Definitions containing rà ntgen rays

We've found 250 definitions:

Röntgen, Wilhelm Konrad von

Röntgen, Wilhelm Konrad von

discoverer of the Röntgen rays, born at Lennep, in Rhenish Prussia; since 1885 has been professor of Physics at Würzburg; his discovery of the X-rays was made in 1898, and has won him a wide celebrity; b. 1845.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

X-ray absorbing glass

X-ray absorbing glass

glass (having a high lead content) that resists the penetration of X-rays and gamma rays

— Wiktionary

radiable

radiable

Transparent to radiant energy, especially X-rays. Capable of being penetrated and examined by rays or waves.

— Wiktionary

Crookes tube

Crookes tube

An early experimental electrical discharge tube by means of which cathode rays and X-rays were discovered.

— Wiktionary

rem

rem

A dose of absorbed radiation equivalent to one roentgen of X-rays or gamma rays

— Wiktionary

retroreflection

retroreflection

reflection in which the reflected rays are parallel to the incident rays

— Wiktionary

radiosterilization

radiosterilization

The sterilization (either of an organism, or a surgical implement) by ionizing radiation such as X-rays or gamma rays.

— Wiktionary

electromagnetic spectrum

electromagnetic spectrum

The entire range of wavelengths of all known electromagnetic radiations extending from gamma rays through visible light, infrared, and radio waves, to X-rays.

— Wiktionary

radial

radial

issuing in rays from a common center; relating to rays of light

— Princeton's WordNet

X-Rays

X-Rays

Penetrating electromagnetic radiation emitted when the inner orbital electrons of an atom are excited and release radiant energy. X-ray wavelengths range from 1 pm to 10 nm. Hard X-rays are the higher energy, shorter wavelength X-rays. Soft x-rays or Grenz rays are less energetic and longer in wavelength. The short wavelength end of the X-ray spectrum overlaps the GAMMA RAYS wavelength range. The distinction between gamma rays and X-rays is based on their radiation source.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

compton

Compton, Arthur Compton, Arthur Holly Compton

United States physicist noted for research on x-rays and gamma rays and nuclear energy; his observation that X-rays behave like miniature bowling balls in their interactions with electrons provided evidence for the quantal nature of light (1892-1962)

— Princeton's WordNet

arthur holly compton

Compton, Arthur Compton, Arthur Holly Compton

United States physicist noted for research on x-rays and gamma rays and nuclear energy; his observation that X-rays behave like miniature bowling balls in their interactions with electrons provided evidence for the quantal nature of light (1892-1962)

— Princeton's WordNet

arthur compton

Compton, Arthur Compton, Arthur Holly Compton

United States physicist noted for research on x-rays and gamma rays and nuclear energy; his observation that X-rays behave like miniature bowling balls in their interactions with electrons provided evidence for the quantal nature of light (1892-1962)

— Princeton's WordNet

Compton scattering

Compton scattering

The increase in the wavelength, and corresponding decrease in the energy, of photons (especially of X-rays and gamma rays) when scattered by interaction with matter

— Wiktionary

Compton effect

Compton effect

The increase in the wavelength, and corresponding decrease in the energy, of photons (especially of X-rays and gamma rays) when scattered by interaction with matter

— Wiktionary

Actinic rays

Actinic rays

"non-luminous rays of higher frequency than the luminous rays."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

aberration

aberration

The convergence to different foci, by a lens or mirror, of rays of light emanating from one and the same point, or the deviation of such rays from a single focus.

— Wiktionary

shadowgraph

radiogram, radiograph, shadowgraph, skiagraph, skiagram

a photographic image produced on a radiosensitive surface by radiation other than visible light (especially by X-rays or gamma rays)

— Princeton's WordNet

radiogram

radiogram, radiograph, shadowgraph, skiagraph, skiagram

a photographic image produced on a radiosensitive surface by radiation other than visible light (especially by X-rays or gamma rays)

— Princeton's WordNet

skiagraph

radiogram, radiograph, shadowgraph, skiagraph, skiagram

a photographic image produced on a radiosensitive surface by radiation other than visible light (especially by X-rays or gamma rays)

— Princeton's WordNet

radiograph

radiogram, radiograph, shadowgraph, skiagraph, skiagram

a photographic image produced on a radiosensitive surface by radiation other than visible light (especially by X-rays or gamma rays)

— Princeton's WordNet

skiagram

radiogram, radiograph, shadowgraph, skiagraph, skiagram

a photographic image produced on a radiosensitive surface by radiation other than visible light (especially by X-rays or gamma rays)

— Princeton's WordNet

X-ray radiation

X-ray radiation

electromagnetic radiation consisting of X-rays, radiation in the X-ray spectrum, of shorter wavelength and higher frequency than ultraviolet and longer wavelength and lower frequency than gamma rays

— Wiktionary

philadelphia fleabane

Philadelphia fleabane, Erigeron philadelphicus

especially pretty plant having a delicate fringe of threadlike rays around flower heads having very slender white or pink rays; United States and Canada

— Princeton's WordNet

erigeron philadelphicus

Philadelphia fleabane, Erigeron philadelphicus

especially pretty plant having a delicate fringe of threadlike rays around flower heads having very slender white or pink rays; United States and Canada

— Princeton's WordNet

Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission

Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission

The spectrometric analysis of fluorescent X-RAYS, i.e. X-rays emitted after bombarding matter with high energy particles such as PROTONS; ELECTRONS; or higher energy X-rays. Identification of ELEMENTS by this technique is based on the specific type of X-rays that are emitted which are characteristic of the specific elements in the material being analyzed. The characteristic X-rays are distinguished and/or quantified by either wavelength dispersive or energy dispersive methods.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Actinology

Actinology

the science which treats of rays of light, especially of the actinic or chemical rays

— Webster Dictionary

Ultrared

Ultrared

situated beyond or below the red rays; as, the ultrated rays of the spectrum, which are less refrangible than the red

— Webster Dictionary

Radiograph

Radiograph

a picture produced by the Rontgen rays upon a sensitive surface, photographic or fluorescent, especially a picture of opaque objects traversed by the rays

— Webster Dictionary

radiation

radiation

rays of energy produced by heat, light, etc.

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

light

light

brightness from the sun's rays or an electric light

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

Radiant

Radiant

especially, emitting or darting rays of light or heat; issuing in beams or rays; beaming with brightness; emitting a vivid light or splendor; as, the radiant sun

— Webster Dictionary

sunburn

sunburn

red, painful skin that has been damaged by the sun's rays

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

Ultraviolet

Ultraviolet

lying outside the visible spectrum at its violet end; -- said of rays more refrangible than the extreme violet rays of the spectrum

— Webster Dictionary

Gamma Rays

Gamma Rays

Penetrating, high-energy electromagnetic radiation emitted from atomic nuclei during NUCLEAR DECAY. The range of wavelengths of emitted radiation is between 0.1 - 100 pm which overlaps the shorter, more energetic hard X-RAYS wavelengths. The distinction between gamma rays and X-rays is based on their radiation source.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

X-Ray Diffraction

X-Ray Diffraction

The scattering of x-rays by matter, especially crystals, with accompanying variation in intensity due to interference effects. Analysis of the crystal structure of materials is performed by passing x-rays through them and registering the diffraction image of the rays (CRYSTALLOGRAPHY, X-RAY). (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Aberration

Aberration

the convergence to different foci, by a lens or mirror, of rays of light emanating from one and the same point, or the deviation of such rays from a single focus; called spherical aberration, when due to the spherical form of the lens or mirror, such form giving different foci for central and marginal rays; and chromatic aberration, when due to different refrangibilities of the colored rays of the spectrum, those of each color having a distinct focus

— Webster Dictionary

Starfish

Starfish

any one of numerous species of echinoderms belonging to the class Asterioidea, in which the body is star-shaped and usually has five rays, though the number of rays varies from five to forty or more. The rays are often long, but are sometimes so short as to appear only as angles to the disklike body. Called also sea star, five-finger, and stellerid

— Webster Dictionary

irradiated

irradiated

Having rays.

— Wiktionary

rayless

rayless

Lacking rays

— Wiktionary

radiolucent

radiolucent

transparent to X-rays

— Wiktionary

hexactine

hexactine

Having six rays

— Wiktionary

biradiate

biradiate

Having two rays

— Wiktionary

octoradiated

octoradiated

Having eight rays.

— Wiktionary

radiophobia

radiophobia

The fear of X-rays.

— Wiktionary

asteriated

asteriated

Radiated, with diverging rays.

— Wiktionary

cosmogenic

cosmogenic

produced by cosmic rays

— Wiktionary

X-ray fluorescence

X-ray fluorescence

X-ray fluorescence is the emission of characteristic "secondary" X-rays from a material that has been excited by bombarding with high-energy X-rays or gamma rays. The phenomenon is widely used for elemental analysis and chemical analysis, particularly in the investigation of metals, glass, ceramics and building materials, and for research in geochemistry, forensic science and archaeology.

— Freebase

Sunny

Sunny

exposed to the rays of the sun; brightened or warmed by the direct rays of the sun; as, a sunny room; the sunny side of a hill

— Webster Dictionary

Radiography

Radiography

Examination of any part of the body for diagnostic purposes by means of X-RAYS or GAMMA RAYS, recording the image on a sensitized surface (such as photographic film).

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

roentgenotherapy

roentgenotherapy

the therapeutic use of X-rays

— Wiktionary

radiate

radiate

To emit rays or waves.

— Wiktionary

sunning

sunning

sun tanning; getting some rays;

— Wiktionary

X-ray

X-ray

A radiograph: a photograph made with X-rays.

— Wiktionary

radiopaque

radiopaque

impenetrable to X-rays and other radiation

— Wiktionary

ray gun

ray gun

A fictional weapon that emits harmful rays.

— Wiktionary

irradiated

irradiated

Emitted outwards from a centre like rays.

— Wiktionary

gamma radiation

gamma radiation

electromagnetic radiation consisting of gamma rays

— Wiktionary

superburst

superburst

A very large burst (of X-rays etc)

— Wiktionary

radiator

radiator

Anything which radiates or emits rays.

— Wiktionary

sunshine

sunshine

A location on which the sun's rays fall.

— Wiktionary

supersoft

supersoft

Describing astronomical X-rays of very low energy

— Wiktionary

radiopacity

radiopacity

the state of being opaque to X-rays

— Wiktionary

X-ray

X-ray

Of or having to do with X-rays.

— Wiktionary

rayproof

rayproof

Shielded to prevent the emission of X-rays.

— Wiktionary

radiodiagnostics

radiodiagnostics

diagnostics by means of X-rays or radiochemical tracers

— Wiktionary

radiability

radiability

the state of being radiable; transparent to X-rays

— Wiktionary

thermodiffractogram

thermodiffractogram

A diffractogram produced using thermal neutrons rather than X-rays

— Wiktionary

cineradiography

cineradiography

cinematography of working internal organs, normally using X-rays

— Wiktionary

radiodiagnosis

radiodiagnosis

diagnosis by means of X-rays or radiochemical tracers

— Wiktionary

eradiate

eradiate

To spread out light rays in all directions.

— Wiktionary

Ultraviolet Rays

Ultraviolet Rays

That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum immediately below the visible range and extending into the x-ray frequencies. The longer wavelengths (near-UV or biotic or vital rays) are necessary for the endogenous synthesis of vitamin D and are also called antirachitic rays; the shorter, ionizing wavelengths (far-UV or abiotic or extravital rays) are viricidal, bactericidal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic and are used as disinfectants.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

skiagram

skiagram

A picture or image created from shadows, especially with X-rays.

— Wiktionary

beamy

beamy

Showing or emitting rays of light; beaming; radiant; shining.

— Wiktionary

sunburst

sunburst

A figure or shape showing rays radiating from a central point.

— Wiktionary

starburst

starburst

A symbol similar to an asterisk, but with additional rays: .

— Wiktionary

X-ray tube

X-ray tube

An X-ray tube is a vacuum tube, that produces X-rays. They are used in X-ray machines. X-rays are part of the electromagnetic spectrum, an ionizing radiation with wavelengths shorter than ultraviolet light. X-ray tubes evolved from experimental Crookes tubes with which X-rays were first discovered in the late 19th century, and the availability of this controllable source of X-rays created the field of radiography, the imaging of opaque objects with penetrating radiation. X-ray tubes are also used in CAT scanners, airport luggage scanners, X-ray crystallography, and for industrial inspection.

— Freebase

Butterfly ray

Butterfly ray

The butterfly rays are a group of rays forming the genus Gymnura and the family Gymnuridae. They are found in warm oceans worldwide, and occasionally in estuaries. The body of butterfly rays is flattened and surrounded by an extremely broad disc formed by the pectoral fins, which merge in front of the head. They have a very short, thread-like, tail. They range from 31 cm to 4 m in body length. McEachran et al. place the butterfly rays in the subfamily Gymnurinae of the family Dasyatidae, but this article follows FishBase and ITIS in treating them as a family.

— Freebase

radiodensity

radiodensity

The relative transparency of a material to X-rays and other radiation

— Wiktionary

dedisperse

dedisperse

To bring together data, rays etc that have been dispersed

— Wiktionary

caustic

caustic

The envelope of reflected or refracted rays for a given curve.

— Wiktionary

focus

focus

a point at which reflected or refracted rays of light converge.

— Wiktionary

stellate

stellate

Shaped like a star, having points, or rays radiating from a center.

— Wiktionary

sunstroke

sunstroke

Heatstroke caused by an excessive exposure to the sun's rays.

— Wiktionary

X-ray fluorescence

X-ray fluorescence

The emission of electrons from a material when exposed to X-rays.

— Wiktionary

X-ray telescope

X-ray telescope

An instrument that detects X-rays originating from outside the Earth's atmosphere.

— Wiktionary

penetrometer

penetrometer

A device that measures the penetrating power of electromagnetic radiation (especially X-rays).

— Wiktionary

photogoniometer

photogoniometer

A goniometer, used in X-ray diffraction, that detects the X-rays using a photocell.

— Wiktionary

radial

radial

arranged like rays that radiate from, or converge to a common centre

— Wiktionary

focal point

focal point

A focus; a point at which rays of light or other radiation converge

— Wiktionary

X-ray tube

X-ray tube

A device that produces X-rays by directing energetic electrons into a metal target.

— Wiktionary

collimated

collimated

of light beams whose rays are parallel and thus has a plane wavefront

— Wiktionary

radiate

radiate

surrounded by rays, such as the head of a saint in a religious picture.

— Wiktionary

acanthopterygious

acanthopterygious

Having fins in which the rays are hard and spinelike; spiny-finned.

— Wiktionary

X-ray microscope

X-ray microscope

A device that uses soft X-rays to produce images of very small objects.

— Wiktionary

focus

focus

a point of a conic at which rays reflected from a curve or surface converge.

— Wiktionary

radioactivity

radioactivity

The radiation so emitted; including gamma rays, alpha particles, neutrons, electrons, positrons, etc.

— Wiktionary

beamstop

beamstop

Any of several devices used in X-ray crystallography to avoid damage by X-rays

— Wiktionary

Myopia

Myopia

nearsightedness; shortsightedness; a condition of the eye in which the rays from distant object are brought to a focus before they reach the retina, and hence form an indistinct image; while the rays from very near objects are normally converged so as to produce a distinct image. It is corrected by the use of a concave lens

— Webster Dictionary

sunglass

sunglass

A convex lens of glass for producing heat by converging the sun's rays into a focus.

— Wiktionary

X-ray binary

X-ray binary

X-ray binaries are a class of binary stars that are luminous in X-rays. The X-rays are produced by matter falling from one component, called the donor to the other component, called the accretor, which is compact: a white dwarf, neutron star, or black hole. The infalling matter releases gravitational potential energy, up to several tenths of its rest mass, as X-rays. An estimated 1041 positrons escape per second from a typical hard low-mass X-ray binary.

— Freebase

Absorptiometry, Photon

Absorptiometry, Photon

A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

X-ray

X-ray

X-radiation is a form of electromagnetic radiation. X-rays have a wavelength in the range of 0.01 to 10 nanometers, corresponding to frequencies in the range 30 petahertz to 30 exahertz and energies in the range 100 eV to 100 keV. The wavelengths are shorter than those of UV rays and longer than those of gamma rays. In many languages, X-radiation is called Röntgen radiation, after Wilhelm Röntgen, who is usually credited as its discoverer, and who had named it X-radiation to signify an unknown type of radiation. Spelling of X-ray in the English language includes the variants x-ray and X ray. X-rays with photon energies above 5-10 keV are called hard X-rays, while those with lower energy are called soft X-rays. Due to their penetrating ability hard X-rays are widely used to image the inside of objects, e.g. in medical radiography and airport security. As a result, the term X-ray is metonymically used to refer to a radiographic image produced using this method, in addition to the method itself. Since the wavelengths of hard X-rays are similar to the size of atoms they are also useful for determining crystal structures by X-ray crystallography. By contrast, soft X-rays are easily absorbed in air and the attenuation length of 600 eV X-rays in water is less than 1 micrometer.−11

— Freebase

positron emission tomography

positron emission tomography

A medical imaging technique which detects the gamma rays produced by positrons emitted from injected radionuclides.

— Wiktionary

estoile

estoile

A six-pointed star whose rays are wavy, as opposed to the straight lines of a mullet.

— Wiktionary

Gamma ray

Gamma ray

Gamma radiation, also known as gamma rays, and denoted by the Greek letter γ, refers to electromagnetic radiation of high frequency and therefore high energy per photon. Gamma rays are ionizing radiation, and are thus biologically hazardous. They are classically produced by the decay from high energy states of atomic nuclei, but are also created by other processes. Paul Villard, a French chemist and physicist, discovered gamma radiation in 1900, while studying radiation emitted from radium. Villard's radiation was named "gamma rays" by Ernest Rutherford in 1903. Natural sources of gamma rays on Earth include gamma decay from naturally occurring radioisotopes, and secondary radiation from atmospheric interactions with cosmic ray particles. Rare terrestrial natural sources produce gamma rays that are not of a nuclear origin, such as lightning strikes and terrestrial gamma-ray flashes. Gamma rays are produced by a number of astronomical processes in which very high-energy electrons are produced, that in turn cause secondary gamma rays by the mechanisms of bremsstrahlung, inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron radiation. A large fraction of such astronomical gamma rays are screened by Earth's atmosphere and must be detected by spacecraft.19

— Freebase

gamma particle

gamma particle

A photon with a wavelength short enough to be considered gamma rays. Usually emitted as a consequence of radioactivity.

— Wiktionary

Eagle ray

Eagle ray

The eagle rays are a group of cartilaginous fishes in the family Myliobatidae, consisting mostly of large species living in the open ocean rather than on the sea bottom. Eagle rays feed on mollusks and crustaceans, crushing their shells with their flattened teeth, while devil and manta rays filter plankton from the water. They are excellent swimmers and are able to breach the water up to several metres above the surface. Compared with other rays, they have long tails, and well-defined rhomboidal bodies. They are ovoviviparous, giving birth to up to six young at a time. They range from 48 centimetres to 9.1 metres in length.

— Freebase

radioscopy

radioscopy

examination of objects by the use of X-rays; radiology

— Wiktionary

sunburnt

sunburnt

Having a sunburn; having been burned by the sun's rays

— Wiktionary

sunshine

sunshine

The direct rays, light or warmth of the sun.

— Wiktionary

radiate

radiate

To come out or proceed in rays or waves.

— Wiktionary

X-ray therapy

X-ray therapy

The therapeutic use of controlled doses of X-rays

— Wiktionary

helioelectric

helioelectric

Describing electric power generated by the rays of the sun

— Wiktionary

focus

focus

To cause (rays of light, etc) to converge at a single point.

— Wiktionary

vergence

vergence

A measure of convergence or divergence of rays

— Wiktionary

gamma-ray

gamma-ray

pertaining to gamma rays or gamma radiation

— Wiktionary

Triradiated

Triradiated

having three rays

— Webster Dictionary

Multiradiate

Multiradiate

having many rays

— Webster Dictionary

photoscanner

photoscanner

A device which photographically records the gamma rays passing through tissue that has been injected with a radioactive material.

— Wiktionary

diacaustic

diacaustic

The curve or surface formed by the intersection of refracted light rays.

— Wiktionary

caustic surface

caustic surface

A surface to which rays reflected or refracted by another surface are tangents.

— Wiktionary

moonburn

moonburn

A burn on the skin caused by excess exposure to the moon's rays.

— Wiktionary

sunburn

sunburn

A burn on the skin caused by excess exposure to the sun's rays.

— Wiktionary

Radiation

Radiation

Emission or propagation of electromagnetic energy (waves/rays), or the waves/rays themselves; a stream of electromagnetic particles (electrons, neutrons, protons, alpha particles) or a mixture of these. The most common source is the sun.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

orthographic

orthographic

Of a projection used in maps, architecture etc., in which the rays are parallel.

— Wiktionary

historadiography

historadiography

the radiography of soft tissue using long wavelength X-rays of low penetrating power

— Wiktionary

cosmic ray

cosmic ray

Cosmic radiation: a stream of cosmic rays.

— Wiktionary

Refract

Refract

to break the natural course of, as rays of light orr heat, when passing from one transparent medium to another of different density; to cause to deviate from a direct course by an action distinct from reflection; as, a dense medium refrcts the rays of light as they pass into it from a rare medium

— Webster Dictionary

ampulla of Lorenzini

ampulla of Lorenzini

An electroreceptor found mainly in cartilaginous fish such as sharks and rays, forming a network of jelly-filled canals.

— Wiktionary

Magnetar

Magnetar

A magnetar is a type of neutron star with an extremely powerful magnetic field, the decay of which powers the emission of high-energy electromagnetic radiation, particularly X-rays and gamma rays. The theory regarding these objects was proposed by Robert Duncan and Christopher Thompson in 1992, but the first recorded burst of gamma rays thought to have been from a magnetar had been detected on March 5, 1979. During the following decade, the magnetar hypothesis has become widely accepted as a likely explanation for soft gamma repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars.

— Freebase

spread

spread

To extend (individual rays, limbs etc.); to stretch out in varying or opposing directions.

— Wiktionary

myliobatidae

Myliobatidae, family Myliobatidae

eagle rays

— Princeton's WordNet

genus gymnura

Gymnura, genus Gymnura

butterfly rays

— Princeton's WordNet

gymnura

Gymnura, genus Gymnura

butterfly rays

— Princeton's WordNet

family torpedinidae

Torpedinidae, family Torpedinidae

electric rays

— Princeton's WordNet

torpedinidae

Torpedinidae, family Torpedinidae

electric rays

— Princeton's WordNet

family dasyatidae

Dasyatidae, family Dasyatidae

sting rays

— Princeton's WordNet

dasyatidae

Dasyatidae, family Dasyatidae

sting rays

— Princeton's WordNet

family myliobatidae

Myliobatidae, family Myliobatidae

eagle rays

— Princeton's WordNet

radiosurgery

radiosurgery

The use of a directed beam of X-rays or other ionizing radiation to destroy diseased tissue

— Wiktionary

Rubific

Rubific

making red; as, rubific rays

— Webster Dictionary

Ray

Ray

to shine, as with rays

— Webster Dictionary

Radious

Radious

consisting of rays, as light

— Webster Dictionary

Phosphorogenic

Phosphorogenic

generating phosphorescence; as, phosphorogenic rays

— Webster Dictionary

Adiactinic

Adiactinic

not transmitting the actinic rays

— Webster Dictionary

Penciled

Penciled

radiated; having pencils of rays

— Webster Dictionary

ray

ray

emit as rays

— Princeton's WordNet

irradiate

irradiate

To emit rays; to shine.

— Wiktionary

Rhinoptera

Rhinoptera

Rhinoptera is a genus of eagle rays, family Myliobatidae, commonly known as the cownose rays It contains the following species: ⁕Rhinoptera adspersa J. P. Müller & Henle, 1841 ⁕Rhinoptera bonasus ⁕Rhinoptera brasiliensis J. P. Müller, 1836 ⁕Rhinoptera javanica J. P. Müller & Henle, 1841 ⁕Rhinoptera jayakari Boulenger, 1895 ⁕Rhinoptera marginata ⁕Rhinoptera neglecta J. D. Ogilby, 1912 ⁕Rhinoptera steindachneri Evermann & O. P. Jenkins, 1891

— Freebase

Biradiated

Biradiated

having two rays; as, a biradiate fin

— Webster Dictionary

arthrogram

arthrogram

A series of images, often X-rays, of a joint after injection of a contrast medium.

— Wiktionary

Reverberation

Reverberation

the act of reverberating; especially, the act of reflecting light or heat, or reechoing sound; as, the reverberation of rays from a mirror; the reverberation of rays from a mirror; the reverberation of voices; the reverberation of heat or flame in a furnace

— Webster Dictionary

disperse

disperse

To separate rays of light etc. according to wavelength; to refract

— Wiktionary

subclass elasmobranchii

Elasmobranchii, subclass Elasmobranchii, Selachii, subclass Selachii

sharks; rays; dogfishes; skates

— Princeton's WordNet

selachii

Elasmobranchii, subclass Elasmobranchii, Selachii, subclass Selachii

sharks; rays; dogfishes; skates

— Princeton's WordNet

subclass selachii

Elasmobranchii, subclass Elasmobranchii, Selachii, subclass Selachii

sharks; rays; dogfishes; skates

— Princeton's WordNet

elasmobranchii

Elasmobranchii, subclass Elasmobranchii, Selachii, subclass Selachii

sharks; rays; dogfishes; skates

— Princeton's WordNet

x-ray

x-ray

examine by taking x-rays

— Princeton's WordNet

x ray

x-ray

examine by taking x-rays

— Princeton's WordNet

gamma knife

gamma knife

a machine that produces and focuses beams of gamma-rays at a specific location in the body, used to burn-up diseased tissues

— Wiktionary

diaheliotropism

diaheliotropism

A tendency of leaves or other plant organs to have their dorsal surface facing towards the rays of light.

— Wiktionary

Asteriated

Asteriated

radiated, with diverging rays; as, asteriated sapphire

— Webster Dictionary

Five-finger

Five-finger

a starfish with five rays, esp. Asterias rubens

— Webster Dictionary

Divergent

Divergent

causing divergence of rays; as, a divergent lens

— Webster Dictionary

irradiance

irradiance

The act of irradiating; emission of rays of light.

— Wiktionary

ray tracing

ray tracing

A computer graphics technique that produces realistic images by projecting imaginary light rays to determine which parts of an object should be illuminated.

— Wiktionary

X-ray spectrometer

X-ray spectrometer

A device for analyzing the chemical composition of substances using the characteristic spectral lines produced by their interaction with X-rays.

— Wiktionary

hodoscope

hodoscope

A device, consisting of multiple detectors, that is used to track the path of cosmic rays and other subatomic particles

— Wiktionary

microdiffraction

microdiffraction

diffraction that uses X-rays focused to a spot size of one micron or less to achieve very high spatial resolution

— Wiktionary

radiate

radiate

send out rays or waves

— Princeton's WordNet

rajidae

Rajidae, family Rajidae

bottom-dwelling tropical rays: skates

— Princeton's WordNet

family rajidae

Rajidae, family Rajidae

bottom-dwelling tropical rays: skates

— Princeton's WordNet

mountain lily

mountain lily, Lilium auratum

Japanese lily with golden rays

— Princeton's WordNet

disperse

disperse

separate (light) into spectral rays

— Princeton's WordNet

irradiate

irradiate

cast rays of light upon

— Princeton's WordNet

x-ray therapy

X-ray therapy

the therapeutic use of X rays

— Princeton's WordNet

lilium auratum

mountain lily, Lilium auratum

Japanese lily with golden rays

— Princeton's WordNet

actinotrichium

actinotrichium

Any of a group of hairlike fibres in the finfolds of fish larvae that develop into fin rays

— Wiktionary

Cosmic ray

Cosmic ray

Cosmic rays are very high-energy particles, mainly originating outside the Solar System. They may produce showers of secondary particles that penetrate and impact the Earth's atmosphere and sometimes even reach the surface. Comprised primarily of high-energy protons and atomic nuclei, their origin has been a mystery. Data from the Fermi space telescope have been interpreted as evidence that a significant fraction of primary cosmic rays originate from the supernovae of massive stars. However, this is not thought to be their only source. Active galactic nuclei probably also produce cosmic rays. The term ray is a historical accident, as cosmic rays were at first, and wrongly, thought to be mostly electromagnetic radiation. In modern common usage high-energy particles with intrinsic mass are known as "cosmic" rays, and photons, which are quanta of electromagnetic radiation are known by their common names, such as "gamma rays" or "X-rays", depending on their frequencies. Cosmic rays attract great interest practically, due to the damage they inflict on microelectronics and life outside the protection of an atmosphere and magnetic field, and scientifically, because the energies of the most energetic ultra-high-energy cosmic rays have been observed to approach 3 × 1020 eV, about 40 million times the energy of particles accelerated by the Large Hadron Collider. At 50 J, the highest-energy ultra-high-energy cosmic rays have energies comparable to the kinetic energy of a 90-kilometre-per-hour baseball. As a result of these discoveries, there has been interest in investigating cosmic rays of even greater energies. Most cosmic rays, however, do not have such extreme energies; the energy distribution of cosmic rays peaks at 0.3 gigaelectronvolts.

— Freebase

Actinic

Actinic

of or pertaining to actinism; as, actinic rays

— Webster Dictionary

Starry

Starry

arranged in rays like those of a star; stellate

— Webster Dictionary

Corradiation

Corradiation

a conjunction or concentration of rays in one point

— Webster Dictionary

Sunshade

Sunshade

anything used as a protection from the sun's rays

— Webster Dictionary

helianthus

helianthus

Any plant, of the genus Helianthus, having large flower heads with dark disk florets and showy yellow rays; the sunflowers

— Wiktionary

Crookes tube

Crookes tube

A Crookes tube is an early experimental electrical discharge tube, with partial vacuum, invented by English physicist William Crookes and others around 1869-1875, in which cathode rays, streams of electrons, were discovered. Developed from the earlier Geissler tube, the Crookes tube consists of a partially evacuated glass container of various shapes, with two metal electrodes, the cathode and the anode, one at either end. When a high voltage is applied between the electrodes, cathode rays travel in straight lines from the cathode to the anode. It was used by Crookes, Johann Hittorf, Julius Plücker, Eugen Goldstein, Heinrich Hertz, Philipp Lenard and others to discover the properties of cathode rays, culminating in J.J. Thomson's 1897 identification of cathode rays as negatively charged particles, which were later named electrons. Crookes tubes are now used only for demonstrating cathode rays. Wilhelm Röntgen discovered X-rays using the Crookes tube in 1895. The term is also used for the first generation, cold cathode X-ray tubes, which evolved from the experimental Crookes tubes and were used until about 1920.

— Freebase

family rhinobatidae

Rhinobatidae, family Rhinobatidae

primitive rays with guitar-shaped bodies

— Princeton's WordNet

family mobulidae

Mobulidae, family Mobulidae

large rays lacking venomous spines: mantas

— Princeton's WordNet

torpediniformes

Torpediniformes, order Torpediniformes

rays with bodies shaped like torpedoes

— Princeton's WordNet

focused

focused, focussed

(of light rays) converging on a point

— Princeton's WordNet

focussed

focused, focussed

(of light rays) converging on a point

— Princeton's WordNet

family pristidae

Pristidae, family Pristidae

large primitive rays with elongated snouts

— Princeton's WordNet

radio-opacity

radiopacity, radio-opacity

opacity to X-rays or other radiation

— Princeton's WordNet

radiate

radiate

send out real or metaphoric rays

— Princeton's WordNet

pristidae

Pristidae, family Pristidae

large primitive rays with elongated snouts

— Princeton's WordNet

rhinobatidae

Rhinobatidae, family Rhinobatidae

primitive rays with guitar-shaped bodies

— Princeton's WordNet

order torpediniformes

Torpediniformes, order Torpediniformes

rays with bodies shaped like torpedoes

— Princeton's WordNet

radiopacity

radiopacity, radio-opacity

opacity to X-rays or other radiation

— Princeton's WordNet

mobulidae

Mobulidae, family Mobulidae

large rays lacking venomous spines: mantas

— Princeton's WordNet

irradiate

irradiate

To throw rays of light upon; to illuminate; to brighten; to adorn with luster.

— Wiktionary

X-ray diffraction

X-ray diffraction

The scattering of X-rays by the regular lattice of atoms or molecules in a crystal.

— Wiktionary

hadrontherapy

hadrontherapy

Any of several forms of radiotherapy that uses beams of elementary particles instead of X-rays

— Wiktionary

caustic

caustic

The envelope of reflected or refracted rays of light for a given surface or object.

— Wiktionary

electric ray

electric ray

Any of the groupof rays of the order Torpedodiniformes, which can produce an electric discharge

— Wiktionary

Raia

Raia

a genus of rays which includes the skates. See Skate

— Webster Dictionary

Actinoid

Actinoid

having the form of rays; radiated, as an actinia

— Webster Dictionary

Basho

Basho

Basho is a crater on Mercury. Though Basho crater is only about 80 kilometers in diameter, its bright rays make it an easily identified feature on Mercury's surface. In addition to the long bright rays, photographs from Mariner 10 showed an intriguing dark halo of material around the crater.

— Freebase

terahertz radiation

terahertz radiation

Especially electromagnetic waves in the range 0.1-30 THz (or subranges there of, see T-rays or T-waves).

— Wiktionary

dynactinometer

dynactinometer

An instrument for measuring the intensity of photogenic rays and computing the power of object glasses.

— Wiktionary

Cathode ray

Cathode ray

Cathode rays are streams of electrons observed in vacuum tubes. If an evacuated glass tube is equipped with two electrodes and a voltage is applied, the glass opposite of the negative electrode is observed to glow, due to electrons emitted from and travelling perpendicular to the cathode. They were first observed in 1869 by German physicist Johann Hittorf, and were named in 1876 by Eugen Goldstein kathodenstrahlen, or cathode rays. Electrons were first discovered as the constituents of cathode rays. In 1897 British physicist J. J. Thomson showed the rays were composed of a previously unknown negatively charged particle, which was later named the electron. Cathode ray tubes use a focused beam of electrons deflected by electric or magnetic fields to create the image in a classic television set.

— Freebase

birefringence

birefringence

the splitting of a ray of light into two parallel rays of perpendicular polarization by passage through an optically anisotropic medium

— Wiktionary

guitarfish

guitarfish

Any of the fish in the Rhinobatidae family of rays.

— Wiktionary

x-ray photography

roentgenography, X-ray photography

radiography that uses X-rays to produce a roentgenogram

— Princeton's WordNet

x-ray machine

X-ray machine

an apparatus that provides a source of X rays

— Princeton's WordNet

x-raying

X-raying, X-radiation

obtaining images by the use of X rays

— Princeton's WordNet

reflection

reflection, reflexion, reflectivity

the ability to reflect beams or rays

— Princeton's WordNet

reflexion

reflection, reflexion, reflectivity

the ability to reflect beams or rays

— Princeton's WordNet

reflectivity

reflection, reflexion, reflectivity

the ability to reflect beams or rays

— Princeton's WordNet

x-radiation

X-raying, X-radiation

obtaining images by the use of X rays

— Princeton's WordNet

roentgenography

roentgenography, X-ray photography

radiography that uses X-rays to produce a roentgenogram

— Princeton's WordNet

Actinic Rays

Actinic Rays

The rays of light at the violet end of the spectrum; also the invisible rays beyond such end, or the ether waves of short periods which most strongly induce chemical change.

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

Radiant

Radiant

emitting or proceeding as from a center; resembling rays; radiating; radiate

— Webster Dictionary

Rayonnant

Rayonnant

darting forth rays, as the sun when it shines out

— Webster Dictionary

gravitational lens

gravitational lens

A massive body that produces distorted, magnified or multiple images of more distant objects when its gravitational field bends the path of light rays.

— Wiktionary

superorder acanthopterygii

Acanthopterygii, superorder Acanthopterygii

teleost fishes having fins with sharp bony rays

— Princeton's WordNet

philipp lenard

Lenard, Philipp Lenard

German physicist who studied cathode rays (1862-1947)

— Princeton's WordNet

heliogram

heliogram

a message transmitted by means of the sun's rays

— Princeton's WordNet

lenard

Lenard, Philipp Lenard

German physicist who studied cathode rays (1862-1947)

— Princeton's WordNet

incident

incident

falling or striking of light rays on something

— Princeton's WordNet

birefringence

double refraction, birefringence

splitting a ray into two parallel rays polarized perpendicularly

— Princeton's WordNet

double refraction

double refraction, birefringence

splitting a ray into two parallel rays polarized perpendicularly

— Princeton's WordNet

acanthopterygii

Acanthopterygii, superorder Acanthopterygii

teleost fishes having fins with sharp bony rays

— Princeton's WordNet

Radiate

Radiate

having rays or parts diverging from a center; radiated; as, a radiate crystal

— Webster Dictionary

Spine-finned

Spine-finned

having fine supported by spinous fin rays; -- said of certain fishes

— Webster Dictionary

Refracted

Refracted

turned from a direct course by refraction; as, refracted rays of light

— Webster Dictionary

Radiotherapy, High-Energy

Radiotherapy, High-Energy

Radiotherapy using high-energy (megavolt or higher) ionizing radiation. Types of radiation include gamma rays, produced by a radioisotope within a teletherapy unit; x-rays, electrons, protons, alpha particles (helium ions) and heavy charged ions, produced by particle acceleration; and neutrons and pi-mesons (pions), produced as secondary particles following bombardment of a target with a primary particle.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

box set

box set

Related musical or video recordings that are gathered on multiple compact discs, DVDs or Blu-rays, and placed in a box, along with a small booklet.

— Wiktionary

radiopaque

radiopaque, radio-opaque

not transparent to X-rays or other forms of radiation

— Princeton's WordNet

radiate

radial, stellate, radiate

arranged like rays or radii; radiating from a common center

— Princeton's WordNet

radial

radial, stellate, radiate

arranged like rays or radii; radiating from a common center

— Princeton's WordNet

stellate

radial, stellate, radiate

arranged like rays or radii; radiating from a common center

— Princeton's WordNet

xeroradiography

xeroradiography

radiography using X-rays and xerographic (rather than roentgenographic) techniques

— Princeton's WordNet

radio-opaque

radiopaque, radio-opaque

not transparent to X-rays or other forms of radiation

— Princeton's WordNet

radiotherapy equipment

radiotherapy equipment

equipment used to treat diseases with x-rays or radioactivity

— Princeton's WordNet

actinoid

actinoid

Having the form of rays; radiated, as in the species of the family Actiniidae.

— Wiktionary

Plagiostomi

Plagiostomi

an order of fishes including the sharks and rays; -- called also Plagiostomata

— Webster Dictionary

Heliograph

Heliograph

an apparatus for telegraphing by means of the sun's rays. See Heliotrope, 3

— Webster Dictionary

Acanthopterygious

Acanthopterygious

having fins in which the rays are hard and spinelike; spiny-finned

— Webster Dictionary

radiometallography

radiometallography

the determination of the structure of metals and alloys by means of X-rays

— Wiktionary

astigmatism

astigmatism

A defect of a lens such that light rays coming from a point do not meet at a focal point so that the image is blurred.

— Wiktionary


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