Definitions containing réville, albert

We've found 250 definitions:

Albert chain

Albert chain

A chain used to make easier access to a pocket watch in the watchpocket of a waistcoat. The Albert style went to a T-bar finding that tucked into a buttoned buttonhole of the waistcoat. From there a further small length of chain hung, to which the wearer attached decorative charms such as fraternity or lodge symbols. The double Albert was a chain draped between both watchpockets, with the T-bar and pendant chain in the middle. With the passing of their use as a functional item, Albert chains are still used as jewelry, worn in any number of manners.

— Wiktionary

Alberta

Alberta

, a feminine form of Albert.

— Wiktionary

Albie

Albie

, short form of Albert.

— Wiktionary

Alberts

Alberts

derived from the given name Albert.

— Wiktionary

Camus

Camus

Albert Camus, French author and philosopher

— Wiktionary

saxegothea

Saxe-gothea, Saxegothea, genus Saxe-gothea, genus Saxegothea

one species: Prince Albert's yew

— Princeton's WordNet

saxe-gothea

Saxe-gothea, Saxegothea, genus Saxe-gothea, genus Saxegothea

one species: Prince Albert's yew

— Princeton's WordNet

genus saxegothea

Saxe-gothea, Saxegothea, genus Saxe-gothea, genus Saxegothea

one species: Prince Albert's yew

— Princeton's WordNet

genus saxe-gothea

Saxe-gothea, Saxegothea, genus Saxe-gothea, genus Saxegothea

one species: Prince Albert's yew

— Princeton's WordNet

Camusian

Camusian

Of or pertaining to Albert Camus (1913u20131960), French philosopher and writer.

— Wiktionary

Albertina

Albertina

, a feminine diminutive form of Albert, Latinate variant of Albertine.

— Wiktionary

einsteinian

Einsteinian

of or relating to Albert Einstein or his theories

— Princeton's WordNet

Bertie

Bertie

A diminutive of Bertram, Albert or of any male given names ending in -bert.

— Wiktionary

Einstein

Einstein

Albert Einstein, the world-famous 20th Century theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity.

— Wiktionary

Allie

Allie

A diminutive of the male given names Alistair, Alfred, Alvin, Albert, Alan or other names beginning with Al-.

— Wiktionary

Al

Al

A diminutive of the male given names Alan, Albert, Alex, Alexander, Alfred, and other names beginning with Al-.

— Wiktionary

cosmological constant

cosmological constant

A term added by Albert Einstein to his equations of general relativity in order to account for a supposed static universe.

— Wiktionary

Alby

Alby

, anglicization of Irish Ailbhe, name of an Irish saint also anglicized as Albert.

— Wiktionary

Einsteinian

Einsteinian

Of or relating to the theories of the theoretical physicist Albert Einstein.

— Wiktionary

Asterix

Asterix

A series of French comic books written by Renu00E9 Goscinny and illustrated by Albert Uderzo about an ancient Gaul man named Asterix.

— Wiktionary

relativity

relativity

Either of two theories (special relativity or general relativity) developed by German-American physicist Albert Einstein. Also called Einsteinian relativity.

— Wiktionary

Einstein-Rosen bridge

Einstein-Rosen bridge

A type of wormhole, originally predicted by physicists Albert Einstein and Nathan Rosen, that is inherently unstable and collapses before any information or matter can pass through.

— Wiktionary

edward vii

Edward, Edward VII, Albert Edward

King of England from 1901 to 1910; son of Victoria and Prince Albert; famous for his elegant sporting ways (1841-1910)

— Princeton's WordNet

edward

Edward, Edward VII, Albert Edward

King of England from 1901 to 1910; son of Victoria and Prince Albert; famous for his elegant sporting ways (1841-1910)

— Princeton's WordNet

albert edward

Edward, Edward VII, Albert Edward

King of England from 1901 to 1910; son of Victoria and Prince Albert; famous for his elegant sporting ways (1841-1910)

— Princeton's WordNet

oratory

oratory

1. Chin-music with Prince Albert accompaniment.

2. The lullaby of the Intellect.

3. Palaver in a Prince Albert.

— The Roycroft Dictionary

michelson-morley experiment

Michelson-Morley experiment

a celebrated experiment conducted by Albert Michelson and Edward Morley; their failure to detect any influence of the earth's motion on the velocity of light was the starting point for Einstein's theory of relativity

— Princeton's WordNet

satyendra nath bose

Bose, Satyendra N. Bose, Satyendra Nath Bose

Indian physicist who with Albert Einstein proposed statistical laws based on the indistinguishability of particles; led to the description of fundamental particles that later came to be known as bosons

— Princeton's WordNet

satyendra n. bose

Bose, Satyendra N. Bose, Satyendra Nath Bose

Indian physicist who with Albert Einstein proposed statistical laws based on the indistinguishability of particles; led to the description of fundamental particles that later came to be known as bosons

— Princeton's WordNet

bose

Bose, Satyendra N. Bose, Satyendra Nath Bose

Indian physicist who with Albert Einstein proposed statistical laws based on the indistinguishability of particles; led to the description of fundamental particles that later came to be known as bosons

— Princeton's WordNet

King Albert

King Albert

King Albert is a solitaire card game using a deck of 52 playing cards. It is said to be named after King Albert of Belgium the first. It is the best known of the three games that are each called Idiot's Delight because of the low chance of winning the game.

— Freebase

Lake Albert

Lake Albert

Lake Albert – also Albert Nyanza and formerly Lake Mobutu Sese Seko – is one of the African Great Lakes. It is Africa's seventh-largest lake, and the world's twenty-seventh largest lake by volume.

— Freebase

Shadow of a Doubt

Shadow of a Doubt

Shadow of a Doubt is a 1943 American psychological thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and starring Teresa Wright and Joseph Cotten. Written by Thornton Wilder, Sally Benson, and Alma Reville, the film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Story for Gordon McDonell. In 1991, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

— Freebase

Prince Albert

Prince Albert

Prince Albert is the third-largest city in Saskatchewan, Canada. It is situated in the centre of the province on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River. The city is known as the "Gateway to the North" because it is the last major centre along the route to the resources of northern Saskatchewan. Prince Albert National Park is located just 51 km north of the city and contains a huge wealth of lakes, forest, and wildlife. The city itself is located in a transition zone between the aspen parkland and boreal forest biomes. Prince Albert is bordered by the Rural Municipality of Prince Albert No. 461 and the Rural Municipality of Buckland No. 491.

— Freebase

Albrecht

Albrecht

. See Albert.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Tiefland

Tiefland

Tiefland is an opera in a prologue and three acts by Eugen d'Albert, to a libretto in German by Rudolph Lothar. Based on the 1896 Catalan play Terra baixa by Àngel Guimerà, Tiefland was d'Albert's seventh opera, and is the one which is now the best known.

— Freebase

theory of relativity

theory of relativity

The generic term of the special relativity and the general relativity, two theories in physics developed mainly by Albert Einstein at the beginning of the 20th century from which several important results such as the equivalence of matter and energy and the Einstein field equations are derived.

— Wiktionary

Nyanza, Albert

Nyanza, Albert

. See Albert Nyanza.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Albert sauce

Albert sauce

Albert sauce is a sauce used principally in British cuisine to enhance the flavour of braised beef. It consists of grated horseradish in a clear bouillon, thickened with cream and egg yolks, and spiced with a little prepared mustard diluted in vinegar. It is named after Prince Albert, Queen Victoria's prince consort.

— Freebase

Albert Medal

Albert Medal

The Albert Medal for Lifesaving was a British medal awarded to recognise the saving of life. It has since been replaced by the George Cross. The Albert Medal was first instituted by a Royal Warrant on 7 March 1866 and discontinued in 1971 with the last two awards promulgated in the London Gazette of 31 March 1970 to the late First Officer Geoffrey Clifford Bye of Boolairoo, New South Wales, Australia and on 11 August 1970 to the late Kenneth Owen McIntyre of Fairy Meadow, New South Wales, Australia. The medal was named in memory of Prince Albert and originally was awarded to recognise saving life at sea. The original medal had a blue ribbon 5/8" wide with 2 white stripes. A further Royal Warrant in 1867 created two classes of Albert Medal, the first in gold and bronze and the second in bronze, both enamelled in blue, and the ribbon of the first class changed to 1 3/8" wide with 4 white stripes. In 1877, the medal was extended to cover saving life on land and from this point there are two medals with different inscriptions to depict which they were awarded for. The land version was enameled in red, with a red ribbon. The titles of the medals changed in 1917, the gold "Albert Medal, first class" becoming the "Albert Medal in gold" and the bronze "Albert Medal, second class" being known as just the "Albert Medal".

— Freebase

Albert Bushnell Hart

Albert Bushnell Hart

Albert Bushnell Hart, Ph.D., was an American historian, writer, and teacher. One of the first generation of professionally trained historians in the United States, a prolific author and editor of historical works, Albert Bushnell Hart became, as Samuel Eliot Morison described him, "The Grand Old Man" of American history, looking the part with his "patriarchal full beard and flowing moustaches."

— Freebase

Ernst, Elector of Saxony

Ernst, Elector of Saxony

founder of the Ernestine line of Saxon princes, ancestor of Prince Consort, born at Altenburg; was kidnapped along with his brother Albert in 1455, an episode famous in German history as the "Prinzenraub" (i. e. the stealing of the prince); succeeded his father in 1464; annexed Thüringia in 1482, and three years later shared his territory with his brother Albert (1441-1486).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

son of Prince Albert and Queen Victoria; b. 1844.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Foley, John Henry

Foley, John Henry

an eminent sculptor, born in Dublin; his first success was achieved in a series of classical figures, including some Shakespearian subjects; statues of Hampden, Burke, J. S. Mill, Goldsmith, &c., brought him further fame, and he was commissioned by the Queen to execute the figure of Prince Albert in the Albert Memorial; his vigour and genius were further revealed in the noble equestrian statues of Hardinge and Outram (1818-1874).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

PowerMag

PowerMag

Robert Albertson, a well-known inventor with over 200 patents and 38 successful commercial product development cycles to date, has been active in continuing the work of Dr. Nikola Tesla. Tesla's inventions, including patents for the commercial use of alternating current (AC) electricity, rivaled Albert Einstein and Thomas Edison for their accomplishments in the electrical field.

— CrunchBase

Frogmore

Frogmore

a royal palace and mausoleum in Windsor Park, the burial-place of Prince Albert.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Betwixt and Between

Betwixt and Between

Betwixt and Between is a work of non-fiction by Albert Camus.

— Freebase

Albertus Magnus

Albertus Magnus

Albertus Magnus, O.P., also known as Albert the Great and Albert of Cologne, is a Catholic saint. He was a German Dominican friar and a bishop. Those such as James A. Weisheipl and Joachim R. Söder have referred to him as the greatest German philosopher and theologian of the Middle Ages, an opinion supported by contemporaries such as Roger Bacon. The Catholic Church honours him as a Doctor of the Church, one of only 35 persons with that honor.

— Freebase

Harold Lamb

Harold Lamb

Harold Albert Lamb was an American historian, screenwriter, short story writer, and novelist.

— Freebase

Albert J. Beveridge

Albert J. Beveridge

Albert Jeremiah Beveridge was an American historian and United States Senator from Indiana.

— Freebase

Cibrario, Luigi

Cibrario, Luigi

an Italian historian and statesman, born at Turin; he held office under Charles Albert of Sardinia (1802-1870).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Unyoro

Unyoro

a native State of Central Africa, between Lake Albert Nyanza and the territory of Uganda.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Jeremias Gotthelf

Jeremias Gotthelf

Albert Bitzius was a Swiss novelist, best known by his pen name of Jeremias Gotthelf.

— Freebase

Favorito

Favorito

Favorito was the personal horse of Charles Albert of Savoy, King of Sardinia from 1831, and was ridden by him during the campaigns of 1848. After the Piedmontese defeat at the Battle of Novara in 1849, and the king’s subsequent abdication, Favorito joined his master in exile in Porto. Following the death of Charles Albert in the July of that year, the horse was brought back to Turin and to the Royal Stables. On Favorito’s death in 1867 his pelt was mounted on a life-size wooden sculpture commissioned from Giovanni Tamone, to a design by Count Stanislao Grimaldi. The horse was equipped as for the wars of 1848–9, including the saddle used by the king in the battle of Novara, and placed along with Charles Albert’s other military effects in the Royal Armoury, where he remains on display to this day.

— Freebase

Fight It Out

Fight It Out

Fight It Out is a 1920 American short Western film directed by Albert Russell and featuring Hoot Gibson.

— Freebase

Al Hirschfeld

Al Hirschfeld

Albert "Al" Hirschfeld was an American caricaturist best known for his black and white portraits of celebrities and Broadway stars.

— Freebase

Salesman

Salesman

Salesman is a 1969 direct cinema documentary film directed by brothers Albert and David Maysles, and Charlotte Zwerin.

— Freebase

Albert Sabin

Albert Sabin

Albert Bruce Sabin was an American medical researcher best known for having developed an oral polio vaccine.

— Freebase

Ticker

Ticker

Ticker is a 2001 action film directed by Albert Pyun, starring Tom Sizemore, Jaime Pressly, Dennis Hopper, Steven Seagal, Ice-T, Kevin Gage, and Nas.

— Freebase

Hard Bargain

Hard Bargain

Hard Bargain is a Blues album by Albert King, released in 1996 with outtakes and previously unreleased material recorded between 1966 and 1972.

— Freebase

Apostles, The Four

Apostles, The Four

picture of St. John, St. Peter, St. Mark, and St. Paul, in the museum at Münich, painted by Albert Dürer.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Strained Relations

Strained Relations

After Grandad's funeral, Delboy & Rodney are surprised to find that his brother, Uncle Albert, has moved in with them - bringing his nautical nightmares.

— Freebase

Achilles of Germany

Achilles of Germany

Albert, third elector of Brandenburg, "fiery, tough old gentleman, of formidable talent for fighting in his day; a very blazing, far-seen character," says Carlyle (1414-1486).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Albert

Albert

Albert was a federal electoral district in New Brunswick, Canada, that was represented in the Canadian House of Commons from 1867 to 1904.

— Freebase

The Scout

The Scout

The Scout is a 1994 comedy film starring Brendan Fraser and Albert Brooks and directed by Michael Ritchie, the director of The Bad News Bears.

— Freebase

Albert Verwey

Albert Verwey

Albert Verwey was a Dutch poet associated with the "Movement of Eighty". Albert Verwey was born May 15, 1865, Amsterdam, Neth. Died March 8, 1937, Noordwijk aan Zee. He was a Dutch poet, scholar, and literary historian who played an important role in the literary life of The Netherlands in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Verwey began to write poetry early in life, and his first book of poems, Persephone, was published in 1883. He was a cofounder in 1885 of the periodical De nieuwe gids, which was one of the chief organs of the Dutch literary revival of the 1880s. Verwey contributed sonnets and other poems to this periodical.

— Freebase

Albert Lea

Albert Lea

Albert Lea is a city in and the county seat of Freeborn County in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Minnesota. The population was 18,016 at the 2010 census. The city is at the junction of Interstates 35 and 90, about 90 miles south of the Twin Cities. It is on the shores of Fountain Lake, Pickerel Lake, Albert Lea Lake, Goose Lake, School Lake, and Lake Chapeau. Fountain Lake and Albert Lea Lake are part of the Shell Rock River flowage. The city's early growth was based upon agriculture, farming support services and manufacturing and was a significant rail center. At one time it was the site of Cargill's headquarters. Other manufacturing included Edwards Manufacturing, Scotsman Ice Machines, Streater Store fixtures, and Universal Milking Machines. Like many U.S. towns much of the manufacturing base has diminished. A long-time center of the city's job opportunity was the Wilson & Company meat packing plant, later known as Farmstead and Farmland. This facility was destroyed by fire in July 2001. The largest employer is currently Mayo Clinic Health System with over 1,500 employees.

— Freebase

Albert B. Fall

Albert B. Fall

Albert Bacon Fall was a United States Senator from New Mexico and the Secretary of the Interior under President Warren G. Harding, infamous for his involvement in the Teapot Dome scandal.

— Freebase

Ergoloid

Ergoloid

Ergoloid mesylates, co-dergocrine mesilate or dihydroergotoxine mesylate, trade name Hydergine, is a mixture of the methanesulfonate salts of three dihydrogenated ergot alkaloids. It was developed by Albert Hofmann for Sandoz.

— Freebase

Scrooge

Scrooge

Scrooge is a 1970 musical film adaptation of Charles Dickens' classic 1843 story, A Christmas Carol. It was filmed in London, directed by Ronald Neame, and starred Albert Finney in the title role. The film's musical score was composed by Leslie Bricusse, and arranged and conducted by Ian Fraser. With eleven musical arrangements interspersed throughout, the award-winning motion picture is a faithful musical retelling of the original, with one exception noted below. The film received limited praise, but Albert Finney won the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor in a Musical/Comedy in 1971. The film received four Academy Award nominations. It is the only live-action version of the story to be nominated for Oscars.

— Freebase

Photo-electricity

Photo-electricity

The development of electrical properties by exposure to light. Crystals of fluor spar are electrified not only by heat (see Pyro-electricity) but also by exposure to sunlight or to the light of the voltaic arc.

[Transcribers note: Although first observed in 1839 by Becquerel, it was not explained until 1905 by Albert Einstein with the introduction of photons.]

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

White Nile

White Nile

one of the two streams forming the Nile, which flows out of the Albert Nyanza, and which unites with the Blue Nile from Abyssinia near Khartoum.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Neisseria gonorrhoeae

Neisseria gonorrhoeae

Neisseria gonorrhoeae, also known as gonococci, or gonococcus, is a species of Gram-negative coffee bean-shaped diplococci bacteria responsible for the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea. N. gonorrhoea was first described by Albert Neisser in 1879.

— Freebase

Albert Goodwill Spalding

Albert Goodwill Spalding

Albert Goodwill Spalding was an American pitcher, manager and executive in the early years of professional baseball, and the co-founder of A.G. Spalding sporting goods company.

— Freebase

Peter De Wint

Peter De Wint

Peter De Wint was an English landscape painter. A number of his pictures are in the National Gallery, the Victoria and Albert Museum and The Collection, Lincoln. He died in London.

— Freebase

CareCloud

CareCloud

CareCloud is a healthcare IT company founded with the mission of revolutionizing the healthcare experience through web-based software and services. The company was founded in 2009 by Albert Santalo, an experienced technologist and entrepreneur. CareCloud provides cloud-based medical practice management software to physicians and other healthcare providers, as well as a comprehensive revenue cycle management service for medical practices that choose to outsource their billing and collections. The company is currently developing an electronic medical record (EMR) system and an integrated app for the iPad.CareCloud™s vision treats healthcare and its participants as an ecosystem " an integrated environment where all participants share a common commitment of reducing inefficiencies and providing excellence in healthcare.

— CrunchBase

Poteau

Poteau

Poteau is a city and county seat of Le Flore County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 8,520 at the 2010 census. Carl Albert State College is located in Poteau.

— Freebase

Altdor`fer, Albrecht

Altdor`fer, Albrecht

a German painter and engraver, a distinguished pupil of Albert Dürer, and as a painter, inspired with his spirit; his "Battle of Arbela" adorns the Münich Picture Gallery (1488-1538).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Rhizopogonaceae

Rhizopogonaceae

Rhizopogonaceae are a family of fungi in the order Boletales. The family, first named and described by botanists Ernst Albert Gäumann and Carroll William Dodge in 1928, contains 3 genera and 152 species.

— Freebase

Albert Paine

Albert Paine

Albert Bigelow Paine was an American author and biographer best known for his work with Mark Twain. Paine was a member of the Pulitzer Prize Committee and wrote in several genres, including fiction, humour, and verse.

— Freebase

High Gear

High Gear

High Gear is the first studio album by hard rock band Howe II, released in 1989 through Shrapnel Records. Howe II was a short-lived group fronted by guitarist Greg Howe and his brother Albert, a singer.

— Freebase

Fritz Albert Lipmann

Fritz Albert Lipmann

Fritz Albert Lipmann, ForMemRS was a German-American biochemist and a co-discoverer in 1945 of coenzyme A. For this, together with other research on coenzyme A, he was awarded half the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1953.

— Freebase

Street Corner

Street Corner

Street Corner is an exploitation film directed by Albert H. Kelley, produced by Wilshire Pictures Corp. and featuring Johnny Duncan, Eddie Gribbon, Marcia Mae Jones, and Milton Ross. It was released on DVD in 2003 by Something Weird Video.

— Freebase

East Prussia

East Prussia

East Prussia was the main part of the region of Prussia along the southeastern Baltic Coast from the 13th century to the end of World War II in May 1945. From 1772–1829 and 1878–1945, the Province of East Prussia was part of the German state of Prussia. The capital city was Königsberg. East Prussia enclosed the bulk of the ancestral lands of the Baltic Old Prussians. During the 13th century, the native Prussians were conquered by the crusading Teutonic Knights. The indigenous Balts who survived the conquest were gradually converted to Christianity. Because of Germanization and colonisation over the following centuries, Germans became the dominant ethnic group, while Poles and Lithuanians formed minorities. From the 13th century, East Prussia was part of the monastic state of the Teutonic Knights, which became the Duchy of Prussia in 1525. The Old Prussian language had become extinct by the 17th or early 18th century. Following the death of Hohenzollern Albert of Brandenburg Prussia, Duke of Prussia, Joachim II, the prince-elector Kurfürst of Brandenburg, became co-inheritor of Ducal Prussia. In 1577, House of Hohenzollern co-regents took over administration from Albert's only son, Albert Friedrich. In 1618 the Duchy of Prussia again passed by inheritance and in personal union with the Hohenzollerns of Brandenburg and the territory was called Brandenburg-Prussia. The territories of the House of Hohenzollern were scattered in Franconia, Brandenburg, eastern Prussia and elsewhere.

— Freebase

Ancre

Ancre

The Ancre is a river of Picardy, France. Rising at Miraumont, a hamlet near the town of Albert, it flows into the Somme at Corbie. It crosses no départements other than the Somme.

— Freebase

Young and Foolish

Young and Foolish

"Young and Foolish" is a popular song with music by Albert Hague and lyrics by Arnold B. Horwitt, published in 1954. The song was introduced in the musical Plain and Fancy. It has been recorded by many singers. A cover version by Ronnie Hilton reached #17 on the UK Singles Chart in 1956.

— Freebase

Mynt

Mynt

MYNT is a dance music act from New York City. The co-ed quintet is made up of DJ/producer/remixers Albert Castillo and Rich "DJ Riddler" Pangilinan, male vocalist Joseph Murena, and female vocalists Marisol Angelique-Solorzano and Kim Sozzi.

— Freebase

Silanol

Silanol

A silanol is a functional group in silicon chemistry with the connectivity Si–O–H. It is related to the hydroxy functional group found in all alcohols. The first example, triethylsilanol, was reported in 1871 by Albert Ladenburg.

— Freebase

Polyphème

Polyphème

Polyphème is an opera composed by Jean Cras with a libretto by Albert Samain. It was written by Cras during World War I and was premiered in Paris in 1922, giving Cras a burst of notoriety in the French press.

— Freebase

Albert François Lebrun

Albert François Lebrun

Albert François Lebrun was a French politician, President of France from 1932 to 1940. He was the last president of the Third Republic. He was a member of the center-right Democratic Republican Alliance.

— Freebase

Butt, Clara

Butt, Clara

operatic singer, born in Sussex; made her début in London at the Albert Hall in the "Golden Legend," and in "Orfeo" at the Lyceum, ever since which appearances she has been much in demand as a singer; b. 1872.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Head Office

Head Office

Head Office is a 1985 American comedy film, produced by HBO Pictures in association with Silver Screen Partners. It stars Judge Reinhold, Eddie Albert, Lori-Nan Engler, Jane Seymour, Richard Masur, Michael O'Donoghue, Ron Frazier, Merritt Butrick and was directed and written by Ken Finkleman.

— Freebase

Kensington

Kensington

a West London parish, in which stand the Palace (Queen Victoria's birthplace), the Albert Memorial and Hall, South Kensington Museum, the Royal College of Music, the Imperial Institute, and many other institutions: contains also Holland House, and has long been the place of residence of notably artistic and literary men.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Kenner Products

Kenner Products

Kenner Products was an American toy company founded in 1947 by brothers, Albert, Phillip, and Joseph L. Steiner, in Cincinnati, Ohio, and was named after the street where the original corporate offices were located, which is just north of Cincinnati's Union Terminal.

— Freebase

William Wirt

William Wirt

William Albert Wirt was a superintendent of schools in Gary, Indiana. Wirt developed the Gary Plan for the more efficient use of school facilities, a reform of the Progressive Movement that was widely adopted in other cities.

— Freebase

Victoria, Alexandrina

Victoria, Alexandrina

Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Empress of India, born at Kensington Palace, the only child of the Duke of Kent, fourth son of George III., who died in 1820, leaving her an infant eight months old; educated under the eye of her mother with special regard to her prospective destiny as Queen; proclaimed, on the death of William IV., on 20th June 1837; crowned at Westminster 28th June 1838; married Prince Albert 10th February 1840; in 1877 added "Empress of India" to her titles; during 1861 became a widow through the death of Prince Albert. Her reign was long and prosperous; 1887 being celebrated as her "Jubilee" year, and 1897 as her "Diamond Jubilee"; was the mother of four sons and five daughters; had grandchildren and great-grandchildren, William II., Emperor of Germany, being a grandchild, and Nicholas II., Czar of Russia, being married to another; b. 1819; died at Osborne, Isle of Wight, Jan. 22, 1901.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Albert Schweitzer

Albert Schweitzer

Albert Schweitzer, OM was a German—and later French—theologian, musician, philosopher, physician, and medical missionary in Africa best known for his interpretive life of Jesus. He was born in the province of Alsace-Lorraine, at that time part of the German Empire. Schweitzer, a Lutheran, challenged both the secular view of Jesus as depicted by historical-critical methodology current at his time in certain academic circles, as well as the traditional Christian view. He depicted Jesus as one who literally believed the end of the world was coming in his own lifetime and believed himself to be a world savior. He received the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize for his philosophy of "Reverence for Life", expressed in many ways, but most famously in founding and sustaining the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, now in Gabon, west central Africa. As a music scholar and organist, he studied the music of German composer Johann Sebastian Bach and influenced the Organ reform movement.

— Freebase

Albert Johnson

Albert Johnson

Albert Johnson was a Canadian amateur football (soccer) player who competed in the 1904 Summer Olympics.. In 1904 he was a member of the Galt F.C. team, which won the gold medal in the football tournament. He played all two matches as a midfielder.

— Freebase

Baker, Sir Samuel White

Baker, Sir Samuel White

a man of enterprise and travel, born in London; discovered the Albert Nyanza; commanded an expedition under the Khedive into the Soudan; wrote an account of it in a book, "Ismailia"; visited Cyprus and travelled over India; left a record of his travels in five volumes with different titles (1821-1893).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Hollies

Hollies

Hollies is a 1974 album by the English pop-rock band The Hollies. The centerpiece is the band's classic cover of Albert Hammond's ballad "The Air That I Breathe," a major worldwide hit that year. It also contains another "Long Cool Woman in a Black Dress" soundalike in "The Day That Curly Billy Shot Down Crazy Sam McGee".

— Freebase

Cross-reference

Cross-reference

The term cross-reference can refer to either: ⁕An instance within a document which refers to related information elsewhere in the same document. In both printed and online dictionaries cross-references are important because they form a network structure of relations existing between different parts of data, dictionary-internal as well as dictionary external. ⁕In an index, a cross reference is often denoted by See also. For example, under the term Albert Einstein in the index of a book about Nobel Laureates, there may be the cross-reference See also: Einstein, Albert. ⁕In hypertext, cross-referencing is maintained to a document with either in-context or out-of-context cross-referencing. These are similar to KWIC and KWOC. ⁕In programming, "cross-referencing" means a listing of every named identifier. ⁕In a relational database management system, a table can have an xref as prefix or suffix to indicate it is a cross-reference table that joins two or more tables together via primary key.

— Freebase

Teck

Teck

a German principality, named after a castle which crowns an eminence called "The Teck," in the Swabian Alb, 20 m. SE. of Stuttgart, conferred in 1868 on Duke Albert of Würtemberg's son, who in 1866 married the Princess Mary of Cambridge; their daughter, Princess May, became in 1893 the Duchess of York.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Madman Atomic Comics

Madman Atomic Comics

Madman is a fictional character, a comic book superhero that appears in comic books published by Image Comics. Created by Mike Allred, the character first appeared in Creatures of the Id. His name, a combination of Frank Sinatra and Albert Einstein, is also a reference to Frankenstein.

— Freebase

Carlo Abarth

Carlo Abarth

Carlo Abarth, born Karl Albert Abarth, was an automobile designer. Abarth was born in Austria, but later was naturalized as an Italian citizen; and at this time his first name Karl was changed to its Italian equivalent of Carlo.

— Freebase

Albert Canal

Albert Canal

The Albert Canal is a canal located in northeastern Belgium, named after King Albert I of Belgium. It connects the major cities Antwerp and Liège and the Meuse and Scheldt rivers, as well as the Canal Dessel-Turnhout-Schoten. It has a depth of 3.4 metres, a free height of 6.7 metres and a total length of 129.5 kilometres. The maximum capacity is a barge of 10,000 tons. Between Antwerp and Liège, there is a height difference of 56 metres, and a total of 6 canal locks were needed to overcome the difference in elevation. Five canal locks each have a height difference of 10 metres, located in Genk, Diepenbeek, Hasselt, Kwaadmechelen and Olen, while the canal lock at Wijnegem has a height difference of 5.45 metres. In the 1930s, it took about 7 days to travel from Antwerp to Liege over water. These days the same distance is covered in 18 hours. Since the completion of the Rhine-Main-Danube Canal in 1992, a barge can now travel from Antwerp all the way across Europe to the Black Sea.

— Freebase

Are You There?

Are You There?

Are You There? is a "farcical musical play in two acts" composed by Ruggero Leoncavallo with a book by Albert de Courville and lyrics by Edgar Wallace. It premièred unsuccessfully on 1 November 1913 at The Prince of Wales's Theatre, London to a rowdy audience which almost became a riot. Its star, Shirley Kellogg, was Courville's wife.

— Freebase

Kladderadatsch

Kladderadatsch

Kladderadatsch was a satirical German-language magazine first published in Berlin on May 7, 1848, and appearing "daily, except for weekdays". It was founded by Albert Hofmann and David Kalisch, the latter the son of a Jewish merchant and the author of several works of comedy. Publication ceased in 1944.

— Freebase

I.Q.

I.Q.

I.Q. is a 1994 American romantic comedy film directed by Fred Schepisi and starring Tim Robbins, Meg Ryan, and Walter Matthau. The original music score was composed by Jerry Goldsmith. The film centers on a mechanic and a Princeton doctoral candidate who fall in love, thanks to the candidate's uncle, Albert Einstein.

— Freebase

Exi

Exi

The Exis were a youth movement in Hamburg, Germany, in the 1950s. The Exis took their name from the existentialist movement, and were influenced by its chief proponents, Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus. There are similar German nicknames for other movements, such as "Sozis" and the "Nazis".

— Freebase

Bismark, Germany

Bismark, Germany

Bismark is a town in the Stendal district, in the historic Altmark region of northern Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. It is situated approximately 22 km west of Stendal. In the early 12th century the area then under the rule of Albert the Bear was settled with peasants descending from the Low Countries. The town's name is derived from the nearby Biese creek, a tributary of the Aland; though it may also refer to the bishop's march, a possession of the Havelberg bishops mentioned in a 1209 deed issued by the Ascanian margrave Albert II. With the Altmark, Bismark was part of the Margraviate of Brandenburg until it was adjudicated to the Prussian Province of Saxony after the 1815 Congress of Vienna. One Herbordus of Bismarck was mentioned holding the office of a Schultheiß in Stendal about 1270. His descendant Otto von Bismarck received the honorary citizenship of Bismark in 1895. Upon an administrative reform effective from 1 January 2010, the town of Bismark comprises the former municipalities of Badingen, Berkau, Büste, Dobberkau, Garlipp, Grassau, Hohenwulsch, Holzhausen, Käthen, Kläden, Könnigde, Kremkau, Meßdorf, Querstedt, Schäplitz, Schernikau, Schorstedt and Steinfeld.

— Freebase

Fritz Pfeffer

Fritz Pfeffer

Friedrich "Fritz" Pfeffer was a German dentist and Jewish refugee who hid with Anne Frank during the Nazi Occupation of the Netherlands, and who perished in the Neuengamme concentration camp in Northern Germany. Pfeffer was given the pseudonym Albert Dussel in Anne's diary, and remains known as such in many editions and adaptations of the publication.

— Freebase

Balmoral Castle

Balmoral Castle

Balmoral Castle is a large estate house in Royal Deeside, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. It is located near the village of Crathie, 6.2 miles west of Ballater and 6.8 miles east of Braemar. Balmoral has been one of the residences of the British Royal Family since 1852, when it was purchased by Queen Victoria and her consort, Prince Albert. It remains the private property of the monarch, and is not part of the Crown Estate. Soon after the estate was purchased the existing house was found to be too small. It was demolished, and the current Balmoral Castle was completed in 1856. The architect was William Smith of Aberdeen, although his designs were amended by Prince Albert. The castle is an example of Scots Baronial architecture, and is classified by Historic Scotland as a category A listed building. The Balmoral Estate has been added to by successive members of the Royal Family, and now covers an area of about 49,000 acres. It is a working estate, including grouse moors, forestry and farmland, as well as managed herds of deer, Highland cattle and ponies.

— Freebase

Michael Sinclair

Michael Sinclair

Lieutenant Albert Michael Sinclair, DSO, known as the Red Fox, was a British prisoner at Colditz Castle during World War II. He was involved in a number of escape attempts throughout the war and was recognized within the camp for his determination to escape. Michael Sinclair is the only person to be killed while attempting to escape Colditz.

— Freebase

Sézary's disease

Sézary's disease

Sézary's disease is a type of cutaneous lymphoma that was first described by Albert Sézary. The affected cells are T-cells that have pathological quantities of mucopolysaccharides. Sézary's disease is sometimes considered a late stage of mycosis fungoides with lymphadenopathy. There are currently no known causes of Sézary's disease.

— Freebase

Maxime

Maxime

Maxime is a 1958 French drama film directed by Henri Verneuil who co-wrote screenplay with Henri Jeanson and Albert Valentin. It based on novel by Henri Duvernois. The film stars Michèle Morgan, Charles Boyer, Arletty and Jane Marken. It tells the story of an ageing roue, a rich man and a lovely woman.

— Freebase

Genk

Genk

Genk is a city and municipality located in the Belgian province of Limburg near Hasselt. The municipality only comprises the city of Genk itself. It is one of the most important industrial cities in Flanders, located on the Albert Canal, between Antwerp and Liège.

— Freebase

Aufbau

Aufbau

Aufbau is a journal for German-speaking Jews around the globe. It was founded in 1934 and is a member of Internationale Medienhilfe. Hannah Arendt, Albert Einstein, Thomas Mann, and Stefan Zweig wrote for the publication. Until 2004 it was published in New York. It is now published in Zürich.

— Freebase

Albert Roussel

Albert Roussel

Albert Charles Paul Marie Roussel was a French composer. He spent seven years as a midshipman, turned to music as an adult, and became one of the most prominent French composers of the interwar period. His early works were strongly influenced by the impressionism of Debussy and Ravel, while he later turned toward neoclassicism.

— Freebase

Big River

Big River

Big River is a town located on the southern end of Cowan Lake in north central Saskatchewan, Canada. It is just north of Saskatchewan's extensive grain belt on Highway 55 and about sixteen kilometres west of Prince Albert National Park. Delaronde Lake is accessed east of the village. Except for some land cleared for farming and a few natural meadows, the town is surrounded by the northern boreal forest.

— Freebase

Albert Abraham Michelson

Albert Abraham Michelson

Albert Abraham Michelson was an American physicist known for his work on the measurement of the speed of light and especially for the Michelson–Morley experiment. In 1907 he received the Nobel Prize in Physics. He became the first American to receive the Nobel Prize in sciences.

— Freebase

Riverview

Riverview

Riverview is a Canadian town in Albert County, New Brunswick, Canada. Riverview is located on the south side of the Petitcodiac River, across from the larger cities of Moncton and Dieppe. Riverview has an area of 34 square kilometres, and a population density of 564.6 inhabitants per square kilometre. Riverview's slogan is "A Great Place To Grow".

— Freebase

Repunit

Repunit

In recreational mathematics, a repunit is a number like 11, 111, or 1111 that contains only the digit 1 — the simplest form of repdigit. The term stands for repeated unit and was coined in 1966 by Albert H. Beiler. A repunit prime is a repunit that is also a prime number. In binary, these are the widely known Mersenne primes.

— Freebase

Prodigy

Prodigy

Albert Johnson, better known by his stage name Prodigy, is an American rapper and one half of the Hip-hop duo Mobb Deep with Havoc. He is the great-great-grandson of the founder of Morehouse College. Prodigy was born with sickle-cell anemia and has suffered from the disease throughout his life.

— Freebase

South Kensington

South Kensington

South Kensington is in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London. It is a built-up area 2.4 miles west- south-west of Charing Cross. It is hard to define boundaries for South Kensington, but a common definition is the commercial area around the tube station and the adjacent garden squares and streets. The smaller neighbourhood around Gloucester Road tube station can also be considered a part, and Albertopolis around Exhibition Road, which includes the Natural History Museum, the Science Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum and Baden-Powell House. Other institutions such as the Royal Albert Hall, Imperial College London, the Royal Geographical Society, the Royal College of Art, the Royal College of Music are within the City of Westminster, but considered to be in South Kensington. Although the postcode SW7 mainly covers South Kensington, some parts of Knightsbridge are also covered. Neighbouring the equally affluent centres of Knightsbridge, Chelsea and Kensington, South Kensington covers some of the most exclusive real estate in the world. It is home to large numbers of French expatriates, but also Spanish, Italian, American, and Middle-Eastern citizens. A significant French presence is evidenced by the location of the consulate, the Lycée Français Charles de Gaulle - a large French secondary school opposite the Natural History Museum - and the French Institute, home to a French cinema. There are several French bookshops and cafes in the area.

— Freebase

Albert Szent-Györgyi

Albert Szent-Györgyi

Albert Szent-Györgyi de Nagyrápolt was a Hungarian physiologist who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1937. He is credited with discovering vitamin C and the components and reactions of the citric acid cycle. He was also active in the Hungarian Resistance during World War II and entered Hungarian politics after the war.

— Freebase

Albert Kesselring

Albert Kesselring

Albert Kesselring was a German Luftwaffe Generalfeldmarschall during World War II. In a military career that spanned both World Wars, Kesselring became one of Nazi Germany's most skilful commanders, being one of 27 soldiers awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds. Nicknamed "Smiling Albert" by the Allies and "Uncle Albert" by his troops, he was one of the most popular generals of World War II with the rank and file. Kesselring joined the Bavarian Army as an officer cadet in 1904, and served in the artillery branch. He completed training as a balloon observer in 1912. During World War I, he served on both the Western and Eastern fronts and was posted to the General Staff, despite not having attended the War Academy. Kesselring remained in the Army after the war but was discharged in 1933 to become head of the Department of Administration at the Reich Commissariat for Aviation, where he was involved in the re-establishment of the aviation industry and the laying of the foundations for the Luftwaffe, serving as its Chief of Staff from 1936 to 1938. During World War II he commanded air forces in the invasions of Poland and France, the Battle of Britain, and Operation Barbarossa. As Commander-in-Chief South, he was overall German commander in the Mediterranean theatre, which included the operations in North Africa. Kesselring conducted an uncompromising defensive campaign against the Allied forces in Italy until he was injured in an accident in October 1944. In the final campaign of the war, he commanded German forces on the Western Front. He won the respect of his Allied opponents for his military accomplishments, but his record was marred by massacres committed by troops under his command in Italy.

— Freebase

Theodore Dreiser

Theodore Dreiser

Theodore Herman Albert Dreiser was an American novelist and journalist of the naturalist school. His novels often featured main characters who succeeded at their objectives despite a lack of a firm moral code, and literary situations that more closely resemble studies of nature than tales of choice and agency. Dreiser's best known novels include Sister Carrie and An American Tragedy.

— Freebase

Evan Hunter

Evan Hunter

Ed McBain was an American author and screenwriter. Born Salvatore Albert Lombino, he legally adopted the name Evan Hunter in 1952. While successful and well known as Evan Hunter, he was even better known as Ed McBain, a name he used for most of his crime fiction, beginning in 1956.

— Freebase

Albert Rothstein

Albert Rothstein

Albert Rothstein is a fictional character, a comic book superhero in the DC Comics universe. Atom Smasher is known for his power of growth and super strength. Created by Roy Thomas and Jerry Ordway, he first appeared in All-Star Squadron #25. Thomas chose his name as a tribute to his friend and fellow comic book fan Alan Rothstein.

— Freebase

Victoria Nyanza

Victoria Nyanza

a lake in East Central Africa, on the Equator, is about the size of Ireland, 300 m. long and 20 m. broad, at an elevation of 3500 ft. above the sea-level; discovered by Captain Speke in 1858, and circumnavigated by Stanley in 1875; is regarded as the head-source of the Nile, the waters of it flowing through Albert Nyanza 80 m. to the N., between which two lakes lies the territory of Uganda.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Albert Pinkham Ryder

Albert Pinkham Ryder

Albert Pinkham Ryder was an American painter best known for his poetic and moody allegorical works and seascapes, as well as his eccentric personality. While his art shared an emphasis on subtle variations of color with tonalist works of the time, it was unique for accentuating form in a way that some art historians regard as modernist.

— Freebase

Radetzky, Johann, Count von

Radetzky, Johann, Count von

Austrian field-marshal, born in Bohemia; entered the Austrian army in 1784; distinguished himself in the war with Turkey in 1788-89, and in all the wars of Austria with France; checked the Revolution in Lombardy in 1848; defeated and almost annihilated the Piedmontese army under Charles Albert in 1849, and compelled Venice to capitulate in the same year, after which he was appointed Governor of Lombardy (1766-1858).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Deutsches Stadion

Deutsches Stadion

The Deutsches Stadion was a monumental stadium designed by Albert Speer for the Nazi party rally grounds in Nuremberg, southern Germany. Its construction began in September 1937, and was slated for completion in 1943. Like most other Nazi monumental structures, however, its construction was interrupted by the outbreak of World War II and never finished.

— Freebase

Eras

Eras

Eras is a humanist sans-serif typeface designed by Albert Boton and Albert Hollenstein, and released by the International Typeface Corporation in 1976. Eras is licensed by the Linotype type foundry. A distinct and curious feature of Eras is its slight, 3-degree right tilt. Eras follows ITC's formulary of increased x-height, and multiple weights from light to ultra bold, though because all weights are slightly slanted, no italic version of the font is supplied. Eras is further distinct for its open bowls on the characters a, P, R, 6, and 9. The letter W changes shape from a merged 'double V' shape in the lighter variants to the standard W symbol in the bolder variants. The typeface is widely used by Telecom Italia Mobile as a corporate typeface It was also used in the emblem and image of the 1998 FIFA World Cup, in the credits for the movie Caddyshack and in the video game Tekken Tag Tournament. The American Broadcasting Company network used the font in its on-air promotion graphics during the early to mid-1980s. It is widely seen in the humorous e-cards distributed through social networking. Four TrueType weights of this font are included with some editions of Microsoft Word, though not with the Windows OS itself

— Freebase

Prismane

Prismane

Prismane is a polycyclic hydrocarbon with the formula C6H6. It is an isomer of benzene, specifically a valence isomer. Prismane is far less stable than benzene. The carbon atoms of the prismane molecule are arranged in the shape of a six-atom triangular prism. Albert Ladenburg proposed this structure for the compound now known as benzene. The compound was not synthesized until 1973.

— Freebase

Grandad

Grandad

Edward Kitchener "Ted" Trotter, better known simply as Grandad, was a character in the popular BBC sitcom Only Fools and Horses from 1981-1984. He was played by Lennard Pearce in the original series, and was portrayed by Phil Daniels in the prequel, Rock & Chips. The character was grandfather to Derek and Rodney Trotter, and older brother to Uncle Albert.

— Freebase

Wolfgang Pauli

Wolfgang Pauli

Wolfgang Ernst Pauli was an Austrian theoretical physicist and one of the pioneers of quantum physics. In 1945, after being nominated by Albert Einstein, he received the Nobel Prize in Physics for his "decisive contribution through his discovery of a new law of Nature, the exclusion principle or Pauli principle," involving spin theory, underpinning the structure of matter and the whole of chemistry.

— Freebase

Chenoua

Chenoua

Jebel Chenoua is a mountain group between Cherchell and Tipasa on the coast of Algeria, just west of Algiers, and a village on that mountain. A majority of its inhabitants speak a Berber language, the Chenoua language. It is the site of Assia Djebar's film La nouba des femmes du mont Chenoua. It also features prominently in Albert Camus' posthumously published novel, A Happy Death

— Freebase

Victor Emmanuel II.

Victor Emmanuel II.

king of Sardinia, and afterwards of united Italy, born in Turin, eldest son of Charles Albert; became king in 1849 on the abdication of his father; distinguished himself in the war against Austria, adding Austrian Lombardy and Tuscany to his dominions, and by the help of Garibaldi, Naples and Sicily, till in 1861 he was proclaimed King of Italy, and in 1870 he entered Rome as his capital city (1820-1878).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Discalceation

Discalceation

Discalceation means "removal of footwear". St. Teresa of Ávila was one of a number of saints of the Roman Catholic Church who were "discalced," or shoeless. She was one of the founders of the Discalced Carmelites religious order. Albert Gallatin Mackey, the pioneering American masonic historian and encyclopedist, made much of masonic initiates being required to remove their usual footwear, as a symbol of reverence on entering a masonic lodge.

— Freebase

Big Fish

Big Fish

Big Fish is a 2003 American fantasy adventure film based on the 1998 novel of the same name by Daniel Wallace. The film was directed by Tim Burton and stars Ewan McGregor, Albert Finney, Billy Crudup, Jessica Lange, and Marion Cotillard. Other roles are performed by Helena Bonham Carter, Matthew McGrory, and Danny DeVito among others. Finney plays Edward Bloom, a former traveling salesman from the Southern United States with a gift for storytelling, now confined to his deathbed. Bloom's estranged son, a journalist played by Crudup, attempts to mend their relationship as his dying father relates tall tales of his eventful life as a young adult, played by Ewan McGregor. Screenwriter John August read a manuscript of the novel six months before it was published and convinced Columbia Pictures to acquire the rights. August began adapting the novel while producers negotiated with Steven Spielberg who planned to direct after finishing Minority Report. Spielberg considered Jack Nicholson for the role of Edward Bloom, but eventually dropped the project to focus on Catch Me If You Can. Tim Burton and Richard D. Zanuck took over after completing Planet of the Apes and brought Ewan McGregor and Albert Finney on board.

— Freebase

Equivalence principle

Equivalence principle

In the physics of general relativity, the equivalence principle is any of several related concepts dealing with the equivalence of gravitational and inertial mass, and to Albert Einstein's observation that the gravitational "force" as experienced locally while standing on a massive body is actually the same as the pseudo-force experienced by an observer in a non-inertial frame of reference.

— Freebase

Nile

Nile

the longest river of Africa, and one of the most noted in the world's history; the Shimiyu, Isanga, and other streams which flow into Victoria Nyanza from the S. are regarded as its ultimate head-waters; from Victoria Nyanza, the Victoria Nile or Somerset River holds a north-westerly course to Albert Nyanza, whence it issues under the name of the Bahr-el-Jebel, swelled by the waters of the Semliki from Albert Edward Nyanza; about 650 m. N. it is joined by the Bahr-el-Ghazal from the W., and bending to the E., now under the name White Nile, receives on that side the Sobat, and as a sluggish navigable stream flows past Fashoda on to Khartoum, where it is met by the Bahr-al-Azrak or Blue Nile; 200 m. lower it receives the Atbara or Black Nile. Through Egypt the river's course is confined to a valley some 10 m. broad, which owes its great fertility to the alluvial deposits left by the river during it annual overflow (July to October, caused by seasonal rains in Abyssinia, &c.). From Khartoum to Assouan occur the cataracts; below this the stream is navigable. A few miles N. of Cairo begins the delta which lies within the Rosetta and Damietta—two main branches of the divided river—and is some 150 m. broad at its base. From Victoria Nyanza to the coast the river measures about 3400 m.

Nilsson, Christine

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Printer's devil

Printer's devil

A printer's devil was an apprentice in a printing establishment who performed a number of tasks, such as mixing tubs of ink and fetching type. A number of famous men served as printers' devils in their youth, including Ambrose Bierce, Benjamin Franklin, Samuel Fuller, Thomas Jefferson, Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, Joel Chandler Harris, Warren Harding, Lawrence Tibbett, John Kellogg, Lyndon Johnson, Hoodoo Brown, James Hogg, Joseph Lyons, Albert Parsons and Lázaro Cárdenas.

— Freebase

Thomas Young

Thomas Young

Thomas Young was an English polymath. Young made notable scientific contributions to the fields of vision, light, solid mechanics, energy, physiology, language, musical harmony, and Egyptology. He "made a number of original and insightful innovations" in the decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphs before Jean-François Champollion eventually expanded on his work. He was admired by, among others, William Herschel, Hermann von Helmholtz, James Clerk Maxwell, and Albert Einstein.

— Freebase

Forodesine

Forodesine

Forodesine is a transition-state analog inhibitor of purine nucleoside phosphorylase under development for the treatment of relapsed B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia Immucillin H was originally discovered by Vern Schramm's laboratory at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York and Industrial Research Limited in New Zealand. Forodesine is being developed by BioCryst Pharmaceuticals as Fodosine. As of 2008, it is currently in phase II clinical trials.

— Freebase

The Misunderstanding

The Misunderstanding

The Misunderstanding, sometimes published as Cross Purpose, is a play written in 1943 in occupied France by Albert Camus. It focuses on Camus’ idea of The Absurd. A man who has been living overseas for many years returns home to find his sister and widowed mother are making a living by taking in lodgers and murdering them. Since neither his sister nor his mother recognize him, he becomes a lodger himself without revealing his identity. Ultimately, his mother and sister kill him.

— Freebase

Vitallium

Vitallium

Vitallium is a trademark for an alloy of 60% cobalt, 20% chromium, 5% molybdenum, and other substances. The alloy is used in dentistry and artificial joints, because of its light weight and resistance to corrosion. It is also used for components of turbochargers because of its thermal resistance. Vitallium was developed by Albert W. Merrick for the Austenal Laboratories in 1932.

— Freebase

Cultura

Cultura

Cultura is the second studio album by Gibraltarian Flamenco Metal quintet Breed 77. It was released through J. Albert Productions on 3 May 2004. Three singles were released from this album, which were "La Última Hora", "The River" and "World's on Fire". The album features 10 original songs and three remastered songs from their previous release. Cultura reached a number 61 position on the UK album charts.

— Freebase

Stockmar, Baron de

Stockmar, Baron de

statesman, born at Coburg; bred to medicine, became physician to Leopold I. of Belgium, and at length his adviser; was adviser also of Queen Victoria before her accession; accompanied Prince Albert to Italy before his marriage, and joined him thereafter in England as the trusted friend of both the queen and him; he had two political ideals—a united Germany under Prussia, and unity of purpose between Germany and England (1757-1863).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

baz

baz

1. [common] The third metasyntactic variable “Suppose we have three functions: FOO, BAR, and BAZ. FOO calls BAR, which calls BAZ....” (See also fum) 2. interj. A term of mild annoyance. In this usage the term is often drawn out for 2 or 3 seconds, producing an effect not unlike the bleating of a sheep; /baaaaaaz/. 3. Occasionally appended to foo to produce ‘foobaz’.Earlier versions of this lexicon derived baz as a Stanford corruption of bar. However, Pete Samson (compiler of the TMRC lexicon) reports it was already current when he joined TMRC in 1958. He says “It came from Pogo. Albert the Alligator, when vexed or outraged, would shout ‘Bazz Fazz!’ or ‘Rowrbazzle!’ The club layout was said to model the (mythical) New England counties of Rowrfolk and Bassex (Rowrbazzle mingled with (Norfolk/Suffolk/Middlesex/Essex).”

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Tacrine

Tacrine

Tacrine is a centrally acting anticholinesterase and indirect cholinergic agonist. It was the first centrally-acting cholinesterase inhibitor approved for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, and was marketed under the trade name Cognex. Tacrine was first synthesised by Adrien Albert at the University of Sydney. See William_K._Summers He is listed as inventor of Tacrine. It also acts as a histamine N-methyltransferase inhibitor.

— Freebase

Jim Hargreaves

Jim Hargreaves

James Albert Hargreaves is a Canadian former professional ice hockey defenceman. He was drafted from the Winnipeg Jets of the Western Canada Hockey League in the second round, 16th overall, by the Vancouver Canucks in the 1970 NHL Amateur Draft. He played 66 games in the National Hockey League with the Canucks, as well as 174 in the World Hockey Association with the Winnipeg Jets, Indianapolis Racers, and San Diego Mariners.

— Freebase

Foreign Correspondent

Foreign Correspondent

Foreign Correspondent is a 1940 American spy thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock which tells the story of an American reporter who tries to expose enemy spies in Britain, a series of events involving a continent-wide conspiracy that eventually leads to the events of a fictionalized World War II. It stars Joel McCrea and features Laraine Day, Herbert Marshall, George Sanders, Albert Bassermann and Robert Benchley, along with Edmund Gwenn. The film was Hitchcock's second Hollywood production since leaving the United Kingdom in 1939 and had an unusually large number of writers: Robert Benchley, Charles Bennett, Harold Clurman, Joan Harrison, Ben Hecht, James Hilton, John Howard Lawson, John Lee Mahin, Richard Maibaum, and Budd Schulberg, with Bennett, Benchley, Harrison, and Hilton the only writers credited in the finished film. It was based on Vincent Sheean's political memoir Personal History, the rights to which were purchased by producer Walter Wanger for $10,000. The film was one of two Hitchcock films nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture in 1941, the other being Rebecca, which went on to win the award. Foreign Correspondent was nominated for six Academy Awards, including one for Albert Bassermann for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor, but did not win any.

— Freebase

Edward VII.

Edward VII.

king of Great Britain and Ireland and "all the British Dominions beyond the Seas," born 9th November 1841, succeeded his mother, Queen Victoria, 22nd Jan. 1901. On 10th March 1863 he married Princess Alexandra, eldest daughter of Christian IX. of Denmark, and has four surviving children: George, Prince of Wales, b. 1865; Louise, Duchess of Fife, b. 1867; Victoria, b. 1868; and Maud, b. 1869, who married Prince Charles of Denmark. The king's eldest son, Albert Victor, b. 1864, died January 14, 1892.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Friday the Thirteenth: Live at the Royal Albert Hall

Friday the Thirteenth: Live at the Royal Albert Hall

Friday the Thirteenth is a live album by the English rock band The Stranglers. To mark the twenty first anniversary of their original recording contract with United Artists Records, they played to a sold out Royal Albert Hall with an eighteen piece string orchestra. Friday the Thirteenth presents part of the set. Composer and musician Jocelyn Pook contributions to the songs Waltz in Black,Valley of the Birds, Daddy's Riding the Range, Golden Brown, and No More Heroes.

— Freebase

Immunostaining

Immunostaining

Immunostaining is a general term in biochemistry that applies to any use of an antibody-based method to detect a specific protein in a sample. The term immunostaining was originally used to refer to the immunohistochemical staining of tissue sections, as first described by Albert Coons in 1941. Now however, immunostaining encompasses a broad range of techniques used in histology, cell biology, and molecular biology that utilise antibody-based staining methods.

— Freebase

Lake Edward

Lake Edward

Lake Edward, Rutanzige or Edward Nyanza is the smallest of the African Great Lakes. It is located in the Albertine Rift, the western branch of the East African Rift, on the border between the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Uganda, with its northern shore a few kilometres south of the Equator. The lake was named by the explorer Henry Morton Stanley in honour of Prince Albert Edward, The Prince of Wales, later to become King Edward VII.

— Freebase

Ellie

Ellie

Ellie is a 1984 comedy film directed by Peter Wittman and distributed by Troma Entertainment. Set in the deep south, the film follows the titular Ellie; after witnessing her father's murder at the hands of her stepmother and her three lecherous stepbrothers, Ellie vows to avenge her father's death using the only weapon she has: her voluptuous body. The film also features appearances from such noteworthy actors as Shelley Winters, George Gobel, Edward Albert and Pat Paulsen.

— Freebase

Landkreuzer P. 1000 Ratte

Landkreuzer P. 1000 Ratte

The Landkreuzer P. 1000 Ratte was a design for a super-heavy tank for use by Nazi Germany during World War II. It was designed in 1942 by Krupp with the approval of Adolf Hitler, but the project was canceled by Albert Speer in early 1943 and no tank was ever completed. At 1,000 metric tons, the P-1000 would have been over five times as heavy as the Panzer VIII Maus, the heaviest tank ever built.

— Freebase

Albert Barnes

Albert Barnes

Albert Barnes was an American theologian, born in Rome, New York. He graduated from Hamilton College, Clinton, New York, in 1820, and from Princeton Theological Seminary in 1823. Barnes was ordained as a Presbyterian minister by the presbytery of Elizabethtown, New Jersey, in 1825, and was the pastor successively of the Presbyterian Church in Morristown, New Jersey, and of the First Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia.

— Freebase

Cos

Cos

Cos is an American sketch comedy/variety TV series that debuted on the ABC Network in September 1976. It was hosted by comedian Bill Cosby and featured an ensemble cast who would perform sketches each week. The show was unsuccessful in the Nielsen ratings and was cancelled by November 1976. Cosby appeared on this series concurrently with his starring role in Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids and the film Mother, Jugs & Speed.

— Freebase

James Pike

James Pike

James Albert Pike was an American Episcopal bishop, prolific writer, and one of the first mainline religious figures to appear regularly on television. His outspoken views on many theological and social issues made him one of the most controversial public figures of his time. He was an early proponent of ordination of women, racial desegregation, and the acceptance of LGBT people within mainline churches. Pike was the fifth Bishop of California.

— Freebase

Albert Fert

Albert Fert

Albert Fert is a French physicist and one of the discoverers of giant magnetoresistance which brought about a breakthrough in gigabyte hard disks. Currently, he is an emeritus professor at Université Paris-Sud in Orsay and scientific director of a joint laboratory between the Centre national de la recherche scientifique and Thales Group. Also, he is an Adjunct professor of physics at Michigan State University. He was awarded the 2007 Nobel Prize in Physics together with Peter Grünberg.

— Freebase

ACD

ACD

ACD was the first CD from Half Man Half Biscuit. If featured some of the tracks from the previous vinyl album, Back Again in the DHSS. "The Best Things In Life" "D'Ye Ken Ted Moult?" "Reasons To Be Miserable" "Rod Hull Is Alive – Why?" "Dickie Davies Eyes" "The Bastard Son Of Dean Friedman" "I Was A Teenage Armchair Honved Fan" "Arthur's Farm" "Carry On Cremating" "Albert Hammond Bootleg" "Reflections In A Flat" "Sealclubbing" "Architecture And Morality, Ted And Alice" "Fuckin' 'Ell It's Fred Titmus" "Time Flies By" "All I Want For Christmas Is A Dukla Prague Away Kit" "The Trumpton Riots"

— Freebase

Margo

Margo

Margo, sometimes known as Margo Albert, was a film actress and dancer. She was born María Marguerita Guadalupe Teresa Estela Bolado Castilla y O'Donnell in 1917 in Mexico City, Mexico. Margo appeared in many American motion pictures and television productions, mostly in minor roles. Her more substantial roles include Lost Horizon, The Leopard Man, Viva Zapata!, and I'll Cry Tomorrow. Her final role was as murderess Serafina in the 1965 Perry Mason episode, "The Case of the Sad Sicilian."

— Freebase

Madame Curie

Madame Curie

Madame Curie is a 1943 biographical film made by MGM. It was directed by Mervyn LeRoy and produced by Sidney Franklin from a screenplay by Paul Osborn, Paul H. Rameau, and Aldous Huxley, adapted from the biography by Eve Curie. It stars Greer Garson, Walter Pidgeon, Robert Walker, Henry Travers, Albert Bassermann, C. Aubrey Smith, Dame May Whitty, Reginald Owen, Van Johnson, and Margaret O'Brien and featuring narration read by James Hilton. The film tells the story of Polish-French physicist Marie Curie.

— Freebase

Albertite

Albertite

Albertite is a type of asphalt found in Albert County, New Brunswick. It is a type of solid hydrocarbon. It is a deep black and lustrous variety, and is less soluble in turpentine than the usual type of asphalt. It was from Albertite that kerosene was first refined. It was first truly studied by New Brunswick geologist Abraham Gesner, who had heard stories of rocks that burned in the area.

— Freebase

Gravitational constant

Gravitational constant

The gravitational constant denoted by letter G, is an empirical physical constant involved in the calculation of gravitational force between two bodies. It usually appears in Sir Isaac Newton's law of universal gravitation, and in Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity. It is also known as the universal gravitational constant, Newton's constant, and colloquially as Big G. It should not be confused with "little g", which is the local gravitational field, especially that at the Earth's surface.

— Freebase

Classics Illustrated

Classics Illustrated

Classics Illustrated is a comic book series featuring adaptations of literary classics such as Moby Dick, Hamlet, and The Iliad. Created by Albert Kanter, the series began publication in 1941 and finished its first run in 1971, producing 169 issues. Following the series' demise, various companies reprinted its titles. This series is different from the Great Illustrated Classics, which is an adaptation of the classics for young readers that includes illustrations, but is not in the comic book form.

— Freebase

Mackenzie

Mackenzie

Mackenzie was a federal electoral district in Saskatchewan, Canada, that was represented in the Canadian House of Commons from 1904 to 1997. This riding was created in 1903, when Saskatchewan was still a part of the Northwest Territories. In 1905, when Saskatchewan was created, the district was retained in the province. The riding was abolished in 1996, and parts of it were merged into the districts of Blackstrap, Churchill River, Prince Albert, Qu'Appelle, Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre, Saskatoon—Humboldt and Yorkton—Melville.

— Freebase

Dremel

Dremel

Dremel is an American brand of power tools known primarily for their rotary tools. The tools were originally developed by Albert J. Dremel, who founded the Dremel Company in 1932 in Racine, Wisconsin. In 1993, the company was purchased by Robert Bosch GmbH, and today it is a division of the Robert Bosch Tool Corporation located in Mount Prospect, Illinois. Dremel's rotary tools are similar to the pneumatic die grinders used in the metalworking industry by tool or moldmakers.

— Freebase

Monaco

Monaco

Monaco, officially the Principality of Monaco, is a sovereign city-state, located on the French Riviera in Western Europe. Bordered by France on three sides, one side borders the Mediterranean Sea. It has an area of 2.02 km², and a population of 36,371, making Monaco the second smallest, and the most densely populated country in the world. Monaco has a land border of only 4.4 km, a coastline of 4.1 km, and a width that varies between 1,700 and 349 m. The highest point in the country is a narrow pathway named Chemin des Révoires on the slopes of Mont Agel, in the Les Révoires district, which is 161 metres above sea level. Monaco's most populous Quartier is Monte Carlo, and the most populous Ward is Larvotto/Bas Moulins. Monaco is known for its land reclamation, which has increased its size by an estimated 20%. Monaco is a principality governed under a form of constitutional monarchy, with Prince Albert II as head of state. Even though Prince Albert II is a constitutional monarch, he still has immense political power. The House of Grimaldi have ruled Monaco, with brief interruptions, since 1297. The official language is French, but Monégasque, Italian, and English are widely spoken and understood. The state's sovereignty was officially recognized by the Franco-Monegasque Treaty of 1861, with Monaco becoming a full United Nations voting member in 1993. Despite Monaco's independence and separate foreign policy, its defence is the responsibility of France. However, Monaco does maintain two small military units.

— Freebase

Erickson

Erickson

Erickson is a town in the Rural Municipality of Clanwilliam in the Canadian province of Manitoba. It is located on Highway 10 on 32-17-18W in south central Manitoba. The main industry of Erickson is agriculture. The community was originally established as a Canadian National railway point in 1905. When a post office was opened in 1908 it was known as Avesta. It was named after a town in south-central Sweden. Shortly after, the post office was moved near the railway station site which was named Erickson Station. The station had been named after the Postmaster, E. Albert Erickson.

— Freebase

Ductile iron

Ductile iron

Ductile iron, also known as ductile cast iron, nodular cast iron, spheroidal graphite iron, spherulitic graphite cast iron and SG iron, is a type of cast iron invented in 1943 by Keith Millis. While most varieties of cast iron are brittle, ductile iron has much more impact and fatigue resistance, due to its nodular graphite inclusions. On October 25, 1949, Keith Dwight Millis, Albert Paul Gagnebin and Norman Boden Pilling received US patent 2,485,760 on a Cast Ferrous Alloy for ductile iron production via magnesium treatment.

— Freebase

Clobber

Clobber

Clobber is an abstract strategy game invented in 2001 by combinatorial game theorists Michael H. Albert, J.P. Grossman and Richard Nowakowski. It has subsequently been studied by Elwyn Berlekamp and Erik Demaine among others. Since 2005, it has been one of the events in the Computer Olympiad. Players take turns to move one of their own pieces onto an orthogonally adjacent opposing piece, removing it from the game. The winner of the game is the player who makes the last move.

— Freebase

Max Planck

Max Planck

Max Karl Ernst Ludwig Planck, FRS was a German theoretical physicist who originated quantum theory, which won him the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1918. Planck made many contributions to theoretical physics, but his fame rests primarily on his role as originator of the quantum theory. This theory revolutionized human understanding of atomic and subatomic processes, just as Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity revolutionized the understanding of space and time. Together they constitute the fundamental theories of 20th-century physics.

— Freebase

Lake No

Lake No

Lake No is a lake in South Sudan. It is located just north of the vast swamp of the Sudd, at the confluence of the Bahr al Jabal and Bahr el Ghazal rivers. It marks the transition between the Bahr al Jabal and White Nile proper. Lake No is located approximately 1,156 km downstream of Uganda's Lake Albert, the major lake on the White Nile preceding Lake No. The lake is considered the center of the Reweng people of Panrou section of Dinka peoples.

— Freebase

Pirate ship

Pirate ship

A pirate ship is a type of amusement ride, consisting of an open, seated gondola which swings back and forth, subjecting the rider to various levels of angular momentum. The first known predecessor of the ride was invented by Charles Albert Marshall of Tulsa, Oklahoma between 1893 and 1897. This ride was originally called "The Ocean Wave". The Ocean Wave was first used in the Marshall Bros Circus in 1897. The circus was run by Charles and his brothers Mike, Will, Ed, friends, and family.

— Freebase

Participatory economics

Participatory economics

Participatory economics, often abbreviated parecon, is an economic system proposed in the 1990s primarily by activist and political theorist Michael Albert and radical economist Robin Hahnel, among others. It uses participatory decision making as an economic mechanism to guide the production, consumption and allocation of resources in a given society. Proposed as an alternative to contemporary capitalist market economies and also an alternative to centrally planned state-socialism, it is described as "an anarchistic economic vision", and is a form of socialism, since in a parecon the means of production are owned in common. The underlying values that parecon seeks to implement are equity, solidarity, diversity, workers' self-management and efficiency. It proposes to attain these ends mainly through the following principles and institutions: ⁕workers' and consumers' councils utilizing self-managerial methods for making decisions ⁕balanced job complexes ⁕remuneration according to effort and sacrifice ⁕participatory planning Albert and Hahnel stress that parecon is only meant to address an alternative economic theory and must be accompanied by equally important alternative visions in the fields of politics, culture and kinship. The authors have also discussed elements of anarchism in the field of politics, polyculturalism in the field of culture, and feminism in the field of family and gender relations as being possible foundations for future alternative visions in these other spheres of society. Stephen R. Shalom has begun work on a participatory political vision he calls "par polity". Both systems together make up the political philosophy of Participism, which has significantly informed the interim International Organization for a Participatory Society.

— Freebase

Hapsburg

Hapsburg

or Habsburg, House of, a famous royal house which has played a leading part in the history of Continental Europe from its foundation in the 12th century by Albert, Count of Hapsburg, and which is represented to-day by the Imperial family of Austria. Representatives of this family wore the Imperial crown of the Holy Roman Empire for centuries. It takes its name from the castle of Habsburg or Habichtaburg, on the Aar, built by Werner, bishop of Strasburg, in the 11th century, a castle, however, which has long since ceased to be in the possession of the family.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

WAER

WAER

WAER is a radio station in Syracuse, New York. It is located on the campus of Syracuse University, and is an auxiliary service of the school. The station features a jazz music and National Public Radio format, with a news and music staff providing programming around the clock. It is best known, however, for its sports staff, which has produced the likes of Bob Costas, Marv Albert, Mike Tirico, Sean McDonough, Bill Roth, Ian Eagle, Brian Higgins, Dick Stockton and many others. Lou Reed also hosted a free-format show on WAER during his time at Syracuse University; this free-format radio tradition at Syracuse is carried on by WERW.

— Freebase

Albert Steffen

Albert Steffen

Albert Steffen was a poet, painter, dramatist, essayist, and novelist. He joined the Theosophical Society in Germany in 1910, and the Anthroposophical Society in 1912 and became its president after the death of its founder, Rudolf Steiner, in 1925. Steffen was chief editor of the society's journal, Das Goetheanum, from 1921-1963. His earliest works, predating his encounter with anthroposophy, already manifest a spiritual awareness. His later works, which reflect a vision of the world permeated by metaphysical powers of good and evil, draw on a wide range of esoteric European and Asian traditions.

— Freebase

Butterflies Are Free

Butterflies Are Free

Butterflies Are Free is a 1972 film based on the play by Leonard Gershe. The 1972 film was produced by M.J. Frankovich, released by Columbia Pictures, directed by Milton Katselas and adapted for the screen by Gershe. It was released on 6 July, 1972 in the USA. Goldie Hawn and Edward Albert starred. Eileen Heckart received an Academy Award for her performance. While the original play was set in Manhattan, New York, the screenplay written for the 1972 film was set in an unknown location in San Francisco.

— Freebase

Albert Meyer

Albert Meyer

Albert Meyer was a Swiss politician, editor of Neue Zürcher Zeitung and member of the Swiss Federal Council. He was elected to the Swiss Federal Council on 12 December 1929 and handed over office on 31 December 1938. He was affiliated to the Free Democratic Party. During his time in office he held the Department of Home Affairs from 1930 to 1934 and the Department of Finance from 1934 to 1938 and was President of the Confederation in 1936.

— Freebase

Prince Albert National Park

Prince Albert National Park

Prince Albert National Park encompasses 3,874 square kilometres in central Saskatchewan, Canada and is located 200 kilometres north of Saskatoon. Though declared a national park March 24, 1927, it had its official opening ceremonies on August 10, 1928 performed by Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King. The park is open all year but the most visited period is from May to September. Although named for the city, the park's main entrance is actually 80 km north of Prince Albert via Highways 2 and 263 which enters the park at its southeast corner. Two additional secondary highways enter the park: No. 264, which branches off Hwy. 2 just east of the Waskesiu townside, and No. 240, which enters the park from the south and links with 263 just outside the entry fee-collection gates. The park ranges in elevation from 488 metres on the western side to 724 metres on the eastern side. Waskesiu is the only town within the park, located on the southern shore of Waskesiu Lake. Most facilities and services one would expect to find in a multi-use park are available, such as souvenir shops, small grocery stores, gas station, laundromat, restaurants, hotels and motels, rental cabins, a small movie theatre, Royal Canadian Mounted Police detachment, camp grounds, three marinas, many beaches, picnic areas, tennis courts and lawn bowling greens. The facilities and services combine recreational and nature experiences. Notably, the park contains the Waskesiu Golf Course designed by famed golf course architect Stanley Thompson who also designed the course in Banff National Park.

— Freebase

Luther

Luther

Luther is a 1961 play by John Osborne depicting the life of Martin Luther, one of the instigators of the Protestant Reformation. Albert Finney created the role of Luther, which he performed at with the English Stage Company at the Theatre Royal, Nottingham, the Théâtre Sarah Bernhardt, Paris, the Holland Festival, the Royal Court Theatre, London, the Phoenix Theatre, London, and the St. James Theatre, New York. The original West End run at the Phoenix ended in March 1962, after 239 performances there, when Finney had to leave the cast to fulfill a contractual obligation with a film company.

— Freebase

Frogmore

Frogmore

The Frogmore Estate or Gardens comprise 33 acres of private gardens within the grounds of the Home Park, adjoining Windsor Castle, in the English county of Berkshire. The name derives from the preponderance of frogs which have always lived in this low-lying and marshy area. It is the location of Frogmore House, a Royal retreat. It is also the site of three burial places of the British Royal Family: the Royal Mausoleum containing the tombs of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert; the Duchess of Kent's Mausoleum, burial place of the Queen Victoria's mother; and the Royal Burial Ground.

— Freebase

Royal Flush

Royal Flush

Royal Flush is a solitaire card game which is played with a deck of 52 playing cards. The game is so called because the aim of the game is to end up with a royal flush of any suit. However, the game is so much mechanical in nature that there is currently no electronic or computer implementation. Its rules are so far included in printed matter such as The Complete Book of Solitaire and Patience Games by Albert Morehead and Geoffrey Mott-Smith and 100 Best Solitaire Games by Sloane Lee and Gabriel Packard.

— Freebase

Wigwag

Wigwag

Wigwag is the nickname given to a type of railroad grade crossing signal once common in North America, named for the pendulum-like motion it used to signal the approach of a train. It is generally credited to Albert Hunt, a mechanical engineer at Southern California's Pacific Electric interurban streetcar railroad, who invented it in 1909 for safer railroad grade crossings. The term should not be confused with its usage in Britain, where wigwag is generally used to refer to alternate flashing lights, such as those found at modern level crossings.

— Freebase

Ajeeb

Ajeeb

Ajeeb was a chess-playing "automaton", created by Charles Hooper, first presented at the Royal Polytechnical Institute in 1868. A particularly intriguing piece of faux mechanical technology, it drew scores of thousands of spectators to its games, the opponents for which included Harry Houdini, Theodore Roosevelt, and O. Henry. The genius behind "Ajeeb" were players such as Harry Nelson Pillsbury, Albert Beauregard Hodges, Constant Ferdinand Burille, Charles Moehle, and Charles Francis Barker. In the history of such devices, it succeeded "The Turk" and preceded "Mephisto". After several spectacular demonstrations at Coney Island, New York, Ajeeb was destroyed in a fire in 1929. Ajeeb is an Urdu word meaning strange or unexplainable. In Arabic ajeeb means something very unique and beautiful.

— Freebase

Hasselt

Hasselt

Hasselt is a Belgian city and municipality, and capital of the Flemish province of Limburg. The Hasselt municipality includes the original city of Hasselt, plus the old communes of Sint-Lambrechts-Herk, Wimmertingen, Kermt, Spalbeek, Kuringen, Stokrooie, Stevoort and Runkst, as well as the hamlets and parishes of Kiewit, Godsheide and Rapertingen. On 31 December 2007 Hasselt had a total population of 71 520. Both the Demer river and the Albert Canal run through the municipality. Hasselt is located in between the Campine region, north of the Demer, and the Hesbaye region, south of it. It is also in the Meuse-Rhine Euroregion.

— Freebase

Gallatin

Gallatin

Gallatin is a city in and the county seat of Sumner County, Tennessee, The population was 30,678 at the 2010 census and 31,101 in 2011. Named for U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Albert Gallatin, the city was established and made the county seat of Sumner County in 1802. Several national companies have facilities or headquarters in Gallatin, including Gap, Inc., RR Donnelley, and Servpro Industries, Inc. Gallatin was formerly the headquarters of Dot Records. The city is also home to Volunteer State Community College, the largest two-year college in the state.

— Freebase

Radionics

Radionics

Radionics is a superstitious pseudoscience involving the use of blood, hair, a signature, or other substances unique to the person as a focus to supposedly heal a patient from afar. The concept behind radionics originated in the early 1900s with Albert Abrams, who became a millionaire by leasing radionic machines which he designed himself. Radionics is not based on any scientific evidence, and contradicts the principles of physics and biology and as a result it has been classed as pseudoscience and quackery by most physicians. The United States Food and Drug Administration does not recognize any legitimate medical uses for such devices.

— Freebase

Steel, Sir John

Steel, Sir John

sculptor, born at Aberdeen; studied at Edinburgh and Rome; made his mark in 1832 by a model of a statue, "Alexander and Bucephalus," and soon took rank with the foremost and busiest sculptors of his day; his works are mostly to be found in Edinburgh, and include the equestrian statue of Wellington, statues of Sir Walter Scott (in the Scott Monument), Professor Wilson, Dr. Chalmers, Allan Ramsay, etc.; the splendid figure of Queen Victoria over the Royal Institution gained him the appointment (1844) of sculptor to Her Majesty in Scotland, and on the unveiling of his fine equestrian statue of Prince Albert in 1876 he was created a knight (1804-1891).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Ulm

Ulm

Ulm is a city in the federal German state of Baden-Württemberg, situated on the River Danube. The city, whose population is estimated at 120,000, forms an urban district of its own and is the administrative seat of the Alb-Donau district. Ulm, founded around 850, is rich in history and traditions as a former Free Imperial City. Today, it is an economic centre due to its varied industries, and it is the seat of a university. Internationally, Ulm is primarily known for having the church with the tallest steeple in the world, the Gothic minster and as the birthplace of Albert Einstein.

— Freebase

Lendu language

Lendu language

The Lendu, or Balendru, are an ethno-linguistic agriculturalist group residing in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo in the area west and northwest of Lake Albert, specifically the Ituri Region of Orientale Province. Their language is one of the most populous of the Central Sudanic languages. There are three-quarters of a million Lendu speakers in the DRC, and 10,000 more in Uganda. A conflict between the Lendu and Hema people was the basis of the Ituri conflict. Ethnologue gives Bbadha as an alternate name of Lendu, but Blench lists Badha as a distinct language. A draft listing of Nilo-Saharan languages, available from his website and dated 2012, lists Lendu/Badha. Besides the Balendru themselves, Lendu is spoken as a native language by a portion of the Hema, Alur, and Okebu.

— Freebase

Turn-On

Turn-On

Turn-On is an American sketch comedy series that aired on ABC in February 1969. Only one episode was shown leaving one episode unaired and the show is considered one of the most infamous flops in TV history. Turn-On's sole episode was shown on Wednesday, February 5, 1969, at 8:30 p.m. Eastern. Among the cast were Teresa Graves, who would join the Laugh-In cast that autumn, and Chuck McCann, longtime kiddie show host, character actor, and voice artist. The writing staff included a young Albert Brooks. The guest host for the 1st episode was Tim Conway.

— Freebase

Harry Atkinson

Harry Atkinson

Harry Albert Atkinson served as the tenth Premier of New Zealand on four separate occasions in the late 19th century, and was Colonial Treasurer for a total of ten years. He was responsible for guiding the country during a time of economic depression, and was known as a cautious and prudent manager of government finances, though distrusted for some radical policies such as his 1882 National Insurance scheme and leasehold land schemes. He also participated in the formation of voluntary military units to fight in the New Zealand Wars, and was noted for his strong belief in the need for seizure of Māori land.

— Freebase

Rockne

Rockne

The Rockne was an American automobile brand produced by the Studebaker Corporation of South Bend, Indiana from 1932-1933. The brand was named for University of Notre Dame football coach Knute Rockne. Discussions between Studebaker and Knute Rockne began in 1928. Rockne was offered a high-visibility job by Studebaker president Albert Erskine. Studebaker planned for a durable, inexpensive car. The Rockne would replace the slow-selling, unduly expensive Erskine car. There were two prototypes that some would consider 1931 Rocknes. In 1930, Ralph Vail and Roy Cole operated an engineering/consulting firm in Detroit. Willys-Overland commissioned them to design a new small six and build two prototypes. Upon presenting the two vehicles to W-O the independent designers/engineers where told W-O was on the verge of bankruptcy and they could do what they wanted with the cars, one a sedan, one a coupe. Vail stopped in South Bend and demonstrated the car to Albert Erskine. Erskine bought the design that day and both Vail and Cole would be brought into the Studebaker organization. The Rockne moniker was a later adoption so, technically, there were no 1931 Rocknes. On March 31, 1931, 12 days after being appointed manager of sales promotion, Knute Rockne was killed in an airplane crash. In September, 1931, George M. Graham, formerly of Willys-Overland, was named sales manager of the new Rockne Motor Corporation. Two models were approved for production, the "65" on 110 in wheelbase and the "75" on a 114 in wheelbase. The "75" was based on the Studebaker Six, while the "65" was based on designs by Vail and Cole, the two engineers under contract for Willys-Overland. The "75" was designed under Studebaker's head of engineering, Delmar "Barney" Roos.

— Freebase

Pete Johnson

Pete Johnson

Pete Johnson was an American boogie-woogie and jazz pianist. Journalist Tony Russell stated in his book The Blues - From Robert Johnson to Robert Cray, that "Johnson shared with the other members of the 'Boogie Woogie Trio' the technical virtuosity and melodic fertility that can make this the most exciting of all piano music styles, but he was more comfortable than Meade Lux Lewis in a band setting; and as an accompanist, unlike Lewis or Albert Ammons, he could sparkle but not outshine his singing partner". Fellow journalist, Scott Yanow added "Johnson was one of the three great boogie-woogie pianists whose sudden prominence in the late 1930s helped make the style very popular".

— Freebase

Cosmological constant

Cosmological constant

In cosmology, the cosmological constant is equivalent to an energy density in otherwise empty space. It was proposed by Albert Einstein as a modification of his original theory of general relativity to achieve a static universe. Einstein abandoned the concept after the observation of the Hubble redshift indicated that the universe might not be stationary, as he had based his theory on the idea that the universe is unchanging. However, a number of observations including the discovery of cosmic acceleration in 1998 have revived the cosmological constant. The Lambda-CDM model of the Universe asserts that Λ is positive, although negligible even on the scale of the Milky Way.

— Freebase

Cendrillon

Cendrillon

Cendrillon is an opera—described as a "fairy tale"—in four acts by Jules Massenet to a French libretto by Henri Caïn based on Perrault's 1698 version of the Cinderella fairy tale. It was given its premiere performance on 24 May 1899 in Paris. The New Grove Dictionary of Opera notes that Massenet's sense of humour and wit is more evident in this work, and the use of recurrent motifs is more discreet, while the love music "reminds us how well Massenet knew his Wagner". Albert Carré persuaded the composer to drop a prologue introducing the characters, but a brief epilogue survives. Another writer comments that Massenet’s perfectly proportioned score moves from a scene worthy of Jean-Baptiste Lully's Armide, through Rossinian vocalises and archaic orchestrations to ballet movements on a par with Tchaikovsky.

— Freebase

Out of Sight

Out of Sight

Out of Sight is a 1998 American crime film based on the novel of the same name by Elmore Leonard and directed by Steven Soderbergh. The first of several collaborations between Soderbergh and star George Clooney, it was released on June 26, 1998. Jennifer Lopez also stars, along with Ving Rhames, Don Cheadle, Dennis Farina, Catherine Keener, Steve Zahn and Albert Brooks. The film received Academy Award nominations for Adapted Screenplay and Editing. It won the Edgar Award for best screenplay and the National Society of Film Critics awards for best film, screenplay, and director. It led to a spinoff TV series in 2003, Karen Sisco.

— Freebase

Coniine

Coniine

Coniine is a poisonous alkaloid found in poison hemlock and the yellow pitcher plant, and contributes to hemlock's fetid smell. It is a neurotoxin which disrupts the peripheral nervous system. It is toxic to humans and all classes of livestock; less than 0.2g is fatal to humans, with death caused by respiratory paralysis. Socrates was put to death by means of this poison in 399 BC. Coniine has two stereoisomers:--coniine, and--coniine, both of which are present in hemlock. Coniine was first synthesized by Albert Ladenburg in 1886; it was the first of the alkaloids to be synthesized.

— Freebase

Mixed Bag

Mixed Bag

Mixed Bag is a 1967 album by Richie Havens. Although often mistaken as his debut, this was actually Havens's third record. It followed two earlier, lesser-known releases on Douglas Records. This was Havens's first record after signing on with manager Albert Grossman which led to this recording on a new folk music section of Verve Records. Mixed Bag is frequently cited as the singer's best work, and was his first album to appear on Billboard's charts. The recording was the first to introduce a wider audience to Havens's rich baritone vocals and the full-sound of Havens's distinct guitar style.

— Freebase

Looker

Looker

Looker is a 1981 science fiction film written and directed by Michael Crichton. It starred Albert Finney, Susan Dey, and James Coburn. Former NFL linebacker Tim Rossovich was featured as the villain's main henchman. The film is a suspense/science fiction piece which comments upon and satirizes media, advertising, TV's effects on the populace, and ridiculous standard of beauty. Though spare in visual effects, the film is notable for being the first commercial film to attempt to make a realistic computer generated character, for the model named "Cindy." It was also the first film to create 3-D shading with a computer, months before the release of the better-known Tron.

— Freebase

Pilote

Pilote

Pilote was a French comics periodical published from 1959 to 1989. Showcasing most of the major French or Belgian comics talents of its day the magazine introduced major series such as Astérix, Barbe-Rouge, Blueberry, Achille Talon, and Valérian et Laureline. Major comics writers like René Goscinny, Jean-Michel Charlier, Greg, Pierre Christin and Jacques Lob were featured in the magazine, as were artists such as Jijé, Morris, Albert Uderzo, Jean Giraud, Enki Bilal, Jean-Claude Mézières, Jacques Tardi, Philippe Druillet, Marcel Gotlib, Alexis, and Annie Goetzinger. Pilote also published several international talents such as Hugo Pratt, Frank Bellamy and Robert Crumb.

— Freebase

Holy Ghost

Holy Ghost

Holy Ghost: Rare & Unissued Recordings (1962–70) is a compilation album by avant-garde saxophonist Albert Ayler released by Revenant Records in 2004. The 9-CD Box Set, housed in a reproduction "Spirit Box" contains live performances recorded by Ayler in Helsinki, Copenhagen, New York City, Cleveland, Berlin, Rotterdam, Newport and Saint-Paul-de-Vence over an eight-year period and features a variety of line-ups which include Cecil Taylor, Sunny Murray, Jimmy Lyons, Gary Peacock, Don Cherry, Rashied Ali, Donald Ayler, Ronald Shannon Jackson, Michael Samson, Frank Wright, Beaver Harris, Pharoah Sanders, Richard Davis, Sam Rivers and Muhammed Ali. The set includes two discs of interviews, reproductions of memorabilia, a Forget-me-not and a bonus disc featuring Ayler's recordings with the 76th A.G. Army Band.

— Freebase

Holy Ghost: Rare & Unissued Recordings

Holy Ghost: Rare & Unissued Recordings

Holy Ghost: Rare & Unissued Recordings (1962–70) is a compilation album by avant-garde saxophonist Albert Ayler released by Revenant Records in 2004. The 9-CD Box Set, housed in a reproduction "Spirit Box" contains live performances recorded by Ayler in Helsinki, Copenhagen, New York City, Cleveland, Berlin, Rotterdam, Newport and Saint-Paul-de-Vence over an eight-year period and features a variety of line-ups which include Cecil Taylor, Sunny Murray, Jimmy Lyons, Gary Peacock, Don Cherry, Rashied Ali, Donald Ayler, Ronald Shannon Jackson, Michael Samson, Frank Wright, Beaver Harris, Pharoah Sanders, Richard Davis, Sam Rivers and Muhammed Ali. The set includes two discs of interviews, reproductions of memorabilia, a Forget-me-not and a bonus disc featuring Ayler's recordings with the 76th A.G. Army Band.

— Freebase

Industrial Township

Industrial Township

Industrial Township is a township in Saint Louis County, Minnesota, United States. The population was 800 at the 2010 census. State Highway 33 serves as a main route in the township. Other main routes include Industrial Road, Saginaw Road, Independence Road, and Albert Road. Highway 33 runs north–south through the township. Industrial Road runs east–west through the middle of the township. County Road 8 runs east–west through the northern portion of the township. The unincorporated community of Burnett is located within Industrial Township. The Cloquet River flows through the township. Industrial Township is located within the unincorporated area of Saginaw.

— Freebase

Irréversible

Irréversible

Irréversible is a 2002 French mystery thriller film written and directed by Gaspar Noé, starring Monica Bellucci, Vincent Cassel and Albert Dupontel. The film employs a non-linear narrative and follows two men as they try to avenge a brutally raped girlfriend. The soundtrack was composed by the electronic musician Thomas Bangalter, who is best known as half of the duo Daft Punk. American film critic Roger Ebert called it "a movie so violent and cruel that most people will find it unwatchable." Irréversible competed at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival and won the Stockholm International Film Festival's award for best film. Irreversible has been associated with the New French Extremity movement.

— Freebase

Quantum cascade laser

Quantum cascade laser

Quantum cascade lasers are semiconductor lasers that emit in the mid- to far-infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum and were first demonstrated by Jerome Faist, Federico Capasso, Deborah Sivco, Carlo Sirtori, Albert Hutchinson, and Alfred Cho at Bell Laboratories in 1994. Unlike typical interband semiconductor lasers that emit electromagnetic radiation through the recombination of electron–hole pairs across the material band gap, QCLs are unipolar and laser emission is achieved through the use of intersubband transitions in a repeated stack of semiconductor multiple quantum well heterostructures, an idea first proposed in the paper "Possibility of amplification of electromagnetic waves in a semiconductor with a superlattice" by R.F. Kazarinov and R.A. Suris in 1971.

— Freebase

Guy de Maupassant

Guy de Maupassant

Henri René Albert Guy de Maupassant was a popular 19th-century French writer, considered one of the fathers of the modern short story and one of the form's finest exponents. A protégé of Flaubert, Maupassant's stories are characterized by their economy of style and efficient, effortless dénouements. Many of the stories are set during the Franco-Prussian War of the 1870s and several describe the futility of war and the innocent civilians who, caught in the conflict, emerge changed. He authored some 300 short stories, six novels, three travel books, and one volume of verse. The story "Boule de Suif" is often accounted his masterpiece. His most unsettling horror story, "Le Horla", was about madness and suicide.

— Freebase

Dynatron

Dynatron

The dedicated dynatron vacuum tube was invented by Albert Hull in 1918. It has three electrodes: a thermionic cathode, a perforated anode, and a supplementary anode or plate, and its characteristic curves have a region exhibiting negative resistance, which is the property desired. Other early vacuum tubes with four or more electrodes not designed for the purpose had significant secondary emission from the anode, and, when operated with the anode at a lower voltage than another electrode, exhibited negative resistance and could be used as oscillators or for other functions. Later tubes had anodes treated to reduce secondary emission, normally an unwanted phenomenon, and were not suitable as dynatron devices.

— Freebase

Albert Sidney Johnston

Albert Sidney Johnston

Albert Sidney Johnston served as a general in three different armies: the Texas Army, the United States Army, and the Confederate States Army. He saw extensive combat during his military career, fighting actions in the Texas War of Independence, the Mexican-American War, the Utah War, and the American Civil War. Considered by Confederate President Jefferson Davis to be the finest general officer in the Confederacy before the emergence of Robert E. Lee, he was killed early in the Civil War at the Battle of Shiloh and was the highest-ranking officer, Union or Confederate, killed during the entire war. Davis believed the loss of Johnston "was the turning point of our fate".

— Freebase

Albert Bierstadt

Albert Bierstadt

Albert Bierstadt was a German-American painter best known for his lavish, sweeping landscapes of the American West. In obtaining the subject matter for these works, Bierstadt joined several journeys of the Westward Expansion. Though not the first artist to record these sites, Bierstadt was the foremost painter of these scenes for the remainder of the 19th century. Bierstadt was part of the Hudson River School, not an institution but rather an informal group of like-minded painters. The Hudson River School style involved carefully detailed paintings with romantic, almost glowing lighting, sometimes called luminism. An important interpreter of the western landscape, Bierstadt, along with Thomas Moran, is also grouped with the Rocky Mountain School.

— Freebase

Formstone

Formstone

Formstone is a type of stucco commonly applied to brick rowhouses in many East Coast urban areas in the United States, although it is most strongly associated with Baltimore. Formstone is commonly colored and shaped on the building to imitate various forms of masonry compound, creating the trompe l'oeil appearance of rock. Formstone was patented by Albert Knight of Baltimore in 1937, although a similar product named Permastone had been invented in Columbus, Ohio, eight years prior. The name Formstone was actually a brand name used by Knight. Permastone, Fieldstone, Dixie Stone, and Stone of Ages were names used for a product similar to Knight's Formstone, particularly in other cities.

— Freebase

Hermann Minkowski

Hermann Minkowski

Hermann Minkowski was a German mathematician. He created and developed the geometry of numbers and used geometrical methods to solve problems in number theory, mathematical physics, and the theory of relativity. Minkowski is perhaps best known for his work in relativity, in which he showed in 1907 that his former student Albert Einstein's special theory of relativity, presented algebraically by Einstein, could also be understood geometrically as a theory of four-dimensional space-time. Einstein himself at first viewed Minkowski's treatment as a mere mathematical trick, before eventually realizing that a geometrical view of space-time would be necessary in order to complete his own later work in general relativity.

— Freebase

Downfall

Downfall

Downfall is a 2004 war film directed by Oliver Hirschbiegel, depicting the final ten days of Adolf Hitler's reign of Nazi Germany in 1945. The film's screenplay was written by Bernd Eichinger, and based upon the books Inside Hitler's Bunker, by historian Joachim Fest; Until the Final Hour, the memoirs of Traudl Junge, one of Hitler's secretaries; Albert Speer's memoirs, Inside the Third Reich; Hitler's Last Days: An Eye–Witness Account, by Gerhardt Boldt; Das Notlazarett Unter Der Reichskanzlei: Ein Arzt Erlebt Hitlers Ende in Berlin by Doctor Ernst-Günther Schenck; and, Siegfried Knappe's memoirs, Soldat: Reflections of a German Soldier, 1936–1949. The film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.

— Freebase

Theory of relativity

Theory of relativity

The theory of relativity, or simply relativity, generally encompasses two theories by Albert Einstein: special relativity and general relativity. Concepts introduced by the theories of relativity include: ⁕Measurements of various quantities are relative to the velocities of observers. In particular, space and time can dilate. ⁕Spacetime: space and time should be considered together and in relation to each other. ⁕The speed of light is nonetheless invariant, the same for all observers. The term "theory of relativity" was based on the expression "relative theory" used by Max Planck in 1906, who emphasized how the theory uses the principle of relativity. In the discussion section of the same paper Alfred Bucherer used for the first time the expression "theory of relativity".

— Freebase

Rough Collie

Rough Collie

The Rough Collie is a long coated breed of medium to large size dog that in its original form was a type of collie used and bred for herding in Scotland. Originating in the 1800s, it is now well known through the works of author Albert Payson Terhune, and through the Lassie novel, movies, and television shows. There is also a smooth-coated variety; some breed organisations, including both the American and the Canadian Kennel Clubs, consider the smooth-coat and rough-coat dogs to be variations of the same breed. Rough Collies generally come in shades of sable, merles, and tri-coloured. This breed is very similar to the smaller Shetland Sheepdog which is partly descended from the Rough Collie.

— Freebase

Proxis

Proxis

Proxis is an online store, founded in 1997. Proxis sells English, Dutch and French books, CDs, DVDs, games, and supplies. Proxis is the Belgian market leader in the field of online shops and ships her products worldwide. Till November 2010, Proxis was a division of Club NV, the book and paper ware store with branches located all over Belgium. In 2006 Proxis and Club became a subsidiary of Distripar, an enterprise of Wallonian entrepreneur Albert Frère. Since December 2010, Proxis has become a division of Medio sprl, owned by Jo Vansteenvoort. MedioEurope distribute and market, books and DVDs to Public Librairies. ProxisAzur is now the biggest online mediashop in Belgium and goes in direct to the consumer.

— Freebase

Victor Horta

Victor Horta

Victor, Baron Horta was a Belgian architect and designer. John Julius Norwich described him as "undoubtedly the key European Art Nouveau architect." Indeed, Horta is one of the most important names in Art Nouveau architecture; the construction of his Hôtel Tassel in Brussels in 1892-3 means that he is sometimes credited as the first to introduce the style to architecture from the decorative arts. The French architect Hector Guimard was deeply influenced by Horta and further spread the "whiplash" style in France and abroad. In 1932 King Albert I of Belgium conferred on Horta the title of Baron for his services to architecture. Four of the buildings he designed have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

— Freebase

Berber

Berber

Berber is a town in the River Nile state of northern Sudan, 50 km north of Atbara, near the junction of the Atbara River and the Nile. The town was the starting-point of the old caravan route across the Nubian Desert to the Red Sea at Suakin. The first line of defense against the Ottoman empire occurred in this city. Some attempts also occurred in Dar Mahas and Dongola. The tribes inhabiting this city are mainly Ja'Alin with fewer numbers of Ababda. English explorer Samuel Baker passed in Berber on his discovery of Albert Nyanza Lake, in 1861. Berber is one of the first Sudanese towns that knew modern schooling. Many of the elder generation leaders were educated in Berber intermediate school.

— Freebase

Gioberti, Vincenzo

Gioberti, Vincenzo

an Italian philosophical and political writer, born at Turin; in 1825 he was appointed to the chair of Theology in his native city, and in 1831 chaplain to the Court of Charles Albert of Sardinia; two years later was exiled on a charge of complicity in the plots of the Young Italy party, and till 1847 remained abroad, chiefly in Brussels, busy with his pen on literary, philosophical, and political subjects; in 1848 he was welcomed back to Italy, and shortly afterwards rose to be Prime Minister of a short-lived government; his later years were spent in diplomatic work at Paris; in philosophy he reveals Platonic tendencies, while his political ideal was a confederated Italy, with the Pope at the head and the king of Sardinia as military guardian (1801-1852).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Key Club

Key Club

Key Club International is the oldest and largest service program for high school students. It is a student-led organization whose goal is to teach leadership through helping. Key Club International is a part of the Kiwanis International family of service-leadership programs. Many local Key Clubs are sponsored by a local Kiwanis club. The organization was started by California State Commissioner of Schools Albert C. Olney, and vocational education teacher Frank C. Vincent, who together worked to establish the first Key Club at Sacramento High School in California, on May 7, 1925. Female students were first admitted in 1977, ten years before women were admitted to the sponsoring organization, Kiwanis International.

— Freebase

The Killers

The Killers

The Killers are an American rock band formed in Las Vegas, Nevada in 2001, by Brandon Flowers and Dave Keuning. Mark Stoermer and Ronnie Vannucci Jr. would complete the current line-up of the band in 2002. The name The Killers is derived from a logo on the bass drum of a fictitious band, portrayed in the music video for the New Order song "Crystal". The group has released four studio albums, Hot Fuss, Sam's Town, Day & Age and Battle Born. They have also released one compilation album, Sawdust and one live album titled Live from the Royal Albert Hall. To date, the band has sold over 6 million albums in the United States, over 5 million albums in the United Kingdom, and a total of 20 million worldwide.

— Freebase

Leó Szilárd

Leó Szilárd

Leó Szilárd was a Hungarian- born American physicist and inventor. He conceived the nuclear chain reaction in 1933, patented the idea of a nuclear reactor with Enrico Fermi, and in late 1939 wrote the letter for Albert Einstein's signature that resulted in the Manhattan Project that built the atomic bomb. He also conceived the electron microscope, the linear accelerator and the cyclotron. Szilárd himself did not build all of these devices, or publish these ideas in scientific journals, and so their credit often went to others. As a result, Szilárd never received the Nobel Prize, but others were awarded the Prize as a result of their work on two of his inventions. He was born in Budapest in the Kingdom of Hungary, and died in La Jolla, California.

— Freebase

Tom Jones

Tom Jones

Tom Jones is a 1963 British adventure comedy film, an adaptation of Henry Fielding's classic novel The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, starring Albert Finney as the titular hero. It was one of the most critically acclaimed and popular comedies of its time, winning four Academy Awards, including Best Picture. The film was directed by Tony Richardson and the screenplay was adapted by playwright John Osborne. The film is notable for its unusual comic style: the opening sequence is performed in the style of a silent movie, and characters sometimes break the fourth wall, often by looking directly into the camera and addressing the audience, and going so far as to have the character of Tom Jones suddenly appearing to notice the camera and covering the lens with his hat.

— Freebase

Endoplasmic reticulum

Endoplasmic reticulum

The endoplasmic reticulum is an organelle of cells in eukaryotic organisms that forms an interconnected network of membrane vesicles. According to the structure the endoplasmic reticulum is classified into two types, that is, rough endoplasmic reticulum and smooth endoplasmic reticulum. The rough endoplasmic reticulum is studded with ribosomes on the cytosolic face. These are the sites of protein synthesis. The rough endoplasmic reticulum is predominantly found in hepatocytes where protein synthesis occurs actively. The smooth endoplasmic reticulum is a smooth network without the ribosomes. The smooth endoplasmic reticulum is concerned with lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and detoxification. The smooth endoplasmic reticulum is abundantly found in mammalian liver and gonad cells. The lacey membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum were first seen by Keith R. Porter, Albert Claude, and Ernest F. Fullam in the year 1945.

— Freebase

Phalanstère

Phalanstère

A phalanstère was a type of building designed for a utopian community and developed in the early 19th century by Charles Fourier. Fourier named these self-contained communities, ideally consisting of 1500-1600 people working together for mutual benefit, after the phalanx, the basic military unit in Ancient Greece. Though Fourier published several journals in Paris, among them La Phalanstère, he created no phalanstères in Europe due to a lack of financial support. Several so-called colonies were founded in the United States of America by Albert Brisbane and Horace Greeley. Fourier believed that the traditional house was a place of exile and oppression of women. He believed gender roles could progress by shaping them within community, more than by pursuits of sexual freedom or other Simonian concepts.

— Freebase

Woodridge

Woodridge

Woodridge is a suburb of Chicago, located primarily in DuPage County, Illinois, with portions in Will County and Cook County. It uses the 630 and 331 area codes. The population was 32,971 at the 2010 census. Woodridge is the home of the Home Run Inn pizzeria chain and a campus of Westwood College. Woodridge was incorporated on August 24, 1959, with less than 500 residents, on a wooded area of high ground overlooking the DuPage River's East Branch. Woodridge is a young community with the vast majority of its homes, businesses, and churches constructed after the 1950s. Woodridge was founded by a housing developer, Albert Kaufman, who was largely responsible for the creation of the village. In July 2007, Woodridge was ranked No. 61 on Money magazine's "100 Best Places to Live".

— Freebase

Highway to Hell

Highway to Hell

Highway to Hell is the sixth studio album by Australian hard rock band AC/DC, released in August 1979. It is also AC/DC's fifth international studio album. It was the last album featuring lead singer Bon Scott, who died early the following year from over-consumption of alcohol. It was originally released by Albert Productions, who licensed the album to Atlantic Records for release outside of Australia, and was then re-released by Epic Records in 2003 as part of the AC/DC Remasters series. On 25 May 2006, Highway to Hell was certified 7x Platinum by the RIAA. In 2003, the album was ranked number 200 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

— Freebase

Gravitational lens

Gravitational lens

A gravitational lens refers to a distribution of matter between a distant source and an observer, that is capable of bending the light from the source, as it travels towards the observer. This effect is known as gravitational lensing and is one of the predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. Although Orest Chwolson or Frantisek Klin are sometimes credited as being the first ones to discuss the effect in print, the effect is more commonly associated with Einstein, who published a more famous article on the subject in 1936. Fritz Zwicky posited in 1937 that the effect could allow galaxy clusters to act as gravitational lenses. It was not until 1979 that this effect was confirmed by observation of the so-called "Twin QSO" SBS 0957+561.

— Freebase

Denver sandwich

Denver sandwich

A Denver sandwich, also known as a Western sandwich, consists of a Denver omelette, sandwiched between two pieces of bread. The bread is commonly toasted, and the sandwich may or may not contain lettuce or other ingredients, depending on individual taste. The sandwich has been claimed to have been invented by many different people, including Denver restaurateur Albert A. McVittie in 1907 as well as M. D. Looney, of Denver, in the same year. It has also been claimed that the “Denver sandwich” was invented at Denver’s Taber Hotel but mentions of it in newspapers predate all these claimants. As early as 1908 it was known as the “Western Sandwich”, cited in a San Antonio newspaper. A “Manhattan Sandwich” was similar in that it contained fried egg, minced ham, and onion.

— Freebase

Filibuster

Filibuster

A filibuster is a type of parliamentary procedure where debate is extended, allowing one or more members to delay or entirely prevent a vote on a given proposal. It is sometimes referred to as talking out a bill, and characterized as a form of obstruction in a legislature or other decision-making body. The English term "filibuster" derives from the Spanish filibustero, itself deriving originally from the Dutch vrijbuiter, "privateer, pirate, robber". The Spanish form entered the English language in the 1850s, as applied to military adventurers from the United States then operating in Central America and the Spanish West Indies such as William Walker. The term in its legislative sense was first used by Democratic congressman Albert G. Brown of Mississippi in 1853, referring to Abraham Watkins Venable's speech against "filibustering" intervention in Cuba.

— Freebase

Yeshiva University

Yeshiva University

Yeshiva University is a private university in New York City, with six campuses in New York and one in Israel. Founded in 1886, it is a research university. Yeshiva University’s undergraduate schools—Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Syms School of Business— "offer a unique dual curriculum inspired by Modern-Centrist-Orthodox Judaism's hashkafa of Torah Umadda combining the finest, contemporary academic education with the timeless teachings of Torah.” Yeshiva is perhaps best known for its secular, highly selective graduate schools, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. Yeshiva University is an independent institution chartered by New York State. It is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and by several professional agencies.

— Freebase

Bunia

Bunia

Bunia is a city in Democratic Republic of the Congo and is the headquarters of Ituri Interim Administration in the Ituri region of Orientale Province. It lies at an elevation of 1275 m on a plateau about 30 km west of Lake Albert in the Albertine Rift, and about 25 km east of the Ituri Forest. The city is at the center of the Ituri conflict between the Lendu and Hema. In the Second Congo War the city and district were the scene of much fighting and many civilian deaths from this conflict, and related clashes between militias and Uganda-based forces. Consequently the city is the base of one of the largest United Nations peace-keeping forces in Africa, and its headquarters in northeastern DRC. The area's natural resources include gold mines over which militias and foreign forces have been fighting.

— Freebase

Albert Reynolds

Albert Reynolds

Albert Reynolds is a former Irish politician who was twice Taoiseach of Ireland, serving from February 1992 to January 1993 and again from January 1993 to December 1994. The first term as head of a Fianna Fáil-Progressive Democrats coalition, and the second time as head of a Fianna Fáil-Labour Party coalition. He was the fifth leader of Fianna Fáil during the same period. He has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. Reynolds was first elected to Dáil Éireann as a TD for Longford–Westmeath in 1977, and was re-elected at each election until his retirement in 2002. He previously served as Minister for Finance, Minister for Industry and Commerce, Minister for Industry and Energy, Minister for Transport and Minister for Posts and Telegraphs.

— Freebase

The Deputy

The Deputy

The Deputy, a Christian tragedy, also known as The Representative, is a controversial 1963 play by Rolf Hochhuth which portrayed Pope Pius XII as having failed to take action or speak out against the Holocaust. It has been translated into more than twenty languages. The play's implicit censure of a venerable if controversial pope has led to numerous counterattacks, of which one of the latest is the 2007 allegation that Hochhuth was the dupe of a KGB disinformation campaign. The Encyclopedia Britannica assesses the play as "a drama that presented a critical, unhistorical picture of Pius XII" and Hochhuth's depiction of the pope having been indifferent to the Nazi genocide as "lacking credible substantiation"." An English translation by Richard and Clara Winston of the complete text was published as The Deputy: A Play, by Grove Press in 1964. A letter from Albert Schweitzer to Hochhuth's German publisher serves as the foreword to the Grove edition. A film version titled Amen. was made by the Greek-born French filmmaker Costa-Gavras in 2002.

— Freebase

Desmond Tutu

Desmond Tutu

Desmond Mpilo Tutu is a South African social rights activist and retired Anglican bishop who rose to worldwide fame during the 1980s as an opponent of apartheid. He was the first black South African Archbishop of Cape Town and primate of the Church of the Province of Southern Africa. Tutu has been active in the defence of human rights and uses his high profile to campaign for the oppressed. He has campaigned to fight AIDS, tuberculosis, poverty, racism, sexism, the imprisonment of Bradley Manning, homophobia and transphobia. He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984; the Albert Schweitzer Prize for Humanitarianism in 1986; the Pacem in Terris Award in 1987; the Sydney Peace Prize in 1999; the Gandhi Peace Prize in 2007; and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009. He has also compiled several books of his speeches and sayings.

— Freebase

Theoretical physics

Theoretical physics

Theoretical physics is a branch of physics which employs mathematical models and abstractions of physical objects and systems to rationalize, explain and predict natural phenomena. This is in contrast to experimental physics, which uses experimental tools to probe these phenomena. The advancement of science depends in general on the interplay between experimental studies and theory. In some cases, theoretical physics adheres to standards of mathematical rigor while giving little weight to experiments and observations. For example, while developing special relativity, Albert Einstein was concerned with the Lorentz transformation which left Maxwell's equations invariant, but was apparently uninterested in the Michelson–Morley experiment on Earth's drift through a luminiferous ether. On the other hand, Einstein was awarded the Nobel Prize for explaining the photoelectric effect, previously an experimental result lacking a theoretical formulation.

— Freebase

Argyrol

Argyrol

Argyrol is the trade name for an antiseptic consisting of compounded solutions at varying strengths of mild silver protein. Agyrol is synonymous with its chemical mild silver protein, manufactured in the chemical industry to pharmaceutical grade only, using denatured pharmaceutical-grade protein for ophthalmic application and elemental silver to produce the silver protein molecule. While employed with Mulford & Co., the American Dr. Albert Coombs Barnes recruited chemist Hille in Germany. They returned to the United States and left Mulford together to launch Argyrol, developed and commercialized by Barnes as Prevention Technology for use on mucous membranes to resolve local infections in mucous-membrane-lined organs, most widely publicized for its value to resolve gonorrhea infections and to prevent gonorrheal blindness and other pathogenic infections to the eyes of newborn infants.

— Freebase

Infocom

Infocom

Infocom was a software company, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, that produced numerous works of interactive fiction. They also produced one notable business application, a relational database called Cornerstone. Infocom was founded on June 22, 1979 by MIT staff and students led by Dave Lebling, Marc Blank, Albert Vezza, and Joel Berez and lasted as an independent company until 1986 when it was bought by Activision. Activision finally shut down the Infocom division in 1989, although they released some titles in the 1990s under the Infocom Zork brand. Activision abandoned the Infocom trademark in 2002. The name was later registered by Oliver Klaeffling of Germany in 2007, which itself was abandoned the following year. The Infocom trademark is currently held by Pete Hottelet's Omni Consumer Products, who registered the name around the same time as Klaeffling in 2007.

— Freebase

Color motion picture film

Color motion picture film

Color motion picture film refers both to unexposed color photographic film in a format suitable for use in a motion picture camera, and to finished motion picture film, ready for use in a projector, which bears images in color. The first color cinematography was by means of additive color systems such as the one patented in England by Edward Raymond Turner in 1899 and tested in 1902. A simplified additive system was developed by George Albert Smith and successfully commercialized in 1909 as Kinemacolor. These early systems used black-and-white film to photograph and project two or more component images through different color filters. With the present-day technology, there are two distinct processes: Eastman Color Negative 2 chemistry and Eastman Color Positive 2 chemistry, usually abbreviated as ECN-2 and ECP-2. Fuji's products are compatible with ECN-2 and ECP-2.

— Freebase

Teapot Dome scandal

Teapot Dome scandal

The Teapot Dome scandal was a bribery incident that took place in the United States from 1920 to 1923, during the administration of President Warren G. Harding. Secretary of the Interior Albert B. Fall leased Navy petroleum reserves at Teapot Dome in Wyoming and two other locations in California to private oil companies at low rates without competitive bidding. In 1922 and 1923, the leases became the subject of a sensational investigation by Senator Thomas J. Walsh. Fall was later convicted of accepting bribes from the oil companies. Before the Watergate scandal, Teapot Dome was regarded as the "greatest and most sensational scandal in the history of American politics". The scandal also was a key factor in posthumously further destroying the public reputation of the Harding administration, which was already unpopular due to its poor handling of the Great Railroad Strike of 1922 and the President's veto of the Bonus Bill in 1922.

— Freebase

Emulation

Emulation

In emulation learning, subjects learn about parts of their environment and use this to achieve their own goals. Observational learning is based primarily on the work of Albert Bandura. First coined by child psychologist David Wood in 1988. In 1990 “emulation” was taken up by Michael Tomasello to explain the findings of an earlier study on ape social learning. The meaning of the term emulation has changed gradually since. Emulation is a form of observational learning, different from imitation, which focuses on the action's environmental results instead of a model's action. Simpler form of observational learning is expected to have profound implications for its capacity for cultural transmission. Emulation produces only fleeting fidelity compared with the opportunity to copy a conspecific, when considerable conformity is displayed even with a simple task. This was observed through a study, ghost-conditions, in chimpanzees and children.

— Freebase

Caryota

Caryota

Caryota is a genus of palm trees. They are often known as fishtail palms because of the shape of their leaves. There are about 13 species native to Asia and the South Pacific. One of the more widely known species is Caryota urens, which yields sap used to make an unrefined sugar called jaggery, and also to make palm wine. Caryota mitis is an invasive introduced species in the US state of Florida. They are also one of the few Arecaceae with bipinnate foliage. Many grow in mountainous areas and are adapted to warm mediterranean climates as well as subtropical and tropical climates. Selected species: ⁕Caryota cumingii - Philippines fishtail palm ⁕Caryota gigas - Giant fishtail palm ⁕Caryota mitis - Burmese fishtail palm ⁕Caryota obtusa - Thailand mountain palm ⁕Caryota ochlandra ⁕Caryota rumphiana - Albert palm ⁕Caryota urens - jaggery palm, solitary fishtail palm, wine palm, toddy palm ⁕Caryota zebrina

— Freebase

Wends

Wends

a horde of savage Slavs who, about the 6th century, invaded and took possession of vacant lands on the southern shores of the Baltic, and extended their inroads as far as Hamburg and the ocean, south also far over the Elbe in some quarters, and were a source of great trouble to the Germans in Henry the Fowler's time, and after; they burst in upon Brandenburg once, in "never-imagined fury," and stamped out, as they thought, the Christian religion there by wholesale butchery of its priests, setting up for worship their own god "Triglaph, ugliest and stupidest of all false gods," described as "something like three whales' cubs combined by boiling, or a triple porpoise dead-drunk." They were at length "fairly beaten to powder" by Albert the Bear, "and either swept away or else damped down into Christianity and keeping of the peace," though remnants of them, with their language and customs, exist in Lusatia to this day.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia


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