Definitions containing são francisco

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São Paulo

São Paulo

São Paulo is the largest city in Brazil, the largest city proper in the southern hemisphere and the Americas' and the world's seventh largest city by population. The metropolis is anchor to the São Paulo metropolitan area, ranked as the second most populous metropolitan area in the Americas and among the ten largest metropolitan areas on the planet. São Paulo is the capital of the state of São Paulo, Brazil's most populous state. It exerts strong regional influence in commerce, finance, arts and entertainment and a strong international influence. The name of the city honors Saint Paul of Tarsus. São Paulo has the largest economy by GDP among Latin American and Brazilian cities. Its GDP per capita is the fifth highest among the larger Latin American cities and Brazil's second highest, behind Brasília. The metropolis has significant cultural, economic and political influence both nationally and internationally. It is home to several important monuments, parks and museums such as the Latin American Memorial, the Museum of the Portuguese Language, São Paulo Museum of Art, Museum of Ipiranga and the Ibirapuera Park. Paulista Avenue is the most important financial center of São Paulo. The city holds many high profile events, like the São Paulo Art Biennial, the Brazil Grand Prix Formula 1 Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo Fashion Week, ATP Brasil Open and the São Paulo Indy 300. Sao Paulo hosts the world's largest gay pride parade according to the Guinness Book of World Records.

— Freebase

South San Francisco

South San Francisco

South San Francisco is a city in San Mateo County, California, United States, located on the San Francisco Peninsula in the San Francisco Bay Area. The population was 63,632 at the 2010 census. South San Francisco lies north of San Bruno and San Francisco International Airport in a small valley south of Daly City, Colma, Brisbane, and San Bruno Mountain, east of Pacifica and the hills of the Coast Range, and west of the waters of San Francisco Bay. Locals often refer to the town as "South City," in much the same way that San Francisco is called "The City." People unfamiliar with the area often mistake "South San Francisco" as the southern part of the city of San Francisco. In fact, the city of South San Francisco is not even contiguous with the city of San Francisco, due to the city of Brisbane being between them. Most of the valley faces San Francisco Bay, affording bay views from higher levels. South San Francisco has mild winters and dry cool summers. The hills to the west shield the city from much of the fog that prevails in neighboring areas. The population has tripled since World War II with the opening of such subdivisions as Buri Buri, Winston Manor and Westborough on the slopes west of El Camino. It has grown from 4,411 in 1920 to 61,824 in 2006. As of the last Census and the published results in 2011, the population of South San Francisco stands at 64,409.

— Freebase

San Francisco

San Francisco

San Francisco, officially the City and County of San Francisco, is the leading financial and cultural center of Northern California and the San Francisco Bay Area. The only consolidated city-county in California, San Francisco encompasses a land area of about 46.9 square miles on the northern end of the San Francisco Peninsula, giving it a density of about 17,620 people per square mile. It is the most densely settled large city in the state of California and the second-most densely populated major city in the United States after New York City. San Francisco is the fourth most populous city in California, after Los Angeles, San Diego and San Jose, and the 14th most populous city in the United States—with a Census-estimated 2012 population of 825,863. The city is also the financial and cultural hub of the larger San Jose-San Francisco-Oakland metropolitan area, with a population of 8.4 million. San Francisco was founded on June 29, 1776, when colonists from Spain established a fort at the Golden Gate and a mission named for St. Francis of Assisi a few miles away. The California Gold Rush of 1849 brought rapid growth, making it the largest city on the West Coast at the time. Due to the growth of its population, San Francisco became a consolidated city-county in 1856. After three-quarters of the city was destroyed by the 1906 earthquake and fire, San Francisco was quickly rebuilt, hosting the Panama-Pacific International Exposition nine years later. During World War II, San Francisco was the port of embarkation for service members shipping out to the Pacific Theater. After the war, the confluence of returning servicemen, massive immigration, liberalizing attitudes, and other factors led to the Summer of Love and the gay rights movement, cementing San Francisco as a center of liberal activism in the United States.

— Freebase

São José dos Campos, Brazil

São José dos Campos, Brazil

São José dos Campos is a municipality and a major city in the state of São Paulo, Brazil and one of the most important industrial and research centers in Latin America. It is located in the Paraíba Valley, between the two most active production and consumption regions in the country, São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. According to a 1999 UN study, São José dos Campos was rated one of the top 25 Brazilian cities for quality of life. With its high per capita income, long life expectancy and high level of infrastructure, São José dos Campos is a, for Brazilian standards, safe and secure city that offers a wide variety of stores and services. A native of São José dos Campos is called a joseense.

— Freebase

Li Sao

Li Sao

"Li Sao" is a Chinese poem dating from the Warring States period of ancient China. The early poetic tradition of China, from before the Common Era, is represented in two anthologies, one being the Chuci, featuring poetry which compares and contrasts with the other ancient poetic compilation, the Shijing. The lead poem and the main inspiration for the Chuci collection is the poem "Li Sao". This famous piece was written by the person known as Qu Yuan, an aristocrat of the Kingdom of Chu. In his signature poem "Li Sao", Qu Yuan manifests himself in a poetic character, which is a major landmark in the tradition of Classical Chinese poetry, contrasting with the anonymous poetic voices encountered in the Shijing and the other early poems which exist as preserved in the form of incidental incorporations into various documents of ancient miscellany. The rest of the Chuci anthology is centered around the "Li Sao", the purported biography of its author Qu Yuan, and often its innovative epic poetic lines. In the "Li Sao", the poet despairs that he has been plotted against by evil factions at court with his resulting rejection by his lord and then recounts a series of shamanistic spirit journeys to various mythological realms, engaging or attempting to engage with a variety of divine or spiritual beings, with the theme of the righteous minister unfairly rejected sometimes becoming exaggerated in the long history of later literary criticism and allegorical interpretation. Dating from the time of King Huai of Chu, in the late third century BCE, the poem "Li Sao" is a remarkable example of poetry in the field of world literature, as well as being an essential work in the tradition of Chinese poetry and literature.

— Freebase

São José dos Campos

São José dos Campos

São José dos Campos is a municipality and city in the state of São Paulo, Brazil and one of the most important industrial and research centers in Latin America. It is located in the Paraíba Valley, between the two most active production and consumption regions in the country, São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. According to a 1999 UN study, São José dos Campos was rated one of the top 25 Brazilian cities for quality of life. With its high per capita income, long life expectancy and high level of infrastructure, São José dos Campos is, for Brazilian standards, a safe and secure city that offers a wide variety of stores and services. A native of São José dos Campos is called a joseense.

— Freebase

Sorocaba

Sorocaba

Sorocaba is a municipality in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Sorocaba is the eighth largest city in the state of São Paulo. Outside the Greater São Paulo region, it ranks behind only Campinas, São José dos Campos and Ribeirão Preto. With an estimated population of 584,313 inhabitants, it is a regional capital of the Sorocaba microregion with 14 municipalities, totaling over 1.5 million inhabitants. It has an area of 456.0 km ², of which 349.2 km ² is urban and 106.8 km ² rural area. Proportional to population, the municipality is the least violent in the interior due to the great performance of the Military Police, both Civil and Municipal, mainly between 2000 and 2002, who fought violence, child labor and drug trafficking. Over the past twelve years the city has been undergoing extensive urbanization projects, improving streets and avenues, as well as infrastructure for the traffic which the city receive every day. It is the eighth and fourth municipality in the consumer market in the state outside the Greater São Paulo metropolitan area, with a potential annual per capita consumption estimated at $ 2,400 for the urban population and $ 917 for rural areas and twenty-ninth largest city in Brazil with potential for consumption. Still, it is the 4th largest city of the state to receive new investments and one of the largest in the country, figuring in the list of 30 cities that create more jobs in Brazil.

— Freebase

Liberdade

Liberdade

Liberdade is the name of a district in the subprefecture of Sé, in São Paulo, Brazil. It is home to the largest Japanese community outside of Japan in the world and has been growing since the 1950s. Liberdade is São Paulo's own equivalent of Japantown in the USA. Significant populations of Chinese and Koreans also live in the district of Liberdade. It is served by the São Paulo Metro. The entrance to Liberdade is marked by a nine-meter tall red torii since 1974. This towering structure, situated on Rua Galvão Bueno, is a distinctive representation of the neighborhood. Liberdade was successfully connected to the São Paulo subway network in the 1970s, opening up this area to commerce like never before. Today, thousands of paulistanos flock to the public square in Liberdade every Sunday to purchase craft goods at the weekly fair. In January 2008, in order to celebrate 100 years of Japanese immigration to Brazil, a project to revitalize the quarter was approved by the mayor Gilberto Kassab. 40% of the restoration were for the visit of the prince Naruhito to São Paulo in June 2008. The Japanese presence in the neighborhood began in 1912. At this time, Japanese immigrants began to take up residence on the street of Count Sarzedas. This street had a steep slope that gave way to a running stream and swamp area. Basement apartments were numerous and inexpensive, and groups of people or families often lived together in the small rooms. However, the central location of the neighborhood meant immigrants could also be closer to work. As the number of immigrants in the neighborhood grew, so did commercial activity. Soon Japanese-owned inns, emporiums, restaurants, shops, and markets were popping up. These new commercial endeavors also become workplaces, which brought more immigrants to the area, and thus the "street of the Japanese" was formed.

— Freebase

Limeira

Limeira

Limeira is a city in the eastern part of the Brazilian state of São Paulo. The population in 2004 is 270,733 and the area is 582.48 km². The elevation is 588 m. It is 154 km far from São Paulo, the state capital, and 1011 km far from Brasilia, Brazil's capital. The city can be easily reached from São Paulo by two highways: Rodovia Anhanguera and Rodovia dos Bandeirantes. It was formerly known as the "Brazilian orange capital" because of the great citrus production that occurred there in the past. Nowadays the main crop cultivated in the city is sugar cane. Limeira is also known for its new plated jewelry and semi-jewelry industry which attract customers from all over the world, giving the city the title of "Brazil's plated jewelry capital." There are more than 450 companies that are responsible for half of Brazil's exports in this sector. There is a famous farm located in Limeira named Fazenda Ibicaba that belonged to Nicolau de Campos Vergueiro, which brought the first immigrants from Europe, specially from Germany, Portugal, Switzerland and Belgium, to replace the enslaved African-Brazilian workers, which was basically a government effort to "bleach" the race, as it was feared Brazil had become a "black" country. Limeira is thus said to have accomplished the first "positive" experience with immigrant workers in Brazil. Probably because Northern Europeans preferred to run their own farms rather than to subject themselves to indentured work and the Portuguese tended to work in commerce, Italian immigrants were brought to work the fields. Such immigrant group was greater in numbers than all the others all over São Paulo state. Northern Europeans and the first Italians to arrive at the country often came with the promise of being granted lands in exchange for their work but the last ones to come suffered besides suffering prejudice were treated a little better than enslaved African-Brazilians. The latter, nonetheless, had nowhere to go for jobs as slavery ended and many begged to be rehired for food. The situation of some of them improved when the British installed the railway in the country and gave them prestigious jobs with housing. Today, Limeira is located in a prosperous region in São Paulo State, having Campinas as the center of its hub.

— Freebase

São Tomé and Príncipe

São Tomé and Príncipe

São Tomé and Príncipe officially the Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Príncipe, is a Portuguese-speaking island nation in the Gulf of Guinea, off the western equatorial coast of Central Africa. It consists of two archipelagos around the two main islands: São Tomé and Príncipe, located about 140 kilometres apart and about 250 and 225 kilometres, respectively, off the northwestern coast of Gabon. Both islands are part of an extinct volcanic mountain range. São Tomé, the sizable southern island, is situated just north of the equator. It was named in honour of Saint Thomas by Portuguese explorers who arrived at the island on his feast day. With a population of 163,000, São Tomé and Príncipe is the second-smallest African country. It is also the smallest Portuguese-speaking country.

— Freebase

Osasco

Osasco

Osasco is a municipality and city in São Paulo State, Brazil, is located in the Greater São Paulo and ranking 5th in population among São Paulo municipalities. The current mayor is Antonio Jorge Pereira Lapas. The population in 2008 is 713,066, the density is 10,970/km² and the total area is 65 km². It is among the world more dense cities, similar in density to Tokyo and New York City. It's considered the major urban centre of the Western portion of the Greater São Paulo. It used to be a district of São Paulo City until February 19, 1962, when Osasco became a municipality of its own. In 1989 the city became the seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Osasco.

— Freebase

GOE

GOE

Grupamento de Operações Especiais, mostly known by its acronym GOE, is the elite arm of the Civil Police of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. It is comparable to Rio de Janeiro's CORE. Founded in 1991, GOE serves to assist conventional police units in high-risk operations involving hostages and uprisings in the prison system. It is subordinate to the Departamento de Polícia Judiciária da Capital - DECAP. In 2005 they moved to new headquarters in Campo Belo in the southern zone of São Paulo which contains infrastructure appropriate to their role as a special forces group. They recently distinguished themselves by imprisoning Lebanese Citizen Rana Koleilat, who was a fugitive in Brazil. She was involved in schemes that led to defrauding investors of funds. The São Paulo GOE has about 200 members, a fleet of 60 vehicles, 5 tactical subdivisions, as well as a specialized Delta unit with its own intelligence service and plain-clothes police and unmarked cars, as well as administrative divisions. Over the years GOE has served as the model for various other tactical units of the same name, throughout São Paulo state and in other states in the federation. Having carried out innumerable successful tactical actions, the São Paulo GOE has established itself as one of the largest and best police special forces units in Brazil.

— Freebase

San Francisco Bay

San Francisco Bay

San Francisco Bay is a shallow, productive estuary that drains water from approximately forty percent of California. Water from the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers, and from the Sierra Nevada mountains passes through the Bay to the Pacific Ocean. Specifically, both rivers flow into Suisun Bay, which flows through the Carquinez Strait to meet with the Napa River at the entrance to San Pablo Bay, which connects at its south end to San Francisco Bay. However, the entire group of interconnected bays is often called the San Francisco Bay. San Francisco Bay is in the U.S. state of California, surrounded by a contiguous region known as the San Francisco Bay Area, dominated by the large cities San Francisco, Oakland, and San Jose. The waterway entrance to San Francisco Bay from the Pacific Ocean is called the Golden Gate. Across the strait spans the Golden Gate Bridge. The bay was designated a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance on February 2, 2013.

— Freebase

Ramaytush people

Ramaytush people

The Ramaytush are one of the linguistic subdivisions of the Ohlone Native Americans of Northern California. Historically, the Ramaytush inhabited the San Francisco Peninsula between San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Ocean in the area which is now San Francisco and San Mateo Counties. The Ramaytush were not thought to be a self-conscious socio-political group. Instead they were defined by modern anthropologists and linguists, initially in the early twentieth century as the San Francisco Costanoans – the people who spoke a common dialect or language within the Costanoan branch of the Utian family. The term Ramaytush was first applied to them during the 1970s. Historically, Ramaytush language territory was largely bordered by ocean and sea, except in the south where they bordered the people of the Santa Clara Valley who spoke Tamyen Ohlone and the people of the Santa Cruz Mountains and Pacific Coast at Point Año Nuevo who spoke dialects merging toward Awaswas Ohlone. To the east, across San Francisco Bay, were tribes that spoke the Chochenyo Ohlone language. To the north, across the Golden Gate, was the Huimen local tribe of Coast Miwok speakers. The northernmost Ramaytush local tribe, the Yelamu of San Francisco, were intermarried with the Huchiun Chochenyos of the Oakland area at the time of Spanish colonization.

— Freebase

São Bernardo do Campo

São Bernardo do Campo

São Bernardo do Campo is a municipality in the state of São Paulo, in southern Metropolitan São Paulo and São Paulo microregion. The municipality's total area is 408.45 km ² and a population estimated at 1 July 2009, according to the IBGE, was 810,979 inhabitants, which results in a population density of 1,962.5 inhabitants / km ².

— Freebase

Ponta Delgada

Ponta Delgada

Ponta Delgada is a city and municipality on the island of São Miguel in the archipelago of the Azores, an autonomous region of Portugal. It includes 44,403 residents in the urban area, and approximately 20,113 inhabitants in the three central parishes that comprise the historical city: São Pedro, São Sebastião, São José. Following the revised constitution of 1976, Ponta Delgada is the administrative capital of the Autonomous Region of the Azores.

— Freebase

Minas Gerais

Minas Gerais

Minas Gerais is one of the 26 states of Brazil, ranks as the second most populous, the third by Gross Domestic Product and the fourth largest by area in the country. The state's capital and largest city, Belo Horizonte, is a major urban and finance center in Latin America, and is the sixth largest urban agglomeration in Brazil, after the cities of Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, Brasilia and Fortaleza, but its metropolitan area is the third largest in Brazil with just over 5,500,000 inhabitants, after those of Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. Minas Gerais is the Brazilian state with the largest number of Presidents of Brazil; Brazil's current president, Dilma Rousseff, having been born in Belo Horizonte, is one of them. With 586,528 km², it is the fourth most extensive state in Brazil. The main producer of coffee and milk in the country, Minas Gerais is known for its heritage of architecture and colonial art in historical cities such as Congonhas, Ouro Preto, Diamantina, Tiradentes and Mariana. In the south, the tourist points are the hydro mineral spas, such as Caxambu, São Lourenço, Poços de Caldas, São Thomé das Letras, Monte Verde and the national parks of Caparaó and Canastra. The landscape of the State is marked by mountains, valleys, and large areas of fertile lands. In the Serra do Cipó, Sete Lagoas, Cordisburgo and Lagoa Santa, the caves and waterfalls are the attractions. Some of Brazil's most famous caverns are located there. In recent years, the state has emerged as one of the largest economic forces of Brazil, exploring its great economic potential.

— Freebase

Neves

Neves

Neves is a small town on the north west coast of São Tomé Island in São Tomé and Príncipe. It is considered a likely location for a future deep water port. Currently, the city does not have a dock or pier capable of receiving ships. Neves is home to the few industrial facilities on the island, such as the petroleum terminal and the brewery. The fuel terminal receives fuel by floating a hose out to ships at anchor, and pumping the fuel ashore. Neves is linked to the capital with a highway. The highway almost encircles the island, which is the largest island in São Tomé and Príncipe. The majority of the population are urban and Neves is the second largest city on the island of Sao Tome.

— Freebase

Diadema

Diadema

Diadema is a municipality in São Paulo state, Brazil. Belonging to the ABC Region of Greater São Paulo, it is 17 km distant from São Paulo's central point. Initially part of São Bernardo do Campo, Diadema became a city of its own in 1959. The city has an area of 30.65 square kilometres and a population of 386,039, the 14th largest in the state. Entirely urbanised, the annual mean temperature in the city is 19,6°C. Its HDI is 0.790. Although located in the heart of a traditionally industrial region, its main source of income is the service sector, featuring 77 healthcare installations. Diadema is still home to a butterfly zoo, a botanical garden, an art museum and an observatory.

— Freebase

Jacareí

Jacareí

Jacareí is a city of approximately 211,308 inhabitants in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. It's an important city in São Paulo state. The city is known as "Capital of Beer" by the daily output of its factories, considered the biggest in Latin America. The economic activity is mainly based on industrial production. The industries produce mainly paper, chemicals, glass, wire and rubber. The city is located in the Paraíba do Sul's valley. This region is a highly industrialized, located between the cities of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. Neighbor Cities: São José dos Campos, Santa Branca, Guararema, Jambeiro, Igaratá and Santa Isabel.

— Freebase

oakland

Oakland

a city in western California on San Francisco Bay opposite San Francisco; primarily and industrial urban center

— Princeton's WordNet

san jose

San Jose

a city in western California located at the southern end of San Francisco Bay to the south of San Francisco; a center for computer and electronics industries

— Princeton's WordNet

Jequitinhonha River

Jequitinhonha River

The Jequitinhonha River flows mainly through the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais. Its source lies near Diamantina in the Espinhaço Mountains at an elevation of 1,200 m, after which it flows northward and then east-northeastward across the uplands. At Salto da Divisa, it is interrupted by the Cachoeira do Salto Grande, [43 m] high. The river descends to the coastal plain at the city of Jequitinhonha, beyond which it is also called Rio Grande do Belmonte and empties into the Atlantic Ocean at Belmonte in Bahia state after a course of approximately 1,090 km. The main tributaries are the Araçuaí River, Piauí, São Miguel, Itacambiruçu, Salinas, São Pedro, and São Francisco. The valley of the Jequitinhonha is one of the poorest regions of Brazil and is still prone to endemic yellow fever. It covers 78,451 km², twice the size of Switzerland and has an approximate population of one million people, distributed in about 80 municipalities. The most populous of these is Almenara located on the middle Jequitinhonha. The valley is known for its variety of gemstones, colonial-era towns, unique handicraft and starkly beautiful landscapes immortalized by the Brazilian author João Guimarães Rosa.

— Freebase

Sea lion

Sea lion

any one of several large species of seals of the family Otariidae native of the Pacific Ocean, especially the southern sea lion (Otaria jubata) of the South American coast; the northern sea lion (Eumetopias Stelleri) found from California to Japan; and the black, or California, sea lion (Zalophus Californianus), which is common on the rocks near San Francisco

— Webster Dictionary

Chochenyo people

Chochenyo people

The Chochenyo are one of the divisions of the indigenous Ohlone people of Northern California. The Chochenyo resided on the east side of the San Francisco Bay, primarily in what is now Alameda County, and also Contra Costa County, inland to the Mount Diablo coastal mountains. Chochenyo is also the name of their spoken language, one of the Costanoan dialects in the Utian family. Linguistically, Chochenyo, Tamyen and Ramaytush are thought to be close dialects of a single language. The Ohlone tribes were hunter-gatherers who moved into the San Francisco Bay Region around 500 AD, displacing earlier Esselen people. In Chochenyo territory, recent datings of the ancient Emeryville Shellmounds and Newark Shellmounds attest to people residing in the Bay Area since the 4000 BC. Chochenyo territory was bordered by the Karkin to the north, the Tamyen to the south and southwest, the San Francisco Bay to the west, and overlapped a bit with the Bay Miwok and Yokuts to the east. During the California Mission Era, the Chochenyos moved en masse to the Mission San Francisco de Asís in San Francisco, and Mission San José of Fremont. Most moved into one of these missions and were baptized, lived and educated to be Catholic neophytes, also known as Mission Indians, until the missions were discontinued by the Mexican Government in 1834. Then the people found themselves landless. A large majority of the Chochenyo died from disease in the missions and shortly thereafter, only a fragment remaining by 1900. The speech of the last two native speakers of Chochenyo was documented in the 1920s in the unpublished fieldnotes of the Bureau of American Ethnology linguist John Peabody Harrington.

— Freebase

Santos, São Paulo

Santos, São Paulo

Santos is a municipality in the São Paulo state of Brazil, founded in 1546 by the Portuguese nobleman Brás Cubas. It is partially located on the island of São Vicente, which harbors both the city of Santos and the city of São Vicente, and partially on the mainland. It is the main city in the metropolitan region of Baixada Santista. As of 2006, its population was estimated at 418,375. The city is also home to the Coffee Museum, where, once, coffee prices were negotiated. There is also a football memorial, dedicated to the city's greatest players, which includes Pelé, who played for Santos Futebol Clube. Its beachfront garden, 5.335 mts in length, figures in the Guinness Book of Records as the largest beachfront garden in the world.

— Freebase

Claridade

Claridade

Claridade was a literary review inaugurated in 1936 in the city of Mindelo on the island of São Vicente, Cape Verde. It was part of a movement of cultural, social, and political emancipations of the Capeverdean society. The founding contributors were Manuel Lopes, Baltasar Lopes da Silva, who used the poetic pseudonym of Osvaldo Alcântara, and Jorge Barbosa, born in the Islands of São Nicolau, Santiago and São Vicente, respectively. The magazine followed the steps of the Portuguese neorealist writers, and contributed to the building of "Cape Verdeanity", an autonomous cultural identity for the archipelago. Claridade revolutionized Cape Verdean literature. It set new standards of literary aesthetics and language, overcoming the conflict between Portuguese Romanticism - dominant during the nineteenth century - and the New Realism. Its founders aimed to free Cape Verdean writers from the Portuguese canons, awaken the Cape Verdean collective conscience and recover local cultural elements that had long been repressed by Portuguese colonialism, such as the Cape Verdean Creole. The project was a facet of the political and ideological unrest that existed in Cape Verde in the 1930s during Salazar's the fascist regime, caused by widespread misery and colonial mismanagement, and exacerbated by severe droughts.

— Freebase

Bananal

Bananal

Bananal is a city in the state of São Paulo in Brazil. The population density is 16.5/km². The population in 2008 was 10,727. The area is 616.320 km². Its boundaries are three cities of Rio de Janeiro state, as well as São José do Barreiro and Arapeí to the west. It is the easternmost municipality in Sâo Paulo state.

— Freebase

Bebedouro

Bebedouro

Bebedouro is a municipality in the state of São Paulo in Brazil. The population in 2003 was 78,433. The area is 684.43 square kilometres. The elevation is 573 metres. The distance from São Paulo city is about 390 km. The foundation of the city took place on May 3, 1884. The name comes from a stream used by cowboys in the 19th century for stopping and taking water. The city grew because of coffee, and, today, it is famous because of orange cultivation and orange juice factories. The municipality contains 3 districts: Bebedouro, Botafogo and Turvínea. There are two more villages: Andes and Areias. Andes is considered as an urban area, although it is not officially a district. There is another locality famous historically because in the past it was a train station between Bebedouro and Botafogo: Mirante de São Paulo. In Bebedouro, there are 3 hospitals, 13 health centers, several shopping stores, 1 movie theater, 1 theater, three museums, 1 cultural center, more than 10 supermarkets, two colleges, more than 30 schools, and 7 hotels.

— Freebase

Trindade

Trindade

Trindade is a city located on São Tomé Island, which is part of the island nation of São Tomé and Príncipe. It is the fifth largest city in the country behind the national capital São Tomé, with an estimated population of 6,636. The city is also serves as the capital of Mé-Zóchi district.

— Freebase

Mauá

Mauá

Mauá is a municipality in the state of São Paulo, in Brazil. Is part of the metropolitan region of São Paulo. The population as of 2006 is 413,943 inhabitants, the density is 6,645.4/km² and the area is 62.6 km². The density is even greater, since one third of the city is industrial area and 10% is rural or forest. This place name comes from the Tupi language and means, the one that is high. As it's a municipality, it can be translated to high city. Mauá has the 23rd largest GDP of São Paulo state. Is the birthplace of Brazilian mother tableware industry.

— Freebase

Redwood City

Redwood City

Redwood City is a California charter city located on the San Francisco Peninsula in Northern California, approximately 27 miles south of San Francisco, and 24 mi north of San Jose. Redwood City's history spans from its earliest inhabitation by the Ohlone people, to its tradition as a port for lumber and other goods, to its place as the county seat of San Mateo County. Today the city is known as the home of several technology companies such as Oracle and Electronic Arts. As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 76,815. The Port of Redwood City is the only deepwater port on San Francisco Bay south of San Francisco.

— Freebase

Santa Cruz

Santa Cruz

Santa Cruz is the county seat and largest city of Santa Cruz County, California in the US. It is located in Northern California As of the 2011 U.S. Census, Santa Cruz had a total population of 60,049. Situated on the northern edge of the Monterey Bay, about 72 mi south of San Francisco, the city is part of the U.S. Census-designated 11-county San Francisco Bay Area Combined Statistical Area but not within the traditional 9-county definition of the San Francisco Bay Area, as it is not in a county that touches the San Francisco Bay. Santa Cruz is counted as part of the Monterey Bay region. The present-day site of Santa Cruz was the location of Spanish settlement beginning in 1791, including Mission Santa Cruz and the pueblo of Branciforte. Following the Mexican–American War of 1846–48, California became the 31st state in 1850. The City of Santa Cruz was chartered in 1866. Important early industries included lumber, gunpowder, lime and agriculture. Late in the 19th century, Santa Cruz established itself as a beach resort community. Santa Cruz is now known for its moderate climate, the natural beauty of its coastline such as Natural Bridges State Park and redwood forests, alternative community lifestyles, and socially liberal leanings. It is also home to the University of California, Santa Cruz, a premier research institution and educational hub, as well as the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, an oceanfront amusement park operating continuously since 1907.

— Freebase

Golden Gate Bridge

Golden Gate Bridge

The Golden Gate Bridge is a suspension bridge spanning the Golden Gate, the opening of the San Francisco Bay into the Pacific Ocean. As part of both U.S. Route 101 and California State Route 1, the structure links the city of San Francisco, on the northern tip of the San Francisco Peninsula, to Marin County. It is one of the most internationally recognized symbols of San Francisco, California, and the United States. It has been declared one of the Wonders of the Modern World by the American Society of Civil Engineers. The Frommers travel guide considers the Golden Gate Bridge "possibly the most beautiful, certainly the most photographed, bridge in the world".

— Freebase

Alameda

Alameda

Alameda is a city in Alameda County, California, United States. It is located on Alameda Island and Bay Farm Island, and is adjacent to and west of Oakland and in eastern San Francisco Bay across from San Francisco and South San Francisco, in the San Francisco Bay Area. Bay Farm Island, a portion of which is also known as "Harbor Bay Isle", is not actually an island, and is part of the mainland adjacent to the Oakland International Airport. At the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 73,812. Alameda is a charter city, rather than a general law city, meaning that the city can provide for any form of government. Alameda became a charter city and adopted a council-manager government in 1916, which it retains to the present.

— Freebase

Berkeley

Berkeley

Berkeley was one of several ferryboats of the Southern Pacific Railroad that for sixty years operated on San Francisco Bay between the Oakland Pier and the San Francisco Ferry Building. Built in 1898 by the Union Iron Works of San Francisco, she served after the 1906 earthquake, ferrying refugees across the bay to Oakland. Berkeley was in regular service from 1898 to the spring of 1958, when she was taken out of service for repairs. She never returned to service, as Southern Pacific decided to end all ferry service on July 29, 1958. Berkeley was put up for sale, and was purchased by the Golden Gate Fishing Company to be used as a whaling processing facility. Before she was put to this use, however, she was sold to ferryboat enthusiast and businessman Bill Conover. Conover had Berkeley docked in Sausalito, a small town on the Bay in Marin County, and converted her into a gift shop called "Trade Fair". However, Berkeley was not well-maintained in her gift shop incarnation and 12 years of serious deterioration took a toll. In 1973, she was sold to the Maritime Museum of San Diego. She was towed out of San Francisco Bay by tug on May 31, 1973 arriving 3 days later in San Diego where she was subsequently restored. She currently serves as the main "building" of the Maritime Museum of San Diego.

— Freebase

Tiburon

Tiburon

Tiburon is an incorporated town in Marin County, California. It occupies most of the Tiburon Peninsula, which reaches south into the San Francisco Bay. The smaller city of Belvedere occupies the south-east part of the peninsula and is contiguous with Tiburon. Tiburon is bordered by Corte Madera to the north and Mill Valley to the west, but is otherwise surrounded by the Bay. The population was 8,962 at the 2010 census. The city's name derives from the Spanish word tiburón, which means "shark". The name was first given to the peninsula on which the city is situated, and probably inspired by the prevalence of locally native leopard sharks in the surrounding waters. Tiburon was formerly the southern terminus of the Northwestern Pacific Railroad. This railroad carried freight, mostly lumber, to the town for transfer to barges for shipping to cities around San Francisco Bay. It is now a commuter and tourist town, linked by fast ferry services to San Francisco and with a concentration of restaurants and clothes shops. It is the nearest mainland point to Angel Island and a regular ferry service connects to the island. The former railroad right of way now forms part of the San Francisco Bay Trail, used by hikers and cyclists. Within the Tiburon town limits, the rail trail passes through the Richardson Bay Park and next to the Audubon Society's Richardson Bay Sanctuary. These provide excellent opportunities for observing wildlife.

— Freebase

Canoas

Canoas

Canoas, which earned city status in 1939, is a municipality in the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul. With almost 400,000 inhabitants, it is part of the Porto Alegre conurbation and has the second highest GDP in the state. It is also the fourth largest city in the state by population. Canoas boasts a strong manufacturing-based economy and is the home of the Canoas Air Force Base, used by the Brazilian Air Force. According to the IBGE, Brazil's Geography and Statistics Institute, Canoas currently has no rural areas, but it started as a village of large landowners. The first of them was conquistador Francisco Pinto Bandeira, who received from the Portuguese Crown, in 1740, an area north of the Gravataí River. History has that 1871 was the beginning of the village of Canoas, when the first section of the railway that would link Porto Alegre to São Leopoldo was inaugurated. Canoas was then part of the municipalities of Gravataí and São Sebastião do Caí. Soon large farms would lose space to small properties. After obtaining city status, Canoas experienced rapid growth, especially after 1945. At that time, it would be called a "cidade-dormitório", because thousands of people would commute to neighboring Porto Alegre to work. However, de-industrialisation in Porto Alegre, the setting-up of numerous manufacturing plants in Canoas and a strong demographic growth have reverted that situation and nowadays Canoas has a per capita GDP higher than Porto Alegre.

— Freebase

Belo Horizonte

Belo Horizonte

Belo Horizonte is the capital and largest city in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais, located in the southeastern region of the country. According to 2010 Census data, the city has a population of 2,375,440 inhabitants living within its urban core, making it, that year, the sixth most populous city in Brazil, behind Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, Brasilia and Fortaleza. However, with over 5,497,922 people residing in the Belo Horizonte Metropolitan Region, or Greater Belo Horizonte, formed by more than twenty cities, it ranks as the third most populous urban agglomeration in the country, after Greater Sao Paulo and Greater Rio. The region was first settled in the early 18th century, but the city as it is known today was planned and constructed in the 1890s, in order to replace Ouro Preto as the capital of Minas Gerais. The city features a mixture of contemporary and classical buildings, and is home to several modern Brazilian architectural icons, most notably the Pampulha Complex. In planning the city, Aarão Reis and Francisco Bicalho sought inspiration in the urban planning of Washington, D.C. The city has employed notable programs in urban revitalization and food security, for which it has been awarded international accolades.²²

— Freebase

São Francisco

São Francisco

São Francisco is a village situated at the southeast of Santiago Island in Cape Verde. It is part of the municipality of Praia. The village is linked with the road linking with Praia which is approximately 8 to 10 km away, São Domingos to the west and along the coastling and up to Achada to the north.

— Freebase

Atlantic Islands

Atlantic Islands

Widely scattered islands in the Atlantic Ocean as far north as the AZORES and as far south as the South Sandwich Islands, with the greatest concentration found in the CARIBBEAN REGION. They include Annobon Island, Ascension, Canary Islands, Falkland Islands, Fernando Po (also called Isla de Bioko and Bioko), Gough Island, Madeira, Sao Tome and Principe, Saint Helena, and Tristan da Cunha.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

capital of cape verde

Praia, Cidade de Praia, capital of Cape Verde

the capital of Cape Verde on Sao Tiago Island

— Princeton's WordNet

centavo

centavo

a fractional monetary unit of several countries: El Salvador and Sao Tome and Principe and Brazil and Argentina and Bolivia and Colombia and Cuba and the Dominican Republic and Ecuador and El Salvador and Guatemala and Honduras and Mexico and Nicaragua and Peru and the Philippines and Portugal

— Princeton's WordNet

cidade de praia

Praia, Cidade de Praia, capital of Cape Verde

the capital of Cape Verde on Sao Tiago Island

— Princeton's WordNet

dobra

dobra

the basic unit of money on Sao Tome e Principe

— Princeton's WordNet

limeira

Limeira

a city of southeastern Brazil (northwest of Sao Paulo)

— Princeton's WordNet

osasco

Osasco

a city in southeastern Brazil; suburb of Sao Paulo

— Princeton's WordNet

praia

Praia, Cidade de Praia, capital of Cape Verde

the capital of Cape Verde on Sao Tiago Island

— Princeton's WordNet

principe

Principe

an island in the Gulf of Guinea that is part of Sao Tome and Principe

— Princeton's WordNet

santos

Santos

a port city in southwestern Brazil on an offshore island near Sao Paulo

— Princeton's WordNet

sao bernardo do campo

Sao Bernardo do Campo

a city in southeastern Brazil; an industrial suburb of Sao Paulo

— Princeton's WordNet

sao jose dos campos

Sao Jose dos Campos

a city in southeastern Brazil to the northeast of Sao Paulo

— Princeton's WordNet

sao thome e principe monetary unit

Sao Thome e Principe monetary unit

monetary unit on Sao Tome e Principe

— Princeton's WordNet

sao tome

Sao Tome

capital of Sao Tome and Principe

— Princeton's WordNet

San Franciscan

San Franciscan

A native of San Francisco.

— Wiktionary

San Franciscan

San Franciscan

Of or relating to San Francisco.

— Wiktionary

Alcatraz

Alcatraz

Alcatraz Island, an island in the San Francisco Bay, California, USA, formerly a famous prison

— Wiktionary

Bay

Bay

The San Francisco Bay Area

— Wiktionary

Bay

Bay

San Francisco Bay.

— Wiktionary

City

City

A popular name (not always capitalized) for any of several other cities in metropolitan areas (such as San Francisco)

— Wiktionary

Giant

Giant

A player on the team the San Francisco Giants.

— Wiktionary

Jints

Jints

Nickname for the New York Giants, subsequently the San Francisco Giants.

— Wiktionary

Golden Gate Bridge

Golden Gate Bridge

A 1.7 mile long suspension bridge linking Marin County, California, to San Francisco, California.

— Wiktionary

Silicon Valley

Silicon Valley

A nickname originally for the region of the San Francisco Bay Area in which there are a high number of industries producing silicon chips and later extended to mean the entire concentration of high-tech businesses in this area.

— Wiktionary

Frisco

Frisco

San Francisco, California.

— Wiktionary

Ohlone

Ohlone

An indigenous population native to the San Francisco and Monterey Bay Areas, California.

— Wiktionary

Costanoan

Costanoan

Ohlone people, native to the San Francisco and Monterey Bay Areas, California.

— Wiktionary

Muwekma

Muwekma

Ohlone people, native to the San Francisco and Monterey Bay Areas, California.

— Wiktionary

Muwekma

Muwekma

The northern Ohlone people, as well as other Native Americans who descended from Mission Indians resident at the Santa Clara, San Jose or San Francisco Missions.

— Wiktionary

Bay Miwok

Bay Miwok

A division of the Miwok people, who resided east of the San Francisco Bay.

— Wiktionary

Coast Miwok

Coast Miwok

A division of the Miwok people, who resided north of the San Francisco Bay.

— Wiktionary

San Fran

San Fran

The City of San Francisco, California.

— Wiktionary

Haight

Haight

A street in San Francisco infamous as drug-infested; a 1960s rallying point for drug culture, especially LSD (hallucinogenic acid).

— Wiktionary

Franquist

Franquist

a supporter of Francisco Franco

— Wiktionary

Franquist

Franquist

pertaining to, or associated with, the regime and policies of Francisco Franco in Spain (1939u201375)

— Wiktionary

49er

49er

A player for the San Francisco 49ers, an NFL team.

— Wiktionary

Baghdad by the Bay

Baghdad by the Bay

Nickname for San Francisco (city in California).

— Wiktionary

Francoesque

Francoesque

Reminiscent of Francisco Franco Bahamonde (1892u20131975), military general and dictator of Spain.

— Wiktionary

Barbary Coast

Barbary Coast

A waterfront area of San Francisco at the time of the gold rush

— Wiktionary

Victorias Secret

Victorias Secret

A retail marketer of women's clothing and beauty products, most recognizable as a marketer of bras and other lingerie, founded in San Francisco in 1977.

— Wiktionary

Luce

Luce

Luce is a rock band based in San Francisco, California. The band was founded in 2000 by lead singer Tom Luce and is made up of keyboardist/producer Adam Rossi, drummer Brian Zalewski, bassist Alex Cordrey and lead guitarist Dylan Brock. Luce's self-titled first album, released in 2001, met with success in the San Francisco Bay Area, winning the California Music Award for Outstanding Debut. It was promoted heavily on the San Francisco radio station KFOG; a single from the album entitled "Good Day" peaked at #39 on the Billboard Adult Top 40 chart. "Good Day" was heard in the movies 13 Going on 30 and How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days and TV shows The O.C. and Alias, and was also featured in commercials for American Leather and for northern California Toyota dealers. The band makes appearances all over northern California and the U.S.; one notable appearance was at Golden Gate Park for the finish of the 2005 Bay to Breakers race. Luce's second album, Never Ending, was released April 19, 2005, and the first single, "Buy A Dog", was the most played song on at least 13 radio stations, including KFOG and WRLT in Nashville. On Nov. 6 of '05, Tom Luce and Adam Rossi sang the national anthem at Arrowhead Stadium before the Kansas City Chiefs hosted the Oakland Raiders.

— Freebase

Santa Clara

Santa Clara

Santa Clara, founded in 1777 and incorporated in 1852, is a city in Santa Clara County, in the U.S. state of California. Located 45 miles southeast of San Francisco, the city is the site of the eighth of 21 California missions, Mission Santa Clara de Asís, and was named after the mission. The Mission and Mission Gardens are located on the grounds of Santa Clara University. Saint Clare is the patron saint of Santa Clara. The population was 116,468 at the 2010 census. It is the ninth most populous city in the San Francisco Bay Area. Santa Clara is located in the center of Silicon Valley and is home to the headquarters of several high-tech companies. It is the site of Levi's Stadium, the future home of the National Football League's San Francisco 49ers and site of Super Bowl L. It is also home to Santa Clara University, the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of California. The city is bordered by San Jose, Sunnyvale and Cupertino.

— Freebase

Silicon Valley

Silicon Valley

Silicon Valley is the southern region of the San Francisco Bay Area in Northern California, in the United States. The region, whose name derives from the Santa Clara Valley in which it is centered, is home to many of the world's largest technology corporations as well as thousands of small startups. The term originally referred to the region's large number of silicon chip innovators and manufacturers, but eventually came to refer to all the high-tech businesses in the area, and is now generally used as a metonym for the American high-tech sector. Despite the development of other high-tech economic centers throughout the United States and the world, Silicon Valley continues to be the leading startup ecosystem for high-tech innovation and development, accounting for one-third of all of the venture capital investment in the United States. Geographically, Silicon Valley encompasses all of the Santa Clara Valley including the city of San Jose, the southern Peninsula Valley, and the southern East Bay. However, with the rapid growth of technology jobs in the San Francisco metropolitan area, some commentators now argue that the traditional boundaries of Silicon Valley have expanded north to include the rest of San Mateo County and the City and County of San Francisco, as well as parts of Marin County.

— Freebase

Internal affairs

Internal affairs

The internal affairs division of a law enforcement agency investigates incidents and plausible suspicions of lawbreaking and professional misconduct attributed to officers on the force. In different systems, internal affairs can go by another name such as "Internal Investigations Division", "professional standards," "inspectorate general", Office of Professional Responsibility or similar. Non-internal affairs officers often derisively refer to the departments as the "rat squad". Several police departments in the USA have been compelled to institute civilian review or investigation of police misconduct complaints in response to community perception that internal affairs investigations are biased in favor of police officers. For example, San Francisco, California, has its Office of Citizen Complaints, created by voter initiative in 1983, in which civilians who have never been members of the San Francisco Police Department investigate complaints of police misconduct filed against members of the San Francisco Police Department. Washington, DC, has a similar office, created in 1999, known as the Office of Police Complaints. Due to the sensitive nature of this responsibility, in many departments, officers working internal affairs are not in a detective command, but report directly to the agency's chief, or to a board of civilian police commissioners.

— Freebase

San Jose

San Jose

San Jose is the third-largest city in California, the tenth-largest in the United States, and the county seat of Santa Clara County. San Jose is the largest city within Silicon Valley, which is a major component of the greater San Francisco Bay Area. It is the largest city in Northern California. San Jose was founded on November 29, 1777, as El Pueblo de San José de Guadalupe, the first civilian town in the Spanish colony of Nueva California. The city served as a farming community to support Spanish military installations at San Francisco and Monterey. When California gained statehood in 1850, San Jose served as its first capital. After more than 150 years as a small farming community, the San Jose area in the mid-20th century contained some of the last undeveloped land near San Francisco Bay. It then began to experience rapid population growth, much of it coming from veterans returning from World War II. San Jose then continued its aggressive expansion during the 1950s and 1960s by annexing more land area. The rapid growth of the high-technology and electronics industries further accelerated the transition from an agricultural center, to an urbanized metropolitan area.

— Freebase

Fruit Fly

Fruit Fly

Fruit Fly is a 2009 musical film with gay and Asian-American themes, directed by H.P. Mendoza, who wrote the screenplay for Colma The Musical. The film, made entirely in San Francisco, premiered on March 15, 2009 at the San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival at the Castro Theatre in San Francisco. It had a limited one-week run in New York on September 24, 2010.

— Freebase

San Pablo Bay

San Pablo Bay

San Pablo Bay is a tidal estuary that forms the northern extension of San Francisco Bay in northern California in the United States. Most of the Bay is shallow; however, there is a deep water channel approximately in mid bay, which allows access to Sacramento, Stockton, Benicia, Martinez, and other smaller Delta ports. It receives the waters of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers, via Suisun Bay and the Carquinez Strait on its northeast end, and it connects to the Pacific Ocean via the San Francisco Bay on its southern end. The bay is heavily silted from the contributions of the two rivers, which themselves drain most of the Central Valley of California. San Pablo Bay also receives the waters of Sonoma Creek through the Napa Sonoma Marsh, San Rafael Creek, and the Petaluma River directly, and the Napa River which flows into the Carquinez Strait via the Mare Island Strait near its entrance into the bay. All tributaries except for Sonoma Creek are commercially navigable and maintained by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The bay is approximately 10 mi across and has an area of approximately 90 sq mi. Two peninsulas separate San Pablo Bay from San Francisco Bay. The eastern is in the City of Richmond and the western in the City of San Rafael. The bay is shared between Contra Costa county on the southern and eastern shore, and Solano, Sonoma and Marin counties on the northern and western shores. The county boundaries meet near the center of the bay. Communities on the shores of San Pablo Bay include: Richmond, San Pablo, Pinole, Hercules, Rodeo in Contra Costa County, Vallejo in Solano County, along with Novato, and San Rafael in Marin County.

— Freebase

Ohlone people

Ohlone people

The Ohlone people, also known as the Costanoan, are a Native American people of the central and northern California coast. When Spanish explorers and missionaries arrived in the late 18th century, the Ohlone inhabited the area along the coast from San Francisco Bay through Monterey Bay to the lower Salinas Valley. At that time they spoke a variety of languages, the Ohlone languages, belonging to the Costanoan sub-family of the Utian language family, which itself belongs to the proposed Penutian language phylum or stock. The term "Ohlone" has been used in place of "Costanoan" since the 1970s by some descendant groups and by most ethnographers, historians, and writers of popular literature. Before the Spanish came, the Ohlone lived in more than 50 distinct landholding groups, and did not view themselves as a distinct group. They lived by hunting, fishing, and gathering, in the typical ethnographic California pattern. Originally, the Ohlone religion was Kuksu, but in the years 1769 to 1833, the Spanish missions in California had a devastating effect on Ohlone culture. The Ohlone population declined steeply during this period. The Ohlone living today belong to one or another of a number of geographically distinct groups, most, but not all, in their original home territory. The Muwekma Ohlone Tribe has members from around the San Francisco Bay Area, and is composed of descendants of the Ohlones/Costanoans from the San Jose, Santa Clara, and San Francisco missions. The Ohlone/Costanoan Esselen Nation, consisting of descendants of intermarried Rumsen Costanoan and Esselen speakers of Mission San Carlos Borromeo, are centered at Monterey. The Amah-Mutsun Tribe are descendants of Mutsun Costanoan speakers of Mission San Juan Bautista, inland from Monterey Bay. Most members of another group of Rumsen language, descendants from Mission San Carlos, the Costanoan Rumsen Carmel Tribe of Pomona/Chino, now live in southern California. These groups, and others with smaller memberships are separately petitioning the federal government for tribal recognition.

— Freebase

Burlingame

Burlingame

Burlingame is a city in San Mateo County, California. It is located on the San Francisco Peninsula and has a significant shoreline on San Francisco Bay. The city is named after diplomat Anson Burlingame. It is renowned for its many surviving examples of Victorian architecture, its affluence, and its high quality of residential life. Burlingame was settled by wealthy San Franciscans looking for a better climate for their second homes. Beginning in the 1960s a population increase and its proximity to the San Francisco International Airport generated airline support services growth. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, Burlingame had a population of 28,806.

— Freebase

Aquatic Park

Aquatic Park

Aquatic Park is a public park in Berkeley, California, United States, located just east of the Eastshore Freeway between Ashby and University Avenues. The park was created in the 1930s by the Works Progress Administration, simultaneous with its work on the nearby Berkeley Yacht Harbor. Its centerpiece is an artificial mile-long lagoon cut off from San Francisco Bay when a causeway for the Eastshore Highway was created in the 1930s in conjunction with the construction of the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge approaches. The lagoon still communicates with the Bay through culverts under the freeway. The east shoreline of the lagoon represents what used to be the original shoreline of San Francisco Bay. The park has been noted as being a long running and "historical" homosexual cruising location by the Berkeley Police Department where men have engaged in anonymous public sex for decades.

— Freebase

Francisco Romero

Francisco Romero

Francisco Romero was a significant Spanish matador. He reputedly introduced the famous red cape into bullfighting in around 1726. He was the founding father of a bullfighting dynasty, fundamental for bullfighting history. He was apparently the inventor of several characteristics that started to be used in a key period for bullfighting when the modern on foot system was defined, as the use of the muleta and estoque to kill the bull face to face. He was the father of Juan Romero, also a bullfighter, and grandfather of the great Pedro Romero. During the first years of the 18th century, at Ronda, Francisco Romero, at the end of a bullfight, asked for permission to kill the bull by himself. Up to this moment, only nobles mounted on horses dared to fight a bull. That afternoon, after provoking the bull a couple of times with a linen, Francisco Romero killed the bull with his sword. He soon repeated the same feat at other bullrings and became an authentic professional, giving birth to the modern style of on foot bullfighting. The use of linens could have been done before Romero's feat. Those linens evolved step by step towards the modern muleta or red cape and capote or purple and yellow cape, but it is very plausible that was Romero the one that popularized his use as the bullfight essential prop.

— Freebase

Verbal Abuse

Verbal Abuse

Verbal Abuse is a hardcore punk band, originally from Houston, but which became successful after moving to San Francisco. Verbal Abuse was started in Houston in 1981 after singer and songwriter Nicki Sicki quit the band Sick Pleasure and moved to Virginia, then back to Texas when he decided he wanted to start another band. At the time, not many bands were playing fast hardcore in Texas and, like D.R.I. and M.D.C. before them, Verbal Abuse relocated to San Francisco in the end of 1981. In San Francisco, Verbal Abuse lived at the infamous "Vats" along with members of The Dicks and M.D.C. as well as Harley Flanagan from the Cro-Mags. By the end of the year, they had signed with Fowl Records and recorded their first LP, Just an American Band, which was released in the beginning of 1983. The band then embarked on a tour to promote their first album, but Brett Dodwell soon left Verbal Abuse to join the army, so Sicki asked former Sick Pleasure bandmate Dave "Koko" Chavez to take his place. However, hardcore was starting to wane in popularity and crossover thrash was the "big thing" in the mid-'80s so Nicki quit the band in 1984. Since remaining members Chavez, Joie Mastrokalos, and Gregg James wanted to continue making music, they asked Condemned to Death singer Scotty Wilkins to sing.

— Freebase

Slim's

Slim's

Opened in 1988 by legendary RB artist Boz Scaggs, Slim's is a live music nightclub dedicated to providing the public with excellent service, a congenial atmosphere, good food drinks, and the finest of American Roots Music--Blues, RB, Cajun/Zydeco, Jazz, Alternative, and more. Pollstar Magazine has voted Slim's the best nightclub in America five out of the last eleven years, and for the past two years Slim's was awarded Best Bar Club by the readers of the San Francisco Chronicle. The club is located in the South of Market district of San Francisco, a hub of nightlife in the city. Although parking in San Francisco is notoriously difficult, we have the luxury of having several hundred parking spaces available at a low-cost garage on our corner. The premises consist mainly of an open floor on our main level. At one end of the floor is our performance stage. At the other end we have a small balcony with table seating for 70 where guests may sit and relax. Our bar runs the length of the floor in an "L" shape. The decor is simple and tasteful, with chandeliers, brick walls, and a bar inspired by the facades of several New Orleans manors. A coat check and additional rest rooms are located in our downstairs level. Slim's is entirely wheelchair accessible.

— Freebase

Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires is the capital and largest city of Argentina, and the second-largest metropolitan area in South America, after Greater São Paulo. It is located on the western shore of the estuary of the Río de la Plata, on the southeastern coast of the South American continent. The Greater Buenos Aires conurbation, which also includes several Buenos Aires Province districts, constitutes the third-largest conurbation in Latin America, with a population of around thirteen million. The city of Buenos Aires is neither part of Buenos Aires Province nor the Province's capital; rather, it is an autonomous district. In 1880, after decades of political infighting, Buenos Aires was federalised and removed from Buenos Aires Province. The city limits were enlarged to include the towns of Belgrano and Flores; both are now neighborhoods of the city. The 1994 constitutional amendment granted the city autonomy, hence its formal name: Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires. Its citizens first elected a Chief of Government in 1996; before, the Mayor was directly appointed by the President of the Republic. Buenos Aires is rated one of the 20 largest cities in the world. It is, along with Mexico City and São Paulo, one of the three Latin American cities considered an 'alpha city' by the study GaWC5 and has been ranked as the most important global city and competitive marketplace of Latin America. Argentina has the second best quality of life in Latin America, second to Chile and Buenos Aires' quality of life is ranked at 61st in the world, with its per capita income among the three highest in the region. It is the most visited city in South America and the second most visited city across Latin America. It is also one of the most important, largest and most populous of South American capitals, often referred to as the Paris of South America.

— Freebase

Cardoso, São Paulo

Cardoso, São Paulo

Cardoso is a municipality in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The city has a population of 11,805 inhabitants and an area of 639.7 km². Cardoso belongs to the Mesoregion of São José do Rio Preto.

— Freebase

Bahia

Bahia

Bahia is one of the 26 states of Brazil, and is located in the eastern part of the country on the Atlantic coast. It is the fourth most populous Brazilian state after São Paulo, Minas Gerais and Rio de Janeiro, and the fifth-largest in size. Bahia's capital is the city of Salvador, or more properly, São Salvador da Bahia de Todos os Santos, and is located at the junction of the Atlantic Ocean and the Bay of All Saints,officially first seen by European sailors in 1501. The name "bahia" is an archaic spelling of the Portuguese word baía, meaning "bay".

— Freebase

Luanda

Luanda

Luanda, formerly named São Paulo da Assunção de Loanda, is the capital and largest city of Angola, in Southern Africa. Located on Angola's coast with the Atlantic Ocean, Luanda is both Angola's chief seaport and its administrative center. It has a metropolitan population of over 5 million. It is also the capital city of Luanda Province, and the world's third most populous Portuguese-speaking city, behind only São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, both in Brazil, and the most populous Portuguese-speaking capital in the world, ahead of Brasília, Maputo and Lisbon. The city is currently undergoing a major reconstruction, with many large developments taking place that will alter the cityscape significantly. Luanda was ranked the most expensive city to live in for expatriates by Mercer, in 2011, but was surpassed by Tokyo in 2012.

— Freebase

São João de Meriti

São João de Meriti

São João de Meriti is a Brazilian city in Rio de Janeiro state. Its historical name is São João do Rio Meriti. Its population was 598,456 inhabitants in 2013. Its located in the region of Baixada Fluminense, having 34.996 km². The city is known as "Americas' Anthill", because its population density is one of the highest in the continent.

— Freebase

São Tomé

São Tomé

São Tomé is the capital city of São Tomé and Príncipe and is by far that nation's largest town. Its name is Portuguese for "Saint Thomas".

— Freebase

Archipelago of the Azores

Archipelago of the Azores

The Archipelago of the Azores is composed of nine volcanic islands situated in the North Atlantic Ocean, and is located about 1,500 km west of Lisbon and about 1,900 km southeast of Newfoundland. The islands, and their Exclusive Economic Zone, form the Autonomous Region of the Azores, one of the two autonomous regions of Portugal. Its main industries are agriculture, dairy farming, livestock ranching, fishing, and tourism, which is becoming the major service activity in the region. In addition to this, the government of the Azores employs a large percentage of the population directly or indirectly in many aspects of the service and tertiary sectors. There are nine major Azorean islands and an islet cluster, in three main groups. These are Flores and Corvo, to the west; Graciosa, Terceira, São Jorge, Pico, and Faial in the centre; and São Miguel, Santa Maria, and the Formigas Reef to the east. They extend for more than 600 km and lie in a northwest-southeast direction. The vast extent of the islands defines an immense exclusive economic zone of 1,100,000 km². The westernmost point of this area is 3,380 km from the North American continent. All the islands have volcanic origins, although some, such as Santa Maria, have had no recorded activity since the islands were settled. Mount Pico, on the island of Pico, is the highest point in Portugal, at 2,351 m. The Azores are actually some of the tallest mountains on the planet, measured from their base at the bottom of the ocean to their peaks, which thrust high above the surface of the Atlantic.

— Freebase

Jaborandi

Jaborandi

Jaborandi is a Brazilian city of the state of São Paulo, located 491 kilometers from the state capital, São Paulo. The population in 2000 was 6,424 inhabitants.

— Freebase

Guarulhos

Guarulhos

Guarulhos is the second largest city in the Brazilian state of São Paulo and a suburb of São Paulo city itself. In the last few years it has outgrown Campinas. The population in 2006 is 1,283,253, the density is 4,035.26 inh./km² and the area is 318 km². It is 12th largest city in Brazil and also the most populous non-capital city in the country.

— Freebase

Campo Grande

Campo Grande

Campo Grande is the capital and largest city of the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul in the Center-West region of the country. The city is nicknamed Cidade Morena because of the reddish-brown colour of the region's soil. It has a population of 796,252, according to a 2011 IBGE estimate, while its metropolitan area is home to 991,420 people. The region where the city is located was in the past a waypoint for travellers who wanted to go from São Paulo or Minas Gerais to northern Mato Grosso by land. In the early 1900s a railway was completed connecting Campo Grande to Corumbá, on the Bolivian border, and to Bauru, São Paulo. Also in the beginning of the 20th century, the Western Brazilian Army Headquarters was established in Campo Grande, making it an important military center. With a population growth from 140,000 people in 1970 to 750,000 people in 2008, Campo Grande is the third largest urban center of the Center-West region, and the 23rd largest city in the country. In 1977, the State of Mato Grosso was split into two, and Campo Grande became the capital of the new state of Mato Grosso do Sul, comprising the southern portion of the former state. By that time, Campo Grande had long surpassed the latter's capital city of Cuiabá in population, which is unusual in Brazil, where most capitals are also the states' largest cities.

— Freebase

Campinas

Campinas

Campinas is a Brazilian city of São Paulo State, in the country's Southeast Region. According to the 2010 Census, the city population is 1,080,999, making it the fourteenth most populous Brazilian city and the third in the São Paulo state. The city's metropolitan area, the Greater Campinas, as of 2013, contains nineteen cities, including Campinas, and has a total population of 2,832,297 people. The city is home to the University of Campinas, one of the most prestigious in Latin America.

— Freebase

Coxo

Coxo

Coxo, is a village and a cove located approximately 5 km north of the island capital of Sao Filipe in the island of Fogo, Cape Verde. Coxo is linked with the road encircling the island and to São Filipe and to Mosteiros.

— Freebase

Ourinhos

Ourinhos

Ourinhos is a municipality/county in the state of São Paulo in Brazil. The population in 2010 is 103,026 and the area is 296.203 km². The elevation is 483 metres. The city of Ourinhos was emancipated from Salto Grande in the 1910s. One version of its etymology is that the name "Ourinhos" is a reference to the old city of Ourinho, on the other side of the Paranapanema river, which today is Jacarezinho, in Paraná state. Today, the city is formed by the town of Ourinhos, which is the only district headquarters, also subdivided into about 120 neighborhoods. It is also one of the main cities in São Paulo state's SW region, having trade and services as its main economic activities. In agriculture, sugar cane, soy, and corn are the main crops. The city also has an important cultural tradition that goes from arts and crafts to theater, music and sports. The city also stands out in its promotion of cultural and economic events and fairs often organized by the city hall and with the help of local companies. The major one is the Ourinhos Agricultural and Industrial Fair, which is held annually in June and is considered one of the largest events of this nature in Brazil.

— Freebase

Patim

Patim

Patim, is a village located approximately 5 km east of the island capital of Sao Filipe in the island of Fogo, Cape Verde. Figueira Pavão are linked the road encircling the island as well as a road to its attractions and to Monte Grande. Since 1990 it split from the municipality of the island name to become a part of São Filipe.

— Freebase

Suba

Suba

Mitar Subotić "Suba", also known as Rex Ilusivii, was a Serbian-born musician and composer who was set to become one of Brazil's most prominent producers when he died in November 1999. Subotić obtained a university degree in his hometown from the University of Novi Sad, Vojvodina, Serbia, before continuing the electronic music studies in Belgrade. He was a pioneer of electronic music in former Yugoslavia, since he mixed and produced a number of celebrated albums of Yugoslav New Wave acts such as Ekatarina Velika, Haustor, Marina Perazić in the course of the 1980s. In 1986, his fusion of electronic music and Yugoslav folk lullabies, In The Mooncage was awarded the International Fund for Promotion of Culture from UNESCO, which included a three-month scholarship to research Afro-Brazilian rhythms in Brazil. Falling in love with the country and its music, he emigrated to São Paulo in the 1990s, where his fruitful production began and ended. During that time he participated Milan Mladenović's last project Angel's Breath, and recorded his famous album São Paulo Confessions.

— Freebase

Bálsamo

Bálsamo

Bálsamo is a municipality in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The population is 8.160 inhabitants. The city belongs to the Mesoregion and Microregion of São José do Rio Preto.

— Freebase

Granja, São Tomé

Granja, São Tomé

Granja is a town on São Tomé Island in the nation of São Tomé and Príncipe. Granja has a church and a square.

— Freebase

Neco

Neco

Manoel Nunes, born March 5, 1895 in São Paulo – died May 31, 1977 in São Paulo, Brazil was an association football midfielder. With great skill and tenacity, he was the first idol of Corinthians, being the first player to get a statue in the team's gardens. As of 2006, Neco is the player who played the longest for Corinthians: 17 years. Called often to the Brazilian national team, he won two South American Championships: 1919 and 1922. Playing for Corinthians, he won the Paulista League eight times as a player and once as a coach. Neco had a quick temper and frequently got involved in fights; his second stint as a manager occurred because he was suspended as a player for 18 games when he beat a referee. He started in the third team of Corinthians at the age of 16 and joined the first team in 1913. In 1915, Corinthians did not play official games because of political issues and almost went bankrupt; this year, Neco played friendlies for Corinthians and the official games for Mackenzie. During this time, he broke into the Corinthians building to retrieve books that the landlord had locked inside due to non-payment of the rent.

— Freebase

Amparo, São Paulo

Amparo, São Paulo

Amparo is a Brazilian city of the state of São Paulo. The population in 2003 was 63,364. The area is 446 km². The city is the seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Amparo. The city is part of the "Water-Circuit", a cluster of towns which are very famous for natural fountains and waterwells. The main event here is the Winter Festival, when some stages are set over the main plaza and shows are scheduled for the whole month of July. All kinds of bands are invited to the city, from sertanejo to heavy metal. Ballet and plays are often part of it. Although the event is more directed to the city inhabitants, it's a touristic event and July might be the best time to visit Amparo. Amparo is very near Campinas and 120 kilometers from São Paulo.

— Freebase

Lins

Lins

Lins is a municipality in the western part of the state of São Paulo in Brazil. The population in 2006 is 69,721 and the area is 527.98 km². The elevation is 437 m. Distance is 455 km from the capital, São Paulo.

— Freebase

Lavras

Lavras

Lavras is a city and municipality in Southern Minas Gerais state, Brazil. Located at an altitude of 900 m, it has an approximate population of 95,000 inhabitants. The area of the municipality is 566.1 km². The average annual temperature is 19.4°C and the average annual rainfall is 1,529.7 ml. Located near the Circuit of the Waters—a series of spas in the state of São Paulo and Minas Gerais—and the historical cities of Minas, it is connected by highway to the state capital, Belo Horizonte, to São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro

— Freebase

Cedral

Cedral

Cedral is a municipality in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The population is 7.972 inhabitants. The city belongs to the Mesoregion and Microregion of São José do Rio Preto.

— Freebase

Fellini

Fellini

Fellini was a Brazilian post-punk band formed in São Paulo City, São Paulo, in 1984. It consisted of Cadão Volpato, Jair Marcos, Ricardo Salvagni, and former Voluntários da Pátria and Smack member Thomas Pappon. One of the most influent bands of the Brazilian underground post-punk scene of the mid-1980s, they were known for their sonority that mixed post-punk with other genres such as MPB, New Wave and samba rock, thus having a unique, almost non-descript musical style. Fellini was first disestablished in 1990, but re-established in 2001 and ending once more in 2010.

— Freebase

Patife Band

Patife Band

Patife Band is a Brazilian post-punk band formed in São Paulo in 1983 by Paulo Barnabé, initially under the name Paulo Patife Band. Characterized by its heavily experimental and almost non-descript musical style, that uses dodecaphonism and atonalism as main principles of composition and flirts with many different genres such as jazz, punk rock, traditional Brazilian music and popular music, it was favorably compared to American band Pere Ubu, and one critic at some point called their sound "a crossing between King Crimson and Fear". The band was disestablished in 1990, but reformed briefly in 2003 with a new line-up and releasing a live album. In 2005, it was reformed again with yet another line-up, and since then they make sporadic shows around São Paulo.

— Freebase

Adolfo

Adolfo

Adolfo is a Brazilian city located in the interior of the state of São Paulo in the region of São José do Rio Preto. Founded: 1959 Elevation: 443 metres Population: 3,437 inhabitants Area: 211.4 square kilometres Population density: 16.26hab/km² Postal code: 15230-000

— Freebase

barbary coast

Barbary Coast

a part of a city that is notorious for gambling dens and brothels and saloons and riotous night life (especially the waterfront of San Francisco after the gold rush of 1849)

— Princeton's WordNet

berkeley

Berkeley

a city in California on the eastern shore of San Francisco Bay; site of the University of California at Berkeley

— Princeton's WordNet

big sur

Big Sur

a picturesque coastal region of California to the south of San Francisco

— Princeton's WordNet

camphor dune tansy

camphor dune tansy, Tanacetum camphoratum

densely hairy plant with rayless flowers; San Francisco Bay area

— Princeton's WordNet

capital of california

Sacramento, capital of California

a city in north central California 75 miles to the northeast of San Francisco on the Sacramento River; capital of California

— Princeton's WordNet

costanoan

Costanoan

a member of a North American Indian people living in coastal California between Monterey and San Francisco Bay

— Princeton's WordNet

flower people

flower people, hippies, hipsters

a youth subculture (mostly from the middle class) originating in San Francisco in the 1960s; advocated universal love and peace and communes and long hair and soft drugs; favored acid rock and progressive rock music

— Princeton's WordNet

golden gate

Golden Gate

a strait in western California that connects the San Francisco Bay with the Pacific Ocean; discovered in 1579 by Sir Francis Drake

— Princeton's WordNet

hippies

flower people, hippies, hipsters

a youth subculture (mostly from the middle class) originating in San Francisco in the 1960s; advocated universal love and peace and communes and long hair and soft drugs; favored acid rock and progressive rock music

— Princeton's WordNet

hipsters

flower people, hippies, hipsters

a youth subculture (mostly from the middle class) originating in San Francisco in the 1960s; advocated universal love and peace and communes and long hair and soft drugs; favored acid rock and progressive rock music

— Princeton's WordNet

monterey

Monterey

a town in western California to the south of San Francisco on a peninsula at the southern end of Monterey Bay

— Princeton's WordNet

nob hill

Nob Hill

a fashionable neighborhood in San Francisco

— Princeton's WordNet

sacramento

Sacramento, capital of California

a city in north central California 75 miles to the northeast of San Francisco on the Sacramento River; capital of California

— Princeton's WordNet

sacramento river

Sacramento River

a river in northern California rising near Mount Shasta and flowing south to the San Francisco Bay

— Princeton's WordNet

san andreas fault

San Andreas Fault

a major geological fault in California; runs from San Diego to San Francisco; the source of serious earthquakes

— Princeton's WordNet

san mateo

San Mateo

a town in California to the south of San Francisco

— Princeton's WordNet

san pablo

San Pablo

a town in western California to the north of Oakland on an arm of San Francisco Bay

— Princeton's WordNet

silicon valley

Silicon Valley

a region in California to the south of San Francisco that is noted for its concentration of high-technology industries

— Princeton's WordNet

tanacetum camphoratum

camphor dune tansy, Tanacetum camphoratum

densely hairy plant with rayless flowers; San Francisco Bay area

— Princeton's WordNet

Oakland

Oakland

on the E. coast of the Bay of San Francisco, 4½ m. across from San Francisco city, is the capital of Alameda County, California, a beautiful city with tree-lined streets, surrounded by vineyards and orchards; it has a home of the adult blind of the State, manufactures of textile and iron goods, and fruit-canning industries, and is the terminus of the Southern Pacific Railroad.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

El Camino Bignum

El Camino Bignum

The road mundanely called El Camino Real, running along San Francisco peninsula. It originally extended all the way down to Mexico City; many portions of the old road are still intact. Navigation on the San Francisco peninsula is usually done relative to El Camino Real, which defines logical north and south even though it isn't really north-south in many places. El Camino Real runs right past Stanford University and so is familiar to hackers.The Spanish word ‘real’ (which has two syllables: /ray·ahl´/) means ‘royal’; El Camino Real is ‘the royal road’. In the FORTRAN language, a real quantity is a number typically precise to seven significant digits, and a double precision quantity is a larger floating-point number, precise to perhaps fourteen significant digits (other languages have similar real types).When a hacker from MIT visited Stanford in 1976, he remarked what a long road El Camino Real was. Making a pun on ‘real’, he started calling it ‘El Camino Double Precision’ — but when the hacker was told that the road was hundreds of miles long, he renamed it ‘El Camino Bignum’, and that name has stuck. (See bignum.)[GLS has since let slip that the unnamed hacker in this story was in fact himself —ESR]In the early 1990s, the synonym El Camino Virtual was been reported as an alternate at IBM and Amdahl sites in the Valley.Mathematically literate hackers in the Valley have also been heard to refer to some major cross-street intersecting El Camino Real as “El Camino Imaginary”. One popular theory is that the intersection is located near Moffett Field — where they keep all those complex planes.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

logical

logical

[from the technical term logical device, wherein a physical device is referred to by an arbitrary ‘logical’ name] Having the role of. If a person (say, Les Earnest at SAIL) who had long held a certain post left and were replaced, the replacement would for a while be known as the logical Les Earnest. (This does not imply any judgment on the replacement.) Compare virtual.At Stanford, ‘logical’ compass directions denote a coordinate system relative to El Camino Real, in which ‘logical north’ is always toward San Francisco and ‘logical south’ is always toward San Jose--in spite of the fact that El Camino Real runs physical north/south near San Francisco, physical east/west near San Jose, and along a curve everywhere in between. (The best rule of thumb here is that, by definition, El Camino Real always runs logical north-south.)In giving directions, one might say: “To get to Rincon Tarasco restaurant, get onto El Camino Bignum going logical north.” Using the word ‘logical’ helps to prevent the recipient from worrying about that the fact that the sun is setting almost directly in front of him. The concept is reinforced by North American highways which are almost, but not quite, consistently labeled with logical rather than physical directions. A similar situation exists at MIT: Route 128 (famous for the electronics industry that grew up along it) wraps roughly 3 quarters around Boston at a radius of 10 miles, terminating near the coastline at each end. It would be most precise to describe the two directions along this highway as ‘clockwise’ and ‘counterclockwise’, but the road signs all say “north” and “south”, respectively. A hacker might describe these directions as logical north and logical south, to indicate that they are conventional directions not corresponding to the usual denotation for those words.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

saga

saga

[WPI] A cuspy but bogus raving story about N random broken people.Here is a classic example of the saga form, as told by Guy L. Steele:Jon L. White (login name JONL) and I (GLS) were office mates at MIT for many years. One April, we both flew from Boston to California for a week on research business, to consult face-to-face with some people at Stanford, particularly our mutual friend Richard P. Gabriel (RPG).RPG picked us up at the San Francisco airport and drove us back to Palo Alto (going logical south on route 101, parallel to El Camino Bignum). Palo Alto is adjacent to Stanford University and about 40 miles south of San Francisco. We ate at The Good Earth, a ‘health food’ restaurant, very popular, the sort whose milkshakes all contain honey and protein powder. JONL ordered such a shake — the waitress claimed the flavor of the day was “lalaberry”. I still have no idea what that might be, but it became a running joke. It was the color of raspberry, and JONL said it tasted rather bitter. I ate a better tostada there than I have ever had in a Mexican restaurant.After this we went to the local Uncle Gaylord's Old Fashioned Ice Cream Parlor. They make ice cream fresh daily, in a variety of intriguing flavors. It's a chain, and they have a slogan: “If you don't live near an Uncle Gaylord's — MOVE!” Also, Uncle Gaylord (a real person) wages a constant battle to force big-name ice cream makers to print their ingredients on the package (like air and plastic and other non-natural garbage). JONL and I had first discovered Uncle Gaylord's the previous August, when we had flown to a computer-science conference in Berkeley, California, the first time either of us had been on the West Coast. When not in the conference sessions, we had spent our time wandering the length of Telegraph Avenue, which (like Harvard Square in Cambridge) was lined with picturesque street vendors and interesting little shops. On that street we discovered Uncle Gaylord's Berkeley store. The ice cream there was very good. During that August visit JONL went absolutely bananas (so to speak) over one particular flavor, ginger honey.Therefore, after eating at The Good Earth — indeed, after every lunch and dinner and before bed during our April visit — a trip to Uncle Gaylord's (the one in Palo Alto) was mandatory. We had arrived on a Wednesday, and by Thursday evening we had been there at least four times. Each time, JONL would get ginger honey ice cream, and proclaim to all bystanders that “Ginger was the spice that drove the Europeans mad! That's why they sought a route to the East! They used it to preserve their otherwise off-taste meat.” After the third or fourth repetition RPG and I were getting a little tired of this spiel, and began to paraphrase him: “Wow! Ginger! The spice that makes rotten meat taste good!” “Say! Why don't we find some dog that's been run over and sat in the sun for a week and put some ginger on it for dinner?!” “Right! With a lalaberry shake!” And so on. This failed to faze JONL; he took it in good humor, as long as we kept returning to Uncle Gaylord's. He loves ginger honey ice cream.Now RPG and his then-wife KBT (Kathy Tracy) were putting us up (putting up with us?) in their home for our visit, so to thank them JONL and I took them out to a nice French restau

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

military post office

military post office

A branch of a designated US-based post office such as New York, San Francisco, Miami, or Seattle established by US Postal Service authority and operated by one of the Military Services. The term includes Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps, and established Coast Guard post offices Also called MPO.

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

Piranhas

Piranhas

Piranhas is a historic town and municipality near the western limit of the State of Alagoas, in the Northeast Region of Brazil. Located on the banks of the São Francisco River, on the border with the State of Sergipe, Piranhas was founded in 1891 and originally named Floriano Peixoto. It was also known as Porto de Piranhas, because fishermen caught piranhas there.

— Freebase

Agreste

Agreste

In Brazil, the agreste is a narrow zone in the states of Paraíba, Pernambuco, Alagoas, Sergipe and Bahia between the coastal forest zona da mata and the semiarid sertão. The agreste actually fades out before Rio Grande do Norte is reached owing to the breakdown of the mountain chain that gives the coastal Atlantic forest zone high rainfall. Most of the agreste is hilly, with the hills becoming higher in the south, except near the narrow valley of the São Francisco River. Land use is predominantly mixed farming, with fruits such as melons especially important. Like the sertão, the agreste is frequently affected by drought, though generally the effects are less severe.

— Freebase

Paulo Afonso Falls

Paulo Afonso Falls

Paulo Afonso Falls is a series of waterfalls on the São Francisco River in the north-east of Brazil adjacent to the city of Paulo Afonso. They stand up to 275 feet high. Upstream of the falls, a hydroelectric dam, the Hidrelétrica de Angiquinho blocks the flow of the river. Prior to the damming of the river, the average water flow over the falls was over 100,000 cu ft/s, and floods exceeded 500,000 cu ft/s. The falls consist of a steep rapid that descends approximately 80 feet and then drops a main plunge of 260 feet into a narrow gorge. The Paulo Afonso Hydroelectric Complex that grew from the original plant was known as Complexo Hidrelétrico de Paulo Afonso in Portuguese, or locally simply as Paulo Afonso. This, and later plants, such as the Hidrelétrica de Xingó downstream, near the town of Piranhas, Alagoas, provide much of the region with electric power.

— Freebase

Barra de São Francisco

Barra de São Francisco

Barra de São Francisco is a municipality located in the Brazilian state of Espírito Santo. Its population was 38,762 and its area is 934 km².

— Freebase

Formoso

Formoso

Formoso is a small town and municipality in north Goiás state, Brazil. The population was 5,241 in a total area of 844 km². Highway connections from Goiânia are made by GO-080 / Nerópolis / São Francisco de Goiás / BR-153 / Jaraguá / GO-080 / Goianésia / Barro Alto / GO-342 / BR-080 / BR-153 / Uruaçu / Santa Tereza de Goiás / GO-241. Formoso is surrounded by the following municipalities: ⁕north: Santa Tereza de Goiás and Trombas ⁕east: Campinorte and Minaçu ⁕west: Estrela do Norte ⁕south: Campinorte and Mara Rosa The economy is based on livestock raising, modest agriculture, small commerce, and government services. There was one bank in 2007. The main agricultural activities were cattle raising: 50,000 head and the growing of rice, sugarcane, manioc, corn, and banana. In 2006 there were 605 farms with 2,114 hectares of planted area. Pasture land made up 45,700 hectares. Approximately 2,000 people were employed in agriculture. Statistics are from IBGE The literacy rate was 84.0% and the infant mortality rate was 24.07 in 1,000 live births. There were 7 schools and 1 hospital with 18 beds. The score on the Municipal Human Development Index was 0.737.

— Freebase

PlayPhone

PlayPhone

Founded in 2003, PlayPhone is a mobile social gaming network. PlayPhone’s custom gaming solution powers app stores for leading worldwide carriers and unites a global gaming community. Preloaded on Android smartphones, PlayPhone’s gaming network offers mobile gamers a new on-device destination to discover and play their favorite games with friends. PlayPhone is based in San Francisco, California with offices in San Jose, California; Brooklin, Sao Paulo; Beijing, China; and United Kingdom.

— Freebase

Jive Software

Jive Software

Jive Software is a software company in the social business software industry headquartered in Palo Alto, California. Founded in 2001, Jive maintains additional offices in Portland, OR; San Francisco, CA; Boulder, CO; New York, NY; Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Reading, UK; Frankfurt, Germany; Sao Paulo, Brazil; Tel Aviv, Israel; Sydney & Melbourne, Australia; Hong Kong; Singapore and Tokyo.

— Freebase

Buritis

Buritis

Buritis is a small city and municipality in northern Minas Gerais state, Brazil. It is located just south of the Urucuia River, which is a tributary of the São Francisco River.

— Freebase

Hands-On Mobile

Hands-On Mobile

Hands-On Mobile is a global publisher of mobile lifestyle, games and personalization products targeting all market segments of the mobile handset marketplace. Hands-On Mobile is a private company headquartered in San Francisco, California. It has further offices in San Diego, London and Manchester (UK), Krakow (Poland), Madrid (Spain), Paris (France), Munich (Germany), Beijing and Shangai (China), and Sao Paulo (Brazil).

— CrunchBase

As It Is

As It Is

As It Is, Inc., is a private corporation formed in 1999 that has assembled a portfolio of technologies and related intellectual property. These include the AutoGnomeâ„¢ and the recently developed commercial-ready business venture designed to capitalize on more than 40 years of development. This first application is TrueThinker.com, a subscriber-based site that will automate and manage the creation and discovery, retrieval, and organization of internet-based information. As It Is, Inc., has an office at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Baird Research and Technology Park, and additional labs and offices in Buffalo, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Maine and Sao Paulo, Brazil. As It Is, Inc.’s TrueThinker offers people or companies an artificial intelligence-based tool for knowledge networking. Its knowledge-management, community and organization features allow users to create, growing and share knowledge on any topic: –AI-based organization: TrueThinker contains patented AI technology (the AutoGnomeâ„¢) that categorizes the information users save"links, searches, documents, etc. It does this after a training period in which it learns about what information the user saved and how s/he organized it. –Communities: People or organizations can create private or public communities of people with the same social, business, research or other interests. There, they can share ideas, resources and information, as well as documents and photos. –KnowledgeBank: Users can store relevant and valued information in the private, secure and searchable TrueThinker KnowledgeBank. They can save documents, images, links, bookmarks, databases and more, organizing the information in any way.Some ways to use TrueThinker: –Businesses can offer employees one place to access institutional wisdom and experience, data and research, as well as forums for people to collaborate on project development, training and other activities. –Enthusiasts or hobbyists can grow their knowledge on their favorite topic by sharing experiences, tips and techniques, news and other information with anyone who has the same interest. –Interest groups can organize, educate and share ideas locally or globally.Users can access TrueThinker from any computer. In addition, TrueThinker is a membership service, so there™s no advertising or privacy issues. A year-long membership to TrueThinker costs $30, but a free, seven-day trial is available now at www.truethinker.com. TrueThinker also offers a referral program, in which members earn $10 every time they refer someone who purchases a TrueThinker membership using a special invitation code.

— CrunchBase

Centrify

Centrify

Centrify provides unified identity services across data center, cloud and mobile - resulting in one single login for users and one unified identity infrastructure for IT. Centrify’s software and cloud services let organizations securely leverage their existing identity infrastructure to centrally manage authentication, access control, privilege management, policy enforcement and compliance across on-premise and cloud resources. More than 4,500 customers have deployed Centrify across millions of servers, applications and mobile devices to optimize costs and increase agility and security. Founded in 2004 by Tom Kemp, Adam Au and Paul Moore, Centrify is headquartered in Sunnyvale, California, with additional development and regional offices in Seattle, Hong Kong, London, Munich, Brisbane and Sao Paulo. Centrify is a privately held company backed by top-tier venture capital firms Mayfield, Accel Partners, INVESCO Private Capital, Sigma Partners and Index Ventures. Our partners include Microsoft, Red Hat, Novell, VMware, Apple and others. To date the company has over 4,500 customers including nearly half of the Fortune 50. For more information about Centrify and its solutions, call +1 (408) 542-7500 or visit www.centrify.com.

— CrunchBase

LDR Holding

LDR Holding

LDR Holding Corporation develops and markets implantable spine systems and instrumentation for patients and the surgeon community in the United States and internationally. Its spinal surgery solutions include cervical and lumbar artificial disc systems, pedicle screw systems, implant systems, cervical cages, synthetic bone substitutes, and ALIF and TLIF devices, as well as VerteBRIDGE product, a direct lateral and oblique lumbar system for surgical applications. The company offers its products through partnerships with surgeons and distributors in Australia, Argentina, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Greece, the Netherlands, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Malaysia, Peru, Portugal, South Africa, Spain, China, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. LDR Holding Corporation was formerly known as LDR Spine USA, Inc. and changed its name after acquiring LDR Médical. The company was founded in 2004 and is based in Austin, Texas with additional offices in Troyes, France; Beijing, China; Sao Paolo, Brazil; and Munich, Germany.

— CrunchBase

MetraTech

MetraTech

MetraTech Corp. simplifies and enables global commerce innovation, while helping businesses respond to an ever changing customer and partner relationship landscape. We empower businesses to embrace change through a unique agreements-based billing, commerce and compensation solution that models and supports fluid, personalized, multi-party agreements for customers, partners and suppliers. We automate business processes and business models to address rapidly changing or complex business strategies. Our products are deployed globally, and our customers use MetraTech to innovatively create and securely collect revenue, provide settlement to partners and manage their customer lifecycle in 12 languages, 28 currencies and 90 countries. Customers include Arkadin, Bell, Concur, the Depository Trust and Clearing Corporation (DTCC), CETIP, The City of Chicago, GRU Sao Paulo International Airport, GXS, Intercall, LifeLock, Microsoft, PGi, Telia Sonera, Telus, and Telmore. The company is headquartered in Boston, with offices in London, Paris and Rio de Janeiro. MetraTech is a venture-backed, privately held company whose investors include Accel Partners, Meritech Capital and Vesbridge Partners.

— CrunchBase

PICS Auditing

PICS Auditing

PICS is a global contractor management consortium committed to improving Health, Safety and Quality. PICS' prequalification and auditing services have become the standard in many industries, including: Chemical, Construction, Energy, Food & Beverage, Oil & Gas, Mining, Manufacturing, Pulp & Paper and Pharmaceutical. Access to thousands of vendors' prequalification information is housed online at www.PICSauditing.com. Founded in 2003 as an organization dedicated to safety, PICS is the fastest-growing, full-service contractor prequalification company worldwide. PICS is headquartered in Irvine, California, with offices in Houston, Texas; Calgary, Canada; Abu Dhabi, UAE; Johannesburg, South Africa; Maidenhead, U.K.; Munich, Germany; Paris, France; Sao Paulo, Brazil; Sydney, Australia; Singapore; Tokyo, Japan and Hong Kong, China.

— CrunchBase

Remark Media

Remark Media

Remark Media, Inc. (Nasdaq: MARK) is a global digital media company focused on creating destinations that merge engaging content with rich social interaction. Remark Media owns and operates a portfolio of digital brands in the personal finance space including DimeSpring.com, Banks.com, IRS.com and FileLater.com. In the 18 to 35 year old lifestyle vertical, the Company publishes Bikini.com, which provides sophisticated and informative content, social media, and e-commerce for the beach lifestyle. Internationally, the Company is the exclusive digital publisher in China and Brazil for translated content from HowStuffWorks.com, a subsidiary of Discovery Communications. BoWenWang (bowenwang.com.cn) and ComoTudoFunciona (hsw.com.br) provide readers in China and Brazil with thousands of articles about how the world around them works, serving as destinations for credible, easy-to-understand reference information. Remark Media is also a founding partner and developer of Sharecare, a highly searchable social Q&A healthcare platform organizing and answering health and wellness questions. Sharecare’s other co-founders include Dr. Mehmet Oz, Oprah Winfrey, Discovery Communications, and WebMD founder Jeff Arnold. The Company is headquartered in Atlanta with additional operations in Las Vegas, Miami, Beijing and Sao Paulo. Additional information is available on its corporate website at remarkmedia.com.

— CrunchBase

San Andreas Fault

San Andreas Fault

The San Andreas Fault is a continental transform fault that runs a length of roughly 810 miles through California in the United States. The fault's motion is right-lateral strike-slip. It forms the tectonic boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate. The fault was first identified in Northern California by the UC Berkeley geology professor Andrew Lawson in 1895 and named by him after a small lake which lies in a linear valley formed by the fault just south of San Francisco, the Laguna de San Andreas. After the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake, Lawson also discovered that the San Andreas Fault stretched southward into southern California. Large-scale lateral movement along the fault was first proposed in a 1953 paper by geologists Mason Hill and Thomas Dibblee.

— Freebase

San Mateo

San Mateo

San Mateo is a city in San Mateo County, California, United States, in high-tech enclave Silicon Valley surrounding area, in the San Francisco Bay Area. With a population of 97,207 as of the 2010 census, it is one of the larger suburbs on the San Francisco Peninsula, located between Burlingame to the north, Foster City to the east, Belmont to the south, and Highlands-Baywood Park and Hillsborough to the west. San Mateo was incorporated in 1864.

— Freebase

Kingfish

Kingfish

Kingfish is an American rock band led by Matthew Kelly, a musician, singer, and songwriter who plays guitar and harmonica. Kelly co-founded Kingfish in 1973 with New Riders of the Purple Sage bass player Dave Torbert and fellow San Francisco Bay Area musicians Robbie Hoddinott, Chris Herold, and Mick Ward. However, Ward died in a car accident later that year, and was soon replaced by Barry Flast, another keyboardist from San Francisco. In 1974, Kingfish became more well known, and signed their first record contract, after Grateful Dead member Bob Weir, a long-time friend of Kelly's, joined the band. Weir toured with Kingfish and was a band member on their first two albums, Kingfish and Live 'n' Kickin'. When the Dead started touring again in 1976, Weir left Kingfish, along with Hoddinott and Herold, who were then replaced by Barry Flast, Michael O'Neill and Dave Perper. The lineup of the band continued to change, with Kelly and Torbert remaining at the core. Then, in 1979 Torbert and Kelly parted ways and Torbert formed a new lineup with Danny "Rio" DeGennaro and Michael O'Neill on guitars and sharing lead vocals. Also part of that lineup were drummer Steve Shive and Ralph Liberto. Dave Torbert died of a heart attack in 1982.

— Freebase

Drake Passage

Drake Passage

The Drake Passage or Mar de Hoces—Sea of Hoces—is the body of water between the southern tip of South America at Cape Horn, Chile and the South Shetland Islands of Antarctica. It connects the southwestern part of the Atlantic Ocean with the southeastern part of the Pacific Ocean and extends into the Southern Ocean. The passage receives its English language name from the 16th century English privateer Sir Francis Drake. Drake's only remaining ship, after having passed through the Strait of Magellan, was blown far South in September 1578. This incident implied an open Links between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Half a century earlier, after a gale had pushed them South from the entrance of the Strait of Magellan, the crew of the Spanish navigator Francisco de Hoces thought they saw a land's end and possibly inferred this passage in 1525. For this reason, some Spanish and Latin American historians and sources call it Mar de Hoces after Francisco de Hoces. The first recorded voyage through the passage was that of the Eendracht, captained by the Dutch navigator Willem Schouten in 1616, naming Cape Horn in the process. The 800 kilometres wide passage between Cape Horn and Livingston Island is the shortest crossing from Antarctica to the rest of the world's land. The boundary between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans is sometimes taken to be a line drawn from Cape Horn to Snow Island. Alternatively the meridian that passes through Cape Horn may be taken as the boundary. Both boundaries lie entirely within the Drake Passage.

— Freebase

Automatic Pilot

Automatic Pilot

Automatic Pilot was a San Francisco, California band. Created in 1980 by members of the San Francisco Gay Men's Chorus, they were described by The Advocate as "a non-official offshoot" of SFGMC along with three official subgroups. Automatic Pilot soon came into their own as an independent force, creating a niche at the fringe of the nascent gay musical movement and a new musical style. They achieved notoriety early on with songs such as "Sit On My Face" and "Killer Purses" performed at benefits for the SFGMC, Theatre Rhinoceros, and the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence. They derived their name from psychiatric testimony at Dan White's trial for killing Mayor George Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk.

— Freebase

Walnut Creek

Walnut Creek

Walnut Creek is a city in Contra Costa County, California, United States, located 16 miles east of the city of Oakland in the East Bay region of the San Francisco Bay Area. Although not as large as neighboring Concord, Walnut Creek serves as the business and entertainment hub for the neighboring cities within central Contra Costa County, due in part to its location at the junction of the highways from Sacramento and San Jose and San Francisco/Oakland, as well as its accessibility by BART. The city's total estimated population, as of 2011, is 65,211. Walnut Creek is the headquarters of the Pac-12 Conference.

— Freebase

Fremont

Fremont

Fremont is a city in Alameda County, California. It was incorporated on January 23, 1956, from the merger of five smaller communities: Centerville, Niles, Irvington, Mission San Jose, and Warm Springs. The city is named after American explorer John Charles Frémont, "the Great Pathfinder." Located in the southeast section of the San Francisco Bay Area in the East Bay region primarily, Fremont had a population at the 2010 census of 214,089. It is the fourth most populous city in the San Francisco Bay Area, and the largest suburb in the metropolis. It is the closest East Bay city to Silicon Valley, and is thus sometimes associated with it. The area consisting of Fremont, Newark, and Union City, is now known as the Tri-City Area. Fremont is the sister city to Elizabeth, South Australia; Puerto Peñasco, Mexico; Fukaya, Japan; Horta, Azores, Portugal; Lipa City, Philippines; and Jaipur, India.

— Freebase

Santa Rosa

Santa Rosa

Santa Rosa is the county seat of Sonoma County, California United States. The 2010 census reported a population of 167,815. Santa Rosa is the largest city in California's North Coast, Wine Country and the North Bay; the fifth most populated city in the San Francisco Bay Area after San Jose, San Francisco, Oakland, and Fremont; and the 26th most populated city in California.

— Freebase

Menlo Park

Menlo Park

Menlo Park is an affluent town at the eastern edge of San Mateo County, in the San Francisco Bay Area of California, in the United States. It is bordered by San Francisco Bay on the north and east; East Palo Alto, Palo Alto, and Stanford to the south; Atherton, North Fair Oaks, and Redwood City to the west. Menlo Park is one of the most educated cities in the state of California and the United States, with nearly 70% of its residents having earned an advanced degree. Menlo Park had 32,026 inhabitants according to the 2010 United States Census.

— Freebase

KKSF

KKSF

KKSF is a radio station in San Francisco, Oakland, and San Jose, California. The station is owned by Clear Channel Communications. The 20,000 watt transmitter and twin towers are located on Point Isabel in Richmond, California, on San Francisco Bay. KDIA utilizes one of KKSF's two towers during the day. The station features talk shows such as the Rush Limbaugh Show and Coast to Coast AM.

— Freebase

Vallejo

Vallejo

Vallejo is the largest city in Solano County, California, United States. The population was 115,942 at the 2010 census. It is the tenth most populous city in the San Francisco Bay Area, and is located on the northeastern shore of San Pablo Bay. Vallejo is named for General Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo. Vallejo is home to the Six Flags Discovery Kingdom theme park; the now-defunct Mare Island Naval Shipyard; the regional office for Region 5 of the United States Forest Service; the California Maritime Academy; the Vallejo Center campus of Solano Community College; and Touro University California, a graduate school offering programs in osteopathic medicine, education, pharmacy, physician assistant studies, and public health. Ferry service runs from a terminal on Mare Island Strait to San Francisco, through the BayLink division of SolTrans. Vallejo has twice served as the capital of the state of California: once in 1852 and again in 1853, both periods being brief. Some of the first Europeans drawn to the Vallejo area were attracted by the sulfur springs; in the year 1902 the area was named Blue Rock Springs. In 2008, Vallejo became the largest city to file for bankruptcy in California history.

— Freebase

San Francisco Peaks

San Francisco Peaks

The San Francisco Peaks are a volcanic mountain range located in north central Arizona, just north of Flagstaff. The highest summit in the range, Humphreys Peak, is the highest point in the state of Arizona at 12,633 feet in elevation. The San Francisco Peaks are the remains of an eroded stratovolcano. An aquifer within the caldera supplies much of Flagstaff's water while the mountain itself is located within the Coconino National Forest and is a popular site for outdoor recreation. The Arizona Snowbowl ski area is located on the western slopes of Humphreys Peak, and has been the subject of major controversy involving several tribes and environmental groups.

— Freebase

World Series

World Series

The World Series is the annual championship series of North American-based Major League Baseball, played since 1903 between the American League and National League team champions. The winner of the World Series championship is determined through a best-of-seven playoff and the winning team is awarded the Commissioner's Trophy. As the series is played in October, which falls during autumn in North America, MLB also refers to it as the Fall Classic. The most recent World Series was won by the San Francisco Giants, who defeated the Detroit Tigers in a four-game sweep in 2012. In the AL, the New York Yankees have played in 40 World Series and won 27, the Oakland/Philadelphia Athletics have played in 14 and won 9, and the Boston Red Sox have played in 12 and won 7, including the first World Series. In the NL, the San Francisco/New York Giants have appeared in 19 World Series and won 7, the St. Louis Cardinals have played in 18 and won 11, and the Los Angeles/Brooklyn Dodgers have appeared in 18 and won 6.

— Freebase

Hyphy

Hyphy

The word hyphy is San Francisco Bay Area slang meaning "hyperactive." More specifically it is an adjective that describes the music and the urban culture associated with that area. It was created by Oakland-based rapper Keak da Sneak when he used the term on an album he recorded in 1994. The hyphy culture began to emerge in the late 1990s and early 2000s as a response from Bay Area rappers against commercial hip hop for not acknowledging their region for setting trends in the hip hop industry. It is distinguished by gritty, pounding rhythms, and in this sense can be associated with San Francisco Bay as crunk music is to the Southern United States. An individual is said to "get hyphy" when they dance in an overstated, fast paced and ridiculous manner, or if they get overly loud with other people. The phrase "to get hyphy" is similar to the southern phrase "to get crunk". Those who consider themselves part of the hyphy movement strive for this behavior. Although the "hyphy movement" has just recently seen light in mainstream America, it has been a long standing and ever evolving culture in the Bay Area since the early 90s. Throughout the Bay Area, there are regularly events called "sideshows". This is where different people come together and partake in or watch illegal automobile performances. This is where drivers do things such as donuts, ghost-riding and streetrace while others dance and "go dumb" around them. These events can be very dangerous. From a USA Today article: "Every record label was getting at us at that time, but we fumbled the ball," says E-40, whose My Ghetto Report Card entered the Billboard album chart at No. 3 in March. "I hung on like a hubcap in the fast lane along with a few other rappers, and now it's time again. We had a 10-year drought and they went to other regions and were bypassing us like the sand out here. But we're trendsetters, and the rap game without the Bay Area is like old folks without bingo."

— Freebase

Northern California

Northern California

Northern California is the northern portion of the U.S. state of California. The San Francisco Bay Area, and Sacramento as well as its metropolitan area are the main population centers. It also contains redwood forests, along with the Sierra Nevada including Yosemite Valley and part of Lake Tahoe, Mount Shasta, and the northern half of the Central Valley, one of the world's most productive agricultural regions. The area also contains one of the 11 megaregions of the United States, spanning from the San Francisco Bay Area east to the Lake Tahoe-Reno area, and from Metropolitan Fresno north to Greater Sacramento. Native Americans arrived in Northern California at least as early as 8,000 to 5,000 BC and perhaps even much earlier, and successive waves of arrivals led to one of the most densely populated areas of pre-Columbian North America. The arrival of European explorers from the early 16th to the mid-18th centuries, did not establish European settlements in Northern California. In 1770, the Spanish mission at Monterey was the first European settlement in the area, followed by other missions along the coast—eventually extending as far north as Sonoma County.

— Freebase

Tegucigalpa

Tegucigalpa

Tegucigalpa, commonly referred to as Tegus, is the capital of Honduras and seat of government of the Republic, along with its twin sister Comayagüela. Founded on September 29, 1578 by the Spanish, it became the country's capital on October 30, 1880 under President Marco Aurelio Soto. The current Constitution of Honduras, enacted in 1982, names the sister cities of Tegucigalpa and Comayagüela as a Central District to serve as the permanent national capital, under articles 8 and 295. During the short-lived Constitution of the Republic of Central America of 1821, Tegucigalpa served as a Federal District and capital of then-newly formed as one nation: the states of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. After this failed attempt to maintain a Central American republic, Honduras returned to become an individual sovereign nation and on January 30, 1937, Article 179 of the 1936 Honduran Constitution was reformed under Decree 53 to established Tegucigalpa and Comayagüela as a Central District. Tegucigalpa is located in the southern-central highland region of Honduras in the department of Francisco Morazán of which it is also the departmental capital. It is situated in a valley, surrounded by mountains and both Tegucigalpa and Comayagüela, being sister cities, are physically separated by the Choluteca River. The Central District is the largest of the 28 municipalities in the Francisco Morazán department.

— Freebase

Stanford University

Stanford University

The Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly referred to as Stanford University or Stanford, is an American private research university located in Stanford, California, on an 8,180-acre campus near Palo Alto. It is situated in the northwestern Silicon Valley, approximately 20 miles northwest of San Jose and 37 miles southeast of San Francisco. It is also one of the most prestigious universities in the world. Leland Stanford, Governor of and U.S. Senator from California and leading railroad tycoon, and his wife, Jane Lathrop Stanford, founded the university in 1891 in memory of their son, Leland Stanford, Jr., who died of typhoid two months before his 16th birthday. The university was established as a coeducational and nondenominational institution. Tuition was free until the 1930s. The university struggled financially after the senior Stanford's 1893 death and after much of the campus was damaged by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake. Following World War II, Provost Frederick Terman supported faculty and graduates' entrepreneurialism to build self-sufficient local industry in what would become known as Silicon Valley. By 1970, Stanford was home to a linear accelerator, and was one of the original four ARPANET nodes.

— Freebase

KEST

KEST

KEST is a radio station in San Francisco, California. Most of the station's programming is non-English, such as Indian, Chinese, and other Asian languages. KEST does English-language programming during the week, usually from 6:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m., which consists of New Age Talk. KEST is owned by Multicultural Radio which owns several stations across the country. KEST broadcasts around the San Francisco Bay Area; its signal is 1000 watts. The station currently features programming from Bay Area Metro Radio. The station was signed on by a local church and began broadcasting in the 1920s. It was not very popular, but in 1939 was purchased by Sherwood Patterson, who changed the call letters to KSAN. New studios were constructed in the Merchandise Mart near Market Street; a 250-watt transmitter was installed in a tower on top of the building. Listenership dramatically increased with a format of popular music and disk jockeys such as Les Malloy, who would purchase the station himself in the early 1960s. Malloy changed the call letters to KSOL and strengthened the rhythm and blues/soul music format targeting the African-American community; the station launched the career of popular 1960s and '70s musician Sly Stone, who was one of the station's DJs. The format changed to a general-market music format by the early 1970s.

— Freebase

Beat Generation

Beat Generation

The Beat Generation was a group of American post-World War II writers who came to prominence in the 1950s, as well as the cultural phenomena that they both documented and inspired. Central elements of "Beat" culture included rejection of received standards, innovations in style, experimentation with drugs, alternative sexualities, an interest in Eastern religion, a rejection of materialism, and explicit portrayals of the human condition. Allen Ginsberg's Howl, William S. Burroughs's Naked Lunch and Jack Kerouac's On the Road are among the best known examples of Beat literature. Both Howl and Naked Lunch were the focus of obscenity trials that ultimately helped to liberalize publishing in the United States. The members of the Beat Generation developed a reputation as new bohemian hedonists, who celebrated non-conformity and spontaneous creativity. The original "Beat Generation" writers met in New York. Later, in the mid-1950s, the central figures ended up together in San Francisco where they met and became friends with figures associated with the San Francisco Renaissance. In the 1960s, elements of the expanding Beat movement were incorporated into the hippie counterculture.

— Freebase

Hippie

Hippie

The hippie subculture was originally a youth movement that arose in the United States during the mid-1960s and spread to other countries around the world. The word 'hippie' came from hipster, and was initially used to describe beatniks who had moved into New York City's Greenwich Village and San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury district. The origins of the terms hip and hep are uncertain, though by the 1940s both had become part of African American jive slang and meant "sophisticated; currently fashionable; fully up-to-date". The Beats adopted the term hip, and early hippies inherited the language and countercultural values of the Beat Generation. Hippies created their own communities, listened to psychedelic rock, embraced the sexual revolution, and some used drugs such as cannabis, LSD, and magic mushrooms to explore altered states of consciousness. In January 1967, the Human Be-In in Golden Gate Park in San Francisco popularized hippie culture, leading to the legendary Summer of Love on the West Coast of the United States, and the 1969 Woodstock Festival on the East Coast. Hippies in Mexico, known as jipitecas, formed La Onda and gathered at Avándaro, while in New Zealand, nomadic housetruckers practiced alternative lifestyles and promoted sustainable energy at Nambassa. In the United Kingdom, mobile "peace convoys" of New age travellers made summer pilgrimages to free music festivals at Stonehenge and later the gigantic Isle of Wight Festival with a crowd of around 700 000 people. In Australia hippies gathered at Nimbin for the 1973 Aquarius Festival and the annual Cannabis Law Reform Rally or MardiGrass. "Piedra Roja Festival", a major hippie event in Chile, was held in 1970.

— Freebase

Babycakes

Babycakes

Babycakes is the fourth book in the Tales of the City series by San Francisco novelist Armistead Maupin, originally serialized in the San Francisco Chronicle. Babycakes is often cited as the first work of fiction to address the AIDS pandemic.

— Freebase

Tin Hat

Tin Hat

Tin Hat is an acoustic chamber music group currently based in San Francisco, California. Their music combines many genres of music, including southern blues, bluegrass, neoclassical, eastern European folk music, and avant-garde. Since its formation in 1997, the original Tin Hat Trio has often expanded its trio format by inviting other musicians to join them. All five of their CDs feature guests, among them Mike Patton, Tom Waits and Willie Nelson, as well as friends like clarinetist Ben Goldberg and harpist Zeena Parkins. Parkins appears on 2002's The Rodeo Eroded and 2004's Book of Silk and has performed live with the trio as the resident sound effects artist in their live music/silent film projects. Goldberg has been a frequent guest of Tin Hat Trio and contributed to both Memory is an Elephant and The Rodeo Eroded. When founding member Rob Burger left the trio in late 2004, Mark Orton and Carla Kihlstedt replaced him with both Goldberg and Parkins, presenting a new, though closely related, ensemble—the Tin Hat Quartet—for two short concert tours in the U.S. in January and April 2005. While on tour, they invited another musician to come under their hat, San Francisco's Ara Anderson—known as one of Tom Waits' favorite sidemen in recent years. Like the departed Burger, Anderson plays myriad keyed instruments as well as trumpet and glockenspiel, thus adding new colors and strokes to the already large canvas of Tin Hat's sound.

— Freebase

San Carlos

San Carlos

San Carlos is a city in San Mateo County, California, USA on the San Francisco Peninsula, about halfway between San Francisco and San Jose. It is an affluent small residential suburb located between Belmont to the north and Redwood City to the south. San Carlos' ZIP code is 94070, and it is within the 650 area code. The population was 28,406 at the 2010 census.

— Freebase

Radioteletype

Radioteletype

Radioteletype is a telecommunications system consisting originally of two or more electromechanical teleprinters in different locations, later superseded by personal computers running software to emulate teleprinters, connected by radio rather than a wired link. Radioteletype evolved from earlier landline teleprinter operations that began in the mid-1800s. The US Navy Department successfully tested printing telegraphy between an airplane and ground radio station in 1922. Later that year, the Radio Corporation of America successfully tested printing telegraphy via their Chatham, Massachusetts, radio station to the R.M.S. Majestic. Commercial RTTY systems were in active service between San Francisco and Honolulu as early as April 1932 and between San Francisco and New York City by 1934. The US military used radioteletype in the 1930s and expanded this usage during World War II. From the 1980s, teleprinters were replaced by computers running teleprinter emulation software. The term radioteletype is used to describe: ⁕either the entire family of systems connecting two or more teleprinters or PCs using software to emulate teleprinters, over radio, regardless of alphabet, link system or modulation,

— Freebase

Vacaville

Vacaville

Vacaville is a city located in Solano County in Northern California. The city is nearly half way between Sacramento and San Francisco on I-80. It sits approximately 35 miles from Sacramento, and 45 miles from San Francisco. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 92,428, making it the third largest city in Solano County.

— Freebase

Hayward

Hayward

Hayward is a city located in Alameda County, California in the East Bay subregion of the San Francisco Bay Area. With a population at the 2010 census of 144,186, Hayward is the sixth largest city in the Bay Area and the third largest in Alameda County. Hayward was ranked as the 37th most populous municipality in California. It is included in the San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont Metropolitan Statistical Area by the US Census. It is located primarily between Castro Valley and Union City, and lies at the eastern terminus of the San Mateo-Hayward Bridge. The city was devastated early in its history by the namesake 1868 Hayward earthquake. From the early 20th century until the beginning of the 1980s, Hayward's economy was dominated by its food canning industry.

— Freebase

Chillum

Chillum

A chillum, or chilam, is a straight conical pipe with end-to-end channel, traditionally made of clay and used since at least the 18th century by wandering Hindu monks, known as sadhus in India. It was invented in India. The culture of owning and smoking in a chillum has spread from India to the world since the mid-1960s. According to Alfred Dunhill, Africans have long employed chillum-style pipes for smoking cannabis and later tobacco. Gourds and various horns were often employed while conical bowls were common in Uganda. One of the more famous pipes is an ivory cone pipe once belonging to "Waganda" monarch King Mtesa. More recently, it has also seen use in sacraments by Rastafarians. Since the 1960s the embellished bamboo chillum has become an American folk art form. These pipes are handmade and often sold by the artists on street corners in places like the Haight-Ashbury district of San Francisco and the Greenwich Village area of New York City. As designs these contemporary smoking pipes recall traditional decorated bamboo pipes from Borneo, however, the American carved bamboo design often employs a brass lighting fixture for a bowl. Since the 1970s, street artist Darrel "Pipeman" Mortimer of San Francisco has made nearly 10,000 such pipes, each signed, numbered and sold personally.

— Freebase

Harold

Harold

Harold is a structure used in longform theatrical improvisation. Developed by Del Close and brought to fruition through Close's collaboration with Charna Halpern, the Harold has become the signature form of Chicago's iO and the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater in New York and Los Angeles. It is now performed by improvisational theatre troupes and teams across the world. The Committee, a San Francisco improv group, performed the first Harold in Concord, California in 1967. They were invited to a high school and decided to do their improvisations on the war in Vietnam. On the way home in a Volkswagen Bus they were discussing the performance when one of them asked what they should call it. Allaudin Mathieu called out "Harold." It was a joking reference to a line from A Hard Days Night where a reporter asked George Harrison what he called his haircut; he answered "Arthur." Close later remarked that he wished he had chosen a better name. When The Committee disbanded in 1972, improv company “Improvisation, Inc.” was the only company in America continuing to perform Del’s “Original” Harold: A 45-minute free-form piece that would seamlessly move from one “Harold technique” to another. In 1976, two former I-Inc performers, Michael Bossier and John Elk, formed "Spaghetti Jam", performing in San Francisco's famous Old Spaghetti Factory through 1983. Spaghetti Jam performed Harolds while also turning Spolin games and Harold techniques into stand-alone performance pieces... i.e. Short-Form Improv.

— Freebase

Threepence

Threepence

The Australian Threepence was a small silver coin used in the Commonwealth of Australia prior to decimalisation. It was minted from 1910 until 1964, excluding 1913, 1929 - 1933 inclusive, 1937, 1945 and 1946. After decimalisation on 14 February 1966, the coin was equivalent to 2½¢, but was rapidly withdrawn from circulation. During World War II, between 1942 - 1944, threepence production was supplemented by coinage produced by the United States Mint with coins produced at the San Francisco and Denver mints. Coins minted at the San Francisco mint 1942-1944 contain a small S on the reverse, while coins produced at the Denver mint 1942-1943 have a small D on the reverse.

— Freebase

Culture Clash

Culture Clash

Culture Clash is an Chicano American performance troupe composed of the writer-comedians Richard Montoya, Ric Salinas, and Herbert Sigüenza. Their work is of a satirical nature. Culture Clash was founded on May 10, 1984 at the Galería de la Raza in San Francisco's Mission District, by the writers José Antonio Burciaga, Marga Gómez, Monica Palacios, Richard Montoya, Ric Salinas, and Herbert Sigüenza. The founding date is significant due to the importance of Cinco de Mayo to Mexican-Americans, the shared ethnicity of the majority of collaborators. Montoya and Sigüenza had both been involved in the Chicano art scene in the San Francisco Bay Area, Montoya being the son of Chicano poet, artist, and activist José Montoya, and Sigüenza having been involved in the art collective La Raza Graphics, which created works of graphic art to support campaigns of the Chicano Movement. Culture Clash's works range from comedic sketches to full-length plays and screenplays, all of which feature political satire and social satire. The troupe's members have appeared separately and together in several films and received numerous awards, commissions and grants. In 1993 they filmed 30 episodes of a sketch comedy television series, also called Culture Clash. Some of them were aired on Fox affiliates. In 2006 they premiered two new full-length plays, the comedy Zorro in Hell and "SF: The Mexican Bus Mission Tour with CC!" Their works have been collected in two volumes, Culture Clash: Life, Death and Revolutionary Comedy and Culture Clash in AmeriCCa: Four Plays. Their papers are housed at the California State University, Northridge Oviatt Library.

— Freebase

Nob Hill

Nob Hill

Nob Hill is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California, centered on the intersection of California Street and Powell Street. It is one of San Francisco's 44 hills, and one of its original "Seven Hills." Prior to the 1850s, Nob Hill was called California Hill. It was renamed after the Central Pacific Railroad's Big Four — called the Nobs — built mansions there. The slang term "nob" means rich or wealthy.

— Freebase

Sunnyvale

Sunnyvale

Sunnyvale is a city in Santa Clara County, California, United States. It is one of the major cities that make up the Silicon Valley located in the San Francisco Bay Area. It is the seventh most populous city in the San Francisco Bay Area. As of the 2010 Census, the population was 140,095. The city is bordered by portions of San Jose to the north, Moffett Federal Airfield to the northwest, Mountain View to the west, Los Altos to the southwest, Cupertino to the south, and Santa Clara to the east. It lies along the historic El Camino Real and Highway 101. As part of the Silicon Valley, high-tech companies such as Maxim Integrated Products, Juniper Networks, Fortinet, Palm, Inc., AMD, NetApp, Spansion, Yahoo!, AppliedMicro and Ariba are headquartered there. Sunnyvale is also home to several aerospace/defense companies; Lockheed Martin has a major facility in Sunnyvale, and Honeywell, Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems - Marine Systems, Finisar, and Spirent also have offices in Sunnyvale. Sunnyvale is also the home to Onizuka Air Force Station, where its main building, locally known as the Blue Cube, is its most prominent feature. The base, named for the deceased Space Shuttle Challenger astronaut Ellison Onizuka, was the primary artificial satellite control facility of the United States armed forces until August 2010.

— Freebase

Golden Gate

Golden Gate

The Golden Gate is the North American strait that connects San Francisco Bay to the Pacific Ocean. Since 1937, it has been spanned by the Golden Gate Bridge. Technically, the 'gate' is defined by the headlands of the San Francisco Peninsula and the Marin Peninsula, while the 'strait' is the water that flows in between.

— Freebase

Marin County

Marin County

Marin County is a county located in the North San Francisco Bay Area of the State of California, across the Golden Gate Bridge from San Francisco County. As of 2010, its population was about 252,400. Its county seat is San Rafael and its largest employer is the county government. Marin County is well known for its natural beauty, liberal politics, and affluence. In May 2009, Marin County had the fifth highest income per capita in the United States at about $91,480. The county is governed the Marin County Board of Supervisors. San Quentin Prison is located in the county, as is George Lucas' Skywalker Ranch. Autodesk, the publisher of AutoCAD, is also located there, as well as numerous other high-tech companies. The Marin County Civic Center was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and draws thousands of visitors a year to guided tours of its arch and atrium design. In 1994, a new county jail facility was embedded into the hillside nearby. America's oldest cross country running event, the Dipsea Race, takes place annually in Marin County, attracting thousands of athletes. Mountain biking was invented on the slopes of Mount Tamalpais in Marin. Marin County's natural sites include the Muir Woods redwood forest, the Marin Headlands, Stinson Beach, the Point Reyes National Seashore, and Mount Tamalpais.

— Freebase

Exploratorium

Exploratorium

The Exploratorium is a museum in San Francisco whose stated mission is to change the way the world learns. It has been described by the New York Times as the most important science museum to have opened since the mid-20th century, an achievement attributed to "the nature of its exhibits, its wide-ranging influence and its sophisticated teacher training program." Characterized as "a mad scientist's penny arcade, a scientific funhouse, and an experimental laboratory all rolled into one," the participatory nature of its exhibits and its self-identification as a center for informal learning has led to it being cited as the prototype for participatory museums around the world. The Exploratorium was founded by physicist and educator Frank Oppenheimer and opened in 1969 at the Palace of Fine Arts, its home until January 2, 2013. On April 17, 2013, the Exploratorium reopened at Piers 15 and 17 on San Francisco's Embarcadero. The historic interior and exterior of Pier 15 was renovated extensively prior to the move, and is divided into several galleries mainly separated by content, including the physics of seeing and listening, Human Behavior, Living Systems, Tinkering, the Outdoor Gallery, and the Bay Observatory Gallery, which focuses on local environment, weather, and landscape.

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Summer of Love

Summer of Love

The Summer of Love was a social phenomenon that occurred during the summer of 1967, when as many as 100,000 people converged on the Haight-Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco, initiating a major cultural and political shift. Although hippies also gathered in major cities across the U.S., Canada and Europe, San Francisco remained the epicenter of the social earthquake which would come to be known as the Hippie Revolution. Like its sister enclave of Greenwich Village, the city became even more of a melting pot of politics, music, drugs, creativity, and the total lack of sexual and social inhibition than it already was. As the hippie counterculture movement came farther and farther forward into public awareness, the activities centered therein became a defining moment of the 1960s, causing numerous 'ordinary citizens' to begin questioning everything and anything about them and their environment as a result. This unprecedented gathering of young people is often considered to have been a social experiment, because of all the alternative lifestyles which became more common and accepted such as gender equality, communal living and free love. Many of these types of social changes reverberated on into the early 1970s, and effects echo throughout modern society.

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IDEO

IDEO

}} IDEO is an international design firm and innovation consultancy founded in Palo Alto, California, United States with other locations in San Francisco, Chicago, New York, Boston, London, Munich, Shanghai, Singapore, Mumbai, Seoul, and Tokyo. The company helps design products, services, environments, and digital experiences. Additionally, the company has become increasingly involved in management consulting and organizational design. IDEO was formed in 1991 by a merger of four established design firms: David Kelley Design, London-based Moggridge Associates and San Francisco's ID Two, and Matrix Product Design. Office-furniture maker Steelcase owned a majority stake in the firm, but began divesting its shares through a five-year management buy-back program in 2007. The founders of the predecessor companies are still involved in the firm. The current CEO is Tim Brown. The firm employs over 550 people in the disciplines of human factors, mechanical, electrical and software engineering, industrial design, interaction design, and communication design. IDEO has worked on thousands of projects for a large number of clients in the consumer food and beverage, retail, computer, medical, furniture, toy, office, and automotive industries. Notable examples are Apple's first mouse, Microsoft's second mouse, the Palm V PDA, and Steelcase's Leap chair. Major clients included Procter & Gamble, PepsiCo, Microsoft, Eli Lilly, Ford, and Steelcase.

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Tom Sawyer

Tom Sawyer

Thomas "Tom" Sawyer is the title character of the Mark Twain novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. He appears in three other novels by Twain: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Tom Sawyer Abroad, and Tom Sawyer, Detective. Sawyer also appears in at least three unfinished Twain works, Huck and Tom Among the Indians, Schoolhouse Hill, and Tom Sawyer's Conspiracy. While all three uncompleted works were posthumously published, only Tom Sawyer's Conspiracy has a complete plot, as Twain abandoned the other two works after finishing only a few chapters. The fictional character's name may have been derived from a joyus and flamboyant fireman named Tom Sawyer whom Twain was acquainted with in San Francisco, California, while Twain was employed as a reporter at the San Francisco Call. Twain used to listen to Sawyer tell stories of his youth, "Sam, he would listen to these pranks of mine with great interest and he'd occasionally take 'em down in his notebook. One day he says to me: ‘I am going to put you between the covers of a book some of these days, Tom.’ ‘Go ahead, Sam,’ I said, ‘but don’t disgrace my name.’" Twain himself said the character sprang from three people, later identified as: John B. Briggs, William Bowen and Twain; however Twain later changed his story saying Sawyer was fully formed solely from his imagination, but as Robert Graysmith says, "The great appropriator liked to pretend his characters sprang fully grown from his fertile mind."

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Tenderloin

Tenderloin

The Tenderloin is a neighborhood in downtown San Francisco, California, in the flatlands on the southern slope of Nob Hill, situated between the Union Square shopping district to the northeast and the Civic Center office district to the southwest. It encompasses about 50 square blocks and a conservative description has it bounded on the north by Geary Street, on the east by Mason Street, on the south by Market Street and on the west by Van Ness Avenue. The northern boundary with Lower Nob Hill historically has been set at Geary Street. The terms Tenderloin Heights or The Tendernob refer to the area around the indefinite boundary between the Upper Tenderloin and Lower Nob Hill. The eastern extent, near Union Square, overlaps with the Theater District. Part of the western extent of the Tenderloin, Larkin and Hyde Streets between Turk and O'Farrell, was officially named "Little Saigon" by the City of San Francisco.

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Longshoremen

Longshoremen

The Longshoremen were an American independent/alternative band from San Francisco, California, in the 1980s. Trouser Press describes them as a "cryptic poetry damage vocal trio." Their recordings are characterized by being mostly vocal "beat poetry chantings" that are uninhibited and whimsical. The three principal members were Judy Gittelsohn and Carol Detweiler and "Dog". They were often supported by members of Club Foot Orchestra and other seminal Bay Area punk or "alternative" bands of the mid-1980s. The band released two albums on the Subterranean record label, Grr Huh Yeah and Walk the Plank. According to a Trouser Press article, Voice Farm's Reilly and Brown co-produced and played on the second album by the Longshoremen, a cryptic San Francisco poetry-damage vocal trio. Where the amateurish and poorly recorded Grr Huh Yeah has too much distracting music for easy appeal, the Voice Farmers keep instrumental accompaniment tastefully understated on Walk the Plank, providing the group with a clear, solid platform for its theatrically chanted spoken-word weirdness. The band's two records are still listed in the Subterranean catalog.

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Francisco

Francisco

Francisco is the innermost irregular satellite of Uranus. Francisco was discovered by Matthew J. Holman, et al. and Brett J. Gladman, et al. in 2003 from pictures taken in 2001 and given the provisional designation S/2001 U 3. Confirmed as Uranus XXII, it was named after a lord in William Shakespeare's play The Tempest.

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Novato

Novato

Novato is a city located in the North Bay region of the San Francisco Bay Area, in northern Marin County. Novato is located about 10 miles north-northwest of San Rafael, at an elevation of 30 feet above sea level. The 2010 U.S. Census estimated the city population to be about 51,904. Novato is about 30 miles north of San Francisco on U.S. 101.

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KLOK

KLOK

KLOK is a radio station broadcasting a World Ethnic format. Licensed to San Jose, California, U.S., the station serves the San Francisco Bay Area. 1170 AM is the first ever and longest running 24/7 South Asian Radio Station featuring a good mix of entertainment and informational programming. Originally a largely brokered-format radio, 1170 AM now carries some of the most popular DESI programming in the North America, which includes the programming of Mahima Creations/Radio Dehotties. By far, the largest 24/7 DESI Signal in the entire North American continent, KLOK 1170 AM has a 50,000 watt signal that covers the San Francisco Bay Area.

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Lombard Street

Lombard Street

Lombard Street is an east–west street in San Francisco, California. It is famous for having a steep, one-block section that consists of eight tight hairpin turns. The street was named after Lombard Street in Philadelphia by San Francisco surveyor Jasper O'Farrell.

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Mountain View

Mountain View

Mountain View is a city in Santa Clara County, in the San Francisco Bay Area of California. It is named for its views of the Santa Cruz Mountains. The city shares its borders with the cities of Palo Alto, Los Altos, and Sunnyvale, as well as Moffett Federal Airfield and the San Francisco Bay. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 74,066. Situated in Silicon Valley, Mountain View is home to many high technology companies. In 1956, Shockley Semiconductor Laboratory, the first company to develop silicon semiconductor devices in what came to be known as Silicon Valley, was established in the city by William Shockley. Today, many of the largest technology companies in the world are headquartered in the city, including Google, Mozilla Foundation, Symantec, and Intuit.

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Technorati

Technorati

Technorati is an Internet search engine for searching blogs. By June 2008, Technorati was indexing 112.8 million blogs and over 250 million pieces of tagged social media. The name Technorati is a blend of the words technology and literati, which invokes the notion of technological intelligence or intellectualism. Technorati was founded by Dave Sifry, with its headquarters in San Francisco, California, USA. Tantek Çelik was the site's Chief Technologist. Technorati uses and contributes to open source software. Technorati has an active software developer community, many of them from open-source culture. Sifry is a major open-source advocate and was a founder of LinuxCare and later of Wi-Fi access point software developer Sputnik. Technorati includes a public developers' wiki, where developers and contributors collaborate, also various open APIs. The site won the SXSW 2006 awards for Best Technical Achievement and Best of Show. It was nominated for a 2006 Webby Award for Best Practices, but lost to Flickr and Google Maps. Technorati was recognized as one of the “2010 Hottest San Francisco Companies” by Lead411.

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Petaluma

Petaluma

Petaluma is a city in Sonoma County, California, in the United States. In the 2010 Census the population was 57,941. Located in Petaluma is the Rancho Petaluma Adobe, a National Historic Landmark. It was built beginning in 1836 by General Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, then Commandant of the San Francisco Presidio. It was the center of a vast 66,000 acre ranch stretching from Petaluma River to Sonoma Creek. The adobe is considered one of the best preserved buildings of its era in Northern California. Petaluma is a transliteration of the Coast Miwok phrase péta lúuma which means hill backside and probably refers to Petaluma's proximity to Sonoma Mountain. Petaluma has a well-preserved, historic city center which includes many buildings that survived the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.

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Carmel-by-the-Sea

Carmel-by-the-Sea

Carmel-by-the-Sea, often called simply Carmel, is a small city in Monterey County, California, United States, founded in 1902 and incorporated on October 31, 1916. Situated on the Monterey Peninsula, Carmel is known for its natural scenery and rich artistic history. In 1906, the San Francisco Call devoted a full page to the "artists, poets and writers of Carmel-by-the-Sea", and in 1910 it reported that 60 percent of Carmel's houses were built by citizens who were "devoting their lives to work connected to the aesthetic arts." Early City Councils were dominated by artists, and the city has had several mayors who were poets or actors, including Herbert Heron, founder of the Forest Theater, bohemian writer and actor Perry Newberry, and actor-director Clint Eastwood, who was mayor for one term, from 1986 to 1988. The city is known for being dog-friendly, with numerous hotels, restaurants and retail establishments admitting guests with dogs. Carmel is also known for several unusual laws, including a prohibition on wearing high-heel shoes without a permit, enacted to prevent lawsuits arising from tripping accidents caused by irregular pavement. Carmel-by-the-Sea is located on the Pacific coast, about 330 miles north of Los Angeles and 120 miles south of San Francisco. As of the 2010 census, the town had a total population of 3,722, down from 4,081 at the 2000 census.

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Kundiman

Kundiman

Kundiman is a genre of traditional Filipino love songs. The lyrics of the Kundiman are written in Tagalog. The melody is characterized by a smooth, flowing and gentle rhythm with dramatic intervals. Kundiman was the traditional means of serenade in the Philippines. The Kundiman came around to be an art song at the end of the nineteenth century and by the early part of the twentieth century, its musical structure was formalised by Filipino composers such as Francisco Santiago and Nicanor Abelardo; they sought poetry for their lyrics, blending verse and music in equal parts. Scholars and historians believed that the Kundiman originated from the Tagalog town of Balayan, Batangas. Dr. Francisco Santiago, the "Father of the Kundiman Art Song", briefly explains in his scholarly work "The Development of Music in the Philippines" the reason why this Tagalog song is called Kundiman is because the first stanza of this song begun thus: In 1872, the illustrious Franciscan Tagalist and poet, Joaquín de Coria wrote the "Nueva Gramática Tagalog Teorica-Práctica" which, besides treating grammar, also enumerates the characteristics of Tagalog language, and discusses Tagalog poetry. In this book, Coria also listed the names of the most important songs of the Tagalogs. They are:

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Charles S. Howard

Charles S. Howard

Charles Stewart Howard was an American businessman. He made his fortune as an automobile dealer and became a prominent thoroughbred racehorse owner. Howard was dubbed one of the most successful Buick salesmen of all time. He lost a son to a car accident in 1926 at an early age and later bought the soon-to-be-famous horse Seabiscuit. According to Laura Hillenbrand's biography of Seabiscuit, Howard's early Buick dealership in San Francisco was given a boost by the hand of fate; on the day of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, he was one of the few individuals who had operational vehicles in the city, and was thus able to help the rescue effort significantly. In 1921, long before he bought Seabiscuit, Charles Howard purchased the 16,000-acre Ridgewood Ranch at Willits in Mendocino County. His 15-year-old son, Frankie, died there in 1926 after a truck accident on the property. Used as a secondary residence, by the 1930s Howard had converted part of the ranch into a thoroughbred horse breeding and training center. Although Seabiscuit was the most famous resident at Ridgewood Ranch, Charles Howard owned many horses in his secondary career as a Thoroughbred owner including Kayak II and Hall of Fame colt Noor, the first of only two horses to defeat two U.S. Triple Crown champions.

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Booksmith

Booksmith

Founded in October 1976, The Booksmith is an independent bookstore located in the Haight Ashbury neighborhood of San Francisco. When first opened, the store was located at 1746 Haight Street, below the former I-Beam nightclub. In 1985, the store moved to its current location at 1644 Haight Street at Belvedere, about a block and a half from the intersection of Haight and Ashbury. Other neighborhood businesses include the Persian Aub Zam-Zam, Recycled Records, Amoeba Music, and Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream. Also located nearby is the Haight Ashbury Free Clinic. The Booksmith caters to neighborhood residents as well as tourists seeking the counter-cultural ambiance of Haight Street. The Booksmith is general interest shop, and is a member of both the Northern California Independent Booksellers Association and the American Booksellers Association. In June 2007, The Booksmith was sold by its founder Gary Frank to married couple Christin Evans and Praveen Madan. The original business was closed, and a new business, Haight Booksmith LLC, opened in its place. According to media reports at the time, the new owners plan to take the store in a different direction. In May 2011, SF Weekly in its "Best of San Francisco" issue named Booksmith the city's "Best Reimagined Bookstore." Describing the changes to the bookstore, "The new owners gutted the clogged entranceway, feng shui-ed the interior, and gave it a cool Victorian steampunk black-and-teal paint job... with more than 200 in-store author readings a year, Booksmith is more of a literary mecca than ever."

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Vette!

Vette!

Vette! is a 1989 racing video game where the object is racing a Chevrolet Corvette through the streets of San Francisco. The game was notable for its detailed un-shaded polygon rendering of San Francisco streets. It was released on three floppy disks with a Black & White or Color version available. It was also released with a large instruction manual that gave detailed specs about the cars and details about various areas in the city. At the beginning of the game, you were prompted to answer a question from the manual to prove you own the game. If you falsely answered, then you were able to play for limited time before a window popped up claiming, "You are Driving a Stolen Vette" and the game crashed.

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Will Clark

Will Clark

William Nuschler "Will" Clark, Jr. is a former first baseman in Major League Baseball best known for his years with the San Francisco Giants from 1986 to 1993. Will was known by the nickname of "Will the Thrill." One story states that he earned the nicknames by his classmates at Jesuit High School in New Orleans, where he played both varsity baseball and varsity basketball. The more common story states that former teammate Bob Brenly gave Clark the moniker after Clark reportedly stated, "I'm just thrilled to be here," when asked about his recent call-up to the big leagues. The nickname has often been truncated to simply, "The Thrill." Another more generic nickname shared by Will, as well as other players past and present, is "The Natural" because of his natural gifts as a baseball player. Ken Griffey Jr., Jeff Francoeur, Rick Ankiel, and most recently, Josh Hamilton have also donned the nickname. Clark was inducted into the College Baseball Hall of Fame in 2006. He was inducted into the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame on August 1, 2008. He currently works in the San Francisco Giants front office after spending five seasons as an advisor for the Arizona Diamondbacks.

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Conceptismo

Conceptismo

Conceptismo is a literary movement of the Baroque period of Portuguese and Spanish literature. It began in the late 16th century and lasted through the 17th century. Conceptismo is characterized by a rapid rhythm, directness, simple vocabulary, witty metaphors, and wordplay. In this style, multiple meanings are conveyed in a very concise manner, and conceptual intricacies are emphasised over elaborate vocabulary. The most prominent writer of Castilian conceptismo is Francisco de Quevedo, who wrote with an ironic style and satirical wit. Other adherents of this style include Baltasar Gracián. Conceptismo contrasts starkly with culteranismo, another movement of the Baroque period, which is characterized by ostentatious vocabulary, complex syntactical order, multiple, complicated metaphors, but highly conventional content. The best-known representative of Spanish culteranismo, Luis de Góngora, had an ongoing feud with Francisco de Quevedo in which they each criticized the other’s writing and personal life.

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Johnny Rae

Johnny Rae

John Anthony Pompeo, better known as Johnny Rae, is an American jazz drummer and vibraphonist. Rae graduated from East Boston High School in 1952 and studied music at the New England Conservatory and at the Berklee College of Music in the early 1950s. His mother was a night club pianist in the Boston area. His first major professional gig was with Herb Pomeroy in 1953-54; following this he played with George Shearing, Johnny Smith, Ralph Sharon, Cozy Cole, Herbie Mann, Cal Tjader, Stan Getz, Gábor Szabó, Charlie Byrd, Earl Hines, Art Van Damme, and Barney Kessel. In addition to modern jazz, he also plays Latin jazz percussion. Since the 1980s Rae has worked in music education and has authored several instruction books. He was a disc jockey in San Francisco for many years. John was married to Mary Carroll, a San Francisco technical recruiter and author, for 3 years.

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Los Altos

Los Altos

Los Altos is a city at the southern end of the San Francisco Peninsula, in the San Francisco Bay Area. The city is in Santa Clara County, California, United States. The population was 28,976 according to the 2010 census. Most of the city's growth occurred between 1950 and 1980. Originally an agricultural town with many summer cottages and apricot orchards, Los Altos is now an affluent bedroom community. Los Altos has several distinctive features. Commercial zones are strictly limited to the downtown area and small shopping and office parks lining Foothill Expressway and El Camino Real. Forbes places Los Altos as the 63rd and 66th most expensive ZIP codes in the United States, behind such cities as Alpine, NJ, Atherton, CA, and Beverly Hills. This lists median home price around $2,000,000. Los Altos means "the heights" or "foothill" in Spanish.

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Humboldt Bay

Humboldt Bay

Humboldt Bay is a natural bay and a multi-basin, bar-built coastal lagoon located on the rugged North Coast of California, United States entirely within Humboldt County. It is the largest protected body of water on the West Coast between San Francisco Bay and Puget Sound and the largest port between San Francisco and Coos Bay, Oregon. The regional center and county seat of Eureka and college town Arcata adjoin the bay, which is the second largest enclosed bay in California. In addition to being a seasonal or permanent home to more than 200 bird species and 100 species of fish, Humboldt Bay is the second largest estuary in California and houses the largest commercial oyster production operation on the West Coast, producing more than half of all oysters farmed in California. The Port of Humboldt Bay is a deep water port with harbor facilities including large industrial docks at Fairhaven, Samoa, and Fields Landing designed to serve cargo and other vessels, while several marinas also located in Greater Eureka have the capacity to serve hundreds of small to mid-size boats and pleasure craft. Since the 1850s, the bay has been used extensively to export logs and forest products as part of the historic West coast lumber trade, with infrequent shipping occurring currently.

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The Offs

The Offs

The Offs are a punk/ska band from San Francisco, started by guitarist Billy Hawk and singer Don Vinil, and later joined by former Hot Tuna drummer Bob Steeler and a rotation of horn players including Bob Roberts, Richard Edson and Roland Young. The Offs were major players in the early days of the San Francisco punk rock scene.

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Francisco Morazán

Francisco Morazán

Francisco Morazán was born in Honduras and was the first Central American president and united Central America in different periods of time from 1827 to 1842 during turbulent times after its Independence from Spain. Before he was president of Central America he was head of state of Honduras, He rose to prominence at the legendary Battle of La Trinidad on November 11, 1827. Since then, and until his execution in 1842, Morazán dominated the political and military scene of Central America. In the political arena, Francisco Morazán was recognized as a visionary and great thinker, as he attempted to transform Central America into one large and progressive nation. He enacted liberal reforms in the new Federal Republic of Central America, including freedom of the press, speech and religion. Morazán also limited church power by making marriage secular and abolishing government-aided tithing. These reforms made him some powerful enemies, and his period of rule was marked by bitter infighting between liberals and conservatives. But through his military skills, Morazán was able to keep a firm grip on power until 1837, when the Federal Republic became irrevocably fractured. This was exploited by the conservative leaders, who rallied around the leadership of Rafael Carrera and in order to protect their own interests, ended up dividing Central America into five nations.

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Coast Line

Coast Line

The Coast Line is a railroad line from Burbank, California 34°11′10″N 118°19′16″W / 34.1861°N 118.321°W north to the San Francisco Bay Area, roughly along the Pacific Coast. It is the shortest rail route from Los Angeles to the Bay Area. The first version of the Coast line, via Saugus and Santa Paula, was completed by the Southern Pacific Railroad on December 31, 1900; the line via Santa Susana opened in 1904 and thereafter was the main line. In 1907 the Bayshore Cutoff opened from 37°37′52″N 122°24′43″W / 37.631°N 122.412°W to San Francisco and thereafter was the main line; in 1935 the new line around San Jose opened from 37°20′29″N 121°54′46″W / 37.3414°N 121.9127°W to 37°17′05″N 121°50′34″W / 37.2848°N 121.8427°W and thereafter was the main line. Ownership is now Caltrain north of Santa Clara, Union Pacific Railroad from there to the north end of Moorpark and Metrolink south of there. UP freight trains run on the route, although the San Joaquin Valley route is the primary North/South California route. The route hosts passenger trains for Amtrak, commuter rail trains for Metrolink in Southern California and Caltrain in Northern California run on the tracks.

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A. Magazine

A. Magazine

A. Magazine was an Asian American-focused magazine published by A.Media, Inc., headquartered in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. The company also had offices in Los Angeles and San Francisco. It was founded in 1989 by Jeff Yang, Amy Chu, Sandi Kim and Bill Yao to cover Asian American issues and culture, and grew out of a campus magazine Yang edited while an undergraduate at Harvard University. The magazine operated for 12 years. On its tenth year, the magazine made a profit for the firs time. During that year it reached its circulation high of 200,000. When the economy declined in 2001, the magazine declined. Until it ceased on February 20, 2002, it was the largest publication for English-speaking Asian Americans in the United States, with bimonthly readership exceeding 200,000 in North America. Though well known and influential in the Asian American community, it was never profitable in its 13 year existence. In November 1999, it obtained US $4.5 million in venture capital funding, and the company was renamed aMedia, reflecting a branching out into Web publishing. Unfortunately, this change came right as the dot-com boom was turning to bust. In early 2000, right after announcing their move to a 20,000-square-foot office in San Francisco, the stock market nosedived. In a desperate attempt to recover, they merged with Click2Asia in November 2000. After a tough shareholder fight, the merged company was shut down in 2002.

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OpenTable

OpenTable

OpenTable is an American public company that offers online real-time restaurant-reservation service. It was founded by Chuck Templeton in San Francisco, California, in 1998. Reservations are free to end users; the company charges restaurants monthly and per-reservation fees for their use of the system. In 1999, the website began operations serving a limited selection of restaurants in San Francisco. It has since expanded to cover 25,000 restaurants in most U.S. states as well as in several major international cities. Reservations can be made online through its website.

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Adteractive

Adteractive

Adteractive, Inc excels at interactive lead generation and customer acquisition. We delight our clients by consistently delivering high volumes of quality leads and customers on a 100% performance basis. Over the last 6 years we have developed a competency in driving high volumes of qualified traffic from a variety of distribution channels, converting and qualifying consumer prospects with compelling user experiences, and delivering qualified leads and new customer acquisitions to our clients. Adteractive manages the complexity of interactive customer acquisitions, billing our clients for each new prospect on a pure CPA basis. Adteractive has built a powerful, proprietary customer acquisition Network. The Network enables Adteractive to acquire large volumes of qualified leads and customers across several distinct online distribution channels for more than 200 advertising clients in a diverse set of vertical markets. The modular, adaptive Network has allowed us to quickly add new, scalable distribution channels and enter new vertical markets as opportunities arise. Adteractive is partnered with many of the largest publishers to deliver significant reach across many areas of interactive media. Our advertising clients are typically established direct-response advertisers with well-recognized brands and broad consumer appeal. Founded in 2000 • 6 Years of Success Founded in 2000 and headquartered in San Francisco, Adteractive is one of the ten fastest growing companies of the year (San Francisco Business Times, 2005). The company has over 150 employees from America's leading web interactive companies.

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Splunk

Splunk

Splunk is an American multinational corporation headquartered in San Francisco, California, which produces software for searching, monitoring, and analyzing machine-generated big data, via a web-style interface. Splunk captures, indexes and correlates real-time data in a searchable repository from which it can generate graphs, reports, alerts, dashboards and visualizations. Splunk aims to make machine data accessible across an organization and identifies data patterns, provides metrics, diagnoses problems and provides intelligence for business operation. Splunk is a horizontal technology used for application management, security and compliance, as well as business and web analytics. Splunk has over 5,200 licensed customers in 74 countries, including more than half of the Fortune 100. The company was started in 2003 by co-founders Michael Baum, Erik Swan and Rob Das. The name "Splunk" is a reference to exploring caves, as in spelunking. Splunk is based in San Francisco, with regional operations across EMEA and Asia and has over 900 employees. Splunk is venture funded, having raised 40 million USD by 2007 and becoming profitable since 2009. In 2012, Splunk had its initial public offering, trading under NASDAQ symbol NASDAQ: SPLK. In September 2013, the company announced the agreement to acquire Bugsense, a leading analytics solution for machine data generated by mobile devices.

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We Are Hunted

We Are Hunted

We Are Hunted was a San Francisco based software company that developed proprietary search technology which continuously scanned the Internet to identify the hottest new music in the world. The company was founded by Stephen Phillips, Richard Slatter and Michael Doherty. The service provided a constant stream of new music, delivered in a simple, tile-based user interface. We Are Hunted was originally owned and operated by Hunted Media, a web services company based in San Francisco, California. In late 2012, Twitter acquired the company, announcing plans to turn the platform into a new product called Twitter Music in early 2013.

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Loomia

Loomia

Loomia is an Internet technology company based in San Francisco, California in the United States. Loomia offers a module that recommends content on a Web site. The company is part of a growing Internet trend that aims to bridge the gap between technological capabilities and user intents. Loomia's technology analyzes the content on the Web site, as well as user behaviors and social contexts to offer additional content that reflects the user's interests. The technology is reported to find the overlap between these diverse datasets as well as matching it against publisher content preferences. In doing so, Loomia's technology attempts to surface publishers' most valuable content and recommend articles and videos that matter to users. Loomia has worked with major media companies to optimize their Web site content such as Time.com, The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, CNET, US News & World Report, and others. The content recommendation module can be found on these sites under the header of "People Who Read This Also Read." Loomia was founded by David Marks, Ken Fromm, and Francis Kelly in 2005. The company is located in San Francisco, CA.

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Amobee

Amobee

About Us Amobee is the first company to deliver a unified, telco-grade system for funding mobile content and communications through advertising revenues. Amobee has launched a new media system for ad-funding the entire mobile content and communication business. Amobee is the only media system capable of dynamically inserting targeted, interactive advertisements into all types of mobile entertainment and communication channels, including videos, music, messaging, games, WAP etc., using a single, telco-grade ad-serving infrastructure. Headquartered in the San Francisco, the company enjoys financial backing from some of the biggest names in venture capital: Accel Partners, Sequoia Capital and Globespan. Amobee has commercial offices in London andSan Francisco, with RD in Herzliya, Israel. What We Believe In 1. Mobile users will engage with an ad-model if they are given a choice and if they understand what they will get in exchange for their engagement. We believe in providing a user-centric, permission-based model and ensuring that consumers are always in control and that they get value in return for ads . The advertising should be presented in a relevant, contextual, targeted, personalized user friendly manner. 2.We believe the Mobile Operators are key to leveraging the value of mobile media because: Operators have a trusted relationship with their subscribersOperators own valuable media properties in their own rightOperators hold the key to mobile media’s unique selling proposition: user data (CRM, Location, transaction history)Operators have a unique, all-encompassing view of the user across all channels, which allows for optimal ad inventory usage. 3. We believe that the ‘user-paid’ model is one of the key barriers to the growth of mobile data consumption and revenues. As the mobile phone is fast becoming a media channel, bringing advertisers on board in a way that creates value for all stakeholders will lead to increased data consumption and greater revenues. 4. We need to make it scalable and easy for Advertisers to engage. Providing a holistic, scalable one-stop solution will help make mobile a more attractive media channel. 5. ‘Ad-funded’ does not necessarily mean ‘free’. We believe in offering the user a choice between various levels of ad-funding and full price, ad-free content.

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Richrelevance

Richrelevance

RichRelevance is a company, based in San Francisco, California, that offers personalized shopping experiences for large retail brands, including Wal-Mart, Sears, Target and others. RichRelevance is headquartered in San Francisco, with offices in New York, Seattle, Boston and London. Richrelevance was founded by a former Amazon.com Personalization R&D team member.

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Washington Redskins

Washington Redskins

The Washington Redskins are a professional American football team based in Washington, D.C. The team belongs to East Division of the National Football Conference in the National Football League. The team's home stadium is FedExField in Landover, Maryland. Its headquarters and training facility are at Redskins Park in Ashburn, Virginia and the newly built Redskins Complex in Richmond, Virginia respectively. The Redskins have played more than 1,000 games since 1932. The Redskins have won five NFL Championships. The franchise has captured 13 NFL divisional titles and six NFL conference championships. The Redskins won the 1937 and 1942 Championship games, as well as Super Bowls XVII, XXII, and XXVI. They also played in, and lost, the 1936, 1940, 1943, and 1945 Championship games, as well as Super Bowls VII and XVIII. They have made 22 postseason appearances, and have an overall postseason record of 23 wins and 17 losses. Only five teams have qualified for more Super Bowls than the Redskins: the Pittsburgh Steelers, Dallas Cowboys, New England Patriots, San Francisco 49ers, and Denver Broncos. The Redskins' five appearances are tied with the Green Bay Packers, Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders, New York Giants, and Miami Dolphins. Only five teams have more Super Bowl wins than the Redskins: the Pittsburgh Steelers, Dallas Cowboys, San Francisco 49ers, Green Bay Packers, and New York Giants. The Redskins' three wins are tied with the Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders, and New England Patriots.

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Carol Doda

Carol Doda

Carol Ann Doda is a former topless stripper in San Francisco, California who was active in the 1960s through 1980s, one of the first of the era. In 1964 Doda made international news, first by dancing topless at the city's Condor Club, then by enhancing her bust from size 34 to 44 through silicone injections. Her breasts became known as Doda's "twin 44s" and "the new Twin Peaks of San Francisco."

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She Lives!

She Lives!

She Lives! is a 1973 made-for-television movie about a young couple, Andy and Pam who meet after Andy places a singles ad in his college newspaper. Pam advises him to put a response to her letter in the "Who's Next" album at a local record store. He does and they meet. They are instantly attracted to each other and in the next scene they are living together. Andy has to overcome the objections of his father and brother and he and Pam get jobs and live in her studio apartment. They are happy until Andy discovers a lump in Pam's neck. They go for tests and find out Pam has Hodgkin's Disease. They are devastated and Pam goes to a therapist to help cope with the sad news. Pam considers suicide, but Andy talks her out of it by convincing her that they will fight. They find a doctor who gives Pam experimental treatments that almost kill her. They travel to San Francisco to meet with another doctor. At first, he won't take Pam's case but eventually he is swayed by Andy's tearful appeal. He turns out to be the doctor who gets Pam's disease into remission. As the young lovers run throughout the streets of San Francisco celebrating the news they come upon a group of girls playing hopscotch. Andy borrows the chalk from one of them and the girl tells him, "Okay, but don't break it." He responds, "I will never break anything as long as I live." He writes She Lives! in chalk and runs through the streets shouting it. He turns and there is Pam, the girl he loves. As the movie ends, Jim Croce's "Time in a Bottle" plays over the credits.

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Ruth Ann Swenson

Ruth Ann Swenson

Ruth Ann Swenson is an American soprano who is renowned for her coloratura roles. Born in Bronxville, New York and raised in Commack, New York on Long Island, Swenson studied at the Academy of Vocal Arts in Philadelphia and briefly at Hartt College of Music in West Hartford, Connecticut. In the early 1980s she joined the Merola Program at the San Francisco Opera and toured the country as Gilda in Western Opera Theater's Rigoletto. She made her San Francisco Opera debut in 1983, as Despina in Mozart's Così fan tutte. But her breakthrough role was Dorinda the shepherdess in Handel's Orlando opposite mezzo Marilyn Horne. Her Metropolitan Opera debut came in 1991, as Zerlina in Mozart's Don Giovanni. In 1993, she won the Richard Tucker Music Foundation Award.

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Dallas Cowboys

Dallas Cowboys

    The Dallas Cowboys are a professional American football team in the Eastern Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). They are based in the Dallas suburb of Irving, Texas. The team currently plays its home games at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington. The Cowboys joined the NFL as a 1960 expansion team. The team's national following might best be represented by its NFL record of consecutive games in front of sold-out stadiums. The Cowboys' streak of 160 sold-out regular and post-season games began in 1990, and included 79 straight sellouts at their home, Texas Stadium, and 81 straight sell-outs on the road.     An article from Forbes Magazine, dated September 10, 2008, lists the Cowboys as the most valuable football franchise in the world, with an estimated value of approximately $1.612 billion, ahead of the Washington Redskins ($1.538 billion) and the New England Patriots ($1.324 billion). They are also one of the wealthiest teams in the NFL, generating almost $269 million in annual revenue.     The Cowboys have been one of the most successful teams of the modern era (since 1960). The team has won five Super Bowls and eight Conference Championships. The Cowboys have more victories (41) on Monday Night Football than any other NFL team; the Miami Dolphins are second with 39 and the San Francisco 49ers are third with 38. They hold NFL records for the most consecutive winning seasons (20, from 1966 to 1985) and most seasons with at least ten wins (25). The team has earned the most post-season appearances (29, which includes another league record of 56 post-season games, winning 32 of them), the most division titles with 19, the most appearances in the NFC Championship Game (14), and the most Super Bowl appearances (8), two more than any other NFL team. The Cowboys also played in two NFL championship games before the NFL's 1970 merger with the American Football League. The Cowboys became the first team in NFL history to win three Super Bowls in just four years (a feat that has been matched only once since, by the New England Patriots). They are also tied with the San Francisco 49ers and the Pittsburgh Steelers for having the most Super Bowl wins (5). The Cowboys' success and popularity has earned them the nickname "America's Team". In a statistical comparison of all teams since the AFL-NFL merger, ESPN's Page 2 placed the Cowboys at the top of its Ultimate Power Ranking.

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Experian

Experian

Experian plc is a global information services group with operations in 44 countries. The company now employs 17,000 people with corporate headquarters in Dublin, Ireland and operational headquarters in Nottingham, United Kingdom, Costa Mesa, California, US and São Paulo, Brazil. It is listed on the London Stock Exchange and is a constituent of the FTSE 100 Index.

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Alumínio

Alumínio

Alumínio is a Brazilian city of the state of São Paulo. The population in 2003 is 16,019 and the area is 83.7 km². Its latitude is 23.5331/23°32'6" S and the longitude is 47.5625/47°15'43" W The elevation is 790 m. Alumínio is located east of Sorocaba and is also a suburban area. The main employer in Alumínio is Companhia Brasileira de Aluminio. Possui uma área de 83,70 km².

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Natura

Natura

Natura is the Brazilian leading manufacturer and marketer of beauty products, household, and personal care, skin care, solar filters, cosmetics, perfume and hair care products the company that sells products through representatives in many countries across the world. The company was founded in 1969, by Luiz Seabra and became a public company, listed on São Paulo Stock Exchange, in 2004. In 1974, Natura adopted direct sales as sales model. In 2012 it had more than 1.2 million "consultants" spread throughout Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, France, Mexico, Peru, USA, Australia, UK and among others, and since 2006 surpasses Avon's sales in Brazil. Natura focuses on its image as an eco-friendly, sustainable company. The company also prides itself on strong research and development activity. It uses ordinary women rather than supermodels in its advertisements. In Brazil, the major competitors of Natura are O Boticário, Jequití and the American company Avon. —Exemplu– Historically committed to preserving the environment, Natura was established in 1983, and was the first company to introduce refills in Brazilian cosmetics industry. In 2007 Natura started to provide its consumer products with neutral carbon thanks to its Carbon Neutral Program, designed to reduce and offset emissions of gases causing the greenhouse gases. In the same year, it became a pioneer in providing its customers with the Environmental Table: a framework for information printed on product packaging, which presents technical data about the formulations and packaging. Inspired by the nutritional table of food products, which provides information such as the percentage of renewable plant-derived ingredients and recommended number of refilagens.

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Rocky Mountain spotted fever

Rocky Mountain spotted fever

Rocky Mountain spotted fever is the most lethal and most frequently reported rickettsial illness in the United States. It has been diagnosed throughout the Americas. Some synonyms for Rocky Mountain spotted fever in other countries include “tick typhus,” “Tobia fever”, “São Paulo fever” or “febre maculosa”, and “fiebre manchada”. It is distinct from the viral tick-borne infection, Colorado tick fever. The disease is caused by Rickettsia rickettsii, a species of bacterium that is spread to humans by Dermacentor ticks. Initial signs and symptoms of the disease include sudden onset of fever, headache, and muscle pain, followed by development of rash. The disease can be difficult to diagnose in the early stages, and without prompt and appropriate treatment it can be fatal. The name “Rocky Mountain spotted fever” is somewhat of a misnomer. Beginning in the 1930s, it became clear that this disease occurred in many areas of the United States other than the Rocky Mountain region. It is now recognized that this disease is broadly distributed throughout the contiguous United States, and occurs as far north as Canada and as far south as Central America and parts of South America. Between 1981 and 1996, this disease was reported from every state of the United States except for Hawaii, Vermont, Maine, and Alaska.

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Kaká

Kaká

Ricardo Izecson dos Santos Leite, commonly known as Kaká, is a Brazilian football attacking midfielder who currently plays for Spanish La Liga club Real Madrid and the Brazilian national team. Kaká started his footballing career at the age of eight, when he began playing for a local club. At the time, he also played tennis, and it was not until he moved on to São Paulo FC and signed his first professional contract with the club at the age of 15 that he chose to focus on football. In 2003 he joined Milan for a fee of €8.5 million. While at Milan, Kaká won the Ballon d'Or and FIFA World Player of the Year awards in 2007. After his success with Milan, Kaká joined Real Madrid for a transfer fee of €65 million, second only to that of Zinedine Zidane, €75 million. Later Real Madrid transferred Cristiano Ronaldo for a fee of €96 million, setting a new transfer fee record, making Kaká's fee the third highest ever. In addition to his contributions on the pitch, Kaká is known for his humanitarian work. In 2004, by the time of his appointment, he became the youngest ambassador of the UN World Food Programme. Kaká is the first sportsperson to amass 10 million followers on Twitter.

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Urbanization

Urbanization

Urbanization is the physical growth of urban areas as a result of rural migration and even suburban concentration into cities, particularly the very large ones. The United Nations projected that half of the world's population would live in urban areas at the end of 2008. By 2050 it is predicted that 64.1% and 85.9% of the developing and developed world respectively will be urbanized. Urbanization is closely linked to modernization, industrialization, and the sociological process of rationalization. Urbanization can describe a specific condition at a set time, i.e. the proportion of total population or area in cities or towns, or the term can describe the increase of this proportion over time. So the term urbanization can represent the level of urban relative to overall population, or it can represent the rate at which the urban proportion is increasing. Urbanization is not merely a modern phenomenon, but a rapid and historic transformation of human social roots on a global scale, whereby predominantly rural culture is being rapidly replaced by predominantly urban culture. The last major change in settlement patterns was the accumulation of hunter-gatherers into villages many thousand years ago. Village culture is characterized by common bloodlines, intimate relationships, and communal behavior whereas urban culture is characterized by distant bloodlines, unfamiliar relations, and competitive behavior. This unprecedented movement of people is forecast to continue and intensify in the next few decades, mushrooming cities to sizes incomprehensible only a century ago. Indeed, today, in Asia the urban agglomerations of Dhaka, Karachi, Mumbai, Delhi, Manila, Seoul and Beijing are each already home to over 20 million people, while the Pearl River Delta, Shanghai-Suzhou and Tokyo are forecast to approach or exceed 40 million people each within the coming decade. Outside Asia, Mexico City, Sao Paulo, New York City, Lagos and Cairo are fast approaching or home to over 20 million people already.

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IPO station

IPO station

IPO is a station on Line D of the Porto Metro, Portugal. The station is at the northern end of the University of Porto campus and is named after the nearby Instituto Português de Oncologia. Although Line D opened in 2005, the IPO and Hospital de São João stations did not open until April 2006 due to safety concerns. Before this time the line terminated at the preceding Pólo Universitário station. The line operates as a ground-level tram at this station.

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Cameroon

Cameroon

Cameroon, officially the Republic of Cameroon, is a country in the west Central Africa region. It is bordered by Nigeria to the west; Chad to the northeast; the Central African Republic to the east; and Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, and the Republic of the Congo to the south. Cameroon's coastline lies on the Bight of Bonny, part of the Gulf of Guinea and the Atlantic Ocean. The country is often referred to as "Africa in miniature" for its geological and cultural diversity. Natural features include beaches, deserts, mountains, rainforests, and savannas. The highest point is Mount Cameroon in the southwest, and the largest cities are Douala, Yaoundé and Garoua. Cameroon is home to over 200 different linguistic groups. The country is well known for its native styles of music, particularly makossa and bikutsi, and for its successful national football team. French and English are the official languages. Early inhabitants of the territory included the Sao civilisation around Lake Chad and the Baka hunter-gatherers in the southeastern rainforest. Portuguese explorers reached the coast in the 15th century and named the area Rio dos Camarões, which became Cameroon in English. Fulani soldiers founded the Adamawa Emirate in the north in the 19th century, and various ethnic groups of the west and northwest established powerful chiefdoms and fondoms. Cameroon became a German colony in 1884.

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Sabino

Sabino

Sabino is a municipality in the state of São Paulo in Brazil. The population in 2004 was 5,146 and the area is 312.57 km². The elevation is 412 m.

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Resurrection of Christ

Resurrection of Christ

The Resurrection of Christ, also called The Kinnaird Resurrection, is an oil painting on wood by the Italian High Renaissance master Raphael. The work is one the earliest known paintings by the artist, executed between 1499 and 1502. It is probably a piece of an unknown predella, though it has been suggested that the painting could be one of the remaining works of the Baronci altarpiece, Raphael's first recorded commission. The painting is presently housed in the São Paulo Museum of Art. The Kinnaird Resurrection is one of the first preserved works of Raphael in which his natural dramatic style of composition was already obvious, as opposed to the gentle poetic style of his master, Pietro Perugino. The extremely rational composition is ruled by a complex ideal geometry which interlinks all the elements of the scene and gives it a strange animated rhythm, transforming the characters in the painting into co-protagonists in a unique "choreography". The painting possesses an esthetic influence from Pinturicchio and Melozzo da Forlì, though the spatial orchestration of the work, with its tendency to movement, shows Raphael's knowledge of the Florentine artistic milieu of the 16th century.

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Guarapuava

Guarapuava

Guarapuava is a city in the mid south of Paraná state in Brazil. It is the largest city in that state by area. Guarapuava is located at 25°23'36" south and 51°27'19" west. The region is known as the centre of the state of Paraná, in the third plateau, also called of the Plateau of Guarapuava. Discovered by the Portuguese in 1770, and founded in 1810, the city's name comes from tupy guarani meaning brave wolf. Its elevation is 943m. The first families to settle in the city were formed through the Tropeiros, which came from Minas Gerais, São Paulo and Rio Grande do Sul. These families had their roots in Poland, Italy and Germany. The city's birthday is celebrated on December 9, due to the beginning of colonisation between Rio Coutinho and Rio Jordão, in the goodwill of Nossa Senhora de Belém in 1819. The city is the seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Guarapuava.

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Manaus

Manaus

Manaus is a city in Brazil, the capital of the state of Amazonas. It is situated at the confluence of the Negro and Solimões rivers. It is the most populous city of Amazonas, according to the statistics of Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, and is a popular ecotourist destination. Manaus belongs to mesoregion Center Amazonense and microregion Manaus. It is located in northern Brazil, 1,936 kilometers from the federal capital, Brasília. The city was founded in 1669 as the Fort of São José do Rio Negro. It was elevated to a town in 1832 with the name of "Manaus", which means "mother of the gods" in tribute to the indigenous nation of Manaós, and legally transformed into a city on October 24 of 1848 with the name of Cidade da Barra do Rio Negro, Portuguese for "The City of the Margins of Black River". Only on September 4 of 1856 did it revert to its current name. It was known at the beginning of the century, as Heart of the Amazon and City of the Forest. Currently its main economic engine is the Industrial Pool of Manaus. It is the largest metropolitan area in Northern Brazil and the eleventh in all of Brazil, with 2,283,906 inhabitants. The population in 2012 was 1.85 million people; it is the most populous city in North Region and seventh most populous city of Brazil, according to data from Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, the IBGE. The city gradually increased its participation in the GDP of Brazil in recent decades, rising to account for 1.4% of the economy of the country in 2010, with all that economic power coming mainly from the Free Economic Zone located in the city. Currently, the city is one of 12 most influential cities of the country. Manaus alone represents 10.89% of the population of the whole of Northern Brazil and 49.9% of the population of the Amazon.

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Itu

Itu

Itu is an old and historic municipality in the state of São Paulo in Brazil. The population in 2009 was 157,384 and the area is 641.68 km². The elevation is 583 m. This place name comes from the Tupi language, meaning big waterfall. Itu is linked with the highway numbered the SP-75 and are flowed with two rivers, Tietê and Jundiaí. Itu has five hospitals, eleven bank agencies and one shopping center, the Plaza Shopping Itu. Itu was founded by the Portuguese in 1610 by Domingos Fernandes. It became a parish in 1653. In 1657, it was elevated to a town and municipality. It became a part of Brazil in 1822. It became a city in 1843. Itu was the birthplace of the Brazilian Republic and has a renowned museum. Itu became a famous town after "Simplicio" a well known Brazilian comedian, born in Itu, was made Tourism Secretary and to increase tourism promoted it as the "capital of large things". For example, the town square holds a giant 4mt high yellow phone-booth "orelhão". The Itu popsicle is about 30 cm tall. And a giant Christmas tree. With the increase in domestic tourism the infrastructure soon developed to attract foreign visitors as well as international meetings, seminars and congress events. In 1999 and 2003 the Seventh Day Adventist Reform Movement held their international delegation session in Itu bringing people from over 80 countries to the city at each event.

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Mato Grosso do Sul

Mato Grosso do Sul

Mato Grosso do Sul is one of the states of Brazil. Neighboring Brazilian states are Mato Grosso, Goiás, Minas Gerais, São Paulo and Paraná. It also borders the countries of Paraguay and Bolivia to the west. The economy of the state is largely based on agriculture and cattle-raising. Bisected in the south by the Tropic of Capricorn, Mato Grosso do Sul generally has a warm and humid climate, and is crossed by numerous effluents of the Paraná River. The state is also famous for its natural beauty, and is a major destination for domestic and international tourism. The Pantanal lowlands cover 12 municipalities and presents an enormous variety of flora and fauna, with forests, natural sand banks, savannahs, open pasture, fields and bushes. The city Bonito, in the mountain of Bodoquena, has prehistoric caverns, natural rivers, waterfalls, swimming pools and the Blue Lake cavern. The name "Mato Grosso do Sul" literally means "Thick Forest of the South" in Portuguese, a name inherited from its northern neighbour state of Mato Grosso, of which it was part until the 1970s. It is not uncommon for people to mistakenly refer to Mato Grosso do Sul as simply "Mato Grosso". Other names that were proposed, at the time of the split and afterwards, include "Pantanal" and "Maracaju".

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Roseira

Roseira

Roseira is a municipality in the state of São Paulo in Brazil. The population in 2004 was 9,788 and the area is 130.57 km². The elevation is 551 m.

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Guará

Guará

Guará is a municipality situated in the northern part of the state of São Paulo in Brazil. The population in 2004 is 20,226 and the area is 363.72 km². The elevation is 573 m. This place name comes from the Tupi language for two animals common in the region, the maned wolf and the great egret.

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Equatorial Guinea

Equatorial Guinea

Equatorial Guinea, officially the Republic of Equatorial Guinea, is a country located in Middle Africa. With an area of 28,000 square kilometres Equatorial Guinea is one of the smallest countries in continental Africa. It has two parts, an insular and a mainland region. The insular region consists of the islands of Bioko in the Gulf of Guinea and Annobón, a small volcanic island south of the equator. Bioko island is the northernmost part of Equatorial Guinea and is the site of the country's capital, Malabo. The island nation of São Tomé and Príncipe is located between Bioko and Annobón. The mainland region, Río Muni, is bordered by Cameroon on the north and Gabon on the south and east. It also includes several small offshore islands. Formerly the colony of Spanish Guinea, its post-independence name evokes its location near both the equator and the Gulf of Guinea. Apart from the Spanish cities of Ceuta and Melilla on the coast of Morocco, it is the only country in mainland Africa whose de jure official language is Spanish.

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Portuguese Language

Portuguese Language

Portuguese is a Romance language. It is the official language of Portugal, Brazil, Mozambique, Angola, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, and São Tomé and Príncipe. Portuguese has co-official status in Macau in East Asia, East Timor in Southeast Asia and in Equatorial Guinea in Central Africa. Also the result of expansion during colonial times, Portuguese speakers are also found in Goa, Daman and Diu in India and in Malacca in Malaysia. Portuguese is a part of the Ibero-Romance group that evolved from several dialects of colloquial Latin in the medieval Kingdom of Galicia. With approximately 210 to 215 million native speakers and 240 million total speakers, Portuguese is usually listed as the seventh most spoken language in the world, the third most spoken European language in the world, the most spoken language in the Southern Hemisphere, the second most spoken Romance language in Africa, Mainland Southeast Asia and the most spoken Romance language in East and South Asia, while in Maritime Southeast Asia, as in South America, the numbers compete with those of Spanish. Spanish author Miguel de Cervantes once called Portuguese "the sweet and gracious language" and Spanish playwright Lope de Vega referred to it as "sweet", while the Brazilian writer Olavo Bilac poetically described it as "a última flor do Lácio, inculta e bela". Portuguese is also termed "the language of Camões", after one of Portugal's greatest literary figures, Luís Vaz de Camões.

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Embu das Artes

Embu das Artes

Embu, also Embu das Artes, is a Brazilian city in the State of São Paulo. It is a suburb of the capital. The population in 2006 was 245,855 inhabitants. Population density is 3,508.2 /km² and the area is 70 km². Its history brought it an unexpected specialization as a city for artists. This has paid tourism dividends to the city.

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Hooters

Hooters

Hooters is the trade name of two privately held American restaurant chains: Hooters of America, Incorporated, based in Atlanta, Georgia, and Hooters, Incorporated, based in Clearwater, Florida. The Hooters name is a double entendre referring to both its owl logo, a bird known for its "hooting" calls, as well as an American slang term for female breasts. Hooters is a restaurant whose waiting staff are primarily young, attractive waitresses usually referred to simply as "Hooter Girls" whose revealing outfits and sex appeal is played up and is a primary component of the company's image. The company also employs other males/females as cooks, hosts, busboys, and managers. The menu includes hamburgers and other sandwiches, steaks, seafood entrees, appetizers, and the restaurant's specialty, chicken wings. Almost all Hooters restaurants hold alcoholic beverage licenses to sell beer and wine, and, where local permits allow, a full liquor bar. Other offerings for sale include Hooters T-shirts, sweatshirts, and various souvenirs and curios. Between company owned locations and franchises, there are now more than 460 Hooters throughout the United States. The company has restaurants in 44 U.S. states, the US Virgin Islands, and Guam. In addition, Hooters operates restaurants in 24 other countries. The company's first overseas location was in Singapore, and other Hooters restaurants are now located in Aruba, Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Germany, Guatemala, Hungary, Japan, Mexico, Panama, Philippines, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, Taiwan and one outlet in the United Kingdom, following the closure of the remaining UK franchises. The three largest restaurants of the chain are located in Singapore, Tokyo, and São Paulo.

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