color of a ship or regiment; the colors of a race horse (that is, of the cap and jacket worn by the jockey)

    Etymology: [OF. color, colur, colour, F. couleur, L. color; prob. akin to celare to conceal (the color taken as that which covers). See Helmet.]

  8. Color(noun)

    an apparent right; as where the defendant in trespass gave to the plaintiff an appearance of title, by stating his title specially, thus removing the cause from the jury to the court

    Etymology: [OF. color, colur, colour, F. couleur, L. color; prob. akin to celare to conceal (the color taken as that which covers). See Helmet.]

  9. Color(verb)

    to change or alter the hue or tint of, by dyeing, staining, painting, etc.; to dye; to tinge; to paint; to stain

    Etymology: [OF. color, colur, colour, F. couleur, L. color; prob. akin to celare to conceal (the color taken as that which covers). See Helmet.]

  10. Color(verb)

    to change or alter, as if by dyeing or painting; to give a false appearance to; usually, to give a specious appearance to; to cause to appear attractive; to make plausible; to palliate or excuse; as, the facts were colored by his prejudices

    Etymology: [OF. color, colur, colour, F. couleur, L. color; prob. akin to celare to conceal (the color taken as that which covers). See Helmet.]

  11. Color(verb)

    to hide

    Etymology: [OF. color, colur, colour, F. couleur, L. color; prob. akin to celare to conceal (the color taken as that which covers). See Helmet.]

  12. Color(verb)

    to acquire color; to turn red, especially in the face; to blush

    Etymology: [OF. color, colur, colour, F. couleur, L. color; prob. akin to celare to conceal (the color taken as that which covers). See Helmet.]

Freebase

  1. Color

    Color or colour is the visual perceptual property corresponding in humans to the categories called red, blue, yellow, green and others. Color derives from the spectrum of light interacting in the eye with the spectral sensitivities of the light receptors. Color categories and physical specifications of color are also associated with objects, materials, light sources, etc., based on their physical properties such as light absorption, reflection, or emission spectra. By defining a color space, colors can be identified numerically by their coordinates. Because perception of color stems from the varying spectral sensitivity of different types of cone cells in the retina to different parts of the spectrum, colors may be defined and quantified by the degree to which they stimulate these cells. These physical or physiological quantifications of color, however, do not fully explain the psychophysical perception of color appearance. The science of color is sometimes called chromatics, chromatography, colorimetry, or simply color science. It includes the perception of color by the human eye and brain, the origin of color in materials, color theory in art, and the physics of electromagnetic radiation in the visible range.

U.S. National Library of Medicine

  1. Color

    The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.

Editors Contribution

  1. color

    A visual attribute of a person, people, plant, nature, or thing that results from the light emitted, transmitted or reflected.

    Color is beautiful and looks amazing when we see various colors painted with each other.

    Submitted by MaryC on December 21, 2019  
  2. color

    Is the visual perceptual quality seen through the eyes of a human or animal derived from the spectrum of light visible in and through the eyes.

    Colors are vital for our perception of life, they bring so much joy.

    Submitted by MaryC on December 21, 2019  

Suggested Resources

  1. color

    Song lyrics by color -- Explore a large variety of song lyrics performed by color on the Lyrics.com website.

How to pronounce COLOR?

  1. Alex
    Alex
    US English
    Daniel
    Daniel
    British
    Karen
    Karen
    Australian
    Veena
    Veena
    Indian

How to say COLOR in sign language?

  1. color

Numerology

  1. Chaldean Numerology

    The numerical value of COLOR in Chaldean Numerology is: 4

  2. Pythagorean Numerology

    The numerical value of COLOR in Pythagorean Numerology is: 9

Examples of COLOR in a Sentence

  1. Michelle Tremillo:

    We want to be clear on a key point about the Harvey Community Relief Fund, which is being housed within the Texas Organizing Project Education Fund: We have an ironclad commitment that 100 percent of the money raised into this fund will be spent directly on ensuring low income and people of color are not forgotten in the relief, recovery and reconstruction efforts. Not a dime will be spent on any other purpose, we and our allies intend to make sure that our communities are at the forefront of the recovery process, and that they get the resources they need to rebuild their lives. We will make a determination about which relief efforts in particular to dedicate this funding after the floods recede. Our expenditures will be dictated by the needs of our communities, and we anticipate those needs will range from personal hygiene items to legal aid and advocacy.

  2. San Francisco:

    In the past few weeks, our city has grappled with a crisis all too common in so many other American cities -- the dissolution of trust between communities of color and law enforcement -- following the death of a young black man shot and killed by police officers.

  3. Musin Almat Zhumabekovich:

    Love piercing eternity My true love for you pierces the universe and eternity. In all the great darkness of solitude, all of it is from the shadows of people, past, present and future, all of them are just shadows compared to you, you sanctify yourself of darkness, you are the flame of my sincere love and passion, and in all this darkness of egoism I see only you - it is infinitely beautiful, sensual and erotic magic of temptation. Too much juicy, too much sweet, sweeter than ever, too, unbearably beautiful and lovely as wondrous relaxing tantric sex music of temptation, dance of lust. Beauty is so picturesquely painted in the sultry hue of hot sexuality, it raises the temperature of my body, soul, consciousness and incredibly high limit, which creates a burn in my soul and heart, like sensual sex in a sauna. The goddess, who collected all horny and love likes of my heart, in the head only one emotion of admiration, delight. Your beauty is of the highest quality, the poetic aesthetics of erotic romance, highly detailed in small details, the delicate ideal divine appearance is the highest art. You are supernatural sexy, beyond beautiful. Your sexy dark skin has conquered my heart. Leather is like a black gem. You are great and beautiful. Juicy, black skin, you are so beautiful that you want to bow down. Your beautiful juicy dark skin, burning predator's passion that stole my heart, in me is the cult of your beauty and personality in general, I worship your beauty, I am the best a fan of your appearance and soul. Your ideally black skin is truly, luxury, royal skin color, too much sweet sugar, when I caress your body, I have a huge amount of endorphins in my soul, you like strong stimulating coffee on a sleepy morning. Your skin is the color of sweet sex from which you can hear the groans of pleasure and orgasm, the sweetest music in the world, the colors of a very hot night of passion and lust. Thoughts about you are my only porn erotic fetish of romance in my mind, since I am obsessed with you. None of your vile deeds can break my heart, my love for you is stronger than hurt, guilt, treason, I love you even if you do not love me and despise you, you feel disgust for me, because my love is stronger for you than your hatred and disgust is stronger than any dependence and obsession you are the one about which I will dream and wait forever. In your arms, I’m supposedly in the arms of a fulfilled dream of my life, happiness itself kisses and kisses me — it’s so cool and cool — it’s just the highest fly of joy, I have so much sincere happiness that it’s hard for me to breathe, talk, think. Having sex with you is immersion in the infinite beauty of your soul and body. Your body is a powerful exciter, all my memory is filled with you, you fill me with your image. You are so much too much Shocking sexy, my every word is a tender kiss of love, I kiss and caress your soul, mind, heart, your hot, ardent, sultry skin color just breathtaking. I fanatically adore your beauty, every second is filled with the powerful force of love and this only increases with time. Author: Musin Almat Zhumabekovich

  4. Stacey Abrams:

    When you know that what you are doing is going to have a disproportionate affect on people of color and on women and you do it anyway, that erodes the public trust in the system and that's problematic.

  5. Ivanka Trump:

    My father values talent. He recognizes real knowledge and skill when he finds it. He is color blind and gender neutral. He hires the best person for the job, period.

Images & Illustrations of COLOR

  1. COLORCOLORCOLORCOLORCOLOR

Popularity rank by frequency of use

COLOR#1#696#10000

Translations for COLOR

From our Multilingual Translation Dictionary

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