Definitions containing réville, albert

We've found 250 definitions:

Albert chain

Albert chain

A chain used to make easier access to a pocket watch in the watchpocket of a waistcoat. The Albert style went to a T-bar finding that tucked into a buttoned buttonhole of the waistcoat. From there a further small length of chain hung, to which the wearer attached decorative charms such as fraternity or lodge symbols. The double Albert was a chain draped between both watchpockets, with the T-bar and pendant chain in the middle. With the passing of their use as a functional item, Albert chains are still used as jewelry, worn in any number of manners.

— Wiktionary

Albert Medal

Albert Medal

The Albert Medal for Lifesaving was a British medal awarded to recognise the saving of life. It has since been replaced by the George Cross. The Albert Medal was first instituted by a Royal Warrant on 7 March 1866 and discontinued in 1971 with the last two awards promulgated in the London Gazette of 31 March 1970 to the late First Officer Geoffrey Clifford Bye of Boolairoo, New South Wales, Australia and on 11 August 1970 to the late Kenneth Owen McIntyre of Fairy Meadow, New South Wales, Australia. The medal was named in memory of Prince Albert and originally was awarded to recognise saving life at sea. The original medal had a blue ribbon 5/8" wide with 2 white stripes. A further Royal Warrant in 1867 created two classes of Albert Medal, the first in gold and bronze and the second in bronze, both enamelled in blue, and the ribbon of the first class changed to 1 3/8" wide with 4 white stripes. In 1877, the medal was extended to cover saving life on land and from this point there are two medals with different inscriptions to depict which they were awarded for. The land version was enameled in red, with a red ribbon. The titles of the medals changed in 1917, the gold "Albert Medal, first class" becoming the "Albert Medal in gold" and the bronze "Albert Medal, second class" being known as just the "Albert Medal".

— Freebase

Prince Albert

Prince Albert

Prince Albert is the third-largest city in Saskatchewan, Canada. It is situated in the centre of the province on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River. The city is known as the "Gateway to the North" because it is the last major centre along the route to the resources of northern Saskatchewan. Prince Albert National Park is located just 51 km north of the city and contains a huge wealth of lakes, forest, and wildlife. The city itself is located in a transition zone between the aspen parkland and boreal forest biomes. Prince Albert is bordered by the Rural Municipality of Prince Albert No. 461 and the Rural Municipality of Buckland No. 491.

— Freebase

Shadow of a Doubt

Shadow of a Doubt

Shadow of a Doubt is a 1943 American psychological thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock, and starring Teresa Wright and Joseph Cotten. Written by Thornton Wilder, Sally Benson, and Alma Reville, the film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Story for Gordon McDonell. In 1991, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

— Freebase

Albert Kesselring

Albert Kesselring

Albert Kesselring was a German Luftwaffe Generalfeldmarschall during World War II. In a military career that spanned both World Wars, Kesselring became one of Nazi Germany's most skilful commanders, being one of 27 soldiers awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds. Nicknamed "Smiling Albert" by the Allies and "Uncle Albert" by his troops, he was one of the most popular generals of World War II with the rank and file. Kesselring joined the Bavarian Army as an officer cadet in 1904, and served in the artillery branch. He completed training as a balloon observer in 1912. During World War I, he served on both the Western and Eastern fronts and was posted to the General Staff, despite not having attended the War Academy. Kesselring remained in the Army after the war but was discharged in 1933 to become head of the Department of Administration at the Reich Commissariat for Aviation, where he was involved in the re-establishment of the aviation industry and the laying of the foundations for the Luftwaffe, serving as its Chief of Staff from 1936 to 1938. During World War II he commanded air forces in the invasions of Poland and France, the Battle of Britain, and Operation Barbarossa. As Commander-in-Chief South, he was overall German commander in the Mediterranean theatre, which included the operations in North Africa. Kesselring conducted an uncompromising defensive campaign against the Allied forces in Italy until he was injured in an accident in October 1944. In the final campaign of the war, he commanded German forces on the Western Front. He won the respect of his Allied opponents for his military accomplishments, but his record was marred by massacres committed by troops under his command in Italy.

— Freebase

Albert Lea

Albert Lea

Albert Lea is a city in and the county seat of Freeborn County in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Minnesota. The population was 18,016 at the 2010 census. The city is at the junction of Interstates 35 and 90, about 90 miles south of the Twin Cities. It is on the shores of Fountain Lake, Pickerel Lake, Albert Lea Lake, Goose Lake, School Lake, and Lake Chapeau. Fountain Lake and Albert Lea Lake are part of the Shell Rock River flowage. The city's early growth was based upon agriculture, farming support services and manufacturing and was a significant rail center. At one time it was the site of Cargill's headquarters. Other manufacturing included Edwards Manufacturing, Scotsman Ice Machines, Streater Store fixtures, and Universal Milking Machines. Like many U.S. towns much of the manufacturing base has diminished. A long-time center of the city's job opportunity was the Wilson & Company meat packing plant, later known as Farmstead and Farmland. This facility was destroyed by fire in July 2001. The largest employer is currently Mayo Clinic Health System with over 1,500 employees.

— Freebase

East Prussia

East Prussia

East Prussia was the main part of the region of Prussia along the southeastern Baltic Coast from the 13th century to the end of World War II in May 1945. From 1772–1829 and 1878–1945, the Province of East Prussia was part of the German state of Prussia. The capital city was Königsberg. East Prussia enclosed the bulk of the ancestral lands of the Baltic Old Prussians. During the 13th century, the native Prussians were conquered by the crusading Teutonic Knights. The indigenous Balts who survived the conquest were gradually converted to Christianity. Because of Germanization and colonisation over the following centuries, Germans became the dominant ethnic group, while Poles and Lithuanians formed minorities. From the 13th century, East Prussia was part of the monastic state of the Teutonic Knights, which became the Duchy of Prussia in 1525. The Old Prussian language had become extinct by the 17th or early 18th century. Following the death of Hohenzollern Albert of Brandenburg Prussia, Duke of Prussia, Joachim II, the prince-elector Kurfürst of Brandenburg, became co-inheritor of Ducal Prussia. In 1577, House of Hohenzollern co-regents took over administration from Albert's only son, Albert Friedrich. In 1618 the Duchy of Prussia again passed by inheritance and in personal union with the Hohenzollerns of Brandenburg and the territory was called Brandenburg-Prussia. The territories of the House of Hohenzollern were scattered in Franconia, Brandenburg, eastern Prussia and elsewhere.

— Freebase

Favorito

Favorito

Favorito was the personal horse of Charles Albert of Savoy, King of Sardinia from 1831, and was ridden by him during the campaigns of 1848. After the Piedmontese defeat at the Battle of Novara in 1849, and the king’s subsequent abdication, Favorito joined his master in exile in Porto. Following the death of Charles Albert in the July of that year, the horse was brought back to Turin and to the Royal Stables. On Favorito’s death in 1867 his pelt was mounted on a life-size wooden sculpture commissioned from Giovanni Tamone, to a design by Count Stanislao Grimaldi. The horse was equipped as for the wars of 1848–9, including the saddle used by the king in the battle of Novara, and placed along with Charles Albert’s other military effects in the Royal Armoury, where he remains on display to this day.

— Freebase

Alberta

Alberta

, a feminine form of Albert.

— Wiktionary

Asterix

Asterix

A series of French comic books written by Renu00E9 Goscinny and illustrated by Albert Uderzo about an ancient Gaul man named Asterix.

— Wiktionary

Einstein

Einstein

Albert Einstein, the world-famous 20th Century theoretical physicist who developed the theory of relativity.

— Wiktionary

relativity

relativity

Either of two theories (special relativity or general relativity) developed by German-American physicist Albert Einstein. Also called Einsteinian relativity.

— Wiktionary

Al

Al

A diminutive of the male given names Alan, Albert, Alex, Alexander, Alfred, and other names beginning with Al-.

— Wiktionary

Einsteinian

Einsteinian

Of or relating to the theories of the theoretical physicist Albert Einstein.

— Wiktionary

Allie

Allie

A diminutive of the male given names Alistair, Alfred, Alvin, Albert, Alan or other names beginning with Al-.

— Wiktionary

Bertie

Bertie

A diminutive of Bertram, Albert or of any male given names ending in -bert.

— Wiktionary

Albie

Albie

, short form of Albert.

— Wiktionary

Alby

Alby

, anglicization of Irish Ailbhe, name of an Irish saint also anglicized as Albert.

— Wiktionary

theory of relativity

theory of relativity

The generic term of the special relativity and the general relativity, two theories in physics developed mainly by Albert Einstein at the beginning of the 20th century from which several important results such as the equivalence of matter and energy and the Einstein field equations are derived.

— Wiktionary

cosmological constant

cosmological constant

A term added by Albert Einstein to his equations of general relativity in order to account for a supposed static universe.

— Wiktionary

Einstein-Rosen bridge

Einstein-Rosen bridge

A type of wormhole, originally predicted by physicists Albert Einstein and Nathan Rosen, that is inherently unstable and collapses before any information or matter can pass through.

— Wiktionary

Albertina

Albertina

, a feminine diminutive form of Albert, Latinate variant of Albertine.

— Wiktionary

Camus

Camus

Albert Camus, French author and philosopher

— Wiktionary

Camusian

Camusian

Of or pertaining to Albert Camus (1913u20131960), French philosopher and writer.

— Wiktionary

Alberts

Alberts

derived from the given name Albert.

— Wiktionary

albert edward

Edward, Edward VII, Albert Edward

King of England from 1901 to 1910; son of Victoria and Prince Albert; famous for his elegant sporting ways (1841-1910)

— Princeton's WordNet

bose

Bose, Satyendra N. Bose, Satyendra Nath Bose

Indian physicist who with Albert Einstein proposed statistical laws based on the indistinguishability of particles; led to the description of fundamental particles that later came to be known as bosons

— Princeton's WordNet

edward

Edward, Edward VII, Albert Edward

King of England from 1901 to 1910; son of Victoria and Prince Albert; famous for his elegant sporting ways (1841-1910)

— Princeton's WordNet

edward vii

Edward, Edward VII, Albert Edward

King of England from 1901 to 1910; son of Victoria and Prince Albert; famous for his elegant sporting ways (1841-1910)

— Princeton's WordNet

einsteinian

Einsteinian

of or relating to Albert Einstein or his theories

— Princeton's WordNet

genus saxe-gothea

Saxe-gothea, Saxegothea, genus Saxe-gothea, genus Saxegothea

one species: Prince Albert's yew

— Princeton's WordNet

genus saxegothea

Saxe-gothea, Saxegothea, genus Saxe-gothea, genus Saxegothea

one species: Prince Albert's yew

— Princeton's WordNet

michelson-morley experiment

Michelson-Morley experiment

a celebrated experiment conducted by Albert Michelson and Edward Morley; their failure to detect any influence of the earth's motion on the velocity of light was the starting point for Einstein's theory of relativity

— Princeton's WordNet

satyendra nath bose

Bose, Satyendra N. Bose, Satyendra Nath Bose

Indian physicist who with Albert Einstein proposed statistical laws based on the indistinguishability of particles; led to the description of fundamental particles that later came to be known as bosons

— Princeton's WordNet

satyendra n. bose

Bose, Satyendra N. Bose, Satyendra Nath Bose

Indian physicist who with Albert Einstein proposed statistical laws based on the indistinguishability of particles; led to the description of fundamental particles that later came to be known as bosons

— Princeton's WordNet

saxe-gothea

Saxe-gothea, Saxegothea, genus Saxe-gothea, genus Saxegothea

one species: Prince Albert's yew

— Princeton's WordNet

saxegothea

Saxe-gothea, Saxegothea, genus Saxe-gothea, genus Saxegothea

one species: Prince Albert's yew

— Princeton's WordNet

oratory

oratory

1. Chin-music with Prince Albert accompaniment.

2. The lullaby of the Intellect.

3. Palaver in a Prince Albert.

— The Roycroft Dictionary

CareCloud

CareCloud

CareCloud is a healthcare IT company founded with the mission of revolutionizing the healthcare experience through web-based software and services. The company was founded in 2009 by Albert Santalo, an experienced technologist and entrepreneur. CareCloud provides cloud-based medical practice management software to physicians and other healthcare providers, as well as a comprehensive revenue cycle management service for medical practices that choose to outsource their billing and collections. The company is currently developing an electronic medical record (EMR) system and an integrated app for the iPad.CareCloud™s vision treats healthcare and its participants as an ecosystem " an integrated environment where all participants share a common commitment of reducing inefficiencies and providing excellence in healthcare.

— CrunchBase

PowerMag

PowerMag

Robert Albertson, a well-known inventor with over 200 patents and 38 successful commercial product development cycles to date, has been active in continuing the work of Dr. Nikola Tesla. Tesla's inventions, including patents for the commercial use of alternating current (AC) electricity, rivaled Albert Einstein and Thomas Edison for their accomplishments in the electrical field.

— CrunchBase

Ernst, Elector of Saxony

Ernst, Elector of Saxony

founder of the Ernestine line of Saxon princes, ancestor of Prince Consort, born at Altenburg; was kidnapped along with his brother Albert in 1455, an episode famous in German history as the "Prinzenraub" (i. e. the stealing of the prince); succeeded his father in 1464; annexed Thüringia in 1482, and three years later shared his territory with his brother Albert (1441-1486).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Foley, John Henry

Foley, John Henry

an eminent sculptor, born in Dublin; his first success was achieved in a series of classical figures, including some Shakespearian subjects; statues of Hampden, Burke, J. S. Mill, Goldsmith, &c., brought him further fame, and he was commissioned by the Queen to execute the figure of Prince Albert in the Albert Memorial; his vigour and genius were further revealed in the noble equestrian statues of Hardinge and Outram (1818-1874).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Nile

Nile

the longest river of Africa, and one of the most noted in the world's history; the Shimiyu, Isanga, and other streams which flow into Victoria Nyanza from the S. are regarded as its ultimate head-waters; from Victoria Nyanza, the Victoria Nile or Somerset River holds a north-westerly course to Albert Nyanza, whence it issues under the name of the Bahr-el-Jebel, swelled by the waters of the Semliki from Albert Edward Nyanza; about 650 m. N. it is joined by the Bahr-el-Ghazal from the W., and bending to the E., now under the name White Nile, receives on that side the Sobat, and as a sluggish navigable stream flows past Fashoda on to Khartoum, where it is met by the Bahr-al-Azrak or Blue Nile; 200 m. lower it receives the Atbara or Black Nile. Through Egypt the river's course is confined to a valley some 10 m. broad, which owes its great fertility to the alluvial deposits left by the river during it annual overflow (July to October, caused by seasonal rains in Abyssinia, &c.). From Khartoum to Assouan occur the cataracts; below this the stream is navigable. A few miles N. of Cairo begins the delta which lies within the Rosetta and Damietta—two main branches of the divided river—and is some 150 m. broad at its base. From Victoria Nyanza to the coast the river measures about 3400 m.

Nilsson, Christine

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Victoria, Alexandrina

Victoria, Alexandrina

Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Empress of India, born at Kensington Palace, the only child of the Duke of Kent, fourth son of George III., who died in 1820, leaving her an infant eight months old; educated under the eye of her mother with special regard to her prospective destiny as Queen; proclaimed, on the death of William IV., on 20th June 1837; crowned at Westminster 28th June 1838; married Prince Albert 10th February 1840; in 1877 added "Empress of India" to her titles; during 1861 became a widow through the death of Prince Albert. Her reign was long and prosperous; 1887 being celebrated as her "Jubilee" year, and 1897 as her "Diamond Jubilee"; was the mother of four sons and five daughters; had grandchildren and great-grandchildren, William II., Emperor of Germany, being a grandchild, and Nicholas II., Czar of Russia, being married to another; b. 1819; died at Osborne, Isle of Wight, Jan. 22, 1901.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Albert Bushnell Hart

Albert Bushnell Hart

Albert Bushnell Hart, Ph.D., was an American historian, writer, and teacher. One of the first generation of professionally trained historians in the United States, a prolific author and editor of historical works, Albert Bushnell Hart became, as Samuel Eliot Morison described him, "The Grand Old Man" of American history, looking the part with his "patriarchal full beard and flowing moustaches."

— Freebase

Albert Canal

Albert Canal

The Albert Canal is a canal located in northeastern Belgium, named after King Albert I of Belgium. It connects the major cities Antwerp and Liège and the Meuse and Scheldt rivers, as well as the Canal Dessel-Turnhout-Schoten. It has a depth of 3.4 metres, a free height of 6.7 metres and a total length of 129.5 kilometres. The maximum capacity is a barge of 10,000 tons. Between Antwerp and Liège, there is a height difference of 56 metres, and a total of 6 canal locks were needed to overcome the difference in elevation. Five canal locks each have a height difference of 10 metres, located in Genk, Diepenbeek, Hasselt, Kwaadmechelen and Olen, while the canal lock at Wijnegem has a height difference of 5.45 metres. In the 1930s, it took about 7 days to travel from Antwerp to Liege over water. These days the same distance is covered in 18 hours. Since the completion of the Rhine-Main-Danube Canal in 1992, a barge can now travel from Antwerp all the way across Europe to the Black Sea.

— Freebase

Albert sauce

Albert sauce

Albert sauce is a sauce used principally in British cuisine to enhance the flavour of braised beef. It consists of grated horseradish in a clear bouillon, thickened with cream and egg yolks, and spiced with a little prepared mustard diluted in vinegar. It is named after Prince Albert, Queen Victoria's prince consort.

— Freebase

Albert Verwey

Albert Verwey

Albert Verwey was a Dutch poet associated with the "Movement of Eighty". Albert Verwey was born May 15, 1865, Amsterdam, Neth. Died March 8, 1937, Noordwijk aan Zee. He was a Dutch poet, scholar, and literary historian who played an important role in the literary life of The Netherlands in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Verwey began to write poetry early in life, and his first book of poems, Persephone, was published in 1883. He was a cofounder in 1885 of the periodical De nieuwe gids, which was one of the chief organs of the Dutch literary revival of the 1880s. Verwey contributed sonnets and other poems to this periodical.

— Freebase

Albertus Magnus

Albertus Magnus

Albertus Magnus, O.P., also known as Albert the Great and Albert of Cologne, is a Catholic saint. He was a German Dominican friar and a bishop. Those such as James A. Weisheipl and Joachim R. Söder have referred to him as the greatest German philosopher and theologian of the Middle Ages, an opinion supported by contemporaries such as Roger Bacon. The Catholic Church honours him as a Doctor of the Church, one of only 35 persons with that honor.

— Freebase

Cross-reference

Cross-reference

The term cross-reference can refer to either: ⁕An instance within a document which refers to related information elsewhere in the same document. In both printed and online dictionaries cross-references are important because they form a network structure of relations existing between different parts of data, dictionary-internal as well as dictionary external. ⁕In an index, a cross reference is often denoted by See also. For example, under the term Albert Einstein in the index of a book about Nobel Laureates, there may be the cross-reference See also: Einstein, Albert. ⁕In hypertext, cross-referencing is maintained to a document with either in-context or out-of-context cross-referencing. These are similar to KWIC and KWOC. ⁕In programming, "cross-referencing" means a listing of every named identifier. ⁕In a relational database management system, a table can have an xref as prefix or suffix to indicate it is a cross-reference table that joins two or more tables together via primary key.

— Freebase

Monaco

Monaco

Monaco, officially the Principality of Monaco, is a sovereign city-state, located on the French Riviera in Western Europe. Bordered by France on three sides, one side borders the Mediterranean Sea. It has an area of 2.02 km², and a population of 36,371, making Monaco the second smallest, and the most densely populated country in the world. Monaco has a land border of only 4.4 km, a coastline of 4.1 km, and a width that varies between 1,700 and 349 m. The highest point in the country is a narrow pathway named Chemin des Révoires on the slopes of Mont Agel, in the Les Révoires district, which is 161 metres above sea level. Monaco's most populous Quartier is Monte Carlo, and the most populous Ward is Larvotto/Bas Moulins. Monaco is known for its land reclamation, which has increased its size by an estimated 20%. Monaco is a principality governed under a form of constitutional monarchy, with Prince Albert II as head of state. Even though Prince Albert II is a constitutional monarch, he still has immense political power. The House of Grimaldi have ruled Monaco, with brief interruptions, since 1297. The official language is French, but Monégasque, Italian, and English are widely spoken and understood. The state's sovereignty was officially recognized by the Franco-Monegasque Treaty of 1861, with Monaco becoming a full United Nations voting member in 1993. Despite Monaco's independence and separate foreign policy, its defence is the responsibility of France. However, Monaco does maintain two small military units.

— Freebase

Balmoral Castle

Balmoral Castle

Balmoral Castle is a large estate house in Royal Deeside, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. It is located near the village of Crathie, 6.2 miles west of Ballater and 6.8 miles east of Braemar. Balmoral has been one of the residences of the British Royal Family since 1852, when it was purchased by Queen Victoria and her consort, Prince Albert. It remains the private property of the monarch, and is not part of the Crown Estate. Soon after the estate was purchased the existing house was found to be too small. It was demolished, and the current Balmoral Castle was completed in 1856. The architect was William Smith of Aberdeen, although his designs were amended by Prince Albert. The castle is an example of Scots Baronial architecture, and is classified by Historic Scotland as a category A listed building. The Balmoral Estate has been added to by successive members of the Royal Family, and now covers an area of about 49,000 acres. It is a working estate, including grouse moors, forestry and farmland, as well as managed herds of deer, Highland cattle and ponies.

— Freebase

Scrooge

Scrooge

Scrooge is a 1970 musical film adaptation of Charles Dickens' classic 1843 story, A Christmas Carol. It was filmed in London, directed by Ronald Neame, and starred Albert Finney in the title role. The film's musical score was composed by Leslie Bricusse, and arranged and conducted by Ian Fraser. With eleven musical arrangements interspersed throughout, the award-winning motion picture is a faithful musical retelling of the original, with one exception noted below. The film received limited praise, but Albert Finney won the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor in a Musical/Comedy in 1971. The film received four Academy Award nominations. It is the only live-action version of the story to be nominated for Oscars.

— Freebase

Bismark, Germany

Bismark, Germany

Bismark is a town in the Stendal district, in the historic Altmark region of northern Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. It is situated approximately 22 km west of Stendal. In the early 12th century the area then under the rule of Albert the Bear was settled with peasants descending from the Low Countries. The town's name is derived from the nearby Biese creek, a tributary of the Aland; though it may also refer to the bishop's march, a possession of the Havelberg bishops mentioned in a 1209 deed issued by the Ascanian margrave Albert II. With the Altmark, Bismark was part of the Margraviate of Brandenburg until it was adjudicated to the Prussian Province of Saxony after the 1815 Congress of Vienna. One Herbordus of Bismarck was mentioned holding the office of a Schultheiß in Stendal about 1270. His descendant Otto von Bismarck received the honorary citizenship of Bismark in 1895. Upon an administrative reform effective from 1 January 2010, the town of Bismark comprises the former municipalities of Badingen, Berkau, Büste, Dobberkau, Garlipp, Grassau, Hohenwulsch, Holzhausen, Käthen, Kläden, Könnigde, Kremkau, Meßdorf, Querstedt, Schäplitz, Schernikau, Schorstedt and Steinfeld.

— Freebase

Eras

Eras

Eras is a humanist sans-serif typeface designed by Albert Boton and Albert Hollenstein, and released by the International Typeface Corporation in 1976. Eras is licensed by the Linotype type foundry. A distinct and curious feature of Eras is its slight, 3-degree right tilt. Eras follows ITC's formulary of increased x-height, and multiple weights from light to ultra bold, though because all weights are slightly slanted, no italic version of the font is supplied. Eras is further distinct for its open bowls on the characters a, P, R, 6, and 9. The letter W changes shape from a merged 'double V' shape in the lighter variants to the standard W symbol in the bolder variants. The typeface is widely used by Telecom Italia Mobile as a corporate typeface It was also used in the emblem and image of the 1998 FIFA World Cup, in the credits for the movie Caddyshack and in the video game Tekken Tag Tournament. The American Broadcasting Company network used the font in its on-air promotion graphics during the early to mid-1980s. It is widely seen in the humorous e-cards distributed through social networking. Four TrueType weights of this font are included with some editions of Microsoft Word, though not with the Windows OS itself

— Freebase

Prince Albert National Park

Prince Albert National Park

Prince Albert National Park encompasses 3,874 square kilometres in central Saskatchewan, Canada and is located 200 kilometres north of Saskatoon. Though declared a national park March 24, 1927, it had its official opening ceremonies on August 10, 1928 performed by Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King. The park is open all year but the most visited period is from May to September. Although named for the city, the park's main entrance is actually 80 km north of Prince Albert via Highways 2 and 263 which enters the park at its southeast corner. Two additional secondary highways enter the park: No. 264, which branches off Hwy. 2 just east of the Waskesiu townside, and No. 240, which enters the park from the south and links with 263 just outside the entry fee-collection gates. The park ranges in elevation from 488 metres on the western side to 724 metres on the eastern side. Waskesiu is the only town within the park, located on the southern shore of Waskesiu Lake. Most facilities and services one would expect to find in a multi-use park are available, such as souvenir shops, small grocery stores, gas station, laundromat, restaurants, hotels and motels, rental cabins, a small movie theatre, Royal Canadian Mounted Police detachment, camp grounds, three marinas, many beaches, picnic areas, tennis courts and lawn bowling greens. The facilities and services combine recreational and nature experiences. Notably, the park contains the Waskesiu Golf Course designed by famed golf course architect Stanley Thompson who also designed the course in Banff National Park.

— Freebase

Big Fish

Big Fish

Big Fish is a 2003 American fantasy adventure film based on the 1998 novel of the same name by Daniel Wallace. The film was directed by Tim Burton and stars Ewan McGregor, Albert Finney, Billy Crudup, Jessica Lange, and Marion Cotillard. Other roles are performed by Helena Bonham Carter, Matthew McGrory, and Danny DeVito among others. Finney plays Edward Bloom, a former traveling salesman from the Southern United States with a gift for storytelling, now confined to his deathbed. Bloom's estranged son, a journalist played by Crudup, attempts to mend their relationship as his dying father relates tall tales of his eventful life as a young adult, played by Ewan McGregor. Screenwriter John August read a manuscript of the novel six months before it was published and convinced Columbia Pictures to acquire the rights. August began adapting the novel while producers negotiated with Steven Spielberg who planned to direct after finishing Minority Report. Spielberg considered Jack Nicholson for the role of Edward Bloom, but eventually dropped the project to focus on Catch Me If You Can. Tim Burton and Richard D. Zanuck took over after completing Planet of the Apes and brought Ewan McGregor and Albert Finney on board.

— Freebase

Albert Schweitzer

Albert Schweitzer

Albert Schweitzer, OM was a German—and later French—theologian, musician, philosopher, physician, and medical missionary in Africa best known for his interpretive life of Jesus. He was born in the province of Alsace-Lorraine, at that time part of the German Empire. Schweitzer, a Lutheran, challenged both the secular view of Jesus as depicted by historical-critical methodology current at his time in certain academic circles, as well as the traditional Christian view. He depicted Jesus as one who literally believed the end of the world was coming in his own lifetime and believed himself to be a world savior. He received the 1952 Nobel Peace Prize for his philosophy of "Reverence for Life", expressed in many ways, but most famously in founding and sustaining the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, now in Gabon, west central Africa. As a music scholar and organist, he studied the music of German composer Johann Sebastian Bach and influenced the Organ reform movement.

— Freebase

Foreign Correspondent

Foreign Correspondent

Foreign Correspondent is a 1940 American spy thriller film directed by Alfred Hitchcock which tells the story of an American reporter who tries to expose enemy spies in Britain, a series of events involving a continent-wide conspiracy that eventually leads to the events of a fictionalized World War II. It stars Joel McCrea and features Laraine Day, Herbert Marshall, George Sanders, Albert Bassermann and Robert Benchley, along with Edmund Gwenn. The film was Hitchcock's second Hollywood production since leaving the United Kingdom in 1939 and had an unusually large number of writers: Robert Benchley, Charles Bennett, Harold Clurman, Joan Harrison, Ben Hecht, James Hilton, John Howard Lawson, John Lee Mahin, Richard Maibaum, and Budd Schulberg, with Bennett, Benchley, Harrison, and Hilton the only writers credited in the finished film. It was based on Vincent Sheean's political memoir Personal History, the rights to which were purchased by producer Walter Wanger for $10,000. The film was one of two Hitchcock films nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture in 1941, the other being Rebecca, which went on to win the award. Foreign Correspondent was nominated for six Academy Awards, including one for Albert Bassermann for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor, but did not win any.

— Freebase

Participatory economics

Participatory economics

Participatory economics, often abbreviated parecon, is an economic system proposed in the 1990s primarily by activist and political theorist Michael Albert and radical economist Robin Hahnel, among others. It uses participatory decision making as an economic mechanism to guide the production, consumption and allocation of resources in a given society. Proposed as an alternative to contemporary capitalist market economies and also an alternative to centrally planned state-socialism, it is described as "an anarchistic economic vision", and is a form of socialism, since in a parecon the means of production are owned in common. The underlying values that parecon seeks to implement are equity, solidarity, diversity, workers' self-management and efficiency. It proposes to attain these ends mainly through the following principles and institutions: ⁕workers' and consumers' councils utilizing self-managerial methods for making decisions ⁕balanced job complexes ⁕remuneration according to effort and sacrifice ⁕participatory planning Albert and Hahnel stress that parecon is only meant to address an alternative economic theory and must be accompanied by equally important alternative visions in the fields of politics, culture and kinship. The authors have also discussed elements of anarchism in the field of politics, polyculturalism in the field of culture, and feminism in the field of family and gender relations as being possible foundations for future alternative visions in these other spheres of society. Stephen R. Shalom has begun work on a participatory political vision he calls "par polity". Both systems together make up the political philosophy of Participism, which has significantly informed the interim International Organization for a Participatory Society.

— Freebase

Rockne

Rockne

The Rockne was an American automobile brand produced by the Studebaker Corporation of South Bend, Indiana from 1932-1933. The brand was named for University of Notre Dame football coach Knute Rockne. Discussions between Studebaker and Knute Rockne began in 1928. Rockne was offered a high-visibility job by Studebaker president Albert Erskine. Studebaker planned for a durable, inexpensive car. The Rockne would replace the slow-selling, unduly expensive Erskine car. There were two prototypes that some would consider 1931 Rocknes. In 1930, Ralph Vail and Roy Cole operated an engineering/consulting firm in Detroit. Willys-Overland commissioned them to design a new small six and build two prototypes. Upon presenting the two vehicles to W-O the independent designers/engineers where told W-O was on the verge of bankruptcy and they could do what they wanted with the cars, one a sedan, one a coupe. Vail stopped in South Bend and demonstrated the car to Albert Erskine. Erskine bought the design that day and both Vail and Cole would be brought into the Studebaker organization. The Rockne moniker was a later adoption so, technically, there were no 1931 Rocknes. On March 31, 1931, 12 days after being appointed manager of sales promotion, Knute Rockne was killed in an airplane crash. In September, 1931, George M. Graham, formerly of Willys-Overland, was named sales manager of the new Rockne Motor Corporation. Two models were approved for production, the "65" on 110 in wheelbase and the "75" on a 114 in wheelbase. The "75" was based on the Studebaker Six, while the "65" was based on designs by Vail and Cole, the two engineers under contract for Willys-Overland. The "75" was designed under Studebaker's head of engineering, Delmar "Barney" Roos.

— Freebase

Lake Albert

Lake Albert

Lake Albert – also Albert Nyanza and formerly Lake Mobutu Sese Seko – is one of the African Great Lakes. It is Africa's seventh-largest lake, and the world's twenty-seventh largest lake by volume.

— Freebase

Tiefland

Tiefland

Tiefland is an opera in a prologue and three acts by Eugen d'Albert, to a libretto in German by Rudolph Lothar. Based on the 1896 Catalan play Terra baixa by Àngel Guimerà, Tiefland was d'Albert's seventh opera, and is the one which is now the best known.

— Freebase

King Albert

King Albert

King Albert is a solitaire card game using a deck of 52 playing cards. It is said to be named after King Albert of Belgium the first. It is the best known of the three games that are each called Idiot's Delight because of the low chance of winning the game.

— Freebase

South Kensington

South Kensington

South Kensington is in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London. It is a built-up area 2.4 miles west- south-west of Charing Cross. It is hard to define boundaries for South Kensington, but a common definition is the commercial area around the tube station and the adjacent garden squares and streets. The smaller neighbourhood around Gloucester Road tube station can also be considered a part, and Albertopolis around Exhibition Road, which includes the Natural History Museum, the Science Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum and Baden-Powell House. Other institutions such as the Royal Albert Hall, Imperial College London, the Royal Geographical Society, the Royal College of Art, the Royal College of Music are within the City of Westminster, but considered to be in South Kensington. Although the postcode SW7 mainly covers South Kensington, some parts of Knightsbridge are also covered. Neighbouring the equally affluent centres of Knightsbridge, Chelsea and Kensington, South Kensington covers some of the most exclusive real estate in the world. It is home to large numbers of French expatriates, but also Spanish, Italian, American, and Middle-Eastern citizens. A significant French presence is evidenced by the location of the consulate, the Lycée Français Charles de Gaulle - a large French secondary school opposite the Natural History Museum - and the French Institute, home to a French cinema. There are several French bookshops and cafes in the area.

— Freebase

Photo-electricity

Photo-electricity

The development of electrical properties by exposure to light. Crystals of fluor spar are electrified not only by heat (see Pyro-electricity) but also by exposure to sunlight or to the light of the voltaic arc.

[Transcribers note: Although first observed in 1839 by Becquerel, it was not explained until 1905 by Albert Einstein with the introduction of photons.]

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

baz

baz

1. [common] The third metasyntactic variable “Suppose we have three functions: FOO, BAR, and BAZ. FOO calls BAR, which calls BAZ....” (See also fum) 2. interj. A term of mild annoyance. In this usage the term is often drawn out for 2 or 3 seconds, producing an effect not unlike the bleating of a sheep; /baaaaaaz/. 3. Occasionally appended to foo to produce ‘foobaz’.Earlier versions of this lexicon derived baz as a Stanford corruption of bar. However, Pete Samson (compiler of the TMRC lexicon) reports it was already current when he joined TMRC in 1958. He says “It came from Pogo. Albert the Alligator, when vexed or outraged, would shout ‘Bazz Fazz!’ or ‘Rowrbazzle!’ The club layout was said to model the (mythical) New England counties of Rowrfolk and Bassex (Rowrbazzle mingled with (Norfolk/Suffolk/Middlesex/Essex).”

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Achilles of Germany

Achilles of Germany

Albert, third elector of Brandenburg, "fiery, tough old gentleman, of formidable talent for fighting in his day; a very blazing, far-seen character," says Carlyle (1414-1486).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Albrecht

Albrecht

. See Albert.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

Alfred, Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

son of Prince Albert and Queen Victoria; b. 1844.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Altdor`fer, Albrecht

Altdor`fer, Albrecht

a German painter and engraver, a distinguished pupil of Albert Dürer, and as a painter, inspired with his spirit; his "Battle of Arbela" adorns the Münich Picture Gallery (1488-1538).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Apostles, The Four

Apostles, The Four

picture of St. John, St. Peter, St. Mark, and St. Paul, in the museum at Münich, painted by Albert Dürer.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Baker, Sir Samuel White

Baker, Sir Samuel White

a man of enterprise and travel, born in London; discovered the Albert Nyanza; commanded an expedition under the Khedive into the Soudan; wrote an account of it in a book, "Ismailia"; visited Cyprus and travelled over India; left a record of his travels in five volumes with different titles (1821-1893).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Butt, Clara

Butt, Clara

operatic singer, born in Sussex; made her début in London at the Albert Hall in the "Golden Legend," and in "Orfeo" at the Lyceum, ever since which appearances she has been much in demand as a singer; b. 1872.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Cibrario, Luigi

Cibrario, Luigi

an Italian historian and statesman, born at Turin; he held office under Charles Albert of Sardinia (1802-1870).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Edward VII.

Edward VII.

king of Great Britain and Ireland and "all the British Dominions beyond the Seas," born 9th November 1841, succeeded his mother, Queen Victoria, 22nd Jan. 1901. On 10th March 1863 he married Princess Alexandra, eldest daughter of Christian IX. of Denmark, and has four surviving children: George, Prince of Wales, b. 1865; Louise, Duchess of Fife, b. 1867; Victoria, b. 1868; and Maud, b. 1869, who married Prince Charles of Denmark. The king's eldest son, Albert Victor, b. 1864, died January 14, 1892.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Frogmore

Frogmore

a royal palace and mausoleum in Windsor Park, the burial-place of Prince Albert.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Gioberti, Vincenzo

Gioberti, Vincenzo

an Italian philosophical and political writer, born at Turin; in 1825 he was appointed to the chair of Theology in his native city, and in 1831 chaplain to the Court of Charles Albert of Sardinia; two years later was exiled on a charge of complicity in the plots of the Young Italy party, and till 1847 remained abroad, chiefly in Brussels, busy with his pen on literary, philosophical, and political subjects; in 1848 he was welcomed back to Italy, and shortly afterwards rose to be Prime Minister of a short-lived government; his later years were spent in diplomatic work at Paris; in philosophy he reveals Platonic tendencies, while his political ideal was a confederated Italy, with the Pope at the head and the king of Sardinia as military guardian (1801-1852).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Hapsburg

Hapsburg

or Habsburg, House of, a famous royal house which has played a leading part in the history of Continental Europe from its foundation in the 12th century by Albert, Count of Hapsburg, and which is represented to-day by the Imperial family of Austria. Representatives of this family wore the Imperial crown of the Holy Roman Empire for centuries. It takes its name from the castle of Habsburg or Habichtaburg, on the Aar, built by Werner, bishop of Strasburg, in the 11th century, a castle, however, which has long since ceased to be in the possession of the family.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Kensington

Kensington

a West London parish, in which stand the Palace (Queen Victoria's birthplace), the Albert Memorial and Hall, South Kensington Museum, the Royal College of Music, the Imperial Institute, and many other institutions: contains also Holland House, and has long been the place of residence of notably artistic and literary men.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Nyanza, Albert

Nyanza, Albert

. See Albert Nyanza.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Radetzky, Johann, Count von

Radetzky, Johann, Count von

Austrian field-marshal, born in Bohemia; entered the Austrian army in 1784; distinguished himself in the war with Turkey in 1788-89, and in all the wars of Austria with France; checked the Revolution in Lombardy in 1848; defeated and almost annihilated the Piedmontese army under Charles Albert in 1849, and compelled Venice to capitulate in the same year, after which he was appointed Governor of Lombardy (1766-1858).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Steel, Sir John

Steel, Sir John

sculptor, born at Aberdeen; studied at Edinburgh and Rome; made his mark in 1832 by a model of a statue, "Alexander and Bucephalus," and soon took rank with the foremost and busiest sculptors of his day; his works are mostly to be found in Edinburgh, and include the equestrian statue of Wellington, statues of Sir Walter Scott (in the Scott Monument), Professor Wilson, Dr. Chalmers, Allan Ramsay, etc.; the splendid figure of Queen Victoria over the Royal Institution gained him the appointment (1844) of sculptor to Her Majesty in Scotland, and on the unveiling of his fine equestrian statue of Prince Albert in 1876 he was created a knight (1804-1891).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Stockmar, Baron de

Stockmar, Baron de

statesman, born at Coburg; bred to medicine, became physician to Leopold I. of Belgium, and at length his adviser; was adviser also of Queen Victoria before her accession; accompanied Prince Albert to Italy before his marriage, and joined him thereafter in England as the trusted friend of both the queen and him; he had two political ideals—a united Germany under Prussia, and unity of purpose between Germany and England (1757-1863).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Succession Wars

Succession Wars

the general title of several European wars which arose in the 18th century consequent on a failure of issue in certain royal lines, most important of which are (1) War of the Spanish Succession (1701-1713). The death (1700) of Charles II. of Spain without direct issue caused Louis XIV. of France and the Emperor Leopold I. (the former married to the elder sister of Charles, the latter to the younger sister, and both grandsons of Philip III. of Spain) to put forth claims to the crown, the one on behalf of his grandson, Philip of Anjou, the other for his second son, the Archduke Charles. War broke out on the entry of Philip into Madrid and his assumption of the crown, England and the United Netherlands uniting with the emperor to curb the ambition of Louis. During the long struggle the transcendent military genius of Marlborough asserted itself in the great victories of Blenheim, Ramillies, and Oudenarde, but the lukewarmness of England in the struggle, the political fall of Marlborough, and the Tory vote for peace prevented the allies reaping the full benefit of their successes. The Treaty of Utrecht (1713) left Philip in possession of his Spanish kingdom, but the condition was exacted that the crowns of Spain and France should not be united. The emperor (the Archduke Charles since 1711) attempted to carry on the struggle, but was forced to sign the Treaty of Rastadt (1714), acknowledging Philip king of Spain. Spain, however, ceded her Netherlands Sardinia, &c., to the emperor, while Gibraltar, Minorca, and parts of North America fell to England. (2) War of the Austrian Succession (1740-1748) followed on the death (1740) of the Emperor Charles VI. without male issue. His daughter, Maria Theresa, entered into possession of Bohemia, Hungary, and the Archduchy of Austria, but was immediately attacked by the Elector Charles Albert of Bavaria and Augustus of Saxony and Poland, both rival claimants for the imperial crown, while Frederick II. of Prussia seized the opportunity of Maria's embarrassment to annex Silesia. France, Spain, and England were drawn into the struggle, the last in support of Maria. Success oscillated from side to side, but the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, which brought the war to a close, left Maria pretty well in possession of her inheritance save the loss of Silesia to Frederick.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Teck

Teck

a German principality, named after a castle which crowns an eminence called "The Teck," in the Swabian Alb, 20 m. SE. of Stuttgart, conferred in 1868 on Duke Albert of Würtemberg's son, who in 1866 married the Princess Mary of Cambridge; their daughter, Princess May, became in 1893 the Duchess of York.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Unyoro

Unyoro

a native State of Central Africa, between Lake Albert Nyanza and the territory of Uganda.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Victor Emmanuel II.

Victor Emmanuel II.

king of Sardinia, and afterwards of united Italy, born in Turin, eldest son of Charles Albert; became king in 1849 on the abdication of his father; distinguished himself in the war against Austria, adding Austrian Lombardy and Tuscany to his dominions, and by the help of Garibaldi, Naples and Sicily, till in 1861 he was proclaimed King of Italy, and in 1870 he entered Rome as his capital city (1820-1878).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Victoria Nyanza

Victoria Nyanza

a lake in East Central Africa, on the Equator, is about the size of Ireland, 300 m. long and 20 m. broad, at an elevation of 3500 ft. above the sea-level; discovered by Captain Speke in 1858, and circumnavigated by Stanley in 1875; is regarded as the head-source of the Nile, the waters of it flowing through Albert Nyanza 80 m. to the N., between which two lakes lies the territory of Uganda.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Wends

Wends

a horde of savage Slavs who, about the 6th century, invaded and took possession of vacant lands on the southern shores of the Baltic, and extended their inroads as far as Hamburg and the ocean, south also far over the Elbe in some quarters, and were a source of great trouble to the Germans in Henry the Fowler's time, and after; they burst in upon Brandenburg once, in "never-imagined fury," and stamped out, as they thought, the Christian religion there by wholesale butchery of its priests, setting up for worship their own god "Triglaph, ugliest and stupidest of all false gods," described as "something like three whales' cubs combined by boiling, or a triple porpoise dead-drunk." They were at length "fairly beaten to powder" by Albert the Bear, "and either swept away or else damped down into Christianity and keeping of the peace," though remnants of them, with their language and customs, exist in Lusatia to this day.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

White Nile

White Nile

one of the two streams forming the Nile, which flows out of the Albert Nyanza, and which unites with the Blue Nile from Abyssinia near Khartoum.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Yeshiva University

Yeshiva University

Yeshiva University is a private university in New York City, with six campuses in New York and one in Israel. Founded in 1886, it is a research university. Yeshiva University’s undergraduate schools—Yeshiva College, Stern College for Women, and Syms School of Business— "offer a unique dual curriculum inspired by Modern-Centrist-Orthodox Judaism's hashkafa of Torah Umadda combining the finest, contemporary academic education with the timeless teachings of Torah.” Yeshiva is perhaps best known for its secular, highly selective graduate schools, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. Yeshiva University is an independent institution chartered by New York State. It is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools and by several professional agencies.

— Freebase

Maxime

Maxime

Maxime is a 1958 French drama film directed by Henri Verneuil who co-wrote screenplay with Henri Jeanson and Albert Valentin. It based on novel by Henri Duvernois. The film stars Michèle Morgan, Charles Boyer, Arletty and Jane Marken. It tells the story of an ageing roue, a rich man and a lovely woman.

— Freebase

Albert B. Fall

Albert B. Fall

Albert Bacon Fall was a United States Senator from New Mexico and the Secretary of the Interior under President Warren G. Harding, infamous for his involvement in the Teapot Dome scandal.

— Freebase

Albert Barnes

Albert Barnes

Albert Barnes was an American theologian, born in Rome, New York. He graduated from Hamilton College, Clinton, New York, in 1820, and from Princeton Theological Seminary in 1823. Barnes was ordained as a Presbyterian minister by the presbytery of Elizabethtown, New Jersey, in 1825, and was the pastor successively of the Presbyterian Church in Morristown, New Jersey, and of the First Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia.

— Freebase

Albert J. Beveridge

Albert J. Beveridge

Albert Jeremiah Beveridge was an American historian and United States Senator from Indiana.

— Freebase

Albert Bierstadt

Albert Bierstadt

Albert Bierstadt was a German-American painter best known for his lavish, sweeping landscapes of the American West. In obtaining the subject matter for these works, Bierstadt joined several journeys of the Westward Expansion. Though not the first artist to record these sites, Bierstadt was the foremost painter of these scenes for the remainder of the 19th century. Bierstadt was part of the Hudson River School, not an institution but rather an informal group of like-minded painters. The Hudson River School style involved carefully detailed paintings with romantic, almost glowing lighting, sometimes called luminism. An important interpreter of the western landscape, Bierstadt, along with Thomas Moran, is also grouped with the Rocky Mountain School.

— Freebase

Albert Paine

Albert Paine

Albert Bigelow Paine was an American author and biographer best known for his work with Mark Twain. Paine was a member of the Pulitzer Prize Committee and wrote in several genres, including fiction, humour, and verse.

— Freebase

Albert C. Barnes

Albert C. Barnes

Albert Coombs Barnes was an American physician and chemist, businessman, art collector, writer, and educator, the founder of the Barnes Foundation in Lower Merion, Pennsylvania. With a fortune made from the development of the antiseptic drug Argyrol, used to treat gonorrhea; a business to promote it; and the well-timed sale of his company in 1929, in his 30s Barnes began to study and collect art. He acquired his first 20 pieces by commissioning his friend, the artist William Glackens, to buy modern work for him in Paris. After selling his business, he devoted himself to the study and collecting of art. In 1922, Barnes established the Barnes Foundation, an educational institution, and housed his collection in a mansion built for that purpose in Lower Merion, Pennsylvania. It was an educational institution based on his private collection of art, which was hung according to his theories of aesthetics and without curatorial commentary. The collection has numerous paintings by Impressionist, Post-Impressionist and Modernist masters, as well as furniture, ancient artifacts, and highly crafted objects from different time periods. He created numerous restrictions to limit the number of visitors and intended to attract students.

— Freebase

Albert Claude

Albert Claude

Albert Claude was a Belgian biologist who shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1974 with Christian de Duve and George Emil Palade. He studied engineering, and then medicine. During the winter of 1928-29 he worked in Berlin, first at the Institut für Krebsforschung, and then at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Biology, Dahlem. In the summer of 1929 he joined the Rockefeller Institute. While working at Rockefeller University in the 1930s and 1940s, he used the electron microscope to make images of cells which deepened the scientific understanding of cellular structure and function. He discovered the chloroplasts in the cell. In 1930, Claude discovered the process of cell fractionation, which was groundbreaking in his time. The process consists of grinding up cells to break the membrane and release the cell's contents. Claude then filtered out the cell membranes and placed the remaining cell contents in a centrifuge to separate them according to mass. He divided the centrifuged contents into fractions, each of a specific mass, and discovered that particular fractions were responsible for particular cell functions.

— Freebase

Albert Fert

Albert Fert

Albert Fert is a French physicist and one of the discoverers of giant magnetoresistance which brought about a breakthrough in gigabyte hard disks. Currently, he is an emeritus professor at Université Paris-Sud in Orsay and scientific director of a joint laboratory between the Centre national de la recherche scientifique and Thales Group. Also, he is an Adjunct professor of physics at Michigan State University. He was awarded the 2007 Nobel Prize in Physics together with Peter Grünberg.

— Freebase

Albert Johnson

Albert Johnson

Albert Johnson was a Canadian amateur football (soccer) player who competed in the 1904 Summer Olympics.. In 1904 he was a member of the Galt F.C. team, which won the gold medal in the football tournament. He played all two matches as a midfielder.

— Freebase

Albert François Lebrun

Albert François Lebrun

Albert François Lebrun was a French politician, President of France from 1932 to 1940. He was the last president of the Third Republic. He was a member of the center-right Democratic Republican Alliance.

— Freebase

Albert Meyer

Albert Meyer

Albert Meyer was a Swiss politician, editor of Neue Zürcher Zeitung and member of the Swiss Federal Council. He was elected to the Swiss Federal Council on 12 December 1929 and handed over office on 31 December 1938. He was affiliated to the Free Democratic Party. During his time in office he held the Department of Home Affairs from 1930 to 1934 and the Department of Finance from 1934 to 1938 and was President of the Confederation in 1936.

— Freebase

Albert Pinkham Ryder

Albert Pinkham Ryder

Albert Pinkham Ryder was an American painter best known for his poetic and moody allegorical works and seascapes, as well as his eccentric personality. While his art shared an emphasis on subtle variations of color with tonalist works of the time, it was unique for accentuating form in a way that some art historians regard as modernist.

— Freebase

Albert Reynolds

Albert Reynolds

Albert Reynolds is a former Irish politician who was twice Taoiseach of Ireland, serving from February 1992 to January 1993 and again from January 1993 to December 1994. The first term as head of a Fianna Fáil-Progressive Democrats coalition, and the second time as head of a Fianna Fáil-Labour Party coalition. He was the fifth leader of Fianna Fáil during the same period. He has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. Reynolds was first elected to Dáil Éireann as a TD for Longford–Westmeath in 1977, and was re-elected at each election until his retirement in 2002. He previously served as Minister for Finance, Minister for Industry and Commerce, Minister for Industry and Energy, Minister for Transport and Minister for Posts and Telegraphs.

— Freebase

Albert Roussel

Albert Roussel

Albert Charles Paul Marie Roussel was a French composer. He spent seven years as a midshipman, turned to music as an adult, and became one of the most prominent French composers of the interwar period. His early works were strongly influenced by the impressionism of Debussy and Ravel, while he later turned toward neoclassicism.

— Freebase

Albert Sidney Johnston

Albert Sidney Johnston

Albert Sidney Johnston served as a general in three different armies: the Texas Army, the United States Army, and the Confederate States Army. He saw extensive combat during his military career, fighting actions in the Texas War of Independence, the Mexican-American War, the Utah War, and the American Civil War. Considered by Confederate President Jefferson Davis to be the finest general officer in the Confederacy before the emergence of Robert E. Lee, he was killed early in the Civil War at the Battle of Shiloh and was the highest-ranking officer, Union or Confederate, killed during the entire war. Davis believed the loss of Johnston "was the turning point of our fate".

— Freebase

Albert Goodwill Spalding

Albert Goodwill Spalding

Albert Goodwill Spalding was an American pitcher, manager and executive in the early years of professional baseball, and the co-founder of A.G. Spalding sporting goods company.

— Freebase

Albert Steffen

Albert Steffen

Albert Steffen was a poet, painter, dramatist, essayist, and novelist. He joined the Theosophical Society in Germany in 1910, and the Anthroposophical Society in 1912 and became its president after the death of its founder, Rudolf Steiner, in 1925. Steffen was chief editor of the society's journal, Das Goetheanum, from 1921-1963. His earliest works, predating his encounter with anthroposophy, already manifest a spiritual awareness. His later works, which reflect a vision of the world permeated by metaphysical powers of good and evil, draw on a wide range of esoteric European and Asian traditions.

— Freebase

Butterflies Are Free

Butterflies Are Free

Butterflies Are Free is a 1972 film based on the play by Leonard Gershe. The 1972 film was produced by M.J. Frankovich, released by Columbia Pictures, directed by Milton Katselas and adapted for the screen by Gershe. It was released on 6 July, 1972 in the USA. Goldie Hawn and Edward Albert starred. Eileen Heckart received an Academy Award for her performance. While the original play was set in Manhattan, New York, the screenplay written for the 1972 film was set in an unknown location in San Francisco.

— Freebase

Mynt

Mynt

MYNT is a dance music act from New York City. The co-ed quintet is made up of DJ/producer/remixers Albert Castillo and Rich "DJ Riddler" Pangilinan, male vocalist Joseph Murena, and female vocalists Marisol Angelique-Solorzano and Kim Sozzi.

— Freebase

Blunt

Blunt

A blunt is a cigar which is wider than a cigarillo and not quite as wide as a Corona. These cigars typically consist of two main parts; the inner leaf, which is similar to a cigarette rolling paper, except it is made of tobacco, and a thicker outer leaf which is rolled around the inner leaf in a spiral. In most commercially available blunts, the "leaves" are not actual tobacco leaves but rather paper made from tobacco pulp. Blunts originally got their name from their 'broad or rounded tip', and were named as such in the 19th century to differentiate them from other cigars with a tapered, pointed tip. Blunts are a specific size cigar that have been so popular as to have been once sold in specific vending machines. The original blunt cigar was manufactured in Philadelphia out of a single leaf outer tobacco wrapper. At the time this was the only cigar wrapped in one continuous leaf, other cigars used pieces of leaves for their outer wrapper. Tobacco leaves naturally taper at the ends. Since this cigar was rolled in one leaf the end would taper and had a round appearance. Due to the popularity of this style of cigar many other Blunts were launched into the marketplace. Older brands of blunts include: Phillies, Dutch Masters, King Edward, Pom Pom, White Owl, El Producto, Back Woods, Swisher Sweets, Optimo, El Rey, Arturo Fuente, Romeo Y Julietta, John T's, Flor de Dominicana, Tampa Nugget, Don Rex, Don Tomas, Don Lino, Detroit Peace, Garcia Y Vega, and Games. Other brands include: Al Capone, Avanti, Blackstone, Good Times, Hav-A-Tampa, Keep Moving, Black & Mild, Prince Albert, Principes, Supre Sweets, Villiger, Cloud 9, Evermore, Cheyenne, Antonio y Cleopatra, Marsh Wheeling, Miami Suites, Muniemaker, Muriel, Tiparillo, Trivo, White Cat, William Penn, BluntVille, El Verso, Bogey, Cafe Creme, Hood Wraps, Panter, Show, Splitarillos, Treez Wrap, Cubero, Ziparillos, and Zig Zag. These types of cigars are commonly sold in convenience stores, gas stations, grocery stores, and drugstores, in contrast to premium cigars, which are sold in cigar shops. Blunts burn quickly like cigarettes, and one can be smoked in about five minutes, whereas a premium cigar takes an hour or so to burn. Unlike premium cigars, blunts are either already cut or have a hole in the mouth end for the smoke to go through, and so they do not need to be cut at the mouth end. Blunts are also significantly cheaper than premium cigars.

— Freebase

Botany

Botany

Botany, plant science, or plant biology, is a discipline of biology and the science of plant life. Traditionally, the science of botany included the study of fungi, algae, and viruses, but this has become less common. A person engaged in the study of botany is called a botanist. Botany began with early efforts to identify edible, medicinal and poisonous plants, making it one of the oldest branches of science. Nowadays, botanists study about 400,000 species of living organisms. The beginnings of modern-style classification systems can be traced to the 1500s–1600s when several attempts were made to classify plants scientifically. In the 19th and 20th centuries, major new techniques were developed for studying plants, including microscopy and analysis of plant chemistry and plant anatomy. In the last two decades of the 20th century, analysis of DNA sequences began to be used to classify plants more accurately, culminating in the APG III system, a molecular system of plant taxonomy that was published in 2009 by the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group. Modern botanical research covers very diverse topics and is increasingly multidisciplinary, integrating strongly with other scientific disciplines such as chemistry, physics and bioinformatics. It includes, for example, the study of paleobotany, plant evolution and speciation, plant diversity, plant ecology, plant anatomy, plant cell biology, cell signaling, plant biochemistry, plant physiology, plant taxonomy and plant systematics, molecular genetics, genomics, proteomics, epigenetics, evolutionary developmental biology, systems biology, plant tissue culture and biotechnology. Scientific disciplines in applied plant science include agronomy, forestry and horticulture, all of which owe much to the discipline of soil science. Key scientists in the history of botany include Theophrastus, Ibn al-Baitar, Carl Linnaeus, Gregor Mendel, Charles Darwin, Joseph Dalton Hooker, William Hooker, Albert Francis Blakeslee, G. Ledyard Stebbins, Arthur Cronquist, Robert Brown, Arthur Tansley and many of those plant explorers whose names are immortalized in the generic or specific names of plants, such as Joseph Banks, John Tradescant the elder, John Tradescant the younger, Joel Roberts Poinsett and George Forrest.

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Lysergic acid diethylamide

Lysergic acid diethylamide

Lysergic acid diethylamide, abbreviated LSD or LSD-25, also known as lysergide and colloquially as acid, is a semisynthetic psychedelic drug of the ergoline family, well known for its psychological effects which can include altered thinking processes, closed and open eye visuals, synesthesia, an altered sense of time and spiritual experiences, as well as for its key role in 1960s counterculture. It is used mainly as an entheogen, recreational drug, and as an agent in psychedelic therapy. LSD is non-addictive, is not known to cause brain damage, and has extremely low toxicity relative to dose. However, adverse psychiatric reactions such as anxiety, paranoia, and delusions are possible. LSD was first synthesized by Albert Hofmann in 1938 from ergotamine, a chemical derived by Arthur Stoll from ergot, a grain fungus that typically grows on rye. The short form "LSD" comes from its early code name LSD-25, which is an abbreviation for the German "Lysergsäure-diethylamid" followed by a sequential number. LSD is sensitive to oxygen, ultraviolet light, and chlorine, especially in solution, though its potency may last for years if it is stored away from light and moisture at low temperature. In pure form it is a colorless, odorless, tasteless solid. LSD is typically delivered orally, usually on a substrate such as absorbent blotter paper, a sugar cube, or gelatin. In its liquid form, it can also be administered by intramuscular or intravenous injection. LSD is very potent, with 20–30 µg being the threshold dose. New clinical LSD experiments in humans started in 2009 for the first time in 40 years.

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Ductile iron

Ductile iron

Ductile iron, also known as ductile cast iron, nodular cast iron, spheroidal graphite iron, spherulitic graphite cast iron and SG iron, is a type of cast iron invented in 1943 by Keith Millis. While most varieties of cast iron are brittle, ductile iron has much more impact and fatigue resistance, due to its nodular graphite inclusions. On October 25, 1949, Keith Dwight Millis, Albert Paul Gagnebin and Norman Boden Pilling received US patent 2,485,760 on a Cast Ferrous Alloy for ductile iron production via magnesium treatment.

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Marriage proposal

Marriage proposal

A marriage proposal is an event where one person in a relationship asks for the other's hand in marriage. If accepted, it marks the initiation of engagement. It often has a ritual quality, sometimes involving the presentation of an engagement ring and the formal asking of a question such as, "Will you marry me?" In western culture, it is traditional for the man to propose to the woman while kneeling on one knee before her, and sometimes putting the ring on her finger, as opposed to merely giving it to her. Often the proposal is a surprise. The average duration of preceding courtship varies considerably throughout the world. In many Western cultures, the tradition has been for the man to propose to the woman. In the United Kingdom and Ireland, 29 February in a leap year is said to be the one day when a woman can propose to her partner. As a monarch, Queen Victoria had to propose to Prince Albert. Finland has the same custom, with the addition that a man rejecting such a proposal was expected to buy his suitor enough cloth for a skirt as compensation. Although still rare, a woman will occasionally propose to a man. Proposals by women have reportedly become more common in recent years, with jewelry companies manufacturing engagement rings for men. However, in the western cultures where engagement rings have traditionally been plain, similar bands worn by both sexes, of course, the idea of "an engagement ring for men" is nothing new.

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Margo

Margo

Margo, sometimes known as Margo Albert, was a film actress and dancer. She was born María Marguerita Guadalupe Teresa Estela Bolado Castilla y O'Donnell in 1917 in Mexico City, Mexico. Margo appeared in many American motion pictures and television productions, mostly in minor roles. Her more substantial roles include Lost Horizon, The Leopard Man, Viva Zapata!, and I'll Cry Tomorrow. Her final role was as murderess Serafina in the 1965 Perry Mason episode, "The Case of the Sad Sicilian."

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Cooper Union

Cooper Union

The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art, commonly referred to simply as Cooper Union, is a privately funded college in the East Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City, located at Cooper Square and Astor Place. Founded in 1859, and inspired in 1830 when Peter Cooper learned about the government-supported École Polytechnique of Paris, the school established a radical new model of American higher education: its mission reflects founder Peter Cooper's fundamental belief that an education "equal to the best" should be accessible to those who qualify, independent of their race, religion, sex, wealth or social status, and should be "open and free to all". The Cooper Union previously granted each admitted student a full-tuition scholarship; as of April 23, 2013, due to financial concerns, that policy has been eliminated beginning with the class entering in the Fall of 2014. The college is divided into three schools: the Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture, the School of Art, and the Albert Nerken School of Engineering. It offers undergraduate and Master's degree programs exclusively in the fields of architecture, fine arts, and engineering. It is a member of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology and the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design. Cooper is considered to be one of the most prestigious colleges in the United States, with all three of its member schools consistently ranked among the highest in the country. Dr. Jamshed Bharucha has succeeded George Campbell Jr. as the college’s twelfth president.

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Photoelectric effect

Photoelectric effect

In the photoelectric effect, electrons are emitted from solids, liquids or gases when they absorb energy from light. Electrons emitted in this manner may be called photoelectrons. In 1887, Heinrich Hertz discovered that electrodes illuminated with ultraviolet light create electric sparks more easily. In 1905 Albert Einstein published a paper that explained experimental data from the photoelectric effect as being the result of light energy being carried in discrete quantized packets. This discovery led to the quantum revolution. Einstein was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1921 for "his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect". The photoelectric effect requires photons with energies from a few electronvolts to over 1 MeV in high atomic number elements. Study of the photoelectric effect led to important steps in understanding the quantum nature of light and electrons and influenced the formation of the concept of wave–particle duality. Other phenomena where light affects the movement of electric charges include the photoconductive effect, the photovoltaic effect, and the photoelectrochemical effect. It also shed light on Max Planck's previous discovery of the Planck Relation linking energy and frequency e=hf as arising from quantization of energy. The factor h is known as the Planck constant.

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Albert Abraham Michelson

Albert Abraham Michelson

Albert Abraham Michelson was an American physicist known for his work on the measurement of the speed of light and especially for the Michelson–Morley experiment. In 1907 he received the Nobel Prize in Physics. He became the first American to receive the Nobel Prize in sciences.

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Taxi Driver

Taxi Driver

Taxi Driver is a 1976 American drama film directed by Martin Scorsese and written by Paul Schrader. The film is set in New York City, soon after the end of the Vietnam War. The film stars Robert De Niro and features Jodie Foster, Harvey Keitel, Cybill Shepherd, and Albert Brooks in his film debut. It is regularly cited by critics, film directors and audiences alike as one of the greatest films of all time including Roger Ebert and Richard Corliss. Nominated for four Academy Awards, including Best Picture, it won the Palme d'Or at the 1976 Cannes Film Festival. The American Film Institute ranked Taxi Driver as the 52nd greatest American film on their AFI's 100 Years…100 Movies list. In 2012, Sight and Sound named it the 31st best film ever created on its decadal poll, ranked with The Godfather Part II. The film was considered "culturally, historically or aesthetically" significant by the US Library of Congress and was selected to be preserved in the National Film Registry in 1994.

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Irréversible

Irréversible

Irréversible is a 2002 French mystery thriller film written and directed by Gaspar Noé, starring Monica Bellucci, Vincent Cassel and Albert Dupontel. The film employs a non-linear narrative and follows two men as they try to avenge a brutally raped girlfriend. The soundtrack was composed by the electronic musician Thomas Bangalter, who is best known as half of the duo Daft Punk. American film critic Roger Ebert called it "a movie so violent and cruel that most people will find it unwatchable." Irréversible competed at the 2002 Cannes Film Festival and won the Stockholm International Film Festival's award for best film. Irreversible has been associated with the New French Extremity movement.

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Simone Weil

Simone Weil

Simone Weil was a French philosopher, Christian mystic, and political activist. Weil's life was marked by an exceptional compassion for the suffering of others; at the age of six, for instance, she refused to eat sugar after she heard that soldiers fighting in World War I had to go without. She died from tuberculosis during World War II, possibly exacerbated by malnutrition after refusing to eat more than the minimal rations that she believed were available to soldiers at the time. After completing her education, Weil became a professor. She taught intermittently throughout the 1930s, taking several breaks due to poor health and to devote herself to political activism, work that would see her assisting in the trade union movement, taking the side of the left in the Spanish Civil War, and spending more than a year working as a labourer, mostly in auto factories, so she could better understand the working class. Unusually among twentieth-century left-leaning intellectuals, she became more religious and inclined towards mysticism as her life progressed. Weil wrote throughout her life, though most of her writings did not attract much attention until after her death. In the 1950s and 1960s, her work became famous on continental Europe and throughout the English-speaking world. Her fame began to decline in the late 1960s and she is now rarely taught at universities. Yet her thought has continued to be the subject of extensive scholarship across a wide range of fields. A meta study from the University of Calgary found that between 1995 and 2012 over 2,500 new scholarly works had been published about her. Although sometimes described as odd, humourless, and irritating, she inspired great affection in many of those who knew her. Albert Camus described her as "the only great spirit of our times".

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Photon

Photon

A photon is an elementary particle, the quantum of light and all other forms of electromagnetic radiation, and the force carrier for the electromagnetic force, even when static via virtual photons. The effects of this force are easily observable at both the microscopic and macroscopic level, because the photon has zero rest mass; this allows long distance interactions. Like all elementary particles, photons are currently best explained by quantum mechanics and exhibit wave–particle duality, exhibiting properties of both waves and particles. For example, a single photon may be refracted by a lens or exhibit wave interference with itself, but also act as a particle giving a definite result when its position is measured. The modern photon concept was developed gradually by Albert Einstein to explain experimental observations that did not fit the classical wave model of light. In particular, the photon model accounted for the frequency dependence of light's energy, and explained the ability of matter and radiation to be in thermal equilibrium. It also accounted for anomalous observations, including the properties of black body radiation, that other physicists, most notably Max Planck, had sought to explain using semiclassical models, in which light is still described by Maxwell's equations, but the material objects that emit and absorb light, do so in amounts of energy that are quantized. Although these semiclassical models contributed to the development of quantum mechanics, many further experiments starting with Compton scattering of single photons by electrons, first observed in 1923, validated Einstein's hypothesis that light itself is quantized. In 1926 the chemist Gilbert N. Lewis coined the name photon for these particles, and after 1927, when Arthur H. Compton won the Nobel Prize for his scattering studies, most scientists accepted the validity that quanta of light have an independent existence, and Lewis' term photon for light quanta was accepted.

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Gallatin

Gallatin

Gallatin is a city in and the county seat of Sumner County, Tennessee, The population was 30,678 at the 2010 census and 31,101 in 2011. Named for U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Albert Gallatin, the city was established and made the county seat of Sumner County in 1802. Several national companies have facilities or headquarters in Gallatin, including Gap, Inc., RR Donnelley, and Servpro Industries, Inc. Gallatin was formerly the headquarters of Dot Records. The city is also home to Volunteer State Community College, the largest two-year college in the state.

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Salesman

Salesman

Salesman is a 1969 direct cinema documentary film directed by brothers Albert and David Maysles, and Charlotte Zwerin.

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Georges Gilles de la Tourette

Georges Gilles de la Tourette

Georges Albert Édouard Brutus Gilles de la Tourette was a French physician who could be classified today as a neurologist who is the eponym of Tourette syndrome, a neurological condition. He was born in "the small town of Saint-Gervais-les-Trois-Clochers, in the district of Châtellerault near the city of Loudun, France", and died in Lausanne, Switzerland. During 1873 Tourette began medical studies at Poitiers. He later relocated to Paris where he became a student, amanuensis and house physician of his mentor, the influential contemporary neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot, director of the Salpêtrière Hospital. Charcot also helped him to advance in his academic career. Tourette studied and lectured in psychotherapy, hysteria and medical and legal ramifications of mesmerism. Tourette described the symptoms of Tourette syndrome in nine patients in 1884, using the name "maladie des tics". Charcot renamed the syndrome "Gilles de la Tourette's illness" in his honor. In 1893 a former female patient shot Tourette in the head, claiming he had hypnotized her against her will. Both Tourette and many modern hypnologists state that this is impossible. His mentor, Charcot, had died recently, and his young son had also died recently. After these events Tourette began to experience mood swings between depression and hypomania. Nevertheless, he organized public lectures in which he spoke about literacy, mesmerism and theatre.

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Cos

Cos

Cos is an American sketch comedy/variety TV series that debuted on the ABC Network in September 1976. It was hosted by comedian Bill Cosby and featured an ensemble cast who would perform sketches each week. The show was unsuccessful in the Nielsen ratings and was cancelled by November 1976. Cosby appeared on this series concurrently with his starring role in Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids and the film Mother, Jugs & Speed.

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Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan is a prairie province in Canada, which has a total area of 651,900 square kilometres and a land area of 592,534 square kilometres, the remainder being water area. Saskatchewan is bordered on the west by the Province of Alberta, on the north by the Northwest Territories, on the east by Manitoba, and on the south by the U.S. states of Montana and North Dakota. As of July 2012, the population of Saskatchewan was estimated at 1,079,958. Residents primarily live in the southern half of the province. Of the total population, 257,300 live in the province's largest city, Saskatoon, while 210,000 live in the provincial capital, Regina. Other major cities include Prince Albert, Moose Jaw, Yorkton, Swift Current and North Battleford. Saskatchewan was first explored by Europeans in 1690 and settled in 1774, having also been inhabited for thousands of years by various indigenous groups. It became a province in 1905. Saskatchewan's current premier is Brad Wall and its lieutenant-governor is Vaughn Solomon Schofield. Its major economic activities are agriculture, mining, and energy. "In 1992, the federal and provincial governments signed a historic land claim agreement with Saskatchewan First Nations. Under the Agreement, the First Nations received money to buy land on the open market. As a result, about 761,000 acres have been turned into reserve land and many First Nations continue to invest their settlement dollars in urban areas", including Saskatoon. The province's name is derived from the Saskatchewan River. Earlier, the river was designated kisiskāciwani-sīpiy in the Cree language.

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Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the general theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics. While best known for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc², he received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect". The latter was pivotal in establishing quantum theory. Near the beginning of his career, Einstein thought that Newtonian mechanics was no longer enough to reconcile the laws of classical mechanics with the laws of the electromagnetic field. This led to the development of his special theory of relativity. He realized, however, that the principle of relativity could also be extended to gravitational fields, and with his subsequent theory of gravitation in 1916, he published a paper on the general theory of relativity. He continued to deal with problems of statistical mechanics and quantum theory, which led to his explanations of particle theory and the motion of molecules. He also investigated the thermal properties of light which laid the foundation of the photon theory of light. In 1917, Einstein applied the general theory of relativity to model the large-scale structure of the universe.

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John Smith

John Smith

John Smith, known as Uncle John, was an early leader of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Smith was the younger brother of Joseph Smith, Sr., uncle of Joseph Smith, Jr. and Hyrum Smith, father of George A. Smith, grandfather of John Henry Smith, and great-grandfather of George Albert Smith. He served as an assistant counselor in the First Presidency under Joseph Smith, Jr. and as Presiding Patriarch under Brigham Young. He was succeeded as Presiding Patriarch by his great nephew, who was also named John Smith. Smith served as president of the stake in Lee County, Iowa during the Nauvoo period. He was also the first president of the Salt Lake Stake, the first stake in Utah Territory, and as such was the leader of the Latter-day Saints in Utah in the winter of 1847–1848. Smith practiced plural marriage and fathered four children.

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Infocom

Infocom

Infocom was a software company, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, that produced numerous works of interactive fiction. They also produced one notable business application, a relational database called Cornerstone. Infocom was founded on June 22, 1979 by MIT staff and students led by Dave Lebling, Marc Blank, Albert Vezza, and Joel Berez and lasted as an independent company until 1986 when it was bought by Activision. Activision finally shut down the Infocom division in 1989, although they released some titles in the 1990s under the Infocom Zork brand. Activision abandoned the Infocom trademark in 2002. The name was later registered by Oliver Klaeffling of Germany in 2007, which itself was abandoned the following year. The Infocom trademark is currently held by Pete Hottelet's Omni Consumer Products, who registered the name around the same time as Klaeffling in 2007.

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Hyperreality

Hyperreality

Hyperreality is used in semiotics and postmodern philosophy to describe an inability of consciousness to distinguish reality from a simulation of reality, especially in technologically advanced post-modern societies. Hyperreality is a way of characterizing what our consciousness defines as "real" in a world where a multitude of media can radically shape and filter an original event or experience. Hyperreality is seen as a condition in which what is real and what is fiction are seamlessly blended together so that there is no clear distinction between where one ends and the other begins. Hyperreality is a hypothetical communications infrastructure made possible by information technology. It allows the commingling of physical reality with virtual reality and human intelligence with artificial intelligence. Individuals may find themselves for different reasons, more in tune or involved with the hyperreal world and less with the physical real world. Some famous theorists of hyperreality include Jean Baudrillard author of Simulacra and Simulation, Albert Borgmann, Daniel J. Boorstin author of The Image: A Guide to Pseudo-Events in America, Neil Postman author of Amusing Ourselves to Death, and Umberto Eco author of Travels in Hyperreality.

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Neisseria gonorrhoeae

Neisseria gonorrhoeae

Neisseria gonorrhoeae, also known as gonococci, or gonococcus, is a species of Gram-negative coffee bean-shaped diplococci bacteria responsible for the sexually transmitted infection gonorrhea. N. gonorrhoea was first described by Albert Neisser in 1879.

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Polyphème

Polyphème

Polyphème is an opera composed by Jean Cras with a libretto by Albert Samain. It was written by Cras during World War I and was premiered in Paris in 1922, giving Cras a burst of notoriety in the French press.

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Special relativity

Special relativity

Special relativity is the physical theory of measurement in an inertial frame of reference proposed in 1905 by Albert Einstein in the paper "On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies". Galileo Galilei had already postulated that all uniform motion is relative, and that there is no absolute and well-defined state of rest, a principle now called Galileo's principle of relativity. Einstein extended this principle so that it accounted for the constant speed of light, a phenomenon that had been recently observed in the Michelson–Morley experiment. He also postulated that it holds for all the laws of physics, including both the laws of mechanics and of electrodynamics, whatever they may be. This theory has a wide range of consequences which have been experimentally verified, including counter-intuitive ones such as length contraction, time dilation and relativity of simultaneity. It has replaced the classical notion of invariant time interval for two events with the notion of invariant space-time interval. Combined with other laws of physics, the two postulates of special relativity predict the equivalence of mass and energy, as expressed in the mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc², where c is the speed of light in vacuum. The predictions of special relativity agree well with Newtonian mechanics in their common realm of applicability, specifically in experiments in which all velocities are small compared with the speed of light. Special relativity reveals that c is not just the velocity of a certain phenomenon—namely the propagation of electromagnetic radiation —but rather a fundamental feature of the way space and time are unified as spacetime. One of the consequences of the theory is that it is impossible for any particle that has rest mass to be accelerated to the speed of light.

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Downfall

Downfall

Downfall is a 2004 war film directed by Oliver Hirschbiegel, depicting the final ten days of Adolf Hitler's reign of Nazi Germany in 1945. The film's screenplay was written by Bernd Eichinger, and based upon the books Inside Hitler's Bunker, by historian Joachim Fest; Until the Final Hour, the memoirs of Traudl Junge, one of Hitler's secretaries; Albert Speer's memoirs, Inside the Third Reich; Hitler's Last Days: An Eye–Witness Account, by Gerhardt Boldt; Das Notlazarett Unter Der Reichskanzlei: Ein Arzt Erlebt Hitlers Ende in Berlin by Doctor Ernst-Günther Schenck; and, Siegfried Knappe's memoirs, Soldat: Reflections of a German Soldier, 1936–1949. The film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film.

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Quadraphonic sound

Quadraphonic sound

Quadraphonic sound – the most widely used early term for what is now called 4.0 surround sound – uses four channels in which speakers are positioned at the four corners of the listening space, reproducing signals that are independent of one another. Quadraphonic audio was the earliest consumer offering in surround sound. It was a commercial failure due to many technical problems and format incompatibilities. Quadraphonic audio formats were more expensive to produce than standard two-channel stereo. Playback required additional speakers and specially designed decoders and amplifiers. The rise of home theatre products in the late 1980s and early 1990s brought multi-channel audio recording back into popularity, although in new digitally based formats. Thousands of quadraphonic recordings were made during the 1970s, and some of these recordings have been reissued in modern surround sound formats such as DTS, Dolby Digital, DVD-Audio and Super Audio CD. In 1967 the rock group Pink Floyd performed the first-ever surround-sound rock concert at “Games for May”, a lavish affair at London’s Queen Elizabeth Hall, where the band debuted its custom-made quadraphonic speaker system. The control device they had made, the Azimuth Co-ordinator, is now displayed at London's Victoria and Albert Museum, as part of their Theatre Collections gallery.

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Clobber

Clobber

Clobber is an abstract strategy game invented in 2001 by combinatorial game theorists Michael H. Albert, J.P. Grossman and Richard Nowakowski. It has subsequently been studied by Elwyn Berlekamp and Erik Demaine among others. Since 2005, it has been one of the events in the Computer Olympiad. Players take turns to move one of their own pieces onto an orthogonally adjacent opposing piece, removing it from the game. The winner of the game is the player who makes the last move.

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McQ

McQ

McQ is a 1974 crime drama film directed by John Sturges, starring John Wayne. The film made extensive use of actual Seattle locations. The beach scenes were filmed on the Pacific coast at Moclips. Eddie Albert and Diana Muldaur co-star. The film also features a young Roger E. Mosley as a police informer, Clu Gulager as a corrupt police detective, Colleen Dewhurst as a cocaine addict and Al Lettieri as the most visible villain of the film, the drug king Santiago, in one of Lettieri's final roles. Wayne had rejected the lead in Dirty Harry a few years prior to this film. The producers of that film chose Seattle as its location in an earlier version of the script; it was later changed to San Francisco when Clint Eastwood became connected with the project. The film has a dramatic car chase, with Wayne in a green 1973 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am "Green Hornet," influenced by Steve McQueen's chase scene in Bullitt. One of Wayne's more famous lines from this movie was after the character of Lon McQ was trapped inside of his car after it was crushed between two large trucks, he states to one of the reporting officers: "I'm up to my butt in gas."

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Albert

Albert

Albert was a federal electoral district in New Brunswick, Canada, that was represented in the Canadian House of Commons from 1867 to 1904.

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Cloakroom

Cloakroom

A cloakroom, or sometimes coatroom, is a room for people to hang their cloaks. They are typically found inside large buildings, such as gymnasiums, schools, churches or meeting halls. In the UK a cloakroom may also be a lavatory. The word is often thought to be derived from the French cloaque. However, it comes from the French cloque meaning travelling cloak. Attended cloakrooms, or coat checks, are staffed rooms where coats and bags can be stored securely. Typically, a ticket is given to the customer, with a corresponding ticket attached to the garment or item. They are often found in nightclubs. A nominal fee is generally charged, or if not, a tip is usually paid by the customer when they reclaim their item. The concept of the coat check was initiated by Albert Behar in the New York area shortly after the Depression. Mr. Behar noticed that customers put their coats on the back of their chairs, and offered to store the coats for the customers in a small room adjoining the restaurant.

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British Archaeological Association

British Archaeological Association

The British Archaeological Association was founded in 1843 and aims to inspire, support and disseminate high quality research in the fields of Western archaeology, art and architecture, primarily of the medieval period, through lectures, conferences, study days and publications. The BAA was founded in December 1843 by Charles Roach Smith, Thomas Wright and Thomas Joseph Pettigrew, to encourage the recording, preservation, and publication of archaeological discoveries, and to lobby for government assistance for the collection of British antiquities. All three men were Fellows of the Society of Antiquaries of London but felt the older body was too aristocratic, too London-focused and lacked the campaigning vigour required. The naming of the new body was symbolic: British referred to the campaign for a museum of British Antiquities, Archaeological differentiated their field from older antiquarian methods and Association had reformist, even revolutionary, overtones. Smith became its first secretary and arranged the first six annual congresses. Although he remained one of the secretaries until 1851, he had effectively resigned the post in 1849. One of the aims of the Association was to promote dialogue between self-identified experts and local archaeologists, to be achieved through the organization of an annual congress, along the model of the French Congres Archaeologique or the annual meetings of the British Association for the Advancement of Science. The first meeting was held in Canterbury in 1844. The site, with its magnificent cathedral, had obvious appeal and was close to the seat of the Association’s first President, Lord Albert Conyngham. The Canterbury Congress occasioned the dispute which led to a split and the formation of the Archaeological Institute. The public reason for the feud was the publication by Thomas Wright of The Archaeological Album, or, Museum of National Antiquities, a commercial publication from which Wright drew profit. This infuriated Oxford publisher John Henry Parker, who was to have been the publisher of the official proceedings. Behind the scenes, however, the dispute had other dimensions, both social and religious.

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Wipe

Wipe

A wipe is a type of film transition where one shot replaces another by travelling from one side of the frame to another or with a special shape. If the wipe proceeds from two opposite edges of the screen toward the center or vice versa, it is known as a barn door wipe. George Lucas is famous for the sweeping use of wipes in his Star Wars films, which help evoke a kinship to old pulp science fiction novels and serials; he was inspired by a similar use of wipes by Akira Kurosawa. The very earliest examples of a wipe are seen as long ago as 1903 in films like Mary Jane's Mishap by George Albert Smith. Wipes can also be used as syntactic tools. Some examples are: ⁕An iris wipe is a wipe that takes the shape of a growing or shrinking circle. It has been frequently used in animated short subjects, such as those in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoon series, to signify the end of a story. When used in this manner, the iris wipe may be centered around a certain focal point and may be used as a device for a "parting shot" joke, a fourth wall-breaching wink by a character, or other purposes.

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Family Jewels

Family Jewels

Family Jewels is a compilation DVD by the hard rock band AC/DC, featuring the group's music videos, live clips and promotional videos from 1975 to 1991. It was released by Albert Productions and Epic Music Video on 28 March 2005. The first disc contains videos from the Bon Scott era, such as the band's first TV appearance and a performance on television ten days before Scott died. The second disc contains material from the Brian Johnson era such as the videos for Back in Black. The compilation is certified 10x Platinum by the RIAA for sales in excess of 1,000,000. The UK magazine Classic Rock awarded Family Jewels the title of 'DVD of the year' in 2005. The third disc was released on 10 November 2009 as part of the Backtracks box set. It is included in both the Deluxe and Standard Edition. This DVD picks up from where the original 2DVD Family Jewels set leaves off, Family Jewels Disc Three begins with "Big Gun" the theme song to the motion picture Last Action Hero. Also on this disc are three music videos from the Ballbreaker album, three from Stiff Upper Lip and two from Black Ice. There are also several songs from the original Family Jewels set that actually had more than one promotional clip. On the third disc are the alternate videos which appear on DVD for the first time.

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Brownian motion

Brownian motion

Brownian motion or pedesis is the presumably random moving of particles suspended in a fluid resulting from their bombardment by the fast-moving atoms or molecules in the gas or liquid. The term "Brownian motion" can also refer to the mathematical model used to describe such random movements, which is often called a particle theory. In 1827, the botanist Robert Brown, looking through a microscope at particles found in pollen grains in water, noted that the particles moved through the water but was not able to determine the mechanisms that caused this motion. Atoms and molecules had long been theorized as the constituents of matter, and many decades later, Albert Einstein published a paper in 1905 that explained in precise detail how the motion that Brown had observed was a result of the pollen being moved by individual water molecules. This explanation of Brownian motion served as definitive confirmation that atoms and molecules actually exist, and was further verified experimentally by Jean Perrin in 1908. Perrin was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1926 "for his work on the discontinuous structure of matter". The direction of the force of atomic bombardment is constantly changing, and at different times the particle is hit more on one side than another, leading to the seemingly random nature of the motion. This transport phenomenon is named after Robert Brown.

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Emulation

Emulation

In emulation learning, subjects learn about parts of their environment and use this to achieve their own goals. Observational learning is based primarily on the work of Albert Bandura. First coined by child psychologist David Wood in 1988. In 1990 “emulation” was taken up by Michael Tomasello to explain the findings of an earlier study on ape social learning. The meaning of the term emulation has changed gradually since. Emulation is a form of observational learning, different from imitation, which focuses on the action's environmental results instead of a model's action. Simpler form of observational learning is expected to have profound implications for its capacity for cultural transmission. Emulation produces only fleeting fidelity compared with the opportunity to copy a conspecific, when considerable conformity is displayed even with a simple task. This was observed through a study, ghost-conditions, in chimpanzees and children.

— Freebase

Body language

Body language

Body language is a form of mental and physical ability of human non-verbal communication, consisting of body posture, gestures, facial expressions, and eye movements. Humans send and interpret such signals almost entirely subconsciously. James Borg states that human communication consists of 93 percent body language and paralinguistic cues, while only 7% of communication consists of words themselves; however, Albert Mehrabian, the researcher whose 1960s work is the source of these statistics, has stated that this is a misunderstanding of the findings. Body language may provide clues as to the attitude or state of mind of a person. For example, it may indicate aggression, attentiveness, boredom, relaxed state, pleasure, amusement, and intoxication. Body language is significant to communication and relationships. It is relevant to management and leadership in business and also in places where it can be observed by many people. It can also be relevant to some outside of the workplace. It is commonly helpful in dating, mating, in family settings, and parenting. Although body language is non-verbal or non-spoken, it can reveal a lot about your feelings and meaning to others and also how other others reveal their feelings toward you. Body language signals happen on a conscious and unconscious level.

— Freebase

Man-Child

Man-Child

Man-Child is the seventeenth album by jazz pianist Herbie Hancock. It is arguably one of his most funk influenced albums and it represents his further departure from the "spacey, higher atmosphere jazz," as he referred to it, of his earlier career. Hancock uses more funk based rhythms around the hi-hat, and snare drum. The tracks are characterized by short, repeated riffs by both the rhythm section, horns accompaniment, and bass lines. Man-Child features less improvisation from the whole band and more concentrated grooves with brief solos from the horns and Hancock himself on synthesizer and Fender Rhodes piano on top of the repeated riffs. This album features the addition of electric guitar to his new sound, which he started only five years prior to this album with Fat Albert Rotunda. The guitarists featured on this album were Melvin "Wah-Wah Watson" Ragin, DeWayne "Blackbyrd" McKnight and David T. Walker. Their extensive use of wah-wah pedal and accenting chords on the up-beat rather than the down-beat is what helps to give the album a distinct and funkier rhythm that is broken up by brief periods of stop-time where only the sustained chords are heard from the electric guitar with an open wah pedal. Furthermore the riffs are fast-paced and energetic with repeating patterns that combine with multiple voices. The horns section in "Hang Up Your Hang-Ups" plays repeated riffs in unison that are alternating answered by electric piano, synthesizer, and electric guitar in brief periods of call and response.

— Freebase

Endoplasmic reticulum

Endoplasmic reticulum

The endoplasmic reticulum is an organelle of cells in eukaryotic organisms that forms an interconnected network of membrane vesicles. According to the structure the endoplasmic reticulum is classified into two types, that is, rough endoplasmic reticulum and smooth endoplasmic reticulum. The rough endoplasmic reticulum is studded with ribosomes on the cytosolic face. These are the sites of protein synthesis. The rough endoplasmic reticulum is predominantly found in hepatocytes where protein synthesis occurs actively. The smooth endoplasmic reticulum is a smooth network without the ribosomes. The smooth endoplasmic reticulum is concerned with lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and detoxification. The smooth endoplasmic reticulum is abundantly found in mammalian liver and gonad cells. The lacey membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum were first seen by Keith R. Porter, Albert Claude, and Ernest F. Fullam in the year 1945.

— Freebase

Banjo Eyes

Banjo Eyes

Banjo Eyes is a musical based on the play Three Men on a Horse by John Cecil Holm and George Abbott. It has a book by Joseph Quinlan and Izzy Ellinson, music by Vernon Duke, and lyrics by John La Touche and Harold Adamson. Produced by Albert Lewis and staged by Hassard Short, the Broadway production opened on December 25, 1941 at the Hollywood Theatre, where it ran for 126 performances. The cast included Eddie Cantor, Lionel Stander, and William Johnson. Although Cantor was known as "Banjo Eyes," the title referred not to his character but to a talking race horse, played in costume by the vaudeville team of Mayo and Martin. In dream sequences, Banjo Eyes would give Cantor's character tips on which horses were going to win different races, but warned him his supposed talent for picking the winners would vanish if he ever placed a bet himself. The book was a very loose adaptation of its source, and the World War II anthem "We Did It Before" by Charles Tobias and Cliff Friend was interpolated into the score for no apparent reason other than to stir up patriotism among audience members. Cantor closed the show by singing a medley of his hits in his customary blackface. The show closed when its star suffered a medical emergency.

— Freebase

Grandad

Grandad

Edward Kitchener "Ted" Trotter, better known simply as Grandad, was a character in the popular BBC sitcom Only Fools and Horses from 1981-1984. He was played by Lennard Pearce in the original series, and was portrayed by Phil Daniels in the prequel, Rock & Chips. The character was grandfather to Derek and Rodney Trotter, and older brother to Uncle Albert.

— Freebase

Ellie

Ellie

Ellie is a 1984 comedy film directed by Peter Wittman and distributed by Troma Entertainment. Set in the deep south, the film follows the titular Ellie; after witnessing her father's murder at the hands of her stepmother and her three lecherous stepbrothers, Ellie vows to avenge her father's death using the only weapon she has: her voluptuous body. The film also features appearances from such noteworthy actors as Shelley Winters, George Gobel, Edward Albert and Pat Paulsen.

— Freebase

Prince consort

Prince consort

A prince consort is the husband of a queen regnant who is not himself a king in his own right. Prince Henrik of Denmark is an example of a current prince consort. In recognition of his status, a prince consort may be given a formal title, such as Prince, Prince Consort or King consort, with Prince being the most common. However, most monarchies do not have formal rules on the styling of princes consort, and a prince consort may have no royal title. Exceptions exist such as in the case of Prince Bernhard of Lippe-Biesterfeld. Prince Consort is a formal title. Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha is the only spouse of a British queen to have held it: it was awarded to him in 1857 by his wife, Queen Victoria. In 2005 Prince Henrik, the spouse of Margrethe II of Denmark, was awarded the same title. Neither the descriptive princess consort nor the title 'Princess Consort' has yet been used in Western monarchies, as dynastic wives of kings have been styled queens consort, often with the title 'Queen'. However, Clarence House has announced that when the present Prince of Wales becomes the sovereign of the United Kingdom, his wife, the Duchess of Cornwall, will have the title Her Royal Highness The Princess Consort rather than Her Majesty The Queen as used by previous wives of kings.

— Freebase

Luther

Luther

Luther is a 1961 play by John Osborne depicting the life of Martin Luther, one of the instigators of the Protestant Reformation. Albert Finney created the role of Luther, which he performed at with the English Stage Company at the Theatre Royal, Nottingham, the Théâtre Sarah Bernhardt, Paris, the Holland Festival, the Royal Court Theatre, London, the Phoenix Theatre, London, and the St. James Theatre, New York. The original West End run at the Phoenix ended in March 1962, after 239 performances there, when Finney had to leave the cast to fulfill a contractual obligation with a film company.

— Freebase

Prodigy

Prodigy

Albert Johnson, better known by his stage name Prodigy, is an American rapper and one half of the Hip-hop duo Mobb Deep with Havoc. He is the great-great-grandson of the founder of Morehouse College. Prodigy was born with sickle-cell anemia and has suffered from the disease throughout his life.

— Freebase

Psilocybin

Psilocybin

Psilocybin is a naturally occurring psychedelic compound produced by more than 200 species of mushrooms, collectively known as psilocybin mushrooms. The most potent are members of the genus Psilocybe, such as P. azurescens, P. semilanceata, and P. cyanescens, but psilocybin has also been isolated from about a dozen other genera. As a prodrug, psilocybin is quickly converted by the body to psilocin, which has mind-altering effects similar to those of LSD and mescaline. The effects generally include euphoria, visual and mental hallucinations, changes in perception, a distorted sense of time, and spiritual experiences, and can include possible adverse reactions such as nausea and panic attacks. Imagery found on prehistoric murals and rock paintings of modern-day Spain and Algeria suggest that human usage of psilocybin mushrooms dates back thousands of years. In Mesoamerica, the mushrooms had long been consumed in spiritual and divinatory ceremonies before Spanish chroniclers first documented their use in the 16th century. In a 1957 Life magazine article, American banker and ethnomycologist R. Gordon Wasson described his experiences ingesting psilocybin-containing mushrooms during a traditional ceremony in Mexico, introducing the drug to popular culture. Shortly afterward, the Swiss chemist Albert Hofmann isolated the active principle psilocybin from the mushroom Psilocybe mexicana. Hofmann's employer Sandoz marketed and sold pure psilocybin to physicians and clinicians worldwide for use in psychedelic psychotherapy. Although increasingly restrictive drug laws of the late 1960s curbed scientific research into the effects of psilocybin and other hallucinogens, its popularity as an entheogen grew in the next decade, largely owing to the increased availability of information on how to cultivate psilocybin mushrooms.

— Freebase

Gumshoe

Gumshoe

Gumshoe is a 1971 film, and was the directorial debut of British director Stephen Frears. Written by local author Neville Smith, who appears as Arthur, the film is set in Liverpool with Albert Finney playing the role of Eddie Ginley. Ginley is a bingo-caller and occasional club comedian who dreams of being a private eye of the kind he knows from films and pulp novels. Having put an advertisement in a local newspaper as a birthday present to himself, Ginley is suddenly contacted for what appears to be an actual piece of detective work... The film has many comic moments as it switches between detective novel and affectionate spoof. It has some shots of Liverpool buildings that have long since been demolished, including the employment exchange on Leece Street. Gumshoe was the first of two films with original music scores by Andrew Lloyd Webber. Some of the music was re-used in Lloyd Webber's musical version of Sunset Boulevard. Several scenes in the London part of the narrative take place in and around Paul Brunton's famous occult bookstore, The Atlantis Bookshop. Despite its relatively lightweight tone, Frears' film is not without its contentious moments. TV broadcasts are nowadays rare because of Ginley's use of racist language and insults. Another scene was significantly shortened before release because of its detailed depiction of a heroin-user preparing and taking his 'fix'.

— Freebase

Looker

Looker

Looker is a 1981 science fiction film written and directed by Michael Crichton. It starred Albert Finney, Susan Dey, and James Coburn. Former NFL linebacker Tim Rossovich was featured as the villain's main henchman. The film is a suspense/science fiction piece which comments upon and satirizes media, advertising, TV's effects on the populace, and ridiculous standard of beauty. Though spare in visual effects, the film is notable for being the first commercial film to attempt to make a realistic computer generated character, for the model named "Cindy." It was also the first film to create 3-D shading with a computer, months before the release of the better-known Tron.

— Freebase

Key Club

Key Club

Key Club International is the oldest and largest service program for high school students. It is a student-led organization whose goal is to teach leadership through helping. Key Club International is a part of the Kiwanis International family of service-leadership programs. Many local Key Clubs are sponsored by a local Kiwanis club. The organization was started by California State Commissioner of Schools Albert C. Olney, and vocational education teacher Frank C. Vincent, who together worked to establish the first Key Club at Sacramento High School in California, on May 7, 1925. Female students were first admitted in 1977, ten years before women were admitted to the sponsoring organization, Kiwanis International.

— Freebase

High Gear

High Gear

High Gear is the first studio album by hard rock band Howe II, released in 1989 through Shrapnel Records. Howe II was a short-lived group fronted by guitarist Greg Howe and his brother Albert, a singer.

— Freebase

WINY

WINY

WINY is a heritage radio station that transmits in AM stereo on 1350 kHz and is owned by Osbrey Broadcasting Company. It operates during the daytime with 5,000 watts of power, and at 79 watts nighttime. Its studios and transmitter are located in Putnam, Connecticut. WINY first signed on the air on May 3, 1953 under the call letters WPCT. The station was financed by three French Canadian businessmen from Central Falls, Rhode Island: named Goyette, Albert Lanthier, and Rene Cote. The station was managed by Daniel Hyland with an original announcing staff of Dick Alarie, Ed Read, and Frank Carroll. The call letters were changed to WINY in September 1960 when the station was purchased by the Herbert C. Rice family and the Winny Broadcasting Company. The call letters were changed to represent the station's new mascot, "Winny, The Community Gal," who was a counterpart to the mascot at sister station WILI, "Willie, The Community Man." The family combined the operations of the two stations into Nutmeg Broadcasting Company, which would go on to own a total of five radio stations throughout Connecticut, including WTNY Southington, WLIS Old Saybrook and WILI-FM Willimantic. WINY changed hands in 1990 to the Gerardi Broadcasting Corporation, and once more in 2001 to the current owners, the Osbrey Broadcasting Company.

— Freebase

Armoire

Armoire

This armoire, displayed at the Great Exhibition of 1851, was designed by Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin and made by JG Crace. The shields along the top and the carved decorative motifs were drawn from medieval sources. The motifs include Crace's initials, a plummet as an emblem of his honesty, and a compass to indicate his ability to keep within his estimates. Many designers of the Victorian period were inspired by the art of the Middle Ages, but Pugin was probably the greatest and most ardent exponent of the Gothic Revival style. The cabinet was the grandest piece in the group of furniture designed by Pugin and made by Crace for the Medieval Court in the Great Exhibition of 1851. As Crace was a judge for Class XXVI and the cabinet was exhibited in his name, it was not eligible for a medal. A prolific designer, best remembered for his decoration of the Houses of Parliament, Pugin exhausted himself and died the year after this cupboard was made, aged only forty. The Victoria and Albert Museum bought the cupboard directly from the 1851 Exhibition, making it one of its earliest acquisitions.

— Freebase

Lawrencium

Lawrencium

Lawrencium is a radioactive synthetic chemical element with the symbol Lr and atomic number 103. In the periodic table of the elements, it is a period 7 d-block element and the last element of the actinide series. Chemistry experiments have confirmed that lawrencium behaves as the heavier homologue to lutetium and is chemically similar to other actinides. Lawrencium was first synthesized by the nuclear-physics team led by Albert Ghiorso on February 14, 1961, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California. The first atoms of lawrencium were produced by bombarding a three-milligram target consisting of three isotopes of the element californium with boron-10 and boron-11 nuclei from the Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator. The team suggested the name lawrencium, and the symbol "Lw", but IUPAC changed the symbol to "Lr" in 1963. It was the final and the heaviest element of the actinide series to be synthesized. All isotopes of lawrencium are radioactive; its most stable known isotope is lawrencium-262, with a half-life of approximately 3.6 hours. All its isotopes except for lawrencium-260, −261 and −262 decay with a half-life of less than a minute.

— Freebase

Battle of Shiloh

Battle of Shiloh

The Battle of Shiloh also known as the Battle of Pittsburg Landing, was a major battle in the Western Theater of the American Civil War, fought April 6 – 7, 1862, in southwestern Tennessee. A Union army under Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant had moved via the Tennessee River deep into Tennessee and was encamped principally at Pittsburg Landing on the west bank of the river. Confederate forces under Generals Albert Sidney Johnston and P. G. T. Beauregard launched a surprise attack on Grant there. The Confederates achieved considerable success on the first day, but were ultimately defeated on the second day. On the first day of the battle, the Confederates struck with the intention of driving the Union defenders away from the river and into the swamps of Owl Creek to the west, hoping to defeat Grant's Army of the Tennessee before the anticipated arrival of Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell's Army of the Ohio. The Confederate battle lines became confused during the fierce fighting, and Grant's men instead fell back to the northeast, in the direction of Pittsburg Landing. A position on a slightly sunken road, nicknamed the "Hornet's Nest", defended by the men of Brig. Gens. Benjamin M. Prentiss's and W. H. L. Wallace's divisions, provided critical time for the rest of the Union line to stabilize under the protection of numerous artillery batteries. Gen. Johnston was killed during the first day of fighting, and Beauregard, his second in command, decided against assaulting the final Union position that night.

— Freebase

Kenner Products

Kenner Products

Kenner Products was an American toy company founded in 1947 by brothers, Albert, Phillip, and Joseph L. Steiner, in Cincinnati, Ohio, and was named after the street where the original corporate offices were located, which is just north of Cincinnati's Union Terminal.

— Freebase

Tiffany glass

Tiffany glass

Tiffany glass refers to the many and varied types of glass developed and produced from 1878 to 1933 at the Tiffany Studios, by Louis Comfort Tiffany and a team of other designers, including Clara Driscoll. In 1865, Tiffany traveled to Europe, and in London he visited the Victoria and Albert Museum, whose extensive collection of Roman and Syrian glass made a deep impression on him. He admired the coloration of medieval glass and was convinced that the quality of contemporary glass could be improved upon. In his own words, the "Rich tones are due in part to the use of pot metal full of impurities, and in part to the uneven thickness of the glass, but still more because the glass maker of that day abstained from the use of paint". Tiffany was an interior designer, and in 1878 his interest turned towards the creation of stained glass, when he opened his own studio and glass foundry because he was unable to find the types of glass that he desired in interior decoration. His inventiveness both as a designer of windows and as a producer of the material with which to create them was to become renowned. Tiffany wanted the glass itself to transmit texture and rich colors and he developed a type of glass he called Favrile.

— Freebase

Ulm

Ulm

Ulm is a city in the federal German state of Baden-Württemberg, situated on the River Danube. The city, whose population is estimated at 120,000, forms an urban district of its own and is the administrative seat of the Alb-Donau district. Ulm, founded around 850, is rich in history and traditions as a former Free Imperial City. Today, it is an economic centre due to its varied industries, and it is the seat of a university. Internationally, Ulm is primarily known for having the church with the tallest steeple in the world, the Gothic minster and as the birthplace of Albert Einstein.

— Freebase

Quantum cascade laser

Quantum cascade laser

Quantum cascade lasers are semiconductor lasers that emit in the mid- to far-infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum and were first demonstrated by Jerome Faist, Federico Capasso, Deborah Sivco, Carlo Sirtori, Albert Hutchinson, and Alfred Cho at Bell Laboratories in 1994. Unlike typical interband semiconductor lasers that emit electromagnetic radiation through the recombination of electron–hole pairs across the material band gap, QCLs are unipolar and laser emission is achieved through the use of intersubband transitions in a repeated stack of semiconductor multiple quantum well heterostructures, an idea first proposed in the paper "Possibility of amplification of electromagnetic waves in a semiconductor with a superlattice" by R.F. Kazarinov and R.A. Suris in 1971.

— Freebase

Cubism

Cubism

Cubism is an early-20th-century avant-garde art movement pioneered by George Braque and Pablo Picasso, joined by Jean Metzinger, Albert Gleizes, Robert Delaunay, Henri Le Fauconnier, Fernand Léger and Juan Gris that revolutionized European painting and sculpture, and inspired related movements in music, literature and architecture. Cubism has been considered the most influential art movement of the 20th century. The term is broadly used in association with a wide variety of art produced in Paris during the 1910s and extending through the 1920s. Variants such as Futurism and Constructivism developed in other countries. A primary influence that led to Cubism was the representation of three-dimensional form in the late works of Paul Cézanne, which were displayed in a retrospective at the 1907 Salon d'Automne. In Cubist artwork, objects are analyzed, broken up and reassembled in an abstracted form—instead of depicting objects from one viewpoint, the artist depicts the subject from a multitude of viewpoints to represent the subject in a greater context.

— Freebase

Wigwag

Wigwag

Wigwag is the nickname given to a type of railroad grade crossing signal once common in North America, named for the pendulum-like motion it used to signal the approach of a train. It is generally credited to Albert Hunt, a mechanical engineer at Southern California's Pacific Electric interurban streetcar railroad, who invented it in 1909 for safer railroad grade crossings. The term should not be confused with its usage in Britain, where wigwag is generally used to refer to alternate flashing lights, such as those found at modern level crossings.

— Freebase

Willie Mays

Willie Mays

Willie Howard Mays, Jr. is a retired American professional baseball player who spent the majority of his major league career with the New York and San Francisco Giants before finishing with the New York Mets. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1979 in his first year of eligibility. Mays was nicknamed The Say Hey Kid. Mays won two MVP awards and tied Stan Musial's record with 24 appearances in the All-Star Game. Mays ended his career with 660 home runs, third at the time of his retirement, and currently fourth all-time. He was a center fielder and won a record-tying 12 Gold Gloves starting the year the award was introduced six seasons into his career. Willie Mays' unquestionable career statistics and longevity in the pre-PED era, the more recent acknowledgement of Mays as perhaps the finest five-tool player ever, and the overwhelming consensus of many surveys and other expert analyses carefully examining Mays' relative performance, have led to a growing opinion that Mays was possibly the greatest all-around baseball player of all-time. In 1999, Mays placed second on The Sporting News's "List of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players", making him the highest-ranking living player. Later that year, he was also elected to the Major League Baseball All-Century Team. Mays is one of five National League players to have had eight consecutive 100-RBI seasons, along with Mel Ott, Sammy Sosa, Chipper Jones and Albert Pujols. Mays hit over 50 home runs in 1955 and 1965, representing the longest time span between 50-plus home run seasons for any player in Major League Baseball history.

— Freebase

Absurdism

Absurdism

In philosophy, "the Absurd" refers to the conflict between the human tendency to seek inherent value and meaning in life and the human inability to find any. In this context absurd does not mean "logically impossible", but rather "humanly impossible". The universe and the human mind do not each separately cause the Absurd, but rather, the Absurd arises by the contradictory nature of the two existing simultaneously. Absurdism, therefore, is a philosophical school of thought stating that the efforts of humanity to find inherent meaning will ultimately fail because the sheer amount of information as well as the vast realm of the unknown make certainty impossible. And yet, some absurdists state that one should embrace the absurd condition of humankind while conversely continuing to explore and search for meaning. As a philosophy, absurdism thus also explores the fundamental nature of the Absurd and how individuals, once becoming conscious of the Absurd, should respond to it. Absurdism is very closely related to existentialism and nihilism and has its origins in the 19th century Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard, who chose to confront the crisis humans faced with the Absurd by developing existentialist philosophy. Absurdism as a belief system was born of the European existentialist movement that ensued, specifically when the French Algerian philosopher and writer Albert Camus rejected certain aspects from that philosophical line of thought and published his essay The Myth of Sisyphus. The aftermath of World War II provided the social environment that stimulated absurdist views and allowed for their popular development, especially in the devastated country of France.

— Freebase

Mackenzie

Mackenzie

Mackenzie was a federal electoral district in Saskatchewan, Canada, that was represented in the Canadian House of Commons from 1904 to 1997. This riding was created in 1903, when Saskatchewan was still a part of the Northwest Territories. In 1905, when Saskatchewan was created, the district was retained in the province. The riding was abolished in 1996, and parts of it were merged into the districts of Blackstrap, Churchill River, Prince Albert, Qu'Appelle, Regina—Lumsden—Lake Centre, Saskatoon—Humboldt and Yorkton—Melville.

— Freebase

Mixed Bag

Mixed Bag

Mixed Bag is a 1967 album by Richie Havens. Although often mistaken as his debut, this was actually Havens's third record. It followed two earlier, lesser-known releases on Douglas Records. This was Havens's first record after signing on with manager Albert Grossman which led to this recording on a new folk music section of Verve Records. Mixed Bag is frequently cited as the singer's best work, and was his first album to appear on Billboard's charts. The recording was the first to introduce a wider audience to Havens's rich baritone vocals and the full-sound of Havens's distinct guitar style.

— Freebase

Repunit

Repunit

In recreational mathematics, a repunit is a number like 11, 111, or 1111 that contains only the digit 1 — the simplest form of repdigit. The term stands for repeated unit and was coined in 1966 by Albert H. Beiler. A repunit prime is a repunit that is also a prime number. In binary, these are the widely known Mersenne primes.

— Freebase

Filibuster

Filibuster

A filibuster is a type of parliamentary procedure where debate is extended, allowing one or more members to delay or entirely prevent a vote on a given proposal. It is sometimes referred to as talking out a bill, and characterized as a form of obstruction in a legislature or other decision-making body. The English term "filibuster" derives from the Spanish filibustero, itself deriving originally from the Dutch vrijbuiter, "privateer, pirate, robber". The Spanish form entered the English language in the 1850s, as applied to military adventurers from the United States then operating in Central America and the Spanish West Indies such as William Walker. The term in its legislative sense was first used by Democratic congressman Albert G. Brown of Mississippi in 1853, referring to Abraham Watkins Venable's speech against "filibustering" intervention in Cuba.

— Freebase

Economism

Economism

Economism is reduction of all social facts to economic dimensions. The term is often used to criticize economics as an ideology, in which supply and demand are the only important factors in decisions, and outstrip or permit ignoring all other factors. It is believed to be a side effect of neoclassical economics and blind faith in an "invisible hand" or "laissez-faire" means of making decisions, extended far beyond controlled and regulated markets, and used to make political and military decisions. Conventional ethics would play no role in decisions under pure economism, except insofar as supply would be withheld, demand curtailed, by moral choices of individuals. Thus, critics of economism insist on political and other cultural dimensions in society. The term of "economism" has been widely used in the Marxist discourse since Lenin who criticized Karl Kautsky. Marxist theorists have also often criticized "vulgar Marxism" for its economism about ideological discourse. It was also used by economist Charles Bettelheim, and is sometimes used today to criticize neoliberalism. Old Right social critic Albert Jay Nock used the term more broadly, denoting a moral and social philosophy "which interprets the whole sum of human life in terms of the production, acquisition, and distribution of wealth". He went on to say "I have sometimes thought that here may be the rock on which Western civilization will finally shatter itself. Economism can build a society which is rich, prosperous, powerful, even one which has a reasonably wide diffusion of material well-being. It can not build one which is lovely, one which has savor and depth, and which exercises the irresistible power of attraction that loveliness wields. Perhaps by the time economism has run its course the society it has built may be tired of itself, bored of its own hideousness, and may despairingly consent to annihilation, aware that it is too ugly to be let live any longer."

— Freebase

Head Office

Head Office

Head Office is a 1985 American comedy film, produced by HBO Pictures in association with Silver Screen Partners. It stars Judge Reinhold, Eddie Albert, Lori-Nan Engler, Jane Seymour, Richard Masur, Michael O'Donoghue, Ron Frazier, Merritt Butrick and was directed and written by Ken Finkleman.

— Freebase

Caryota

Caryota

Caryota is a genus of palm trees. They are often known as fishtail palms because of the shape of their leaves. There are about 13 species native to Asia and the South Pacific. One of the more widely known species is Caryota urens, which yields sap used to make an unrefined sugar called jaggery, and also to make palm wine. Caryota mitis is an invasive introduced species in the US state of Florida. They are also one of the few Arecaceae with bipinnate foliage. Many grow in mountainous areas and are adapted to warm mediterranean climates as well as subtropical and tropical climates. Selected species: ⁕Caryota cumingii - Philippines fishtail palm ⁕Caryota gigas - Giant fishtail palm ⁕Caryota mitis - Burmese fishtail palm ⁕Caryota obtusa - Thailand mountain palm ⁕Caryota ochlandra ⁕Caryota rumphiana - Albert palm ⁕Caryota urens - jaggery palm, solitary fishtail palm, wine palm, toddy palm ⁕Caryota zebrina

— Freebase

Exi

Exi

The Exis were a youth movement in Hamburg, Germany, in the 1950s. The Exis took their name from the existentialist movement, and were influenced by its chief proponents, Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus. There are similar German nicknames for other movements, such as "Sozis" and the "Nazis".

— Freebase

Guerrillero Heroico

Guerrillero Heroico

Guerrillero Heroico is an iconic photo of Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara wearing his black beret taken by Alberto Korda. It was taken on March 5, 1960, in Havana, Cuba, at a memorial service for victims of the La Coubre explosion and by the end of the 1960s turned the charismatic and controversial leader into a cultural icon. Korda has said that at the moment he shot the picture, he was drawn to Guevara's facial expression, which showed "absolute implacability" as well as anger and pain. Years later, Korda would say that the photo showed Che's firm and stoic character. Guevara was 31 at the time the photo was taken. Emphasizing the image's ubiquitous nature and wide appeal, the Maryland Institute College of Art called the picture a symbol of the 20th century and the world's most famous photo. Versions of it have been painted, printed, digitized, embroidered, tattooed, silk-screened, sculpted or sketched on nearly every surface imaginable, leading the Victoria and Albert Museum to say that the photo has been reproduced more than any other image in photography. Jonathan Green, director of the UCR/California Museum of Photography, has speculated that "Korda's image has worked its way into languages around the world. It has become an alpha-numeric symbol, a hieroglyph, an instant symbol. It mysteriously reappears whenever there's a conflict. There isn’t anything else in history that serves in this way".

— Freebase

Forodesine

Forodesine

Forodesine is a transition-state analog inhibitor of purine nucleoside phosphorylase under development for the treatment of relapsed B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia Immucillin H was originally discovered by Vern Schramm's laboratory at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York and Industrial Research Limited in New Zealand. Forodesine is being developed by BioCryst Pharmaceuticals as Fodosine. As of 2008, it is currently in phase II clinical trials.

— Freebase

Berber

Berber

Berber is a town in the River Nile state of northern Sudan, 50 km north of Atbara, near the junction of the Atbara River and the Nile. The town was the starting-point of the old caravan route across the Nubian Desert to the Red Sea at Suakin. The first line of defense against the Ottoman empire occurred in this city. Some attempts also occurred in Dar Mahas and Dongola. The tribes inhabiting this city are mainly Ja'Alin with fewer numbers of Ababda. English explorer Samuel Baker passed in Berber on his discovery of Albert Nyanza Lake, in 1861. Berber is one of the first Sudanese towns that knew modern schooling. Many of the elder generation leaders were educated in Berber intermediate school.

— Freebase

Rhizopogonaceae

Rhizopogonaceae

Rhizopogonaceae are a family of fungi in the order Boletales. The family, first named and described by botanists Ernst Albert Gäumann and Carroll William Dodge in 1928, contains 3 genera and 152 species.

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Zero-point energy

Zero-point energy

Zero-point energy, also called quantum vacuum zero-point energy, is the lowest possible energy that a quantum mechanical physical system may have; it is the energy of its ground state. All quantum mechanical systems undergo fluctuations even in their ground state and have an associated zero-point energy, a consequence of their wave-like nature. The uncertainty principle requires every physical system to have a zero-point energy greater than the minimum of its classical potential well. This results in motion even at absolute zero. For example, liquid helium does not freeze under atmospheric pressure at any temperature because of its zero-point energy. The concept of zero-point energy was developed in Germany by Albert Einstein and Otto Stern in 1913, as a corrective term added to a zero-grounded formula developed by Max Planck in 1900. The term zero-point energy originates from the German Nullpunktsenergie. An alternative form of the German term is Nullpunktenergie. Vacuum energy is the zero-point energy of all the fields in space, which in the Standard Model includes the electromagnetic field, other gauge fields, fermionic fields, and the Higgs field. It is the energy of the vacuum, which in quantum field theory is defined not as empty space but as the ground state of the fields. In cosmology, the vacuum energy is one possible explanation for the cosmological constant. A related term is zero-point field, which is the lowest energy state of a particular field.

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Sézary's disease

Sézary's disease

Sézary's disease is a type of cutaneous lymphoma that was first described by Albert Sézary. The affected cells are T-cells that have pathological quantities of mucopolysaccharides. Sézary's disease is sometimes considered a late stage of mycosis fungoides with lymphadenopathy. There are currently no known causes of Sézary's disease.

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Tacrine

Tacrine

Tacrine is a centrally acting anticholinesterase and indirect cholinergic agonist. It was the first centrally-acting cholinesterase inhibitor approved for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, and was marketed under the trade name Cognex. Tacrine was first synthesised by Adrien Albert at the University of Sydney. See William_K._Summers He is listed as inventor of Tacrine. It also acts as a histamine N-methyltransferase inhibitor.

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Dundee

Dundee

Dundee, officially the City of Dundee, is the fourth-largest city in Scotland. It lies within the eastern central Lowlands on the north bank of the Firth of Tay, which feeds into the North Sea. Under the name of Dundee City, it forms one of the 32 council areas used for local government in Scotland. The town developed into a burgh in Medieval times, and expanded rapidly in the 19th century largely due to the jute industry. This, along with its other major industries gave Dundee its epithet as the city of "jute, jam and journalism". In mid-2012, the population of the City of Dundee was estimated to be 156,561. Dundee's recorded population reached a peak of 182,204 at the time of the 1971 census, but has since declined. Today, Dundee is promoted as 'One City, Many Discoveries' in honour of Dundee's history of scientific activities and of the RRS Discovery, Robert Falcon Scott's Antarctic exploration vessel, which was built in Dundee and is now berthed in the city harbour. Biomedical and technological industries have arrived since the 1980s, and the city now accounts for 10% of the United Kingdom's digital-entertainment industry. Dundee has two universities—the University of Dundee and the University of Abertay Dundee. A £1,000,000,000 master plan to regenerate and to reconnect the Waterfront to the city centre which started in 2001 is expected to be completed within a 30 year period, with the Dundee Victoria & Albert Museum opening by 2015, at a cost of £45 million.

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Einsteinium

Einsteinium

Einsteinium is a synthetic element with the symbol Es and atomic number 99. It is the seventh transuranic element, and an actinide. Einsteinium was discovered as a component of the debris of the first hydrogen bomb explosion in 1952, and named after Albert Einstein. Its most common isotope einsteinium-253 is produced artificially from decay of californium-253 in a few dedicated high-power nuclear reactors with a total yield on the order of one milligram per year. The reactor synthesis is followed by a complex procedure of separating einsteinium-253 from other actinides and products of their decay. Other isotopes are synthesized in various laboratories, but at much smaller amounts, by bombarding heavy actinide elements with light ions. Owing to the small amounts of produced einsteinium and the short half-life of its most easily produced isotope, there are currently almost no practical applications for it outside of basic scientific research. In particular, einsteinium was used to synthesize, for the first time, 17 atoms of the new element mendelevium in 1955. Einsteinium is a soft, silvery, paramagnetic metal. Its chemistry is typical of the late actinides, with a preponderance of the +3 oxidation state; the +2 oxidation state is also accessible, especially in solids. The high radioactivity of einsteinium-253 produces a visible glow and rapidly damages its crystalline metal lattice, with released heat of about 1000 watts per gram. Difficulty in studying its properties is due to einsteinium-253's conversion to berkelium and then californium at a rate of about 3% per day. The isotope of einsteinium with the longest half life, einsteinium-252 would be more suitable for investigation of physical properties, but it has proven far more difficult to produce and is available only in minute quantities, and not in bulk. Einsteinium is the element with the highest atomic number which has been observed in macroscopic quantities in its pure form, and this was the common short-lived isotope einsteinium-253.

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Michelson–Morley experiment

Michelson–Morley experiment

The Michelson–Morley experiment was performed in 1887 by Albert Michelson and Edward Morley at what is now Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio. It attempted to detect the relative motion of matter through the stationary luminiferous aether. The negative results are generally considered to be the first strong evidence against the then prevalent aether theory, and initiated a line of research that eventually led to special relativity, in which the stationary aether concept has no role. The experiment has been referred to as "the moving-off point for the theoretical aspects of the Second Scientific Revolution". Michelson–Morley type experiments have been repeated many times with steadily increasing sensitivity. These include experiments from 1902 to 1905, and a series of experiments in the 1920s. In addition, recent resonator experiments have confirmed the absence of any aether wind at the 10−17 level. Together with the Ives–Stilwell and Kennedy–Thorndike experiments, it forms one of the fundamental tests of special relativity theory.

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Sideman

Sideman

A sideman is a professional musician who is hired to perform or record with a group of which he or she is not a regular member. They often tour with solo acts as well as bands and jazz ensembles. Sidemen are generally required to be adaptable to many different styles of music, and so able to fit smoothly into the group in which they are currently playing. Often aspiring musicians start out as sidemen, and then move on to develop their own sound, a name, and fans of their own, or go on to form their own groups. Some examples of this are: ⁕James Burton and Glen D. Hardin, playing guitar and keyboards respectively, who performed in the backing band for Elvis Presley, also backed Gram Parsons before joining newcomer Rodney Crowell and veteran Albert Lee in Emmylou Harris' "Hot Band". ⁕Don Henley and Glenn Frey were in the initial backup band for Linda Ronstadt, which toured in support of her eponymous debut album. Afterwards, with the addition of Joe Walsh and Don Felder, they formed the Eagles. Some sidemen become famous for their musical specialties, and become highly sought-after by pop, rock, blues, jazz and country music bands. Examples of some of these include multi-instrumentalists. David Lindley is a multi-instrumentalist who has worked with such diverse musicians as Curtis Mayfield, Dolly Parton, Jackson Browne, and Hani Naser. Lindley used his time as a sideman to discover and master new instruments while on tour around the world, becoming proficient on ethnic instruments rarely seen in Western music genres. He has mastered so many that he admits to losing count, and instead placed a photo gallery of them on his website.

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Ernest Solvay

Ernest Solvay

Ernest Gaston Joseph Solvay was a Belgian chemist, industrialist and philanthropist. Born at Rebecq, he was prevented by acute pleurisy from going to university. He worked in his uncle's chemical factory from the age of 21. In 1861, he developed the ammonia-soda process for the manufacture of soda ash from brine and limestone. The process was an improvement over the earlier Leblanc process. He founded the company Solvay & Cie and established his first factory at Couillet in 1863 and further perfected the process until 1872, when he patented it. Soon, Solvay process plants were established in the United Kingdom, the United States, Germany and Austria. Today, about 70 Solvay process plants are still operational worldwide. The exploitation of his patents brought Solvay considerable wealth, which he used for philanthropic purposes, including the establishment in 1894 of the "Institut des Sciences Sociales" or Institute for Sociology at the Free University of Brussels, as well as International Institutes for Physics and Chemistry. In 1903, he founded the Solvay Business School which is also part of the Free University of Brussels. In 1911, he began a series of important conferences in physics, known as the Solvay Conferences, whose participants included luminaries such as Max Planck, Ernest Rutherford, Maria Skłodowska-Curie, Henri Poincaré, and Albert Einstein. A later conference would include Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, Max Born, and Erwin Schrödinger.

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Ticker

Ticker

Ticker is a 2001 action film directed by Albert Pyun, starring Tom Sizemore, Jaime Pressly, Dennis Hopper, Steven Seagal, Ice-T, Kevin Gage, and Nas.

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Moncton

Moncton

Moncton is a Canadian city located in Westmorland County in southeastern New Brunswick. Situated in the Petitcodiac River Valley, it lies at the geographic centre of the Maritime Provinces. The city has gained the nickname "Hub City" because of its central location and also because Moncton has historically been the railway and land transportation hub for the Maritimes. The city proper has a population of 69,074. The city covers 142 square kilometres. The Moncton CMA has a population of 138,644. The CMA includes the neighbouring city of Dieppe and the town of Riverview, as well as adjacent suburban areas in Westmorland and Albert counties. Although the area was originally settled in 1733, Moncton is considered to have been officially founded in 1766 with the arrival of Pennsylvania Dutch immigrants from Philadelphia. Initially an agricultural settlement, Moncton was not incorporated until 1855. It was named for Lt. Col. Robert Monckton, the British officer who had captured nearby Fort Beauséjour a century earlier. A significant wooden shipbuilding industry had developed in the community by the mid-1840s, allowing for civic incorporation in 1855, but the shipbuilding economy collapsed in the 1860s, causing the town to subsequently lose its charter in 1862. Moncton regained its charter in 1875 after the community's economy rebounded, mainly due to a growing railway industry. In 1871, the Intercolonial Railway of Canada had chosen Moncton to be its headquarters, and Moncton remained a railroad town for well over a century until the closure of the Canadian National Railway locomotive shops in the late 1980s.

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Royal Flush

Royal Flush

Royal Flush is a solitaire card game which is played with a deck of 52 playing cards. The game is so called because the aim of the game is to end up with a royal flush of any suit. However, the game is so much mechanical in nature that there is currently no electronic or computer implementation. Its rules are so far included in printed matter such as The Complete Book of Solitaire and Patience Games by Albert Morehead and Geoffrey Mott-Smith and 100 Best Solitaire Games by Sloane Lee and Gabriel Packard.

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Corpuscular theory of light

Corpuscular theory of light

In optics, corpuscular theory of light, originally set forward by Pierre Gassendi, states that light is made up of small discrete particles called "corpuscles" which travel in a straight line with a finite velocity and possess kinetic energy. It was largely developed by Sir Isaac Newton. Newton's theory remained in force for more than 100 years and took precedence over Huygens' wave front theory, partly because of Newton’s great prestige. However when the corpuscular theory failed to adequately explain the diffraction, interference and polarization of light it was abandoned in favour of Huygen's wave theory. Newton's corpuscular theory was an elaboration of his view of reality as interactions of material points through forces. Note Albert Einstein's description of Newton's conception of physical reality: [Newton's] physical reality is characterised by concepts of space, time, the material point and force. Physical events are to be thought of as movements according to law of material points in space. The material point is the only representative of reality in so far as it is subject to change. The concept of the material point is obviously due to observable bodies; one conceived of the material point on the analogy of movable bodies by omitting characteristics of extension, form, spatial locality, and all their 'inner' qualities, retaining only inertia, translation, and the additional concept of force.

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Einstein field equations

Einstein field equations

The Einstein field equations or Einstein's equations are a set of 10 equations in Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity which describe the fundamental interaction of gravitation as a result of spacetime being curved by matter and energy. First published by Einstein in 1915 as a tensor equation, the EFE equate local spacetime curvature with the local energy and momentum within that spacetime. Similar to the way that electromagnetic fields are determined using charges and currents via Maxwell's equations, the EFE are used to determine the spacetime geometry resulting from the presence of mass-energy and linear momentum, that is, they determine the metric tensor of spacetime for a given arrangement of stress–energy in the spacetime. The relationship between the metric tensor and the Einstein tensor allows the EFE to be written as a set of non-linear partial differential equations when used in this way. The solutions of the EFE are the components of the metric tensor. The inertial trajectories of particles and radiation in the resulting geometry are then calculated using the geodesic equation.

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Leó Szilárd

Leó Szilárd

Leó Szilárd was a Hungarian- born American physicist and inventor. He conceived the nuclear chain reaction in 1933, patented the idea of a nuclear reactor with Enrico Fermi, and in late 1939 wrote the letter for Albert Einstein's signature that resulted in the Manhattan Project that built the atomic bomb. He also conceived the electron microscope, the linear accelerator and the cyclotron. Szilárd himself did not build all of these devices, or publish these ideas in scientific journals, and so their credit often went to others. As a result, Szilárd never received the Nobel Prize, but others were awarded the Prize as a result of their work on two of his inventions. He was born in Budapest in the Kingdom of Hungary, and died in La Jolla, California.

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Out of Sight

Out of Sight

Out of Sight is a 1998 American crime film based on the novel of the same name by Elmore Leonard and directed by Steven Soderbergh. The first of several collaborations between Soderbergh and star George Clooney, it was released on June 26, 1998. Jennifer Lopez also stars, along with Ving Rhames, Don Cheadle, Dennis Farina, Catherine Keener, Steve Zahn and Albert Brooks. The film received Academy Award nominations for Adapted Screenplay and Editing. It won the Edgar Award for best screenplay and the National Society of Film Critics awards for best film, screenplay, and director. It led to a spinoff TV series in 2003, Karen Sisco.

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Henry Wood

Henry Wood

Sir Henry Joseph Wood, CH was an English conductor best known for his association with London's annual series of promenade concerts, known as the Proms. He conducted them for nearly half a century, introducing hundreds of new works to British audiences. After his death, the concerts were officially renamed in his honour as the "Henry Wood Promenade Concerts", although they continued to be generally referred to as "the Proms". Born in modest circumstances to parents who encouraged his musical talent, Wood started his career as an organist. During his studies at the Royal Academy of Music, he came under the influence of the voice teacher Manuel Garcia and became his accompanist. After similar work for Richard D'Oyly Carte's opera companies on the works of Arthur Sullivan and others, Wood became the conductor of a small operatic touring company. He was soon engaged by the larger Carl Rosa Opera Company. One notable event in his operatic career was conducting the British premiere of Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin in 1892. From the mid-1890s until his death, Wood focused on concert conducting. He was engaged by the impresario Robert Newman to conduct a series of promenade concerts at the Queen's Hall, offering a mixture of classical and popular music at low prices. The series was successful, and Wood conducted annual promenade series until his death in 1944. By the 1920s, Wood had steered the repertoire entirely to classical music. When the Queen's Hall was destroyed by bombing in 1941, the Proms moved to the Royal Albert Hall.

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Negev

Negev

The Negev is a desert and semidesert region of southern Israel. The region's largest city and administrative capital is Beersheba, in the north. At its southern end is the Gulf of Aqaba and the resort city of Eilat. It contains several development towns, including Dimona, Arad and Mitzpe Ramon, as well as a number of small Bedouin cities, including Rahat and Tel as-Sabi. There are also several kibbutzim, including Revivim and Sde Boker; the latter became the home of Israel's first Prime Minister, David Ben-Gurion, after his retirement from politics. The desert is home to the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, whose faculties include the Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research and the Albert Katz International School for Desert Studies, both located on the Midreshet Ben-Gurion campus adjacent to Sde Boker. In October 2012, global travel guide publisher Lonely Planet rated the Negev second on a list of the world's top ten regional travel destinations for 2013, noting its current transformation through development.

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Coniine

Coniine

Coniine is a poisonous alkaloid found in poison hemlock and the yellow pitcher plant, and contributes to hemlock's fetid smell. It is a neurotoxin which disrupts the peripheral nervous system. It is toxic to humans and all classes of livestock; less than 0.2g is fatal to humans, with death caused by respiratory paralysis. Socrates was put to death by means of this poison in 399 BC. Coniine has two stereoisomers:--coniine, and--coniine, both of which are present in hemlock. Coniine was first synthesized by Albert Ladenburg in 1886; it was the first of the alkaloids to be synthesized.

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Epic poetry

Epic poetry

An epic is a lengthy narrative poem, ordinarily concerning a serious subject containing details of heroic deeds and events significant to a culture or nation. Oral poetry may qualify as an epic, and Albert Lord and Milman Parry have argued that classical epics were fundamentally an oral poetic form. Another type of epic poetry is epyllion, which is a brief narrative poem with a romantic or mythological theme. The term, which means 'little epic', came into use in the nineteenth century. It refers primarily to the erudite, shorter hexameter poems of the Hellenistic period and the similar works composed at Rome from the age of the neoterics; to a lesser degree, the term includes some poems of the English Renaissance, particularly those influenced by Ovid. The most famous example of classical epyllion is perhaps Catullus 64. Some of the most famous examples of epic poetry include the Ramayana, Mahabharata, the Ancient Greek Iliad and the Odyssey, the Old English Beowulf, or the Portuguese Lusiads.

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Logical topology

Logical topology

Logical topology is the arrangement of devices on a computer network and how they communicate with one another. How devices are connected to the network through the actual cables that transmit data, or the physical structure of the network, is called the physical topology. Physical topology defines how the systems are physically connected. It represents the physical layout of the devices on the network. Where, the Logical topology defines how the systems communicate across the physical topologies. Logical topologies are bound to network protocols and describe how data is moved across the network. There are attempts to study the logical topology of the Internet by network scientists such as Albert-László Barabási. EXAMPLE : twisted pair Ethernet is a logical bus topology in a physical star topology layout. while IBM's token ring is a logical ring topology, it is physically set up in star topology. There are two main types of logical topologies: • shared media topology • token-based topology Shared Media In a shared media topology, all the systems have the ability to access the physical layout whenever they need it. The main advantage in a shared media topology is that the systems have unrestricted access to the physical media. Of course, the main disadvantage to this topology is collisions. If two systems send information out on the wire at the same time, the packets collide and kill both packets. Ethernet is an example of a shared media topology. To help avoid the collision problem, Ethernet uses a protocol called Carrier Sense Multiple Access/Collision Detection. In this protocol, each system monitors the wire, listening for traffic. If traffic is detected, the system waits until it hears no traffic before it sends packets out. If a situation occurs where two systems send out packets at the same time and a collision occurs, each system waits for a period of time before it retries. This time period is different for each system, so that the collision does not occur again. For small networks, the shared media topology works fine; however, as you begin to add more systems to the network, there is a greater opportunity for collisions. To help reduce the number of collisions, many networks are broken up into several smaller networks with the use of switches or hubs, and each network is then referred to as its own collision domain. Shared media networks are typically deployed in a bus, star, or hybrid physical topology. Logical topology and physical topology are parts of network topology.

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Flying frog

Flying frog

A "flying" frog is a frog that has the ability to achieve gliding flight. That is, it can descend at an angle of less than 45° relative to the horizontal. Other arboreal frogs can also descend vertically, but only at angles greater than 45°, which is referred to as parachuting. Gliding flight has evolved independently among 3,400 species of frogs from both New World and Old World families. This parallel evolution is seen as an adaptation to their life in trees, high above the ground. Characteristics of the Old World species include "enlarged hands and feet, full webbing between all fingers and toes, lateral skin flaps on the arms and legs, and reduced weight per snout-vent length". These morphological changes contribute to the flying frog's aerodynamic abilities. Alfred Russel Wallace made one of the earliest reports of a flying frog. The species he observed was later described by George Albert Boulenger as Rhacophorus nigropalmatus. Flying frogs includes members of the following genera: ⁕Ecnomiohyla ⁕Polypedates ⁕Rhacophorus

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Wasabi

Wasabi

Wasabi is a social networking website in Europe, with 4.5 million members. The site was formed in 2001 as Passado, by two school friends who thought it would be interesting if people who left their school or university could just keep in touch. Passado then expanded rapidly and became one of the most successful European reunion platform for school friends and work colleagues. Nowadays it is re-building itself to be the leading European Social Network. In the past few years Wasabi has added more Web 2.0 functionality including blogging, photo sharing, reviews and a groups section. With growing communities in Spain, France, Germany and recently Italy. The Headquarters of Wasabi are situated in London /Great Britain. In late 2008, i-CD Publishing Ltd, the legal entity behind Wasabi, filed a lawsuit against its former employee, Albert Popkov, for launching a popular Russian social networking site odnoklassniki.ru claiming that he illegally used some of the data and knowledge acquired during his work on Passado project. As of 25/06/2011, the following message is displayed on the website: 'Sorry, we are closing down the site for internal reasons, we apologise for any inconvenience. Thank you for supporting us.'

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Observational learning

Observational learning

Observational learning is the learning that occurs through observing the behavior of other people. Albert Bandura, who is best known for the classic Bobo doll experiment, discovered this basic form of learning in 1986. Bandura stressed the importance of observational learning because it allowed children especially, to acquire new responses through observing others' behavior. This form of learning does not need reinforcement to occur; instead, a model is required. A social model can be a parent, sibling, friend, or teacher, but particularly in childhood a model is someone of authority or higher status. A social model is significantly important in observational learning because it allows one to cognitively process behavior, encode what is observed, and store it in memory for later imitation. While the model may not be intentionally trying to instill any particular behavior, many behaviors that one observes, remembers and imitates are actions that models display. A child may learn to swear, smack, smoke, and deem other inappropriate behavior acceptable through poor modeling. Bandura claims that children continually learn desirable and undesirable behavior through observational learning. Observational learning suggests that an individual's environment, cognition, and behavior all integrate and ultimately determine how one functions. Through observational learning, behaviors of an individual can spread across a culture through a process known as diffusion chain, which basically occurs when an individual first learns a behavior by observing another individual and that individual serves as a model through whom other individuals will learn the behavior and so on so forth.

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Al Gore

Al Gore

Albert Arnold "Al" Gore, Jr. is an American politician, advocate and philanthropist, who served as the 45th Vice President of the United States, under President Bill Clinton. He was the Democratic Party's nominee for President and lost the 2000 U.S. presidential election despite winning the popular vote. Gore is currently an author and environmental activist. He has founded a number of non-profit organizations, including the Alliance for Climate Protection, and has received a Nobel Peace Prize for his work in climate change activism. Gore was an elected official for 24 years. He was a Congressman from Tennessee from 1977–85 and from 1985–93 served as one of the state's Senators. He served as Vice-President during the Clinton administration from 1993-2001. In the 2000 presidential election, Gore won the popular vote but lost the Electoral College to Republican George W. Bush. An election dispute over a vote recount in Florida was settled by the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled 5-4 in favor of Bush. Gore is the founder and current chair of the Alliance for Climate Protection, the co-founder and chair of Generation Investment Management, the co-founder and chair of Current TV, a member of the Board of Directors of Apple Inc., and a senior adviser to Google. Gore is also a partner in the venture capital firm, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, heading its climate change solutions group. He has served as a visiting professor at Middle Tennessee State University, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, Fisk University, and the University of California, Los Angeles. He is also a member of the Board of Directors of World Resources Institute.

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Clumber Spaniel

Clumber Spaniel

The Clumber Spaniel is a breed of dog of the spaniel type, developed in the United Kingdom. It is the largest of the spaniels, and comes in predominantly one colour. The name of the breed is taken from Clumber Park in Nottinghamshire. It is a gundog that specialises in hunting in heavy cover. They are gentle and loyal, and can act aloof with strangers. They have several habits which could be considered disadvantages, including a constant shedding of its coat, snoring and the production of excessive drool. The history of the breed is uncertain prior to the mid-19th century with two theories being prevalent. Clumber Spaniels have been kept and bred by various British Monarchs, including Prince Albert, King Edward VII and King George V. They were introduced into Canada in 1844, and in 1884 became one of the first ten breeds recognised by the American Kennel Club. The breed can suffer from a variety of breed-specific ailments varying in severity from temporary lameness due to bone growth whilst young to hip dysplasia or spinal disc herniation.

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Dromomania

Dromomania

Dromomania, also travelling fugue, is an uncontrollable psychological urge to wander. People with this condition spontaneously depart from their routine, travel long distances and take up different identities and occupations. Months may pass before they return to their former identities. The term comes from the Greek: dromos and mania. The most famous case was that of Jean-Albert Dadas, a Bordeaux gas-fitter. Dadas would suddenly set out on foot and reach cities as far away as Prague, Vienna or Moscow with no memory of his travels. A medical student, Philippe Tissie, wrote about Dadas in his doctoral dissertation in 1887. Jean-Martin Charcot presented a similar case he called automatisme ambulatoire - French for "ambulatory automatism" or "walking around without being in control of one's own actions." Only a handful of cases of such behaviour have been documented, nearly all in France in the late nineteenth century. On the other hand, dromomania in wider sense can be characteristic of other mental disorders, e.g. Borderline personality disorder. More generally, the term is sometimes used to describe people who have a strong emotional or even physical need to be constantly traveling and experiencing new places, often at the expense of their normal family, work, and social lives.

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Crowfoot

Crowfoot

Crowfoot or Isapo-Muxika was a chief of the Siksika First Nation. His parents, Istowun-eh'pata and Axkahp-say-pi, were Kainai. His brother Iron Shield became Chief Bull. He was only five when Istowun-eh'pata was killed during a raid on the Crow tribe, and a year later, his mother remarried to Akay-nehka-simi of the Siksika people. The young boy was adopted by the Siksika, who gave him the name Kyi-i-staah, until he could receive his father’s name, Istowun-eh’pata. Because of his brave performance and injury during the battle, he was finally given his adult name, Isapo-muxika, taken from a deceased relative. Crowfoot was a warrior who fought in as many as 19 battles and sustained many injuries. Despite this, he tried to obtain peace instead of tribal warfare. When the Canadian Pacific Railway sought to build their mainline through Blackfoot territory, negotiations with Albert Lacombe convinced Crowfoot that it should be allowed. In 1877 Colonel James Macleod and Lieutenant-Governor David Laird drew up Treaty Number 7 and persuaded Crowfoot and other chiefs to sign it. In gratitude Canadian Pacific Railway President William Van Horne gave Crowfoot a lifetime pass to ride on the CPR.

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Pirate ship

Pirate ship

A pirate ship is a type of amusement ride, consisting of an open, seated gondola which swings back and forth, subjecting the rider to various levels of angular momentum. The first known predecessor of the ride was invented by Charles Albert Marshall of Tulsa, Oklahoma between 1893 and 1897. This ride was originally called "The Ocean Wave". The Ocean Wave was first used in the Marshall Bros Circus in 1897. The circus was run by Charles and his brothers Mike, Will, Ed, friends, and family.

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House of Hanover

House of Hanover

The House of Hanover is a German royal dynasty which has ruled the Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg, the Kingdom of Hanover, the Kingdom of Great Britain, the Kingdom of Ireland and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. It succeeded the House of Stuart as monarchs of Great Britain and Ireland in 1714 and held that office until the death of Queen Victoria in 1901. They are sometimes referred to as the House of Brunswick and Lüneburg, Hanover line. The House of Hanover is a younger branch of the House of Welf, which in turn is the senior branch of the House of Este. Queen Victoria was the granddaughter of George III, and was an ancestor of most major European royal houses. She arranged marriages for her children and grandchildren across the continent, tying Europe together; this earned her the nickname "the grandmother of Europe". She was the last British monarch of the House of Hanover; her son King Edward VII belonged to the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, the line of his father, Prince Albert. Under semi-Salic law, Victoria could not inherit the German kingdom and duchies unless the entire male line became extinct; those possessions passed to the next eligible male heir, her uncle Ernest Augustus I of Hanover, the Duke of Cumberland and Teviotdale—the fifth son of George III.

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Pornified

Pornified

Pornified: How Pornography Is Damaging Our Lives, Our Relationships, and Our Families is a 2005 book by American writer Pamela Paul, discussing the impact of ready access to pornography on Americans. The book was selected as one of the best books of 2005 by The San Francisco Chronicle and was a New York Times Book Review Editor's Choice. Social conservatives such as Albert Mohler, President of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, endorsed the book enthusiastically, though he predicted it might "find a chilly reception in a society increasingly given over to the titillation, perversion, and profits offered by pornography." The Washington Post Book World characterized the book as "A persuasive argument that today’s pornography is not the Playboy centerfold or the Deep Throat of yesteryear…Paul’s remedy charts a sensible middle ground between restraints and free speech." Sex columnist Amy Sohn, on the other hand, cared less for the book and argued in the New York Times Book Review that "Paul never gives credence to the many women who enjoy consuming porn, alone or with partners."

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Don Juan

Don Juan

Don Juan or Don Giovanni is a legendary, fictional libertine whose story has been told many times by many authors. El burlador de Sevilla y convidado de piedra by Tirso de Molina is a play set in the fourteenth century that was published in Spain around 1630. Evidence suggests it is the first written version of the Don Juan legend. Among the best known works about this character today are Molière's play Dom Juan ou le Festin de pierre, Byron's epic poem Don Juan, José de Espronceda's poem El estudiante de Salamanca and José Zorrilla's play Don Juan Tenorio. Along with Zorrilla's work, arguably the best known version is Don Giovanni, an opera composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart with libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte, first performed in Prague in 1787 and itself the source of inspiration for works by E. T. A. Hoffmann, Alexander Pushkin, Søren Kierkegaard, George Bernard Shaw and Albert Camus. Don Juan is used synonymously for "womanizer", especially in Spanish slang, and is often used in reference to hypersexuality.

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Madman Atomic Comics

Madman Atomic Comics

Madman is a fictional character, a comic book superhero that appears in comic books published by Image Comics. Created by Mike Allred, the character first appeared in Creatures of the Id. His name, a combination of Frank Sinatra and Albert Einstein, is also a reference to Frankenstein.

— Freebase

Max Planck

Max Planck

Max Karl Ernst Ludwig Planck, FRS was a German theoretical physicist who originated quantum theory, which won him the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1918. Planck made many contributions to theoretical physics, but his fame rests primarily on his role as originator of the quantum theory. This theory revolutionized human understanding of atomic and subatomic processes, just as Albert Einstein’s theory of relativity revolutionized the understanding of space and time. Together they constitute the fundamental theories of 20th-century physics.

— Freebase

Critical opalescence

Critical opalescence

Critical opalescence is a phenomenon which arises in the region of a continuous, or second-order, phase transition. Originally reported by Thomas Andrews in 1869 for the liquid-gas transition in carbon dioxide, many other examples have been discovered since. The phenomenon is most commonly demonstrated in binary fluid mixtures, such as methanol and cyclohexane. As the critical point is approached, the sizes of the gas and liquid region begin to fluctuate over increasingly large length scales. As the density fluctuations become of a size comparable to the wavelength of light, the light is scattered and causes the normally transparent liquid to appear cloudy. Tellingly, the opalescence does not diminish as one gets closer to the critical point, where the largest fluctuations can reach even centimetre proportions, confirming the physical relevance of smaller fluctuations. In 1908 the Polish physicist Marian Smoluchowski became the first to ascribe the phenomenon of critical opalescence to large density fluctuations. In 1910 Albert Einstein showed that the link between critical opalescence and Rayleigh scattering is quantitative.

— Freebase

Albert Sabin

Albert Sabin

Albert Bruce Sabin was an American medical researcher best known for having developed an oral polio vaccine.

— Freebase

Albert Speer

Albert Speer

Berthold Konrad Hermann Albert Speer was a German architect who was, for a part of World War II, Minister of Armaments and War Production for the Third Reich. Speer was Adolf Hitler's chief architect before assuming ministerial office. As "the Nazi who said sorry", he accepted moral responsibility at the Nuremberg trials and in his memoirs for complicity in crimes of the Nazi regime. His level of involvement in the persecution of the Jews and his level of knowledge of the Holocaust remain matters of dispute. Speer joined the Nazi Party in 1931, launching him on a political and governmental career which lasted fourteen years. His architectural skills made him increasingly prominent within the Party and he became a member of Hitler's inner circle. Hitler instructed him to design and construct a number of structures, including the Reich Chancellery and the Zeppelinfeld stadium in Nuremberg where Party rallies were held. Speer also made plans to reconstruct Berlin on a grand scale, with huge buildings, wide boulevards, and a reorganized transportation system. In February 1942, Hitler appointed Speer Minister of Armaments and War Production. Under his leadership, Germany's war production continued to increase despite considerable Allied bombing. After the war, he was tried at Nuremberg and sentenced to 20 years in prison for his role in the Nazi regime, principally for the use of forced labor. He served his full sentence, most of it at Spandau Prison in West Berlin.

— Freebase

Binge eating disorder

Binge eating disorder

Binge eating disorder is the most common eating disorder in the United States affecting 3.5% of females and 2% of males and is prevalent in up to 30% of those seeking weight loss treatment. Although it was not classified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders as an eating disorder until 2013, it was first described in 1959 by psychiatrist and researcher Albert Stunkard as "Night Eating Syndrome", and the term "Binge Eating Disorder" was coined to describe the same binging-type eating behavior without the exclusive nocturnal component. BED usually leads to obesity although it can occur in normal weight individuals. There may be a genetic inheritance factor involved in BED independent of other obesity risks and there is also a higher incidence of psychiatric comorbidity, with the percentage of individuals with BED and an Axis I comorbid psychiatric disorder being 78.9% and for those with subclinical BED, 63.6%.

— Freebase

Grace Kelly

Grace Kelly

Grace Patricia Kelly was an American actress who, in April 1956, married Rainier III, Prince of Monaco, to become princess consort of Monaco, styled as Her Serene Highness The Princess of Monaco and commonly referred to as Princess Grace or Princess Gracia. After embarking on an acting career in 1950, at the age of 20, Grace Kelly appeared in New York City theatrical productions as well as in more than forty episodes of live drama productions broadcast during the early 1950s Golden Age of Television. In October 1953, with the release of Mogambo, she became a movie star, a status confirmed in 1954 with a Golden Globe Award and Academy Award nomination as well as leading roles in five films, including The Country Girl, in which she gave a deglamorized, Academy Award-winning performance. She retired from acting at 26 to enter upon her duties in Monaco. She and Prince Rainier had three children: Caroline, Albert, and Stéphanie. She also retained her American roots, maintaining dual US and Monégasque citizenships. She died after suffering a stroke on September 14, 1982, when she lost control of her automobile and crashed. Her daughter, Princess Stéphanie, was in the car with her, and survived the accident.

— Freebase

Teapot Dome scandal

Teapot Dome scandal

The Teapot Dome scandal was a bribery incident that took place in the United States from 1920 to 1923, during the administration of President Warren G. Harding. Secretary of the Interior Albert B. Fall leased Navy petroleum reserves at Teapot Dome in Wyoming and two other locations in California to private oil companies at low rates without competitive bidding. In 1922 and 1923, the leases became the subject of a sensational investigation by Senator Thomas J. Walsh. Fall was later convicted of accepting bribes from the oil companies. Before the Watergate scandal, Teapot Dome was regarded as the "greatest and most sensational scandal in the history of American politics". The scandal also was a key factor in posthumously further destroying the public reputation of the Harding administration, which was already unpopular due to its poor handling of the Great Railroad Strike of 1922 and the President's veto of the Bonus Bill in 1922.

— Freebase

Hard Bargain

Hard Bargain

Hard Bargain is a Blues album by Albert King, released in 1996 with outtakes and previously unreleased material recorded between 1966 and 1972.

— Freebase

Victor Horta

Victor Horta

Victor, Baron Horta was a Belgian architect and designer. John Julius Norwich described him as "undoubtedly the key European Art Nouveau architect." Indeed, Horta is one of the most important names in Art Nouveau architecture; the construction of his Hôtel Tassel in Brussels in 1892-3 means that he is sometimes credited as the first to introduce the style to architecture from the decorative arts. The French architect Hector Guimard was deeply influenced by Horta and further spread the "whiplash" style in France and abroad. In 1932 King Albert I of Belgium conferred on Horta the title of Baron for his services to architecture. Four of the buildings he designed have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

— Freebase

Cosmological constant

Cosmological constant

In cosmology, the cosmological constant is equivalent to an energy density in otherwise empty space. It was proposed by Albert Einstein as a modification of his original theory of general relativity to achieve a static universe. Einstein abandoned the concept after the observation of the Hubble redshift indicated that the universe might not be stationary, as he had based his theory on the idea that the universe is unchanging. However, a number of observations including the discovery of cosmic acceleration in 1998 have revived the cosmological constant. The Lambda-CDM model of the Universe asserts that Λ is positive, although negligible even on the scale of the Milky Way.

— Freebase

Immunostaining

Immunostaining

Immunostaining is a general term in biochemistry that applies to any use of an antibody-based method to detect a specific protein in a sample. The term immunostaining was originally used to refer to the immunohistochemical staining of tissue sections, as first described by Albert Coons in 1941. Now however, immunostaining encompasses a broad range of techniques used in histology, cell biology, and molecular biology that utilise antibody-based staining methods.

— Freebase

Frank Sinatra

Frank Sinatra

Francis Albert "Frank" Sinatra was an American singer and film actor. Beginning his musical career in the swing era with Harry James and Tommy Dorsey, Sinatra found unprecedented success as a solo artist from the early to mid-1940s after being signed by Columbia Records in 1943. Being the idol of the "bobby soxers", he released his first album, The Voice of Frank Sinatra in 1946. His professional career had stalled by the 1950s, but it was reborn in 1953 after he won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in From Here to Eternity. He signed with Capitol Records in 1953 and released several critically lauded albums. Sinatra left Capitol to found his own record label, Reprise Records in 1961, toured internationally, was a founding member of the Rat Pack and fraternized with celebrities and statesmen, including John F. Kennedy. Sinatra turned 50 in 1965, recorded the retrospective September of My Years, starred in the Emmy-winning television special Frank Sinatra: A Man and His Music, and scored hits with "Strangers in the Night" and "My Way". With sales of his music dwindling and after appearing in several poorly received films, Sinatra retired for the first time in 1971. Two years later, however, he came out of retirement and in 1973 recorded several albums, scoring a Top 40 hit with " New York, New York" in 1980. Using his Las Vegas shows as a home base, he toured both within the United States and internationally, until a short time before his death in 1998. Sinatra also forged a highly successful career as a film actor. After winning Best Supporting Actor in 1953, he also garnered a nomination for Best Actor for The Man with the Golden Arm, and critical acclaim for his performance in The Manchurian Candidate. He also starred in such musicals as High Society, Pal Joey, Guys and Dolls and On the Town.

— Freebase

Vitallium

Vitallium

Vitallium is a trademark for an alloy of 60% cobalt, 20% chromium, 5% molybdenum, and other substances. The alloy is used in dentistry and artificial joints, because of its light weight and resistance to corrosion. It is also used for components of turbochargers because of its thermal resistance. Vitallium was developed by Albert W. Merrick for the Austenal Laboratories in 1932.

— Freebase

Gravitational constant

Gravitational constant

The gravitational constant denoted by letter G, is an empirical physical constant involved in the calculation of gravitational force between two bodies. It usually appears in Sir Isaac Newton's law of universal gravitation, and in Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity. It is also known as the universal gravitational constant, Newton's constant, and colloquially as Big G. It should not be confused with "little g", which is the local gravitational field, especially that at the Earth's surface.

— Freebase

Wolfgang Pauli

Wolfgang Pauli

Wolfgang Ernst Pauli was an Austrian theoretical physicist and one of the pioneers of quantum physics. In 1945, after being nominated by Albert Einstein, he received the Nobel Prize in Physics for his "decisive contribution through his discovery of a new law of Nature, the exclusion principle or Pauli principle," involving spin theory, underpinning the structure of matter and the whole of chemistry.

— Freebase

Theory of relativity

Theory of relativity

The theory of relativity, or simply relativity, generally encompasses two theories by Albert Einstein: special relativity and general relativity. Concepts introduced by the theories of relativity include: ⁕Measurements of various quantities are relative to the velocities of observers. In particular, space and time can dilate. ⁕Spacetime: space and time should be considered together and in relation to each other. ⁕The speed of light is nonetheless invariant, the same for all observers. The term "theory of relativity" was based on the expression "relative theory" used by Max Planck in 1906, who emphasized how the theory uses the principle of relativity. In the discussion section of the same paper Alfred Bucherer used for the first time the expression "theory of relativity".

— Freebase

Sheerwater

Sheerwater

Sheerwater is a large housing estate in the Borough of Woking in Surrey, England, located between West Byfleet and Woking. Its border to the north is defined by the Basingstoke Canal and to the south by the South Western Main Line railway line. An iPetition was started in Aug 2012 to build a railway station to serve Sheerwater with a suggested location at the southern entry of the estate. Sheerwater was designed as a new neighbourhood by the London County Council, with nearly 1,300 homes built in the early 1950s and over 5,000 people settling in the Borough. There is one pub in Sheerwater, The Birch and Pines. The main through road on the estate is Albert Drive which splits into two short one-way streets at the southwest end. On Dartmouth Avenue there is a parade of shops which include two convenience stores, takeaways and a glass/glazing business. The only church in the estate is also on Dartmouth Avenue. Bishop David Brown School is located in Sheerwater. A notable former resident of Sheerwater is Bruce Foxton who together with other pupils of the then Sheerwater Comprehensive formed The Jam.

— Freebase

Cowes

Cowes

Cowes is an English seaport town and civil parish on the Isle of Wight. Cowes is located on the west bank of the estuary of the River Medina facing the smaller town of East Cowes on the east Bank. The two towns are linked by the Cowes Floating Bridge, a chain ferry. The population was 9,663 in the 2001 census, a figure that is easily doubled during the regatta in early August. Leland's 19th century verses described the towns poetically as "The two great Cowes that in loud thunder roar, This on the eastern, that the western shore". Cowes has been seen as a home for international yacht racing since the founding of the Royal Yacht Squadron in 1815. The town gives its name to the world's oldest regular regatta, Cowes Week, which occurs annually in the first week of August. Later on in the summer, powerboat races are held. Much of the town's architecture is still heavily influenced by the style of ornate building which Prince Albert popularised.

— Freebase

Gung-ho

Gung-ho

Gung ho is a term in American English used to mean "enthusiastic" or "dedicated". Gung ho is an anglicised pronunciation of "gōng hé", which is also sometimes anglicised as "kung ho". Gōng hé is a shortened version and slogan of the "gōngyè hézuòshè" or Chinese Industrial Cooperatives, which was abbreviated as INDUSCO in English. The two Chinese characters "gōng" and "hé" are translated individually as "work" and "together". The linguist Albert Moe studied both the origin and the usage in English. He concludes that the term is an "Americanism that is derived from the Chinese, but its several accepted American meanings have no resemblance whatever to the recognized meaning in the original language" and that its "various linguistic uses, as they have developed in the United States, have been peculiar to American speech." In Chinese, concludes Moe, "this is neither a slogan nor a battle cry; it is only a name for an organization." The term was picked up by United States Marine Corps Major Evans Carlson from his New Zealand friend, Rewi Alley, one of the founders of the Chinese Industrial Cooperatives. Carlson explained in a 1943 interview: "I was trying to build up the same sort of working spirit I had seen in China where all the soldiers dedicated themselves to one idea and worked together to put that idea over. I told the boys about it again and again. I told them of the motto of the Chinese Cooperatives, Gung Ho. It means Work Together-Work in Harmony...."

— Freebase

Palmerston

Palmerston

The town of Palmerston, in New Zealand's South Island lies 50 kilometres to the north of the city of Dunedin. It is the largest town in the Waihemo Ward of the Waitaki District with a population of 890 residents. Palmerston grew at a major road junction: State Highway 1 links Dunedin and Waikouaiti to the south with Oamaru and Christchurch to the north, whereas State Highway 85 heads inland to become the principal highway of the Maniototo. The Main South Line railway passes through the town and a tourist train, the Seasider travels from Dunedin to Palmerston and back once or twice a week. From 1880 until 1989, the town acted as the junction between the main line and a branch line that ran inland, the Dunback and Makareao Branches. Palmerston stands near the banks of the Shag River, five kilometres inland from the Pacific coast. Between it and the sea stands the lone hill of Puketapu, crowned with a monument to the 19th century Otago politician Sir John McKenzie. An annual race takes place up to the memorial and back which is called the Kelly's canter dedicated to Albert Kelly who ran up Puketapu as a constable in the Palmerston police force every day during World War II.

— Freebase

Prismane

Prismane

Prismane is a polycyclic hydrocarbon with the formula C6H6. It is an isomer of benzene, specifically a valence isomer. Prismane is far less stable than benzene. The carbon atoms of the prismane molecule are arranged in the shape of a six-atom triangular prism. Albert Ladenburg proposed this structure for the compound now known as benzene. The compound was not synthesized until 1973.

— Freebase

Kinetic theory

Kinetic theory

The kinetic theory of gases describes a gas as a large number of small particles, all of which are in constant, random motion. The rapidly moving particles constantly collide with each other and with the walls of the container. Kinetic theory explains macroscopic properties of gases, such as pressure, temperature, and volume, by considering their molecular composition and motion. Essentially, the theory posits that pressure is due not to static repulsion between molecules, as was Isaac Newton's conjecture, but due to collisions between molecules moving at different velocities through Brownian motion. While the particles making up a gas are too small to be visible, the jittering motion of pollen grains or dust particles which can be seen under a microscope, known as Brownian motion, results directly from collisions between the particle and gas molecules. As pointed out by Albert Einstein in 1905, this experimental evidence for kinetic theory is generally seen as having confirmed the existence of atoms and molecules.

— Freebase

Hasselt

Hasselt

Hasselt is a Belgian city and municipality, and capital of the Flemish province of Limburg. The Hasselt municipality includes the original city of Hasselt, plus the old communes of Sint-Lambrechts-Herk, Wimmertingen, Kermt, Spalbeek, Kuringen, Stokrooie, Stevoort and Runkst, as well as the hamlets and parishes of Kiewit, Godsheide and Rapertingen. On 31 December 2007 Hasselt had a total population of 71 520. Both the Demer river and the Albert Canal run through the municipality. Hasselt is located in between the Campine region, north of the Demer, and the Hesbaye region, south of it. It is also in the Meuse-Rhine Euroregion.

— Freebase

Classics Illustrated

Classics Illustrated

Classics Illustrated is a comic book series featuring adaptations of literary classics such as Moby Dick, Hamlet, and The Iliad. Created by Albert Kanter, the series began publication in 1941 and finished its first run in 1971, producing 169 issues. Following the series' demise, various companies reprinted its titles. This series is different from the Great Illustrated Classics, which is an adaptation of the classics for young readers that includes illustrations, but is not in the comic book form.

— Freebase

Turn-On

Turn-On

Turn-On is an American sketch comedy series that aired on ABC in February 1969. Only one episode was shown leaving one episode unaired and the show is considered one of the most infamous flops in TV history. Turn-On's sole episode was shown on Wednesday, February 5, 1969, at 8:30 p.m. Eastern. Among the cast were Teresa Graves, who would join the Laugh-In cast that autumn, and Chuck McCann, longtime kiddie show host, character actor, and voice artist. The writing staff included a young Albert Brooks. The guest host for the 1st episode was Tim Conway.

— Freebase

Frock coat

Frock coat

A frock coat is a man's coat characterised by knee-length skirts all around the base, popular during the Victorian and Edwardian periods. The double-breasted style is sometimes called a Prince Albert. The frock coat is a fitted, long-sleeved coat with a centre vent at the back, and some features unusual in post-Victorian dress. These include the reverse collar and lapels, where the outer edge of the lapel is cut from a separate piece of cloth to the main body, and also a high degree of waist suppression, where the coat's diameter round the waist is much less than round the chest. This is achieved by a high horizontal waist seam with side bodies, which are extra panels of fabric above the waist used to pull in the naturally cylindrical drape. The frock coat was widely worn in much the same situations as modern lounge suits and formalwear, with different variations. One example is that a frock coat for formalwear was always double-breasted with peaked lapels; as informal wear, the single-breasted frock coat often sported the step, or notched, lapel, and was more common in the early nineteenth century than the formal model.

— Freebase

Ginger Group

Ginger Group

The Ginger Group was not a formal political party in Canada, but a faction of radical Progressive and Labour Members of Parliament who advocated socialism. The group is said to have taken its name from Ginger Goodwin, a United Mine Workers organizer. Ginger was shot dead outside Cumberland, British Columbia by company-hired private policemen on July 27, 1918. His murder sparked Canada's first general strike. The term ginger group also refers to small group with new, radical ideas trying to act as a catalyst within a larger body. The Ginger Group split with the Progressive Party in 1924 when Progressive leader Robert Forke proved too eager to accommodate the Liberal government of William Lyon Mackenzie King and agreed to support the government's budget with only minimal concessions. J. S. Woodsworth, using his right as the leader of the Independent Labour MPs, moved a stronger amendment to the budget based on demands the Progressives had made in earlier years but had since abandoned. The Progressive and Labour MPs who broke with their Progressive colleagues to support Woodsworth became the "Ginger Group". and was made up of United Farmers of Alberta MPs George Gibson Coote, Robert Gardiner, Edward Joseph Garland, Donald MacBeth Kennedy and Henry Elvins Spencer as well as United Farmers of Ontario MP Agnes Macphail. The group was later joined by Labour MPs J.S. Woodsworth, William Irvine, Abraham Albert Heaps and Angus MacInnis, independent MP Joseph Tweed Shaw and Progressive MPs Milton Neil Campbell, William John Ward W.C. Good and Preston Elliott.

— Freebase

Working Week

Working Week

Working Week were a British jazz-dance musical ensemble, active in the 1980s and 1990s. Working Week were formed in 1983 by guitarist Simon Booth and saxophonist Larry Stabbins, who were previously in post-punk outfit Weekend. The duo released their debut single "Venceremos - We Will Win" the following year, a tribute to Chilean protest singer Victor Jara featuring vocal contributions from Robert Wyatt and Tracey Thorn from Everything but the Girl. It became the band's sole entry in the UK Singles Chart, where it peaked at #64. Singer Julie Tippetts provided vocals for the follow-up "Storm of Light". A debut album, Working Nights was released in April 1985, with vocalist Juliet Roberts added as a full time member of the band. She also sang on the 1986 album Companeros and Surrender, released in 1987, but left the band after that year's single "Knocking on Your Door". Julie Tippetts returned as vocalist for the 1989 album Fire in the Mountain, and Eyvon Waite was featured as solo vocalist for 1991's Black and Gold, the band's final studio album. They appeared on 9 February 1986 at the Royal Albert Hall, in a benefit concert for victims of the 1985 Armero tragedy in Colombia.

— Freebase

Aberration of light

Aberration of light

The aberration of light is an astronomical phenomenon which produces an apparent motion of celestial objects about their locations dependent on the velocity of the observer. Aberration causes objects to appear to be angled or tilted towards the direction of motion of the observer compared to when the observer is stationary. The change in angle is typically very small, on the order of v/c where c is the speed of light and v the velocity of the observer. In the case of "stellar" or "annual" aberration, the apparent position of a star to an observer on Earth varies periodically over the course of a year as the Earth's velocity changes as it revolves around the Sun, by a maximum angle of approximately 20 arcseconds in right ascension or declination. Aberration is historically significant because of its role in the development of the theories of light, electromagnetism and ultimately the theory of Special Relativity. It was first observed in the late 1600s by astronomers searching for stellar parallax in order to confirm the heliocentric model of the solar system, much to their surprise. In 1729 James Bradley provided a classical explanation for it in terms of the finite speed of light relative to the motion of the Earth in its orbit around the Sun which he used to make one of the earliest measurements of the speed of light. However, Bradley's theory was incompatible with 19th century theories of light, and aberration became a major motivation for the aether drag theories of Augustin Fresnel and G. G. Stokes, and for Hendrick Lorentz' aether theory of electromagnetism in 1892. The aberration of light, together with Lorentz' elaboration of Maxwell's electrodynamics, the moving magnet and conductor problem, the negative aether drift experiments, as well as the Fizeau experiment, led Albert Einstein to develop the theory of Special Relativity in 1905, which provided a conclusive explanation for the aberration phenomenon.

— Freebase

Pas de Quatre

Pas de Quatre

Pas de Quatre is a ballet divertissement choreographed by Jules Perrot in 1845, on the suggestion of Benjamin Lumley, Director at His Majestys Theatre to music composed by Cesare Pugni. On the night it premiered in London, it caused a sensation with the critics and the public alike. The reason for this was that it brought together, on one stage, the four greatest ballerinas of the time. The ballerinas were, in order of appearance, Lucile Grahn, Carlotta Grisi, Fanny Cerrito, and Marie Taglioni. The order of appearance was done by age, from youngest to oldest, to quelch further confrontations between them. The original cast of Pas de Quatre only danced four performances together; Queen Victoria and Prince Albert were in attendance on July 12, 1845, at the third of these four performances. The fifth great Romantic ballerina of the time, Fanny Elssler, was invited to take part in the gala event but declined to do so; the young Lucile Grahn accepted without hesitation. Pas de Quatre captured the essence of the Romantic style as the ballerinas danced with demure lightness, delicacy, and poise. The steps demand that each area of classical ballet technique is executed. These areas include adagio movements, petite allegro, grand allegro, fast footwork, graceful changes of position, and the elegant and fluid arm movements that have become a signature element of Pas de Quatre. Each ballerina has an individual variation, which are performed in succession between an opening and finale that are danced by all the ballerinas together. These variations were choreographed for the ballerina premiering in each role, and were designed to display the best features of each.

— Freebase

Yellow Pine

Yellow Pine

Yellow Pine is an unincorporated census-designated place in Valley County, Idaho, United States. As of the 2010 census, its population was 32. Yellow Pine has an area of 0.995 square miles; 0.984 square miles of this is land, and 0.011 square miles is water. Although unincorporated, the community has its own zip code, 83677, where overall 44 people live on a total land area of 174.269 square miles, according to the 2010 Census. Yellow Pine is a 247-acre "inholder" community in eastern Valley Co., located on the East Fork of the South Fork of the Salmon River, approximately half a mile upstream from its confluence with Johnson Creek. It is bounded on the north by the Payette National Forest and on the south by the Boise National Forest. Located at 4,802 feet, Yellow Pine has historically served as the trade center for the larger Yellow Pine basin mining area, including Stibnite. Many of the early miner-settlers came from Warren. In 1906 Albert Behne established the first post office and mail service. Behne had a dream. A grower of roses who loved classical music and opera, he envisioned a thriving city complete with street cars. In 1924 he received the patent on the 47½ acres where the village presently exists. In 1930, at the age of 76, he platted the original Yellow Pine townsite.²

— Freebase

Penny-farthing

Penny-farthing

Penny-farthing, high wheel, high wheeler, and ordinary are all terms used to describe a type of bicycle with a large front wheel and a much smaller rear wheel that was popular after the boneshaker, until the development of the safety bicycle, in the 1880s. They were the first machines to be called "bicycles". Although they are now most commonly known as "penny-farthings", this term was probably not used until they were nearly outdated; the first recorded print reference is 1891 in Bicycling News. It comes from the British penny and farthing coins, one much larger than the other, so that the side view resembles a penny leading a farthing. For most of their reign, they were simply known as "bicycles". In the late 1890s, the retronym "ordinary" began to be used, to distinguish them from the emerging safety bicycles, and this term or Hi-wheel is preferred by many modern enthusiasts. About 1870, James Starley, described as the father of the bicycle industry, and others began producing bicycles based on the French boneshaker but with front wheels of increasing size, because larger front wheels, up to 1.5 m in diameter, enabled higher speeds on bicycles limited to direct drive. In 1878, Albert Pope began manufacturing the Columbia bicycle outside of Boston, starting their two-decade heyday in America.

— Freebase


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