Definitions containing tübingen

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Ferdinand Christian Baur

Ferdinand Christian Baur

Ferdinand Christian Baur was a German Protestant theologian and founder and leader of the Tübingen School of theology. Following Hegel's theory of dialectic, Baur argued that second century Christianity represented the synthesis of two opposing theses: Jewish Christianity and Gentile Christianity. This and the rest of Baur's work had a profound impact upon higher criticism of biblical and related texts. Adolf Hilgenfeld followed Baur's lead and edited the Tübingen School's journal, though he was less radical than Baur. A patristic scholar and philosopher at Tübingen, Albert Schwegler, gave the School's theories their most vigorous expression. The School's influence peaked in the 1840s, but was waning by the early twentieth century. Baur's views were revolutionary, but "one thing is certain: New Testament study, since his time, has had a different colour". He had a number of followers, who in many cases modified his positions, and the groundwork laid by Baur continues to be built upon in the twenty-first century.

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Ammer

Ammer

The Ammer is a small river in Baden-Württemberg, Germany, a tributary of the Neckar. It has its source southwest of Herrenberg. Along the southern edge of the Schönbuch, it flows through Herrenberg, Ammerbuch, Unterjesingen and Tübingen, before it discharges into the Neckar at Tübingen-Lustnau after 25 km. The following rivers join the Ammer: ⁕Aischbach ⁕Kochhartbach ⁕Käsbach ⁕Sulzbach ⁕Enzbach ⁕Himbach ⁕Weilersbach ⁕Goldersbach

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Wanne

Wanne

Wanne is a residential area in the northern outskirts of the city of Tübingen, Germany. Beyond Wanne extends the vast state nature protection area of the Schönbuch. It is situated on a slope facing south and is very popular with people working at the Morgenstelle, a large complex of university buildings on the opposite slope, or at the cluster of university hospitals that extend further south of these buildings. Wanne is popular as a residential area because of its vicinity to the nature reserve, its elevation and southern exposure. However, it does not have many shops and it is somewhat inconvenient to go to the historic city center of Tübingen.

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Hugo von Mohl

Hugo von Mohl

Hugo von Mohl was a German botanist from Stuttgart. He was a son of the Württemberg statesman Benjamin Ferdinand von Mohl, the family being connected on both sides with the higher class of state officials of Württemberg. While a pupil at the gymnasium he pursued botany and mineralogy in his leisure time, till in 1823 he entered the University of Tübingen. After graduating with distinction in medicine he went to Munich, where he met a distinguished circle of botanists, and found ample material for research. This seems to have determined his career as a botanist, and he started in 1828 those anatomical investigations which continued till his death. In 1832 he was appointed professor of botany in Tübingen, a post which he never left. Unmarried, his pleasures were in his laboratory and library, and in perfecting optical apparatus and microscopic preparations, for which he showed extraordinary manual skill. He was largely a self-taught botanist from boyhood, and, little influenced in his opinions even by his teachers, preserved always his independence of view on scientific questions. He received many honours during his lifetime, and was elected foreign fellow of the Royal Society in 1868.

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Neckar

Neckar

The Neckar is a 367 km long river in Germany, mainly flowing through the southwestern state of Baden-Württemberg, with a short section through Hesse. The Neckar is a major right tributary of the River Rhine. Rising in the Black Forest near Villingen-Schwenningen in the Schwenninger Moos conservation area at a height of 706 m above sea level, it passes through Rottweil, Rottenburg am Neckar, Kilchberg, Tübingen, Wernau, Nürtingen, Plochingen, Esslingen, Stuttgart, Ludwigsburg, Marbach, Heilbronn and Heidelberg, before discharging into the Rhine at Mannheim, at 95 m above sea level. From Plochingen to Stuttgart the Neckar valley is densely populated and industrialised, with several well-known companies, e.g. Daimler AG and Mahle GmbH being located there. Between Stuttgart and Lauffen the Neckar cuts a scenic, meandering, and in many places steep-sided, valley into fossiliferous Triassic limestones and Pleistocene travertine. Along the Neckar's valley in the Odenwald hills many castles can be found, including Burg Hornberg and Burg Guttenberg in Haßmersheim; the now-mothballed Obrigheim Nuclear Power Plant and the active Neckarwestheim Nuclear Power Plant are also located there. After passing Heidelberg, the Neckar discharges on average 145 m³/s of water into the Rhine, making the Neckar its 4th largest tributary, and the 10th largest river in Germany.

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Hans Geiger

Hans Geiger

Johannes "Hans" Wilhelm Geiger was a German physicist. He is perhaps best known as the co-inventor of the Geiger counter and for the Geiger-Marsden experiment which discovered the Atomic nucleus. Geiger was born at Neustadt-an-der-Haardt, Germany. He was one of five children born to the Indologist Wilhelm Ludwig Geiger, who was professor at the University of Erlangen. In 1902, Geiger started studying physics and mathematics in University of Erlangen and was awarded a doctorate in 1906. In 1907 he began work with Ernest Rutherford at the University of Manchester and in 1909, along with Ernest Marsden, conducted the famous Geiger-Marsden experiment called the "gold foil experiment". Together they created the Geiger counter. In 1911 Geiger and John Mitchell Nuttall discovered the Geiger-Nuttall law and performed experiments that led to Rutherford's atomic model. In 1928 Geiger and his student Walther Müller created an improved version of the Geiger counter, the Geiger-Müller counter. Geiger also worked with James Chadwick. In 1912 he became leader of the Physical-Technical Reichsanstalt in Berlin, 1925 professor in Kiel, 1929 in Tübingen, and from 1936 in Berlin.

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Altstadt

Altstadt

Altstadt is the German language word for "old town", meaning "historical city centre within the city wall", in contrast to younger suburbs outside. Neustadt, the logical opposite of "Altstadt", mostly stands for a part of the "Altstadt" in modern sense, sometimes only few years younger than the oldest part, sometimes a late medieval enlargement. Most German towns have an Altstadt, even though the ravages of war have destroyed many of them, especially during the Thirty Years' War. In the "War of the Palatinian Succession" of 1688, the order to Brûlez le Palatinat! was executed by Mélac, devastating many cities and large parts of South Western Germany, like the Heidelberg castle. Allied Strategic bombing during World War II destroyed nearly all large cities, with Dresden being the most prominent victim. Many smaller towns remained intact, for example Tübingen, Dinkelsbühl, Quedlinburg and Wismar. Some Altstadt parts in Freiburg, Berlin, Münster, Rothenburg ob der Tauber and famously Weimar and others have been restored. But most destroyed bigger German old towns were not reconstructed. Important old towns like those of Hildesheim, Braunschweig, Frankfurt, Kassel and Pforzheim were largely lost or only reconstructed in limited areas.

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Gmelinite

Gmelinite

Gmelinite-Na is one of the rarer zeolites but the commonest member of the gmelinite series, gmelinite-Ca, gmelinite-K and gmelinite-Na. It is closely related to the very similar mineral chabazite. Gmelinite was named as a single species in 1825 after Christian Gottlob Gmelin professor of chemistry and mineralogist from Tübingen, Germany, and in 1997 it was raised to the status of a series. Gmelinite-Na has been synthesised from Na-bearing aluminosilicate gels. The naturally occurring mineral forms striking crystals, shallow, six sided double pyramids, which can be colorless, white, pale yellow, greenish, orange, pink, and red. They have been compared to an angular flying saucer.

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Dettingen

Dettingen

Dettingen is a suburban district of Rottenburg am Neckar in the administrative district of Tübingen in Baden-Württemberg.

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David Strauss

David Strauss

David Friedrich Strauss was a German theologian and writer. He scandalized Christian Europe with his portrayal of the "historical Jesus", whose divine nature he denied. His work was connected to the Tübingen School, which revolutionized study of the New Testament, early Christianity, and ancient religions. Strauss was a pioneer in the historical investigation of Jesus.

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Karzer

Karzer

A Karzer was a designated lock-up or detention room to incarcerate students for punishment, within a jurisdiction of some institutions of learning in Germany. Karzers existed both at universities and at gymnasiums in Germany until the beginning of the twentieth century. Marburg's last Karzer inmate, for example, was registered as late as 1931. Responsible for the administration of the Karzer was the so-called Pedell, or during later times Karzerwärter. While Karzer arrest originally would have been a severe punishment, the respect for these punishment diminished with time, particularly in the 19th century, as it came a matter of honour to have been incarcerated at least once during one's time at university. At the end of 19th century, as the students in the cell became responsible for their own food and drink and receiving of visitors became permitted, the "punishment" would often turn into a social occasion with excessive consumption of alcohol. Karzers have been preserved at the universities of Heidelberg, Jena, Marburg, Freiburg, Tübingen, Freiberg, Greifswald, Göttingen and at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg in Erlangen. The Karzer in Göttingen was known, after the Pedell Brühbach, as Hotel de Brühbach; it was moved in the 19th century, because of the extension of the university library, to the Aula building; a cell door, preserved from the old Karzer, shows graffiti by Otto von Bismarck. Bearing witness to how the students spent the time in the cell are the many memorable wall, table and door paintings left by students in the cells and today shown as tourist attractions in the older German universities.

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Ofterdingen

Ofterdingen

Ofterdingen is a municipality in the district of Tübingen in Baden-Württemberg in Germany.

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