Definitions containing saône-et-loire

We've found 171 definitions:

Briant, Saône-et-Loire

Briant, Saône-et-Loire

Briant is a commune in the Saône-et-Loire department in the region of Bourgogne in eastern France.

— Freebase

Couches

Couches

Couches is a commune in the Saône-et-Loire department in the region of Bourgogne in eastern France. ⁕ ⁕ ⁕ ⁕

— Freebase

Burgundy

Burgundy

Burgundy is a region of central France. Burgundy includes the following four departements: Côte-d'Or, Saône-et-Loire, Yonne and Nièvre

— Freebase

Verzé

Verzé

Verzé is a commune in the Saône-et-Loire department in the region of Bourgogne in eastern France.

— Freebase

Oudry

Oudry

Oudry is a commune in the Saône-et-Loire department in the region of Bourgogne in eastern France.

— Freebase

Juif

Juif

Juif is a commune in the Saône-et-Loire department in the region of Bourgogne in eastern France.

— Freebase

Condal

Condal

Condal is a commune in the Saône-et-Loire department in the region of Bourgogne in eastern France.

— Freebase

Fley

Fley

Fley is a commune in the Saône-et-Loire department in the region of Bourgogne in eastern France.

— Freebase

Charolais, France

Charolais, France

Charolais is an area of France, named after the town of Charolles, and located in today's Saône-et-Loire département, in Burgundy.

— Freebase

Autun

Autun

Autun is a commune in the Saône-et-Loire department in Burgundy in eastern France. It was founded during the early Roman Empire as Augustodunum. Autun marks the easternmost extent of the Umayyad campaign in Europe.

— Freebase

rhone-alpes

Rhone-Alpes

a mountainous region of eastern France drained by the Rhone and Saone and Isere rivers

— Princeton's WordNet

Angers

Angers

A city in Pays de la Loire, France

— Wiktionary

Anse

Anse

Anse is a commune in the Rhône department in eastern France. It is situated on the river Saône, approx. 7 km south of Villefranche-sur-Saône.

— Freebase

bucheron

bucheron

A goat's milk cheese from the Loire Valley in France.

— Wiktionary

Sarthe

Sarthe

one of the departments in Pays de la Loire, France (INSEE number 72).

— Wiktionary

Loire

Loire

The Loire is the longest river in France. With a length of 1,012 kilometres, it drains an area of 117,054 km², which represents more than a fifth of France's land area. It is the 170th longest river in the world. It rises in the Cévennes in the département of Ardèche at 1,350 m near Mont Gerbier de Jonc, and flows for over 1,000 km north through Nevers to Orléans, then west through Tours and Nantes until it reaches the Bay of Biscay at St Nazaire. Its main tributaries include the Maine, Nièvre and the Erdre rivers on its right bank, and the Allier, Cher, Indre, Vienne, and the Sèvre Nantaise rivers from the left bank. The Loire gives its name to six départements: Loire, Haute-Loire, Loire-Atlantique, Indre-et-Loire, Maine-et-Loire, and Saône-et-Loire. The central part of the Loire Valley was added to the World Heritage Sites list of UNESCO on December 2, 2000. The banks are characterized by vineyards and chateaux in the Loire Valley. Historicity of the Loire River valley begins with the earliest Middle Palaeolithic period 40–90 ka, followed by the modern humans, succeeded by the Neolithic period of the Stone Age and the Gauls, the inhabitants in the Loire during the Iron Age, in the period between 1500 and 500 BC. Gauls made it a major naval trading route by 600 BC, establishing trade with the Greeks on the Mediterranean coast. Gallic rule ended in the valley in 56 BC with Julius Caesar winning over this territory. Christianity made entry into this valley from 3rd century AD with many saints converting the pagans. It was the time when the wineries also came to be established in the valley.

— Freebase

Vendu00E9e

Vendu00E9e

One of the du00E9partements of Pays de la Loire, France.

— Wiktionary

anjou

Anjou

a former province of western France in the Loire valley

— Princeton's WordNet

nantes

Nantes

a port city in western France on the Loire estuary

— Princeton's WordNet

muscadet

Muscadet

dry white wine from the Loire valley in France

— Princeton's WordNet

Mayenne

Mayenne

One of the du00E9partements of Pays de la Loire, France (number 53)

— Wiktionary

mayenne

Mayenne

a department of northwestern France in the Pays de la Loire region

— Princeton's WordNet

Saône

Saône

The Saône is a river of eastern France. It is a right tributary of the River Rhône. Rising at Vioménil in the Vosges department, it joins the Rhône in Lyon. The name "Saône" derives from that of the Gallic river goddess Souconna, which has also been connected with a local Celtic tribe, the Sequanes. Monastic copyists progressively transformed "Souconna" to "Saoconna", which ultimately gave rise to "Saône". The other recorded ancient names for the river were Brigoulus and Arar.

— Freebase

Roanne

Roanne

Roanne is a commune in the Loire department in central France. It is located 90 km northwest of Lyon on the Loire River.

— Freebase

chenin blanc

Chenin blanc

white grape grown especially in California and the lower Loire valley of France

— Princeton's WordNet

vouvray

Vouvray

a dry white French wine (either still or sparkling) made in the Loire valley

— Princeton's WordNet

Langue d'oil

Langue d'oil

the dialect formerly spoken north of the Loire (in which the word for "yes" was oil, F. oui)

— Webster Dictionary

Tours

Tours

The capital of the Indre-et-Loire du00E9partement, in Centre, in France

— Wiktionary

Langue d'oc

Langue d'oc

the dialect, closely akin to French, formerly spoken south of the Loire (in which the word for "yes" was oc); Provencal

— Webster Dictionary

chenin blanc

Chenin blanc

made in California and the Loire valley in France

— Princeton's WordNet

muscadet

muscadet

A white grape grown chiefly in the Loire valley of France, or a dry white wine made from this grape

— Wiktionary

Cluny

Cluny

Cluny or Clugny is a commune in the Saône-et-Loire department in the region of Bourgogne in eastern France. It is 20 km northwest of Mâcon. The town grew up around the Benedictine Cluny Abbey, founded by Duke William I of Aquitaine in 910. The height of Cluniac influence was from the second half of the 10th century through the early 12th. The abbey was sacked by the Huguenots in 1562 and many of the valuable manuscripts were destroyed or removed.

— Freebase

muscadet

Muscadet

white grape grown especially in the valley the Loire in France

— Princeton's WordNet

Forez

Forez

Forez is a former province of France, corresponding approximately to the central part of the modern Loire département and a part of the Haute-Loire and Puy-de-Dôme départements. The final "z" in Forez is not pronounced in the Loire département, however, it is pronounced in the western part of the former province, essentially when referring to the correspondent Forez Mountains

— Freebase

Department

Department

a territorial division; a district; esp., in France, one of the districts composed of several arrondissements into which the country is divided for governmental purposes; as, the Department of the Loire

— Webster Dictionary

orleans

Orleans

a city on the Loire river in north central France; site of the siege of Orleans by the English (1428-1429)

— Princeton's WordNet

Roanne

Roanne

an old French town in the department of Loire, on the river Loire, 49 m. NW of St. Étienne; has interesting ruins, a college flourishing cotton and hat factories, dye-works, tanneries, &c.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Saumur

Saumur

Saumur is a commune in the Maine-et-Loire department in western France. The historic town is located between the Loire and Thouet rivers, and is surrounded by the vineyards of Saumur itself, Chinon, Bourgueil, Coteaux du Layon, etc. which produce some of France's finest wines.

— Freebase

Auvergne

Auvergne

Auvergne is one of the 27 administrative regions of France. It comprises the 4 departments of Allier, Puy de Dome, Cantal and Haute Loire. The current administrative region of Auvergne is larger than the historical province of Auvergne, and includes provinces and areas that historically were not part of Auvergne. The Auvergne region is composed of the following old provinces: ⁕Auvergne: departments of Puy-de-Dôme, Cantal, north-west of Haute-Loire, and extreme south of Allier. The province of Auvergne is entirely contained inside the Auvergne region. ⁕Bourbonnais: department of Allier. A small part of Bourbonnais is also contained inside the Centre region. ⁕Velay: centre and southeast of department of Haute-Loire. Velay is entirely contained inside the Auvergne region. ⁕a small part of Gévaudan: extreme southwest of Haute-Loire. Gévaudan is essentially inside the Languedoc-Roussillon region. ⁕a small part of Vivarais: extreme southeast of Haute-Loire. Vivarais is essentially inside the Rhône-Alpes region. ⁕a small part of Forez: extreme northeast of Haute-Loire. Forez is essentially inside the Rhône-Alpes region.

— Freebase

Loire Valley

Loire Valley

The Loire Valley, spanning 280 kilometres, is located in the middle stretch of the Loire River in central France. Its area comprises about 800 square kilometres. It is referred to as the Cradle of the French Language, and the Garden of France due to the abundance of vineyards, fruit orchards, and artichoke and asparagus fields, which line the banks of the river. Notable for its historic towns, architecture and wines, the valley has been inhabited since the Middle Palaeolithic period. In 2000, UNESCO added the central part of the Loire River valley to its list of World Heritage Sites.

— Freebase

Velet

Velet

Velet is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Corre

Corre

Corre is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Saint-Nazaire

Saint-Nazaire

Saint-Nazaire, is a commune in the Loire-Atlantique department in western France. The town has a major harbour, on the right bank of the Loire River estuary, near the Atlantic Ocean. The town is at the south of the second-largest swamp in France, called "la Brière". Given its location, Saint-Nazaire has a long tradition of fishing and shipbuilding.

— Freebase

Blois

Blois

capital of the deps. of Loire and Cher, France, on the Loire, 35 m. S. of Orleans; a favourite residence of Francis I. and Charles IX., and the scene of events of interest in the history of France.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Jans

Jans

Jans is a commune in the Loire-Atlantique department in western France.

— Freebase

Èvre

Èvre

The Èvre is a 92 km long river in western France, left tributary of the Loire River. Its source is at Vezins, 1.5 km northeast of the village. It flows into the Loire at Le Marillais, 3 km east of the village. The Èvre flows through the following communes in the Maine-et-Loire département, ordered from source to mouth: Vezins, La Tourlandry, Trémentines, Le May-sur-Èvre, La Jubaudière, Jallais, La Poitevinière, Beaupréau, La Chapelle-du-Genêt, Le Fief-Sauvin, Montrevault, Saint-Pierre-Montlimart, Saint-Rémy-en-Mauges, La Boissière-sur-Èvre, La Chapelle-Saint-Florent, Botz-en-Mauges, Saint-Florent-le-Vieil, Le Marillais

— Freebase

Écuelle

Écuelle

Écuelle is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Marast

Marast

Marast is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Fresse

Fresse

Fresse is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Chancey

Chancey

Chancey is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Vanne

Vanne

Vanne is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Cuve

Cuve

Cuve is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Boulot

Boulot

Boulot is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Scye

Scye

Scye is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Cordonnet

Cordonnet

Cordonnet is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Chenonceaux

Chenonceaux

Chenonceaux is a commune in the Indre-et-Loire department in central France. It is situated in the Loire Valley, about 26 km east of Tours on the right bank of the Cher River. The population of permanent residents hovers about 300, as of 2004, but there is a large influx of tourists during the pleasant months of the year, because the village is home to the former royal Château de Chenonceau, one of the most popular destinations in France. The castle is distinctive in being built right over the river.

— Freebase

Ouches

Ouches

Ouches is a commune in the Loire department in central France.

— Freebase

Précieux

Précieux

Précieux is a commune in the Loire department in central France.

— Freebase

Cordelle

Cordelle

Cordelle is a commune in the Loire department in central France.

— Freebase

Arcon

Arcon

Arcon is a commune in the Loire department in central France.

— Freebase

Juré

Juré

Juré is a commune in the Loire department in central France.

— Freebase

Fercé

Fercé

Fercé is a commune in the Loire-Atlantique department in western France.

— Freebase

Chauvé

Chauvé

Chauvé is a commune in the Loire-Atlantique department in western France.

— Freebase

Legé

Legé

Legé is a commune in the Loire-Atlantique department in western France.

— Freebase

Amboise

Amboise

Amboise is a commune in the Indre-et-Loire department in central France. It lies on the banks of the Loire River, 17 miles east of Tours. Today a small market town, it was once home of the French royal court. The town of Amboise is also only about 11 miles away from the historic Château de Chenonceau, situated on the Cher River near the small village of Chenonceaux. Its former name was Ambacia, from the old name of the river and marsh Amasse.

— Freebase

Vou

Vou

Vou is a commune in the Indre-et-Loire department in central France.

— Freebase

Monnaie

Monnaie

Monnaie is a commune in the Indre-et-Loire department in central France.

— Freebase

Hommes

Hommes

Hommes is a commune in the Indre-et-Loire department in central France.

— Freebase

Draché

Draché

Draché is a commune in the Indre-et-Loire department in central France.

— Freebase

Tence

Tence

Tence is a commune in the Haute-Loire department in south-central France.

— Freebase

Cigogné

Cigogné

Cigogné is a commune in the Indre-et-Loire department in central France.

— Freebase

Trogues

Trogues

Trogues is a commune in the Indre-et-Loire department in central France.

— Freebase

Bocé

Bocé

Bocé is a commune in the Maine-et-Loire department in western France.

— Freebase

Gesté

Gesté

Gesté is a commune in the Maine-et-Loire department in western France.

— Freebase

Collat

Collat

Collat is a commune in the Haute-Loire department in south-central France.

— Freebase

Douillet

Douillet

Douillet is a commune in the Sarthe department in the Pays de la Loire region in north-western France.

— Freebase

Corné

Corné

Corné is a commune in the Maine-et-Loire department in western France.

— Freebase

Muscadet

Muscadet

Muscadet is a white French wine. It is made at the western end of the Loire Valley, near the city of Nantes in the Pays de la Loire region neighboring the Brittany Region. More Muscadet is produced than any other Loire wine. It is made from the Melon de Bourgogne grape, often referred to simply as melon. As a rule in France, Appellation d'origine contrôlée wines are named either after their growing region or after their variety. The name 'Muscadet' is therefore an exception. The name seems to refer to a characteristic of the wine produced by the melon grape variety: vin qui a un goût musqué - 'wine with a musk-like taste'. Though wine expert Tom Stevenson notes that Muscadet wines do not have much, if any, "muskiness" or Muscat-like flavors or aromas. The sole variety used to produce Muscadet, Melon de Bourgogne, was initially planted in the region sometime in or before the 17th century. It became dominant after a hard freeze in 1709 killed most of the region's vines. Dutch traders who were major actors in the local wine trade encouraged the planting of this variety and distilled much of the wine produced into eau de vie for sale in Northern Europe. The generic 'Muscadet' appellation, officially established in 1937, contains three regional sub-appellations: Muscadet-Sèvre et Maine, officially established in 1936, covering 20,305 acres with 21 villages in the Loire-Atlantique department and 2 in the Maine-et-Loire department. This appellation produces 80% of all Muscadets. Muscadet-Coteaux de la Loire, officially established in 1936, covering 467 acres with 24 villages spread across the Loire-Atlantique and Maine-et-Loire departments. Muscadet-Côtes de Grandlieu, officially established in 1994, benefits from the Grandlieu lake's microclimate. This sub appellation covers 717 hectares with 17 villages in the Loire-Atlantique department and 2 villages in the Vendée department.

— Freebase

Nantes

Nantes

capital of the department of Loire-Inférieure, North-West France, on the Loire, 35 m. from the sea; its fine streets, handsome buildings, and historical associations make it one of the most interesting cities in France; the cathedral and the ducal castle date from the 15th century; shipbuilding, sugar-refining, and hardware are the staple industries, while an active shipping trade is kept up with the colonies.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Saumur

Saumur

a town of France, in the department of Maine-et-Loire, situated on the Loire and partly on an island in the river, 32 m. SE. of Angers; once famous for its Protestant theological seminary, and till the Edict of Nantes a stronghold of the Huguenots; has interesting churches, a castle (still used as an arsenal), and a noted cavalry school; has trade in grain, dried fruits, rosaries, &c.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Auvergne`

Auvergne`

an ancient province of France, united to the crown under Louis XIII. in 1610, embracing the deps. of Puy-de-Dôme, Cantal, and part of Haute-Loire, the highlands of which separate the basin of the Loire from that of the Garonne, and contain a hardy and industrious race of people descended from the original inhabitants of Gaul; they speak a strange dialect, and supply all the water-carriers and street-sweepers of Paris.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Angers

Angers

Angers is a city in western France, about 300 km southwest of Paris, and the chef-lieu of the Maine-et-Loire department. Angers was before the French Revolution the capital of the province of Anjou, and inhabitants of both the city and the province are called Angevins. The commune of Angers proper, without the metropolitan area, is the third most populous in northwestern France after Nantes and Rennes and the 18th in France. Angers is the historical capital of Anjou and was for centuries an important stronghold in northwestern France. It is the cradle of the Plantagenet dynasty and was during the reign of René of Anjou one of the intellectual centres of Europe. Angers developed at the confluence of three rivers, the Mayenne, the Sarthe, and the Loir, all coming from the north and flowing south to the Loire. Their confluence, just north of Angers, creates the Maine, a short but wide river that flows into the Loire several kilometers south. The Angers metropolitan area is a major economic centre in western France, particularly active in the industrial sector, horticulture, and business tourism. Angers proper covers 42.70 km² and has a population of 147,305 inhabitants, while c. 394,700 live in its metropolitan area. The Angers Loire Métropole intercommunality is made up of 33 communes covering 540 km² with 287,000 inhabitants.

— Freebase

Ancenis

Ancenis

a town on the Loire, 23 m. NE. of Nantes.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Cholet

Cholet

Cholet is a commune of western France in the Maine-et-Loire department. It was the capital of military Vendée.

— Freebase

Maché

Maché

Maché is a commune in the Vendée department in the Pays de la Loire region in western France.

— Freebase

Challans

Challans

Challans is a commune in the Vendée département in the Pays de la Loire région in western France.

— Freebase

Degré

Degré

Degré is a commune in the Sarthe department in the Pays de la Loire region in north-western France.

— Freebase

Chevillé

Chevillé

Chevillé is a commune in the Sarthe department in the Pays de la Loire region in north-western France.

— Freebase

Cré

Cré

Cré is a commune in the Sarthe department in the Pays de la Loire region in north-western France.

— Freebase

Tours

Tours

Tours is a city in central France, the capital of the Indre-et-Loire department. It stands on the lower reaches of the river Loire, between Orléans and the Atlantic coast. Touraine, the region around Tours, is known for its wines, the alleged perfection of its local spoken French, and the Battle of Tours in 732. It is also the site of the Paris–Tours road bicycle race. Tours is the largest city in the Centre region of France, although it is not the regional capital, which is the region's second-largest city, Orléans. In 2006, the city itself had 138,268 inhabitants and the metropolitan area had 546,105 .

— Freebase

Vernie

Vernie

Vernie is a commune in the Sarthe department in the region of Pays-de-la-Loire in north-western France.

— Freebase

Pincé

Pincé

Pincé is a commune in the Sarthe department in the region of Pays-de-la-Loire in north-western France.

— Freebase

Piacé

Piacé

Piacé is a commune in the Sarthe department in the region of Pays-de-la-Loire in north-western France.

— Freebase

Bérus

Bérus

Bérus is a commune in the Sarthe department in the region of Pays-de-la-Loire in north-western France.

— Freebase

Beaujolais

Beaujolais

Beaujolais is a French Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée wine generally made of the Gamay grape which has a thin skin and is low in tannins. Like most AOC wines they are not labeled varietally. Whites from the region, which make up only 1% of its production, are made mostly with Chardonnay grapes though Aligoté is also permitted until 2024. Beaujolais tends to be a very light-bodied red wine, with relatively high amounts of acidity. In some vintages, Beaujolais produces more wine than the Burgundy wine regions of Chablis, Côte d'Or, Côte Chalonnaise and Mâconnais put together. The wine takes its name from the historical Beaujolais province and wine producing region. It is located north of Lyon, and covers parts of the north of the Rhône département and parts of the south of the Saône-et-Loire département. While administratively considered part of the Burgundy wine region, the climate is closer to the Rhône and the wine is unique enough to be considered separately from Burgundy and Rhône. The region is known internationally for its long tradition of winemaking, uniquely emphasized the use of carbonic maceration, and more recently for the popular Beaujolais nouveau.

— Freebase

Blois

Blois

Blois is the capital of Loir-et-Cher department in central France, situated on the banks of the lower river Loire between Orléans and Tours.

— Freebase

Armor`ica

Armor`ica

a district of Gaul from the Loire to the Seine.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Boii

Boii

an ancient people of Gaul, occupying territory between the Allier and the Loire.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Allier

Allier

a confluent of the river Loire, in France, near Nevers; also the department through which it flows.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Monts, Indre-et-Loire

Monts, Indre-et-Loire

Monts is a commune in the Indre-et-Loire department in central France. It was here at the Château de Candé on 3 June 1937 that The Duke of Windsor, formerly King Edward VIII, married the twice-divorced Wallis Warfield Simpson for whom he had abdicated the throne of England.

— Freebase

Brittany

Brittany

Brittany is a cultural region in the north-west of France. Previously a kingdom and then a duchy, Brittany was united to the Kingdom of France in 1532 as a province. Brittany has also been referred to as Less, Lesser or Little Britain. Brittany is considered as one of the six Celtic nations. Brittany occupies the northwest peninsula of continental Europe in northwest France. It is bordered by the English Channel to the north, the Celtic Sea and the Atlantic Ocean to the west, and the Bay of Biscay to the south. Its land area is 34,023 km². The historical province of Brittany is divided into five departments: Finistère in the west, Côtes-d'Armor in the north, Ille-et-Vilaine in the north east, Loire-Atlantique in the south east and Morbihan in the south on the Bay of Biscay. In 1956, French regions were created by gathering departments among them. The Region of Brittany comprises, since then, four of the five Breton departments, while the remaining area of the old Brittany, the Loire-Atlantique department, around Nantes, forms part of the Pays de la Loire region. This territorial organisation is regularly contested. The Kingdom and the Duchy of Brittany, the province of Brittany, and the modern Region of Brittany cover the western part of Armorica, as it was known during the period of Roman occupation.

— Freebase

Nantes

Nantes

Nantes is a city in West France, located on the Loire River, 50 km from the Atlantic coast. The city is the 6th largest in France, while its metropolitan area ranks 8th with over 800,000 inhabitants. Nantes, labeled art and history city, is the capital city of the Pays de la Loire region and the Loire-Atlantique département and also the largest city in the Grand-Ouest. Together with Vannes, Rennes and Carhaix, it was one of the major cities of the historic province of Brittany, and the ancient Duchy of Brittany. Though officially separated from Brittany in 1789, Nantes is culturally Breton and still widely regarded as its capital city. In 2004, Time described Nantes as "the most liveable city in Europe". In 2010, Nantes was named a hub city for innovation in the Innovation Cities Index by innovation agency, 2thinknow. The city was ranked 36th globally from 289 cities and 4th overall in France, behind Paris, Lyon and Strasbourg for innovation across multiple sectors of the economy. As of 2013, Nantes holds the title of European Green Capital for its efforts to reduce air pollution and CO2 emissions, for its high quality and well-managed public transport system and for its biodiversity with 3,366 hectares of green spaces and several Natura 2000 zones which guarantee a protection of nature in the area.

— Freebase

Vouvray

Vouvray

Vouvray is a commune in the Indre-et-Loire department in central France. It is best known for its production of white wine, rated among the best in France.

— Freebase

Loches

Loches

Loches is a commune in the Indre-et-Loire department in central France. It is situated 29 miles southeast of Tours by railway, on the left bank of the Indre River.

— Freebase

Saint-Joachim

Saint-Joachim

Saint-Joachim is a commune in the Loire-Atlantique department in western France. It is in the centre of the Brière marsh, and comprises a group of "islands" within the marsh.

— Freebase

Lavaré

Lavaré

Lavaré is a commune in the Sarthe department in the region of Pays-de-la-Loire in north-western France. The commune is twinned with the village of Old Catton, Norfolk, England.

— Freebase

Rive-de-Gier

Rive-de-Gier

Rive-de-Gier is a commune in the Loire department in central France. The town is located on both sides of the river Gier. It's between Saint-Etienne and Lyon and had an important part during the French industrial revolution. Rive de Gier is a town in the French department of Loire, arrondissement Saint-Etienne. Rive de Gier has 14,831 inhabitants, so the population is roughly back to the level it was at the end of the 19th Century. Economically Rive-de-Gier was known for coal mining, iron works and glass works. The river Gier has been covered in the center of the city, so the watercourse is not visible in the downtown. As the river is not navigable, was built to transport the coal from the canal Givors, but which is now filled. The community is situated on the edge of the Regional Natural Park Pilat and is associated with this.

— Freebase

Loiret

Loiret

Loiret is a department in north-central France The department is named after the river Loiret, a tributary of the Loire. The Loiret is located wholly within the department.

— Freebase

Cher

Cher

an affluent of the Loire below Tours; also the dep. in France (359) to which it gives name; an agricultural and pastoral district; capital Bourges.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Vendée

Vendée

The Vendée is a department in the Pays-de-la-Loire region in west-central France, on the Atlantic Ocean. The name Vendée is taken from the Vendée river which runs through the southeastern part of the department.

— Freebase

Onay

Onay

Onay is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France. It is located 12 km south east of Gray, 60 km east of Dijon and 40 km north west of Besançon, on the route D177. Onay is within the prefecture of Vesoul and the sub-prefecture of Lure.

— Freebase

Touraine

Touraine

The Touraine is one of the traditional provinces of France. Its capital was Tours. During the political reorganization of French territory in 1790, the Touraine was divided between the departments of Indre-et-Loire, Loir-et-Cher and Indre.

— Freebase

Franche-Comté

Franche-Comté

Franche-Comté the former "Free County" of Burgundy, as distinct from the neighbouring Duchy, is an administrative region and a traditional province of eastern France. It is composed of the modern departments of Doubs, Jura, Haute-Saône and Territoire de Belfort and has a population of 1,168,208. The principal cities are the capital Besançon, Belfort, and Montbéliard. Other important cities are Dole, Vesoul, Arbois, and Lons-le-Saunier.

— Freebase

Ouche

Ouche

The Ouche is a river in the Côte-d'Or department in eastern France. It is a right tributary of the Saône, which it joins in Échenon. Its source is in Lusigny-sur-Ouche. The Ouche flows through the following towns: Bligny-sur-Ouche, La Bussière-sur-Ouche, Fleurey-sur-Ouche, Velars-sur-Ouche, Dijon, Longvic and Varanges. Part of the Canal de Bourgogne runs through the Ouche valley.

— Freebase

Gien

Gien

Gien is a commune in the Loiret department in north-central France. Gien is on the Loire River, 80 km from Orléans. The town was bought for the royal property by Philip II of France. The town is twinned with Malmesbury in England.

— Freebase

Creusot, Le

Creusot, Le

a town in the dep. Saône-et-Loire, near Autun, which owes its importance to the large iron-works established there; is a district rich in coal and iron.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Chère

Chère

The Chère is a 65.1 km long river in the Loire-Atlantique and Ille-et-Vilaine départements, western France. Its source is at Soudan. It flows generally west. It is a left tributary of the Vilaine into which it flows between Pierric and Sainte-Anne-sur-Vilaine.

— Freebase

Anjou

Anjou

Anjou is a former county, duchy and province centred on the city of Angers in the lower Loire Valley of western France. Its traditional Latin name was Andegavia. Anjou was united with the English Crown from 1151-1199, when Henry II, and, in turn, his son Richard the Lionheart, inherited the county, and thus themselves became Counts of Anjou. At its peak, the Angevin Empire then spread from Ulster to the Pyrenees. But Richard had no legitimate issue, so in 1199 Anjou passed to his nephew, Arthur of Brittany, while the Crown of England passed to Henry II’s fifth son and Richard’s youngest brother, John. Count Arthur was taken prisoner by John in 1203, and disappeared in suspicious circumstances. In 1204, the county as a whole was in turn seized by France. Its status was elevated to that of a duchy for Prince Louis, the second son of John II of France, and remained as such until the Revolution. Today, Anjou corresponds largely to the present-day département of Maine-et-Loire.

— Freebase

Dordogne

Dordogne

Dordogne is a department in southwestern France. The department is located in the region of Aquitaine between the Loire Valley and the Pyrenees. and is named after the great Dordogne river that runs through it. It roughly corresponds with the ancient county of Périgord.

— Freebase

étienne, St.

étienne, St.

an important French town, capital of the dep. of the Loire, on the Furens, 35 m. SW. of Lyons; chief seat of the iron-works of France; also has noted ribbon factories.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Autun`

Autun`

an ancient city in the dep. of Saône-et-Loire, on the Arroux, 28 m. NW. from Châlons, where Talleyrand was bishop, with a fine cathedral and rich in antiquities; manufactures serges, carpets, velvet, &c.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Rive-de-Gier

Rive-de-Gier

a flourishing town in the department of Loire, France, on the Gier, 13 m. NE. of St. Étienne; is favourably situated in the heart of a rich coal district; has manufactures of silk, glass, machinery, steel, &c.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Ancenis

Ancenis

Ancenis is a commune in the Loire-Atlantique department in western France. It is a sub-prefecture of the department. It played a great historical role as a key location on the road to Nantes, the historical capital of Brittany. It was named the key of Brittany and the door of Brittany.

— Freebase

Chambord

Chambord

spacious château in the dep. of Loire-et-Cher, France, built by Francis I.; after being long a residence for royalty and people of distinction, was presented in 1821 to the Duc de Bordeaux, the Comte de Chambord.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

St. Nazaire

St. Nazaire

a flourishing seaport of France, on the Loire, 40 m. W. of Nantes, where large sums have been expended in improving its spacious docks to accommodate an increasing shipping-trade; its exports, brandy, coal, wheat, &c., are mainly from Nantes and the interior.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Orléans

Orléans

Orléans is a city in north-central France, about 130 kilometres southwest of Paris. It is the capital of the Loiret department and of the Centre region. Orléans is located on the Loire River where the river curves south towards the Massif Central. The city of New Orleans, in the United States is named after the commune of Orléans.

— Freebase

Poitou

Poitou

formerly a province in France, lying S. of the Loire, between the Vienne River and the sea; passed to England when its countess, Eleanor, married Henry I., 1152; was taken by Philip Augustus 1205, ceded to England again 1360, and retaken by Charles V. 1369.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Beauce

Beauce

Beauce is a natural region in northern France, located between the Seine and Loire rivers. It now comprises the Eure-et-Loir département and parts of Loiret, Essonne and Loir-et-Cher. The region shared the history of the province of Orléanais and the county of Chartres, which is its only major city. Beauce is one of France's most productive agricultural areas.

— Freebase

Saint-Étienne

Saint-Étienne

Saint-Étienne is a city in eastern central France. It is located in the Massif Central, 50 km southwest of Lyon in the Rhône-Alpes region, along the trunk road that connects Toulouse with Lyon. Saint-Étienne is the capital of the Loire département and has a population of approximately 178,500 in the city itself expanding to over 317,000 in the metropolitan area.

— Freebase

Rhone

Rhone

The Rhone is one of the major rivers of Europe, rising in Switzerland and running from there through southeastern France. At Arles, near its mouth on the Mediterranean Sea, the river divides into two branches, known as the Great Rhone and the Little Rhone. The resulting delta constitutes the Camargue region. In French, the adjective derived from the river is rhodanien, as in le sillon rhodanien, which is the name of the long, straight Saône and Rhone river valleys, a deep cleft running due south to the Mediterranean and separating the Alps from the Massif Central.

— Freebase

Cévennes

Cévennes

a range of low mountains on the eastern edge of the central plateau of France, separating the basin of the Rhône from those of the Loire and Garonne; average height from 3000 to 4000 ft.; the chief scene of the dragonnades against the Huguenots under Louis XIV.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Chenin blanc

Chenin blanc

Chenin blanc, is a white wine grape variety from the Loire valley of France. Its high acidity means it can be used to make everything from sparkling wines to well-balanced dessert wines, although it can produce very bland, neutral wines if the vine's natural vigor is not controlled. Outside the Loire it is found in most of the New World wine regions; it is the most widely planted variety in South Africa, where it is also known as Steen. The grape may have been one of the first to be grown in South Africa by Jan van Riebeeck in 1655, or it may have come to that country with Huguenots fleeing France after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685. Chenin blanc was often misidentified in Australia as well, so tracing its early history in the country is not easy. It may have been introduced in James Busby's collection of 1832, but C. Waterhouse was growing Steen at Highercombe in Houghton, South Australia by 1862. It provides a fairly neutral palate for the expression of terroir, vintage variation and the winemaker's treatment. In cool areas the juice is sweet but high in acid with a full-bodied fruity palate. In the unreliable summers of northern France, the acidity of under ripened grapes was often masked with chaptalization with unsatisfactory results, whereas now the less ripe grapes are made into popular sparkling wines such as Crémant de Loire. The white wines of the Anjou AOC are perhaps the best expression of Chenin as a dry wine, with flavors of quince and apples. In nearby Vouvray AOC they aim for an off-dry style, developing honey and floral characteristics with age. In the best vintages the grapes can be left on the vines to develop noble rot, producing an intense, viscous dessert wine which may improve considerably with age.

— Freebase

Amboise

Amboise

a town on the Loire, 14 m. E. of Tours, with a castle, once the residence of the French kings. The Conspiracy of A., the conspiracy of Condé and the Huguenots in 1560 against Francis II., Catharine de Medici, and the Guises. The Edict of A. (1563) conceded the free exercise of their worship to the Protestants.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Chanzy

Chanzy

a French general, born at Nouart, Ardennes; served in Algeria; commanded the army of the Loire in 1870-71; distinguished himself by his brilliant retreat from Mans to Laval; was afterwards Governor-General in Algeria; died suddenly, to the regret of his country (1823-1883).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Neustria

Neustria

western portion of the kingdom of the Franks in the time of the Merovingian and Carlovingian dynasties, and in constant rivalry with Austrasia (q. v.), the kingdom of the East; it extended from the Scheldt to the Loire and Soissons; Paris, Orleans, and Tours were the chief towns.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Le Mans

Le Mans

Le Mans is a city in France, located on the Sarthe River. Traditionally the capital of the province of Maine, it is now the capital of the Sarthe department and the seat of the Roman Catholic diocese of Le Mans. Le Mans is a part of the Pays de la Loire region. Its inhabitants are called Manceaux and Mancelles. It has been host to the famous 24 Hours of Le Mans sports car race since 1923.

— Freebase

Saône-et-Loire

Saône-et-Loire

an east-midland department of France, bounded SE. and W. by the Saône and Loire; has a fine fertile surface, and is noted for its cattle and abundant output of wine; iron and coal are wrought, and its towns are busy with the manufacture of cotton goods, pottery, machinery, &c.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Pays de la Loire

Pays de la Loire

Pays de la Loire is one of the 27 regions of France. It is one of the regions created in the late 20th century to serve as a zone of influence for its capital, Nantes, one of a handful so-called "balancing metropolises" ¹. Other examples of "artificially created" regions include Rhône-Alpes, which was created as the region for Lyon, and Midi-Pyrénées, which was created as the region for Toulouse.

— Freebase

Gamay

Gamay

Gamay is a purple-colored grape variety used to make red wines, most notably grown in Beaujolais and in the Loire Valley around Tours. Its full name is Gamay Noir à Jus Blanc. It is a very old cultivar, mentioned as long ago as the 15th century. It has been often cultivated because it makes for abundant production; however, it can produce wines of distinction when planted on acidic soils, which help to soften the grape's naturally high acidity.

— Freebase

St. étienne

St. étienne

a busy industrial town of France, capital of department of Loire, on the Furens, 36 m. SW. of Lyons; has been called the "Birmingham of France"; is in the centre of a rich coal district, and produces every kind of hardware; the manufacture of ribbons is also an important industry; there is a school of mines.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Vendée, La

Vendée, La

a dep. of France, on the Bay of Biscay, S. of Loire-Inférieure; marshy on the W., wooded on the N., and with an open fertile tract in the middle and S.; it is famous as the seat of a stubborn resistance to the Revolution, and for the bloody violence with which it was suppressed.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Loir

Loir

The Loir is a river in western France. It is a left tributary of the Sarthe River. Its source is in the Eure-et-Loir département, north of Illiers-Combray. It joins the river Sarthe in Briollay, north of the city Angers. It is indirectly a tributary of the Loire, and runs roughly parallel to it and slightly north of it for much of its length, and so might be regarded as a Yazoo type river.

— Freebase

Beurre blanc

Beurre blanc

Beurre blanc —literally translated from French as "white butter"— is a hot emulsified butter sauce made with a reduction of vinegar and/or white wine and grey shallots into which cold, whole butter is blended off the heat to prevent separation. The small amounts of lecithin and other emulsifiers naturally found in butter are used to form an oil-in-water emulsion. Although similar to hollandaise in concept, it is not considered either a classic leading or compound sauce. This sauce originates in Loire Valley cuisine.

— Freebase

TAT European Airlines

TAT European Airlines

Transport Aérien Transrégional was a French regional airline with its head office on the grounds of Tours Val de Loire Airport in Tours. It was formed in 1968 as Touraine Air Transport by M. Marchais. Air France acquired a minority stake in the airline in 1989. Between 1993 and 1996 the company was gradually taken over by British Airways. It subsequently merged with Air Liberté. The merged entity was sold on to the SAir Group in 2001, which in turn merged it with AOM.

— Freebase

Orlan

Orlan

Orlan is a French artist, born May 30, 1947 in Saint-Étienne, Loire. She adopted the name Orlan in 1971, which she always writes in capital letters : "ORLAN". She lives and works in Los Angeles, New York, and Paris. She was invited to be a scholar in residence at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, for the 2006-2007 academic year. She sits on the board of administrators for the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, and is a professor at the École nationale supérieure d'arts de Cergy-Pontoise. Although Orlan is best known for her work with plastic surgery in the early to mid-1990s, she has not limited her work to a particular medium.

— Freebase

Anatole France

Anatole France

Anatole France was a French poet, journalist, and novelist. He was born in Paris, and died in Saint-Cyr-sur-Loire. He was a successful novelist, with several best-sellers. Ironic and skeptical, he was considered in his day the ideal French man of letters. He was a member of the Académie française, and won the Nobel Prize for Literature in recognition of his literary achievements. France is also widely believed to be the model for narrator Marcel's literary idol Bergotte in Marcel Proust's In Search of Lost Time.

— Freebase

Bucheron

Bucheron

Bûcheron is a goat's milk cheese native to the Loire Valley in France. Semi-aged, ripening for 5 to 10 weeks, Bucheron is produced as short logs that are sliced and sold as small rounds in food stores. Bûcheron has an ivory-colored pâte surrounded by a bloomy white rind. Soft, but semi-firm in texture, this cheese when young has a mild taste and it has a harder texture. As it ages, is gets a softer texture and a sharper, more intense taste.. It is a good cheese for salads or for snacking with hearty grained breads, crackers and grapes.

— Freebase

Mâconnais

Mâconnais

The Mâconnais district lies in the south of the Burgundy wine region in France, west of the River Saône. It takes its name from the town of Mâcon. It is best known as a source of good value white wines made from the Chardonnay grape; the wines from Pouilly-Fuissé are particularly sought-after. Almost all the wine made in the Mâconnais is white wine. Chardonnay is the main grape grown, in fact there is a village of that name in the far north of the region. Some plantations of Gamay and Pinot noir is made into red and rosé Mâcon, making up no more than 30% of the total wine production. Gamay is grown in the Beaujolais cru of Moulin-à-Vent which extends into the Mâconnais, but has little in common with the wines north of the border.

— Freebase

Drownings at Nantes

Drownings at Nantes

The Drownings at Nantes were a series of mass executions by drowning during the Reign of Terror in Nantes, France, that occurred between November 1793 and February 1794. During this period, anyone arrested and jailed for not consistently supporting the Revolution, or suspected of being a royalist sympathizer, especially Catholic priests and nuns, was cast into the Loire and drowned on the orders of Jean-Baptiste Carrier, the representative-on-mission in Nantes. Before the murders ceased, as many as four thousand or more people, including innocent families with women and children, lost their lives in what Carrier himself called "the national bathtub."

— Freebase

Tours

Tours

a historic old town of France, on the Loire, 145 m. SW. of Paris; presents a spacious and handsome appearance, and contains a noble Gothic cathedral, archbishop's palace, Palais de Justice, besides ancient châteaux and interesting ruins; is a centre of silk and woollen manufactures, and does a large printing trade; suffered greatly by the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes and during the Franco-German War; became the seat of government after the investment of Paris and until its capitulation to the Germans.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Cantal

Cantal

Cantal is a department in south-central France. It is named after the Cantal mountain range, a group of extinct, eroded volcanic peaks, which covers much of the department. Residents are known as Cantaliens or Cantalous. Cantal is part of the current region of Auvergne. It borders the departments of Puy-de-Dôme, Haute-Loire, Aveyron, Lot, Lozère, and Corrèze. Its principal towns are Aurillac, Saint-Flour, and Mauriac. The highest point in Cantal is Le Plomb du Cantal at 1858 metres. Cantal remains, with Lozère and Creuse, one of the most sparsely populated and geographically isolated French departments. Aurillac is the farthest removed departmental capital from a major motorway.

— Freebase

Microjoule

Microjoule

Microjoule is a team that builds ultra-efficient vehicles. It is composed of students and advisors at Lycée La Joliverie in St Sébastien sur Loire, France. The team has broken the world record for most efficient gasoline-powered vehicle three times: ⁕1999: 9,845 miles per gallon. ⁕26 June 2001: 10,227 miles per gallon at the annual Shell Eco-Marathon competition. ⁕9 July 2003: 10,705 miles per gallon at the annual Shell Eco-Marathon competition. ⁕13 July 2006: 10,127.9 miles per gallon at the annual Shell Eco-Marathon competition. ⁕March 2008 or earlier: 7,148 miles on a single gallon of fuel

— Freebase

Orleans

Orleans

on the Loire, 75 m. by rail SW. of Paris, is the capital of the province of Loiret, a trading rather than an industrial town, commerce being fostered by excellent railway, canal, and river communications; the town is of ancient date, and its streets are full of quaint wooden houses; there is an old cathedral and museum; many historic associations include the raising of the siege in 1429 by Joan of Arc, whose house is still shown, and two captures by the Germans, 1870

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Cluny

Cluny

a town in the dep. of Saône-et-Loire, on an affluent of the Saône; renowned in the Middle Ages for its Benedictine abbey, founded in 910, and the most celebrated in Europe, having been the mother establishment of 2000 others of the like elsewhere; in ecclesiastical importance it stood second to Rome, and its abbey church second to none prior to the erection of St. Peter's; a great normal school was established here in 1865.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Franks

Franks

the name given in the 3rd century to a confederation of Germanic tribes, who subsequently grouped themselves into two main bodies called the Salians and the Ripuarians, the former dwelling on the Upper Rhine, and the latter on the Middle Rhine. Under their king, Clovis, the Salians overran Central Gaul, subjugating the Ripuarians, and extending their territory from the Scheldt to the Loire, whence in course of time there generally developed the kingdom of France. The Franks were of a tall and martial bearing, and thoroughly democratic in their political instincts.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Duke of Burgundy

Duke of Burgundy

Duke of Burgundy was a title borne by the rulers of the Duchy of Burgundy, a small portion of traditional lands of Burgundians west of river Saône which in 843 was allotted to Charles the Bald's kingdom of West Franks. Under the Ancien Regime, the Duke of Burgundy was the premier lay peer of the kingdom of France. Beginning with Robert II of France, the title has been held by the Capetians, the French royal family. It was granted to Robert's younger son, Robert, who founded the House of Burgundy. When the senior line of the House of Burgundy became extinct, it was inherited by John II of France through proximity of blood. John granted the duchy as an appanage for his younger son, Philip the Bold. The Valois Dukes of Burgundy became dangerous rivals to the senior line of the House of Valois. When the male line of the Valois Dukes of Burgundy became extinct, it was confiscated by Louis XI of France. From then on, the title was never given again to a younger son. Today, the title is used by the House of Bourbon as a revived courtesy title.

— Freebase

Institut national des sciences appliquées

Institut national des sciences appliquées

The Institut National des Sciences Appliquées is a grande école – a French engineering university. There are 6 INSA establishments organised as a network and located in major French regional cities Lyon, Rennes, Rouen, Strasbourg, Toulouse, Blois and Bourges. All INSAs share the same philosophy, at the same time preserving an individual identity based on their respective histories, origins, economic environments and on poles of excellence developed from specific competences. The INSA network represents the largest engineer training group in France: 12% of all engineers who obtain their degree in France each year, graduate from one of the INSA establishments. To date, almost 50,000 INSA engineers contribute to the social and economic fabric worldwide. The INSA are public establishments with a scientific, cultural and professional orientation. They are under the aegis of the Ministry of Higher Education and are accredited by the "Commission des Titres" to deliver Engineering Degrees. INSA Lyon INSA Rennes INSA Rouen INSA Strasbourg INSA Toulouse INSA Centre Val de Loire

— Freebase

Orléanais

Orléanais

Orléanais is a former province of France, around the cities of Orléans, Chartres, and Blois. The name comes from Orléans, its main city and traditional capital. The province was one of those into which France was divided before the French Revolution. It was the country around Orléans, the pagus Aurelianensis; it lay on both banks of the Loire, and for ecclesiastical purposes formed the diocese of Orléans. It was in the possession of the Capet family before the advent of Hugh Capet to the throne of France in 987, and in 1344 Philip VI gave it with the title of duke to Philip of Valois, one of his younger sons. In a geographical sense the region around Orléans is sometimes known as the Orléanais, but this is somewhat smaller than the former province. Orléanais was also a dialect of the French language spoken in the province of Orléanais until the beginning of the 19th century.

— Freebase

Ain

Ain

Ain is a department named after the Ain River on the eastern edge of France. Being part of the region Rhône-Alpes and bordered by the rivers Saône and Rhône, the department of Ain enjoys a privileged geographic situation. It has an excellent transport network and benefits from the proximity to the international airports of Lyon and Geneva. Ain is composed of four geographically different areas which – each with its own characteristics – contribute to the diversity and the dynamic economic development of the department. In the Bresse agriculture and agro-industry are dominated by the cultivation of cereals, cattle breeding, milk and cheese production as well as poultry farming. In the Dombes, pisciculture assumes greater importance as does wine making in the Bugey. The high diversification of the department's industry is accompanied by a strong presence of the plastics sector in and around Oyonnax. Due to its diverse industrial character and the cooperation of small and medium enterprises, Ain ranks among the departments with the fastest growing economy in the country. Its unemployment rate lies far beneath the national and regional average. Besides the export-oriented SME's, several large enterprises, with a prominent position on national and international markets, have settled in the department.

— Freebase

Berenger

Berenger

or Berenga`rius, of Tours, a distinguished theologian, born at Tours; held an ecclesiastical office there, and was made afterwards archdeacon of Angers; ventured to deny the doctrine of transubstantiation, a denial for which he was condemned by successive councils of the Church, and which he was compelled more than once publicly to retract, though he so often and openly recalled his retractation that the pope, notwithstanding the opposition of the orthodox, deemed it prudent at length to let him alone. After this he ceased to trouble the Church, and retired to an island on the Loire, where he gave himself up to quiet meditation and prayer (998-1088).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Vesoul

Vesoul

Vesoul is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté located in eastern France. Most populated municipality of the department with 15,920 inhabitants in 2009, is the seventh city Franche-Comté. The same year, Urban community of Vesoul which covers 19 municipalities together 34,055 inhabitants while the Urban area of Vesoul which includes 78 municipalities, groups 59,244 inhabitants. Its urban area is the fifth largest Franche-Comté. Its inhabitants are known in French as Vésuliens. Nicknamed the "Nice of the East", the reputation of Vesoul based primarily on the song "Vesoul" by Jacques Brel and the Vesoul International Film Festival of Asian Cinema. Its 16,000 inhabitants, account Vesoul 2000 students and 8000 licensed sport. The city has received many labels and names that reflect the investigation brings to life Vesoul common. Built on top of the hill de la Motte, in the first millennium, the old medieval town of Castrum Vesulium, the city is gradually presented as European commercial and economic center with many traders and exchangers and European Jews. At the end of the Middle Ages, the city experienced a period of strong difficulties as plagues, epidemics, destruction ...

— Freebase

Aulne

Aulne

The Aulne is a 140 km long river of Brittany in north-western France, flowing down the hills and emptying into the roadstead of Brest, one of the many fjord-like bays just south of Brest. The river is part of the Canal de Nantes à Brest, the navigation canal that once connected the city of Nantes on the Loire River with the port town of Brest on the Atlantic coast. This canal is still navigable over part of its length, but sea-going traffic is interrupted by the hydro-electric dam of Guerledan, which submerged a number of the original locks of the canal. The Aulne river flows through Châteaulin. Aulne in French means "alder". Some alders, like willows, prefer wet habitats, so they typically grow along rivers like the Aulne or in marshy areas. Whether due to a mistranslation of "Erlkonig" or not, the word "Erlkönig" is rendered in French Le Roi des aulnes i.e., the Alder King.

— Freebase

Burgundy wine

Burgundy wine

Burgundy wine is wine made in the Burgundy region in eastern France, in the valleys and slopes west of the Saône River, a tributary of the Rhône. The most famous wines produced here—those commonly referred to as "Burgundies"—are dry red wines made from Pinot noir grapes and white wines made from Chardonnay grapes. Red and white wines are also made from other grape varieties, such as Gamay and Aligoté, respectively. Small amounts of rosé and sparkling wines are also produced in the region. Chardonnay-dominated Chablis and Gamay-dominated Beaujolais are formally part of the Burgundy wine region, but wines from those subregions are usually referred to by their own names rather than as "Burgundy wines". Burgundy has a higher number of appellations d'origine contrôlée than any other French region, and is often seen as the most terroir-conscious of the French wine regions. The various Burgundy AOCs are classified from carefully delineated Grand Cru vineyards down to more nonspecific regional appellations. The practice of delineating vineyards by their terroir in Burgundy goes back to medieval times, when various monasteries played a key role in developing the Burgundy wine industry.

— Freebase

Pascal Verrot

Pascal Verrot

Pascal Verrot is a French-born orchestra conductor who holds the post of principal conductor of the Sendai Philharmonic and former musical director of Picardie Orchestra. Prior to that, he was music director of the Québec Symphony Orchestra, the oldest orchestra in Canada, from 1991 to 1997. Born in Lyon, France, in 1959, Mr. Verrot holds degrees both from the Sorbonne University in Paris and the Paris Conservatory where he studied for four years with Jean-Sébastien Béreau, winning first prize in the conducting competition. During that time, he made his debut as oboist and conductor of the wind ensemble Union Musicale of Villefranche sur Saône. He also studied for three years with the late Franco Ferrara at the Accademia Musicale Chigiana in Siena, Italy. Pascal Verrot made his international debuts in 1985, when he was prize winner at the Tokyo International Conducting Competition. Since then, his guest conducting appearances have included many performances in Japan, in France and in North-America. Mr. Verrot has conducted several North-American renowned ensembles that include the Boston Symphony, the Montreal Symphony, the Toronto Symphony, the Utah Symphony and most recently the Pacific Symphony. His native country of France has offered him numerous occasions to lead major orchestras.

— Freebase

Armorica

Armorica

Armorica or Aremorica is the name given in ancient times to the part of Gaul between the Seine and Loire rivers, that includes the Brittany peninsula, extending inland to an indeterminate point and down the Atlantic coast. The toponym is based on the Gaulish phrase are-mori "on/at [the] sea", made into the Gaulish place name Aremorica "Place by the Sea". The suffix -ika was first used to create adjectival forms and then, names. The original designation was vague, including a large part of what became Normandy in the 10th century and, in some interpretations, the whole of the coast down to the Garonne river. Later, the term became restricted to Brittany. In Breton, "on [the] sea" is war vor, though the older form arvor is used to refer to the coastal regions of Brittany, in contrast to argoad for the inland regions. These cognate modern usages suggest that the Romans first contacted coastal people in the inland region and assumed that the regional name Aremorica referred to the whole area, both coastal and inland.

— Freebase

Neustria

Neustria

The territory of Neustria or Neustrasia, meaning "new [western] land" by opposition to Austrasia, originated in 511, made up of the regions from Aquitaine to the English Channel, approximating most of the north of present-day France, with Paris and Soissons as its main cities. Thus Neustria formed the western part of the kingdom of the Franks under the rule of the Merovingian dynasty during the sixth to eighth centuries. The distinct area originated at the time of the death of Clovis I, when his sons divided his lands between them. It later became a term for the region between the Seine and the Loire rivers known as the regnum Neustriae, a constituent subkingdom of the Carolingian Empire and then West Francia. The Carolingian kings also created a March of Neustria which was a frontier duchy against the Bretons and Vikings that lasted until the Capetian monarchy in the late tenth century. Neustria was also employed as a term for northwestern Italy during the period of Lombard domination. It was contrasted with the northeast, which was likewise called Austrasia, the same term as given to eastern Francia.

— Freebase

Republican marriage

Republican marriage

Republican marriage was a form of execution that allegedly occurred in Nantes during the Reign of Terror in Revolutionary France and "involved tying a naked man and woman together and drowning them". This was reported to have been practiced during the drownings at Nantes that were ordered by local Jacobin representative-on-mission Jean-Baptiste Carrier between November 1793 and January 1794 in the city of Nantes. Most accounts indicate that the victims were drowned in the Loire River, although a few sources describe an alternative means of execution in which the bound couple is run through with a sword, either before, or instead of drowning. While the executions of men, women and children by drowning in Nantes is not generally disputed, the factual nature of the "republican marriages," in particular, has been doubted by several historians who suspect it to be a legend. The earliest reports of such "marriages" date from 1794, when Carrier was tried for his crimes, and they were soon cited by contemporary counter-revolutionary authors such as Louis-Marie Prudhomme and Louis Gabriel Ambroise de Bonald.

— Freebase

Pepin the Short

Pepin the Short

king of the Franks, was the son of Charles Martel, and at first shared with his brother Carloman the viceroyalty of the kingdom under Hilderik III.; in 747 Carloman retired to a monastery, and five years later Pepin deposed Hilderik and ascended the throne; his kingdom embraced the valleys of the Rhine, the Rhône, and the Seine; he united his interests with those of the Church, and in 756 entered Italy to rescue the Pope from the threatened domination of the Lombards; reduced Aistulf of Lombardy to vassalage, assumed the title of Patrician of Rome, and by bestowing on Pope Stephen III. the "Exarchate" of the Roman empire, laid the foundation of papal temporal sovereignty, five cities being placed under his jurisdiction; his subsequent exploits included the conquest of the Loire Valley and the expulsion of the Moors from France; his fame was overshadowed by that of his son Charlemagne; d. 678.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

New Orleans

New Orleans

New Orleans is a major United States port and the largest city and metropolitan area in the state of Louisiana. The population of the city was 343,829 as of the 2010 U.S. Census. The New Orleans metropolitan area had a population of 1,167,764 in 2010 and was the 46th largest in the United States. The New Orleans–Metairie–Bogalusa Combined Statistical Area, a larger trading area, had a 2010 population of 1,214,932. The city is named after Orléans, a city located on the Loire River in Centre, France, and is well known for its distinct French Creole architecture, as well as its cross-cultural and multilingual heritage. New Orleans is also famous for its cuisine, music, and its annual celebrations and festivals, most notably Mardi Gras. The city is often referred to as the "most unique" in America. New Orleans is located in southeastern Louisiana, straddling the Mississippi River. The city and Orleans Parish are coterminous. The city and parish are bounded by the parishes of St. Tammany to the north, St. Bernard to the east, Plaquemines to the south and Jefferson to the south and west. Lake Pontchartrain, part of which is included in the city limits, lies to the north and Lake Borgne lies to the east.

— Freebase

Coffer

Coffer

A coffer in architecture, is a sunken panel in the shape of a square, rectangle, or octagon in a ceiling, soffit or vault. A series of these sunken panels were used as decoration for a ceiling or a vault, also called caissons, or lacunaria, so that a coffered ceiling can be called a lacunar ceiling: the strength of the structure is in the framework of the coffers. The stone coffers of the ancient Greeks and Romans are the earliest surviving examples, but a seventh-century BC Etruscan chamber tomb in the necropolis of San Giuliano, which is cut in soft tufa-like stone reproduces a ceiling with beams and cross-beams lying on them, with flat panels fillings the lacunae. For centuries, it was thought that wooden coffers were first made by crossing the wooden beams of a ceiling in the Loire Valley châteaux of the early Renaissance. In 2012, however, archaeologists working under Andrew Wallace-Hadrill at the House of the Telephus in Herculaneum discovered that wooden coffered ceilings were constructed in Roman times. Experimentation with the possible shapes of the pole is coffering, which solve problems of mathematical tiling, or tessellation, were a feature of Islamic as well as Renaissance architecture. The more complicated problems of diminishing the scale of the individual coffers were presented by the requirements of curved surfaces of vaults and domes.

— Freebase

Sauvignon blanc

Sauvignon blanc

Sauvignon blanc is a green-skinned grape variety which originates from the Bordeaux region of France. The grape most likely gets its name from the French word sauvage and blanc due to its early origins as an indigenous grape in South West France., a possible descendant of savagnin. Sauvignon blanc is planted in many of the world's wine regions, producing a crisp, dry, and refreshing white varietal wine. The grape is also a component of the famous dessert wines from Sauternes and Barsac. Sauvignon blanc is widely cultivated in France, Chile, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Brazil, Moldova and California. Some California Sauvignon blancs are also called "Fume Blanc," though this is often perceived to be a different type of wine. Depending on the climate, the flavor can range from aggressively grassy to sweetly tropical. Wine experts have used the phrase "crisp, elegant, and fresh" as a favorable description of Sauvignon blanc from the Loire Valley and New Zealand. Sauvignon blanc, when slightly chilled, pairs well with fish or cheese, particularly Chèvre. It is also known as one of the few wines that can pair well with sushi. Along with Riesling, Sauvignon blanc was one of the first fine wines to be bottled with a screwcap in commercial quantities, especially by New Zealand producers. The wine is usually consumed young, as it does not particularly benefit from aging, except for some oak-aged Pessac-Léognan and Graves from Bordeaux that can age up to fifteen years. Dry and sweet white Bordeaux, typically made with Sauvignon blanc as a major component, is another exception.

— Freebase


The Web's Largest Resource for

Definitions & Translations


A Member Of The STANDS4 Network