Definitions containing rémusat, charles, comte de

We've found 250 definitions:

Malignant

Malignant

one of the adherents of Charles L. or Charles LL.; -- so called by the opposite party

— Webster Dictionary

Comtist

Comtist

a disciple of Comte; a positivist

— Webster Dictionary

Interval

Interval

space of time between any two points or events; as, the interval between the death of Charles I. of England, and the accession of Charles II

— Webster Dictionary

carolean

Caroline, Carolean

of or relating to the life and times of kings Charles I or Charles II of England

— Princeton's WordNet

caroline

Caroline, Carolean

of or relating to the life and times of kings Charles I or Charles II of England

— Princeton's WordNet

charles i

Charles, Charles II, Charles I, Charles the Bald

as Charles II he was Holy Roman Emperor and as Charles I he was king of France (823-877)

— Princeton's WordNet

charles

Charles, Charles II, Charles I, Charles the Bald

as Charles II he was Holy Roman Emperor and as Charles I he was king of France (823-877)

— Princeton's WordNet

charles ii

Charles, Charles II, Charles I, Charles the Bald

as Charles II he was Holy Roman Emperor and as Charles I he was king of France (823-877)

— Princeton's WordNet

charles the bald

Charles, Charles II, Charles I, Charles the Bald

as Charles II he was Holy Roman Emperor and as Charles I he was king of France (823-877)

— Princeton's WordNet

comtism

Comtism

Auguste Comte's positivistic philosophy that metaphysics and theology should be replaced by a hierarchy of sciences from mathematics at the base to sociology at the top

— Princeton's WordNet

Comtism

Comtism

The positivistic philosophy of Auguste Comte (1798u20131857), according to which metaphysics and theology should be replaced by a hierarchy of sciences from mathematics at the base to sociology at the top.

— Wiktionary

Dickens

Dickens

Charles Dickens, English novelist.

— Wiktionary

Plough

Plough

same as Charles's Wain

— Webster Dictionary

Clarence House

Clarence House

the office of Prince Charles.

— Wiktionary

Wagon

Wagon

the Dipper, or Charles's Wain

— Webster Dictionary

Carlos

Carlos

of and origin. English equivalent: Charles.

— Wiktionary

fortean

fortean

Of or pertaining to Charles Fort.

— Wiktionary

Dickensian

Dickensian

A reader or scholar of Charles Dickens.

— Wiktionary

Chuck

Chuck

A diminutive of the male given name Charles.

— Wiktionary

Carlo

Carlo

of Italian origin. English equivalents: Charles, Carl

— Wiktionary

Charley

Charley

A diminutive of the male given name Charles.

— Wiktionary

Hortense de Beauharnais

Hortense de Beauharnais

Hortense Eugénie Cécile Bonaparte, Queen consort of Holland, was the stepdaughter of Emperor Napoleon I, being the daughter of his first wife, Joséphine de Beauharnais. She later became the wife of the former's brother, Louis Bonaparte, King of Holland, and the mother of Napoleon III, Emperor of the French. She had also an illegitimate son, Charles Auguste Louis Joseph, duc de Morny, by her lover Charles Joseph, comte de Flahaut.

— Freebase

Chas

Chas

Short form of the male given name Charles.

— Wiktionary

San Carlos

San Carlos

Places named after Saint Charles (acquired from the Spanish)

— Wiktionary

Carroll

Carroll

Lewis Carroll - pseudonym of British author Charles Lutwidge Dodgson.

— Wiktionary

Chip

Chip

A diminutive of the male given names Christopher and Charles.

— Wiktionary

Caroline

Caroline

Relating to the time of Kings Charles I and II.

— Wiktionary

force de frappe

force de frappe

The French nuclear deterrence force developed by Charles de Gaulle.

— Wiktionary

analytical engine

analytical engine

A mechanical general-purpose computer, designed by Charles Babbage but never built.

— Wiktionary

Clarence House

Clarence House

a royal home in London, now the official residence of Prince Charles.

— Wiktionary

Darwinian

Darwinian

Relating to the theory of evolution, as advanced by Charles Darwin.

— Wiktionary

Gaullism

Gaullism

French political ideology based on Charles de Gaulle's thoughts and actions.

— Wiktionary

Sleeping Beauty

Sleeping Beauty

A fairy tale originally titled La Belle au bois dormant by Charles Perrault.

— Wiktionary

Blissymbols

Blissymbols

a constructed language using ideographs invented by Charles K. Bliss after the Second World War.

— Wiktionary

simple English

simple English

Constructed language created by Charles Kay Ogden which only contains a small number of words

— Wiktionary

Billy Bunter

Billy Bunter

A fictional fat boy with round spectacles in Charles Hamilton's stories set at Greyfriars School.

— Wiktionary

Cavachon

Cavachon

A breed of dog that is a cross between a Bichon Frisu00E9 and a Cavalier King Charles spaniel

— Wiktionary

Auguste Comte

Auguste Comte

Isidore Auguste Marie François Xavier Comte, better known as Auguste Comte, was a French philosopher. He was a founder of the discipline of sociology and of the doctrine of positivism. He is sometimes regarded as the first philosopher of science in the modern sense of the term. Strongly influenced by the utopian socialist Henri Saint-Simon, Comte developed the positive philosophy in an attempt to remedy the social malaise of the French Revolution, calling for a new social doctrine based on the sciences. Comte was a major influence on 19th-century thought, influencing the work of social thinkers such as Karl Marx, John Stuart Mill, and George Eliot. His concept of sociologie and social evolutionism, though now outdated, set the tone for early social theorists and anthropologists such as Harriet Martineau and Herbert Spencer, evolving into modern academic sociology presented by Émile Durkheim as practical and objective social research. Comte's social theories culminated in the "Religion of Humanity", which influenced the development of religious humanist and secular humanist organizations in the 19th century. Comte likewise coined the word altruisme.

— Freebase

Snoopy

Snoopy

Charlie Brown's pet beagle in the comic strip Peanuts, by Charles M. Schulz; often representing doggish soulfulness.

— Wiktionary

cavalier

cavalier

Of or pertaining to the party of King Charles I.

— Wiktionary

Dickensian

Dickensian

Of or pertaining to Charles Dickens or, especially, his writings.

— Wiktionary

Cavalier

Cavalier

of or pertaining to the party of King Charles I

— Webster Dictionary

Parliamentarian

Parliamentarian

one who adhered to the Parliament, in opposition to King Charles I

— Webster Dictionary

Charlie

Charlie

A diminutive of the male name Charles; also used as a formal given name.

— Wiktionary

fagin

Fagin

a villainous Jew in a novel by Charles Dickens

— Princeton's WordNet

Favorite

Favorite

short curls dangling over the temples; -- fashionable in the reign of Charles II

— Webster Dictionary

Darwin

Darwin

Charles Darwin (1809u20131882), British naturalist and founder of the theory of evolution by natural selection.

— Wiktionary

eleanor gwynne

Gwynn, Gywn, Gynne, Nell Gwynn, Nell Gywn, Nell Gwynne, Eleanor Gwynn, Eleanor Gwyn, Eleanor Gwynne

English comedienne and mistress of Charles II (1650-1687)

— Princeton's WordNet

eleanor gwynn

Gwynn, Gywn, Gynne, Nell Gwynn, Nell Gywn, Nell Gwynne, Eleanor Gwynn, Eleanor Gwyn, Eleanor Gwynne

English comedienne and mistress of Charles II (1650-1687)

— Princeton's WordNet

nell gywn

Gwynn, Gywn, Gynne, Nell Gwynn, Nell Gywn, Nell Gwynne, Eleanor Gwynn, Eleanor Gwyn, Eleanor Gwynne

English comedienne and mistress of Charles II (1650-1687)

— Princeton's WordNet

cavalier

Cavalier, Royalist

a royalist supporter of Charles I during the English Civil War

— Princeton's WordNet

nell gwynn

Gwynn, Gywn, Gynne, Nell Gwynn, Nell Gywn, Nell Gwynne, Eleanor Gwynn, Eleanor Gwyn, Eleanor Gwynne

English comedienne and mistress of Charles II (1650-1687)

— Princeton's WordNet

nell gwynne

Gwynn, Gywn, Gynne, Nell Gwynn, Nell Gywn, Nell Gwynne, Eleanor Gwynn, Eleanor Gwyn, Eleanor Gwynne

English comedienne and mistress of Charles II (1650-1687)

— Princeton's WordNet

micawber

Micawber, Wilkins Micawber

fictional character created by Charles Dickens; an eternal optimist

— Princeton's WordNet

gwynn

Gwynn, Gywn, Gynne, Nell Gwynn, Nell Gywn, Nell Gwynne, Eleanor Gwynn, Eleanor Gwyn, Eleanor Gwynne

English comedienne and mistress of Charles II (1650-1687)

— Princeton's WordNet

gynne

Gwynn, Gywn, Gynne, Nell Gwynn, Nell Gywn, Nell Gwynne, Eleanor Gwynn, Eleanor Gwyn, Eleanor Gwynne

English comedienne and mistress of Charles II (1650-1687)

— Princeton's WordNet

gywn

Gwynn, Gywn, Gynne, Nell Gwynn, Nell Gywn, Nell Gwynne, Eleanor Gwynn, Eleanor Gwyn, Eleanor Gwynne

English comedienne and mistress of Charles II (1650-1687)

— Princeton's WordNet

eleanor gwyn

Gwynn, Gywn, Gynne, Nell Gwynn, Nell Gywn, Nell Gwynne, Eleanor Gwynn, Eleanor Gwyn, Eleanor Gwynne

English comedienne and mistress of Charles II (1650-1687)

— Princeton's WordNet

restoration

Restoration

the reign of Charles II in England; 1660-1685

— Princeton's WordNet

royalist

Cavalier, Royalist

a royalist supporter of Charles I during the English Civil War

— Princeton's WordNet

snoopy

Snoopy

a fictional beagle in a comic strip drawn by Charles Schulz

— Princeton's WordNet

wilkins micawber

Micawber, Wilkins Micawber

fictional character created by Charles Dickens; an eternal optimist

— Princeton's WordNet

Mansonite

Mansonite

A follower of Charles Manson (born 1934), American leader of a cult-like criminal group in the 1960s.

— Wiktionary

Inklings

Inklings

The literary group centered around English writer C.S. Lewis and his associates, particularly J.R.R. Tolkien and Charles Williams.

— Wiktionary

Choiseul

Choiseul

Choiseul is an illustrious family from Champagne, France, descendents of the comtes of Langres. The family's head was Renaud III de Choiseul, comte de Langres and sire de Choiseul, who in 1182 married Alix de Dreux, daughter of Louis VI of France. It has formed into the Langres, Clémont, Aigremont, Beaugré, Allecourt, Frontières, Praslin, Plessis branches, among others. It also took the name Choiseul-Gouffier from the 18th century onwards. It has produced several marshals: ⁕Jean de Baudricourt, seigneur of Baudricourt and of Choiseul ⁕Charles de Choiseul, comte of the Plessis-Praslin, who served under Henri IV and Louis XIII ⁕César de Choiseul du Plessis-Praslin, duc de Choiseul, who defied Turenne at Rethel, when he commanded the Spanish army ⁕Caesar, duc de Choiseul, French marshal and diplomat, generally known for the best part of his life as marshal du Plessis-Praslin ⁕Claude de Choiseul, comte de Choiseul-Francières, who distinguished himself in the battle of Seneffe against the Dutch Republic and made a marshal in 1693 Two bishops and an archbishop: ⁕Gilbert de Choiseul du Plessis Praslin, brother of marshal César de Choiseul du Plessis-Praslin, Bishop of Comminges from 1644 to 1670.

— Freebase

william menninger

Menninger, William Menninger, William Claire Menninger

United States psychiatrist and son of Charles Menninger (1899-1966)

— Princeton's WordNet

karl menninger

Menninger, Karl Menninger, Karl Augustus Menninger

United States psychiatrist and son of Charles Menninger (1893-1990)

— Princeton's WordNet

menninger

Menninger, William Menninger, William Claire Menninger

United States psychiatrist and son of Charles Menninger (1899-1966)

— Princeton's WordNet

william claire menninger

Menninger, William Menninger, William Claire Menninger

United States psychiatrist and son of Charles Menninger (1899-1966)

— Princeton's WordNet

menninger

Menninger, Karl Menninger, Karl Augustus Menninger

United States psychiatrist and son of Charles Menninger (1893-1990)

— Princeton's WordNet

karl augustus menninger

Menninger, Karl Menninger, Karl Augustus Menninger

United States psychiatrist and son of Charles Menninger (1893-1990)

— Princeton's WordNet

Car

Car

the stars also called Charles's Wain, the Great Bear, or the Dipper

— Webster Dictionary

Peircean

Peircean

Of or pertaining to Charles S. Peirce, 19th-20th century American logician, mathematician, scientist, and philosopher, founder of pragmatism.

— Wiktionary

peter paul rubens

Rubens, Peter Paul Rubens, Sir Peter Paul Rubens

prolific Flemish baroque painter; knighted by the English king Charles I (1577-1640)

— Princeton's WordNet

sir peter paul rubens

Rubens, Peter Paul Rubens, Sir Peter Paul Rubens

prolific Flemish baroque painter; knighted by the English king Charles I (1577-1640)

— Princeton's WordNet

rubens

Rubens, Peter Paul Rubens, Sir Peter Paul Rubens

prolific Flemish baroque painter; knighted by the English king Charles I (1577-1640)

— Princeton's WordNet

Earl

Earl

a nobleman of England ranking below a marquis, and above a viscount. The rank of an earl corresponds to that of a count (comte) in France, and graf in Germany. Hence the wife of an earl is still called countess. See Count

— Webster Dictionary

delinquent

delinquent

a term applied to royalists by their opponents in the English Civil War 1642 - 1645. Charles I was known as the chief delinquent.

— Wiktionary

wallace

Wallace, Alfred Russel Wallace

English naturalist who formulated a concept of evolution that resembled Charles Darwin's (1823-1913)

— Princeton's WordNet

alfred russel wallace

Wallace, Alfred Russel Wallace

English naturalist who formulated a concept of evolution that resembled Charles Darwin's (1823-1913)

— Princeton's WordNet

thomas carew

Carew, Thomas Carew

Englishman and Cavalier poet whose lyric poetry was favored by Charles I (1595-1639)

— Princeton's WordNet

carew

Carew, Thomas Carew

Englishman and Cavalier poet whose lyric poetry was favored by Charles I (1595-1639)

— Princeton's WordNet

Fourierite

Fourierite

Of, pertaining to, characteristic of, or associated with Charles Fourier or his socialist and philosophic theories.

— Wiktionary

Tiny Tim

Tiny Tim

A fictional poor and disabled boy whose foretold imminent death is ultimately averted by Ebenezer Scrooge in the classic tale by Charles Dickens.

— Wiktionary

Carlist

Carlist

a partisan of Charles X. of France, or of Don Carlos of Spain

— Webster Dictionary

Trainband

Trainband

a band or company of an organized military force instituted by James I. and dissolved by Charles II.; -- afterwards applied to the London militia

— Webster Dictionary

Baudelairean

Baudelairean

Of or pertaining to Charles Pierre Baudelaire (1821-1867), French poet, critic, and translator, or to his works.

— Wiktionary

Pleure

Pleure

Pleure is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Choux

Choux

Choux is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Brans

Brans

Brans is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

aerodrome

aerodrome

A flying machine composed of aeroplanes. An aeroplane, particularly one constructed by or according to the design of Samuel Pierpont Langley and Charles M. Manly.

— Wiktionary

Darwinism

Darwinism

The principles of natural selection set out by Charles Darwin in the Origin of Species (1859) and other writings.

— Wiktionary

Chaplinesque

Chaplinesque

Reminiscent of Sir Charles Spencer "Charlie" Chaplin (1889u20131977), English comic actor and film director of the silent film era.

— Wiktionary

Fourierism

Fourierism

The cooperative socialistic system of Charles Fourier, a Frenchman, who recommended the reorganization of society into small communities, living in common.

— Wiktionary

oates

Oates, Titus Oates

English conspirator who claimed that there was a Jesuit plot to assassinate Charles II (1649-1705)

— Princeton's WordNet

king charles spaniel

King Charles spaniel

a toy English spaniel with a black-and-tan coat; named after Charles II who popularized it

— Princeton's WordNet

titus oates

Oates, Titus Oates

English conspirator who claimed that there was a Jesuit plot to assassinate Charles II (1649-1705)

— Princeton's WordNet

Fourierism

Fourierism

the cooperative socialistic system of Charles Fourier, a Frenchman, who recommended the reorganization of society into small communities, living in common

— Webster Dictionary

Cameronian

Cameronian

a follower of the Rev. Richard Cameron, a Scotch Covenanter of the time of Charles II

— Webster Dictionary

darwinian

Darwinian

of or relating to Charles Darwin's theory of organic evolution

— Princeton's WordNet

Regicide

Regicide

one who kills or who murders a king; specifically (Eng.Hist.), one of the judges who condemned Charles I. to death

— Webster Dictionary

cavalier

cavalier

One of the court party in the time of King Charles I, as contrasted with a Roundhead or an adherent of Parliament.

— Wiktionary

abhorrer

abhorrer

A nickname given in the early 17 century to signatories of addresses of a petition to reconvent parliament, adressed to Charles II.

— Wiktionary

Jacob Marley

Jacob Marley

A fictional man who is a character of , by Charles Dickens, and appears as a ghost to warn his former business partner Ebenezer Scrooge against being greedy and selfish.

— Wiktionary

Royalist

Royalist

an adherent of a king (as of Charles I. in England, or of the Bourbons in france); one attached to monarchical government

— Webster Dictionary

Cavalier

Cavalier

one of the court party in the time of king Charles I. as contrasted with a Roundhead or an adherent of Parliament

— Webster Dictionary

Wagoner

Wagoner

the constellation Charles's Wain, or Ursa Major. See Ursa major, under Ursa

— Webster Dictionary

methodist church

Methodist Church, Methodists

a Protestant denomination founded on the principles of John Wesley and Charles Wesley

— Princeton's WordNet

methodists

Methodist Church, Methodists

a Protestant denomination founded on the principles of John Wesley and Charles Wesley

— Princeton's WordNet

Mason-Dixon Line

Mason-Dixon Line

The boundary line between Pennsylvania and Maryland, as run before the Revolution (1764-1767) by two English astronomers named Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon.

— Wiktionary

jehovah's witnesses

Jehovah's Witnesses

Protestant denomination founded in the United States by Charles Taze Russell in 1884

— Princeton's WordNet

Belfort

Belfort

Belfort is a city in north-east France in the Franche-Comté région, situated between Lyon and Strasbourg. It is the biggest town and the administrative town of the Territoire de Belfort département in the Franche-Comté region. Belfort is located at 400 km from Paris, 141 km from Strasbourg, 290 km from Lyon and 150 km from Zürich. The residents of the city are called ‘’Belfortains’’. It is located on the Savoureuse, on the strategically important natural route between the Rhine and the Rhône – the Belfort Gap or Burgundian Gate. The city of Belfort has 50,199 inhabitants. Together with its suburbs and satellite towns, Belfort forms the largest agglomeration in Franche-Comté region with an urban population of 308,601 inhabitants.

— Freebase

jacques alexandre cesar charles

Charles, Jacques Charles, Jacques Alexandre Cesar Charles

French physicist and author of Charles's law which anticipated Gay-Lussac's law (1746-1823)

— Princeton's WordNet

jacques charles

Charles, Jacques Charles, Jacques Alexandre Cesar Charles

French physicist and author of Charles's law which anticipated Gay-Lussac's law (1746-1823)

— Princeton's WordNet

english civil war

English Civil War

civil war in England between the Parliamentarians and the Royalists under Charles I; 1644-1648

— Princeton's WordNet

charles

Charles, Jacques Charles, Jacques Alexandre Cesar Charles

French physicist and author of Charles's law which anticipated Gay-Lussac's law (1746-1823)

— Princeton's WordNet

eames chair

Eames chair

a chair designed by Charles Eames; originally made of molded plywood; seat and back shaped to fit the human body

— Princeton's WordNet

St. Simonians

St. Simonians

. See St. Simon, Comte de.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

lindy

lindy, lindy hop

an energetic American dance that was popular in the 1930s (probably named for the aviator Charles Lindbergh)

— Princeton's WordNet

dickensian

Dickensian

of or like the novels of Charles Dickens (especially with regard to poor social and economic conditions)

— Princeton's WordNet

lindy hop

lindy, lindy hop

an energetic American dance that was popular in the 1930s (probably named for the aviator Charles Lindbergh)

— Princeton's WordNet

Carrollian

Carrollian

Of or pertaining to Lewis Carroll (1832-1898, real name Charles Lutwidge Dodgson) or his writings, most notably a type of imaginative fantasy involving humorous plays on words and logic.

— Wiktionary

Carolus

Carolus

an English gold coin of the value of twenty or twenty-three shillings. It was first struck in the reign of Charles I

— Webster Dictionary

Exclusionist

Exclusionist

one who would exclude another from some right or privilege; esp., one of the anti-popish politicians of the time of Charles II

— Webster Dictionary

Mouthe

Mouthe

Mouthe is a commune in the Doubs department in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France.

— Freebase

Brères

Brères

Brères is a commune in the Doubs department in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France.

— Freebase

Interim

Interim

a name given to each of three compromises made by the emperor Charles V. of Germany for the sake of harmonizing the connecting opinions of Protestants and Catholics

— Webster Dictionary

Velet

Velet

Velet is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Caroline

Caroline

. Borrowed in the 17th century from the form of Carolina, feminine derivative of Carolus, the equivalent of Charles, which came from Karl.

— Wiktionary

Jehovahs Witnesses

Jehovahs Witnesses

A monotheistic and nontrinitarian Restoration Christian denomination founded by Charles Taze Russell in 1879 as a small Bible study group. Originally known as International Bible Students or Bible Students.

— Wiktionary

abhorrer

abhorrer

a signer of a 1679 address to Charles II in which those who petitioned for the reconvening of parliament were condemned and abhorred

— Princeton's WordNet

Hablot Knight Browne

Hablot Knight Browne

Hablot Knight Browne was an English artist, famous as Phiz, illustrator of books by Charles Dickens, Charles Lever and Harrison Ainsworth.

— Freebase

Bluebeard

Bluebeard

A famous fairytale written by Charles Perrault in 1697 about a violent nobleman who has the habit of murdering his wives and the attempts of his current wife to avoid the same fate.

— Wiktionary

combined gas law

combined gas law

a combination of Boyle's law and Charles's law which states that the product of the volume and pressure of an ideal gas divided by its temperature is constant

— Wiktionary

princess diana

Diana, Princess Diana, Princess of Wales, Lady Diana Frances Spencer

English aristocrat who was the first wife of Prince Charles; her death in an automobile accident in Paris produced intense national mourning (1961-1997)

— Princeton's WordNet

royal society

Royal Society, Royal Society of London for Improving Natural Knowledge

an honorary English society (formalized in 1660 and given a royal charter by Charles II in 1662) through which the British government has supported science

— Princeton's WordNet

diana

Diana, Princess Diana, Princess of Wales, Lady Diana Frances Spencer

English aristocrat who was the first wife of Prince Charles; her death in an automobile accident in Paris produced intense national mourning (1961-1997)

— Princeton's WordNet

princess of wales

Diana, Princess Diana, Princess of Wales, Lady Diana Frances Spencer

English aristocrat who was the first wife of Prince Charles; her death in an automobile accident in Paris produced intense national mourning (1961-1997)

— Princeton's WordNet

lady diana frances spencer

Diana, Princess Diana, Princess of Wales, Lady Diana Frances Spencer

English aristocrat who was the first wife of Prince Charles; her death in an automobile accident in Paris produced intense national mourning (1961-1997)

— Princeton's WordNet

Légna

Légna

Légna is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Lézat

Lézat

Lézat is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Colonne

Colonne

Colonne is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Peintre

Peintre

Peintre is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Rogna

Rogna

Rogna is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Courlans

Courlans

Courlans is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Chemin, Jura

Chemin, Jura

Chemin is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Orgelet

Orgelet

Orgelet is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Mouchard

Mouchard

Mouchard is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Rans

Rans

Rans is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Oath of Abjuration

Oath of Abjuration

An oath asserting the right of the present royal family to the crown of England, and expressly abjuring allegiance to the descendants of Charles Edward Stuart, the Jacobite Pretender.

— Wiktionary

Frais

Frais

Frais is a commune in the Territoire de Belfort department in Franche-Comté in northeastern France.

— Freebase

Moval

Moval

Moval is a commune in the Territoire de Belfort department in Franche-Comté in northeastern France.

— Freebase

Commonwealth

Commonwealth

specifically, the form of government established on the death of Charles I., in 1649, which existed under Oliver Cromwell and his son Richard, ending with the abdication of the latter in 1659

— Webster Dictionary

Charles Digby Harrod

Charles Digby Harrod

Charles Digby Harrod was an English merchant who expanded Harrods in London into a department store after his father, Charles Henry Harrod had retired.

— Freebase

catherine de medicis

Catherine de Medicis

queen of France as the wife of Henry II and regent during the minority of her son Charles IX (1519-1589)

— Princeton's WordNet

pangenesis

pangenesis

A mechanism for heredity proposed by Charles Darwin long before the true mechanism was discovered, according to which the cells of the body shed "gemmules" which collect in the reproductive organs prior to fertilization.

— Wiktionary

dodgson

Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson

English author; Charles Dodgson was an Oxford don of mathematics who is remembered for the children's stories he wrote under the pen name Lewis Carroll (1832-1898)

— Princeton's WordNet

lewis carroll

Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson

English author; Charles Dodgson was an Oxford don of mathematics who is remembered for the children's stories he wrote under the pen name Lewis Carroll (1832-1898)

— Princeton's WordNet

carroll

Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson

English author; Charles Dodgson was an Oxford don of mathematics who is remembered for the children's stories he wrote under the pen name Lewis Carroll (1832-1898)

— Princeton's WordNet

reverend dodgson

Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson

English author; Charles Dodgson was an Oxford don of mathematics who is remembered for the children's stories he wrote under the pen name Lewis Carroll (1832-1898)

— Princeton's WordNet

charles dodgson

Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson

English author; Charles Dodgson was an Oxford don of mathematics who is remembered for the children's stories he wrote under the pen name Lewis Carroll (1832-1898)

— Princeton's WordNet

charles lutwidge dodgson

Carroll, Lewis Carroll, Dodgson, Reverend Dodgson, Charles Dodgson, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson

English author; Charles Dodgson was an Oxford don of mathematics who is remembered for the children's stories he wrote under the pen name Lewis Carroll (1832-1898)

— Princeton's WordNet

simultaneity

simultaneity

More than one complete musical texture occurring at the same time. This first appeared in the music of Charles Ives, and is common in the music of Conlon Nancarrow, and others.

— Wiktionary

Doubs

Doubs

Doubs is a department in the Franche-Comté region of eastern France named after the Doubs River.

— Freebase

lamplighter

lamplighter

A person employed to light streetlights at dusk and snuff them at dawn. An obsolete occupation since lights are now electric, most likely seen in the works of such authors as Charles Dickens, often appearing as a symbolic light-bringing figure.

— Wiktionary

Latitudinarian

Latitudinarian

a member of the Church of England, in the time of Charles II., who adopted more liberal notions in respect to the authority, government, and doctrines of the church than generally prevailed

— Webster Dictionary

Charles River

Charles River

The Charles River is an 80 mi long river that flows in an overall northeasterly direction in eastern Massachusetts. From its source in Hopkinton, the river travels through 23 cities and towns until reaching the Atlantic Ocean at Boston. It is also sometimes called the River Charles or simply the Charles.

— Freebase

Cavalier

Cavalier

Cavalier was the name used by Parliamentarians for a Royalist supporter of King Charles I and his son Charles II during the English Civil War, the Interregnum, and the Restoration. Prince Rupert, commander of much of Charles I's cavalry, is often considered an archetypical Cavalier. Their clothes were leather knee high boots, tunics and hats complete with plumes

— Freebase

Positivism

Positivism

a system of philosophy originated by M. Auguste Comte, which deals only with positives. It excludes from philosophy everything but the natural phenomena or properties of knowable things, together with their invariable relations of coexistence and succession, as occurring in time and space. Such relations are denominated laws, which are to be discovered by observation, experiment, and comparison. This philosophy holds all inquiry into causes, both efficient and final, to be useless and unprofitable

— Webster Dictionary

Charles

Charles

Charles is a neighborhood in northern Providence, Rhode Island. Along with Wanskuck, it comprises what is sometimes referred to as the North End. To the west Charles is partitioned from Wanskuck by Route 146, while the Chad Brown public housing complex separates Charles from Smith Hill to the south, and the West River and Interstate 95 bounds the area to the east. The city limits abutting the city of North Providence bound Charles to the north.

— Freebase

Lods

Lods

Lods is a commune in the Doubs département in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France.

— Freebase

Sochaux

Sochaux

Sochaux is a commune in the Doubs department in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France.

— Freebase

Supt

Supt

Supt is a commune in the Jura department in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France.

— Freebase

Laire

Laire

Laire is a commune in the Doubs department in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France.

— Freebase

Vitreux

Vitreux

Vitreux is a commune in the Jura department in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France.

— Freebase

Levier

Levier

Levier is a French Commune in the Doubs department in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France.

— Freebase

francis galton

Galton, Francis Galton, Sir Francis Galton

English scientist (cousin of Charles Darwin) who explored many fields including heredity, meteorology, statistics, psychology, and anthropology; founder of eugenics and first to use fingerprints for identification (1822-1911)

— Princeton's WordNet

sir francis galton

Galton, Francis Galton, Sir Francis Galton

English scientist (cousin of Charles Darwin) who explored many fields including heredity, meteorology, statistics, psychology, and anthropology; founder of eugenics and first to use fingerprints for identification (1822-1911)

— Princeton's WordNet

galton

Galton, Francis Galton, Sir Francis Galton

English scientist (cousin of Charles Darwin) who explored many fields including heredity, meteorology, statistics, psychology, and anthropology; founder of eugenics and first to use fingerprints for identification (1822-1911)

— Princeton's WordNet

Écuelle

Écuelle

Écuelle is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Cordonnet

Cordonnet

Cordonnet is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Scye

Scye

Scye is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Fresse

Fresse

Fresse is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Chancey

Chancey

Chancey is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Boulot

Boulot

Boulot is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Cuve

Cuve

Cuve is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Vanne

Vanne

Vanne is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Marast

Marast

Marast is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

henry ii

Henry II

king of France from 1547 to 1559; regained Calais from the English; husband of Catherine de Medicis and father of Charles IX (1519-1559)

— Princeton's WordNet

american capital

Washington, Washington D.C., American capital, capital of the United States

the capital of the United States in the District of Columbia and a tourist mecca; George Washington commissioned Charles L'Enfant to lay out the city in 1791

— Princeton's WordNet

capital of the united states

Washington, Washington D.C., American capital, capital of the United States

the capital of the United States in the District of Columbia and a tourist mecca; George Washington commissioned Charles L'Enfant to lay out the city in 1791

— Princeton's WordNet

washington

Washington, Washington D.C., American capital, capital of the United States

the capital of the United States in the District of Columbia and a tourist mecca; George Washington commissioned Charles L'Enfant to lay out the city in 1791

— Princeton's WordNet

washington d.c.

Washington, Washington D.C., American capital, capital of the United States

the capital of the United States in the District of Columbia and a tourist mecca; George Washington commissioned Charles L'Enfant to lay out the city in 1791

— Princeton's WordNet

Jacques Charles

Jacques Charles

Jacques Alexandre César Charles was a French inventor, scientist, mathematician, and balloonist. Charles and the Robert brothers launched the world's first hydrogen-filled balloon in August 1783; then in December 1783, Charles and his co-pilot Nicolas-Louis Robert ascended to a height of about 1,800 feet in a manned balloon. Their pioneering use of hydrogen for lift led to this type of balloon being named a Charlière. Charles's law, describing how gases tend to expand when heated, was formulated by Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac in 1802, but he credited it to unpublished work by Jacques Charles. Charles was elected to the Académie des Sciences, in 1793, and subsequently became professor of physics at the Conservatoire des Arts et Métiers.

— Freebase

Baby Grand

Baby Grand

"Baby Grand" is the fourth and final single released off Billy Joel's album The Bridge. A duet with Joel and Ray Charles, the song is a ballad dedicated to the baby grand piano, and the relationship it can share with its players. The two originally got together when Charles contacted Joel about the naming of his daughter, Alexa Ray, after Charles. Charles then suggested they create a song together. Joel originally sang the song in his thick New York accent, but decided to do a Charles impression instead when he noticed Charles was trying to imitate his style. The song was positively received by critics. The single peaked at #75 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and at #3 on the Hot Adult Contemporary Tracks chart. The music video features Joel and Charles playing the piano right next to each other.

— Freebase

Charles G. Finney

Charles G. Finney

Charles G. Finney was an American fantasy novelist and newspaperman. His full name was Charles Grandison Finney, evidently after his great-grandfather, the evangelist Charles Grandison Finney. His first novel and most famous work, The Circus of Dr. Lao won one of the inaugural National Book Awards: the Most Original Book of 1935.

— Freebase

Little Red Riding Hood

Little Red Riding Hood

A fairy tale of many different versions, especially the ones by Charles Perrault and more recently the Brothers Grimm, about a young girl who walks though the forest to visit her grandmother and encounters the Big Bad Wolf (or another vicious wolf, which may be a werewolf in archaic versions).

— Wiktionary

fighting french

Free French, Fighting French

a French movement during World War II that was organized in London by Charles de Gaulle to fight for the liberation of France from German control and for the restoration of the republic

— Princeton's WordNet

free french

Free French, Fighting French

a French movement during World War II that was organized in London by Charles de Gaulle to fight for the liberation of France from German control and for the restoration of the republic

— Princeton's WordNet

Congreve, Richard

Congreve, Richard

author of political tracts, was a pupil of Dr. Arnold's, and a disciple of Comte in philosophy; b. 1818.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Convention

Convention

an extraordinary assembly of the parkiament or estates of the realm, held without the king's writ, -- as the assembly which restored Charles II. to the throne, and that which declared the throne to be abdicated by James II

— Webster Dictionary

Vesoul

Vesoul

Vesoul is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté located in eastern France. Most populated municipality of the department with 15,920 inhabitants in 2009, is the seventh city Franche-Comté. The same year, Urban community of Vesoul which covers 19 municipalities together 34,055 inhabitants while the Urban area of Vesoul which includes 78 municipalities, groups 59,244 inhabitants. Its urban area is the fifth largest Franche-Comté. Its inhabitants are known in French as Vésuliens. Nicknamed the "Nice of the East", the reputation of Vesoul based primarily on the song "Vesoul" by Jacques Brel and the Vesoul International Film Festival of Asian Cinema. Its 16,000 inhabitants, account Vesoul 2000 students and 8000 licensed sport. The city has received many labels and names that reflect the investigation brings to life Vesoul common. Built on top of the hill de la Motte, in the first millennium, the old medieval town of Castrum Vesulium, the city is gradually presented as European commercial and economic center with many traders and exchangers and European Jews. At the end of the Middle Ages, the city experienced a period of strong difficulties as plagues, epidemics, destruction ...

— Freebase

Methodist

Methodist

one of a sect of Christians, the outgrowth of a small association called the "Holy Club," formed at Oxford University, A.D. 1729, of which the most conspicuous members were John Wesley and his brother Charles; -- originally so called from the methodical strictness of members of the club in all religious duties

— Webster Dictionary

Charlot

Charlot

Charlot is a fictionalized form of Charles the Younger, son of Charlemagne, in the tradition of the Matter of France. His legend may also incorporate elements of Charlemagne's great-grandson Charles the Child. He slew the son of Ogier the Dane, and was killed in revenge, causing a long period of strife between Ogier and the emperor. In the story of Huon of Bordeaux, it is Huon who kills Charlot. Charlot is possibly based on Charlemagne's real son Charles, who predeceased his father; Auguste Longnon identified him with Charlemagne's grandson Charles the Child, who died before his father Charles the Bald in a similar situation as Charlot in a fight with a man named Aubouin.

— Freebase

English Revolution

English Revolution

In Marxism, the "English Revolution" is the period of the English Civil Wars and Commonwealth period, in which Parliament challenged King Charles I's authority, engaged in civil conflict against his forces, and executed him in 1649. This was followed by a ten-year period of bourgeois republican government, the "Commonwealth", before monarchy was restored in the shape of Charles' son, Charles II in 1660.

— Freebase

Erle Stanley Gardner

Erle Stanley Gardner

Erle Stanley Gardner was an American lawyer and author of detective stories. Best known for the Perry Mason series, he also published under the pseudonyms A.A. Fair, Kyle Corning, Charles M. Green, Carleton Kendrake, Charles J. Kenny, Les Tillray and Robert Parr.

— Freebase

Charles Doughty

Charles Doughty

Charles John Joseph Addison Doughty was a British Conservative Party politician. A son of Sir Charles Doughty and Lady Alison Doughty, one of four siblings, he was Member of Parliament for East Surrey from 1951 to 1970.

— Freebase

Positivism

Positivism

Positivism is a philosophy of science based on the view that information derived from logical and mathematical treatments and reports of sensory experience is the exclusive source of all authoritative knowledge, and that there is valid knowledge only in scientific knowledge. Verified data received from the senses are known as empirical evidence. This view holds that society, like the physical world, operates according to general laws. Introspective and intuitive knowledge is rejected. Although the positivist approach has been a recurrent theme in the history of Western thought, the modern sense of the approach was developed by the philosopher and founding sociologist Auguste Comte in the early 19th century. Comte argued that, much as the physical world operates according to gravity and other absolute laws, so also does society.

— Freebase

jeanne d'arc

Jeanne d'Arc, Joan of Arc, Saint Joan

French heroine and military leader inspired by religious visions to organize French resistance to the English and to have Charles VII crowned king; she was later tried for heresy and burned at the stake (1412-1431)

— Princeton's WordNet

joan of arc

Jeanne d'Arc, Joan of Arc, Saint Joan

French heroine and military leader inspired by religious visions to organize French resistance to the English and to have Charles VII crowned king; she was later tried for heresy and burned at the stake (1412-1431)

— Princeton's WordNet

saint joan

Jeanne d'Arc, Joan of Arc, Saint Joan

French heroine and military leader inspired by religious visions to organize French resistance to the English and to have Charles VII crowned king; she was later tried for heresy and burned at the stake (1412-1431)

— Princeton's WordNet

Anagram

Anagram

literally, the letters of a word read backwards, but in its usual wider sense, the change or one word or phrase into another by the transposition of its letters. Thus Galenus becomes angelus; William Noy (attorney-general to Charles I., and a laborious man) may be turned into I moyl in law

— Webster Dictionary

Crescent

Crescent

any one of three orders of knighthood; the first instituted by Charles I., king of Naples and Sicily, in 1268; the second by Rene of Anjou, in 1448; and the third by the Sultan Selim III., in 1801, to be conferred upon foreigners to whom Turkey might be indebted for valuable services

— Webster Dictionary

Saint-Simonianism

Saint-Simonianism

Saint-Simonianism was a French political and social movement of the first half of the 19th century, inspired by the ideas of Claude Henri de Rouvroy, comte de Saint-Simon. Saint-Simon has been "variously portrayed as a utopian socialist, the founder of sociology and a prescient madman". His ideas, expressed largely through a succession of journals such as l'Industrie, La politique and L'Organisateur centered on a perception that growth in industrialization and scientific discovery would have profound changes on society. He believed, nonetheless, that society would restructure itself by abandoning traditional ideas of temporal and spiritual power, an evolution that would lead, inevitably, to a productive society based on, and benefiting from, a " ... union of men engaged in useful work", the basis of "true equality". These ideas influenced Auguste Comte, Karl Marx, John Stuart Mill, and many other thinkers and social theorists.

— Freebase

Rupert's drop

Rupert's drop

a kind of glass drop with a long tail, made by dropping melted glass into water. It is remarkable for bursting into fragments when the surface is scratched or the tail broken; -- so called from Prince Rupert, nephew of Charles I., by whom they were first brought to England. Called also Rupert's ball, and glass tear

— Webster Dictionary

Radiography, Dental, Digital

Radiography, Dental, Digital

A rapid, low-dose, digital imaging system using a small intraoral sensor instead of radiographic film, an intensifying screen, and a charge-coupled device. It presents the possibility of reduced patient exposure and minimal distortion, although resolution and latitude are inferior to standard dental radiography. A receiver is placed in the mouth, routing signals to a computer which images the signals on a screen or in print. It includes digitizing from x-ray film or any other detector. (From MEDLINE abstracts; personal communication from Dr. Charles Berthold, NIDR)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Contes, Alpes-Maritimes

Contes, Alpes-Maritimes

Contes is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in the region of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur in south-eastern France. Its inhabitants are Contois. Because the village sounds like the French word comte, the aristocratic title count, it called itself Point Libre during the revolutionary period.

— Freebase

exonym

exonym

A place name or a personal name used by foreigners instead of the native-language version used by its inhabitants, such as Moscow in English for the city called Moskva in Russian, or such as Charles in English for historical people called Karl or Carl in their Germanic languages.

— Wiktionary

Lake Charles

Lake Charles

Lake Charles is the fifth-largest incorporated city in the U.S. state of Louisiana, located on Lake Charles, Prien Lake, and the Calcasieu River. Founded in 1861 in Calcasieu Parish, it is a major cultural, industrial, and educational center in the southwest region of the state, and one of the most important in Acadiana. As of the 2010 census, the population was 71,993. Lake Charles is the principal city of the Lake Charles Metropolitan Statistical Area, having a population of 194,138. It is the larger principal city of the Lake Charles-Jennings Combined Statistical Area, with a population of 225,235. A 2010 population estimate of the five parish area was over 292,619. It is considered a major center of petrochemical refining, tourism, gaming, and education, being home to McNeese State University and Sowela Technical Community College. Because of the lakes and waterways throughout the city, metropolitan Lake Charles is often referred to as the Lake Area.

— Freebase

Jambool

Jambool

Jambool, Inc. operates Social Gold™, an industry-leading virtual monetization platform.Social Gold enables developers to create and manage their own white-labeled virtual currency, to provide a in-app payments experience to their users, and to optimize their virtual economy using analytics. Social Gold powers the virtual currency and payment solutions for thousands of online games and virtual worlds.Jambool is headquartered in San Francisco with offices in Seattle and Singapore. Investors include Hit Forge, Charles River Ventures, Bay Partners, and Madrona Venture Group.

— CrunchBase

Charles Jasper Glidden

Charles Jasper Glidden

Charles Jasper Glidden was an American telephone pioneer, financier and supporter of the automobile in the United States. Charles Glidden, with his wife Lucy, were the first to circle the world in an automobile, and repeated the feat in 1908.

— Freebase

Gramont

Gramont

or Grammont, Philibert, Comte de, a celebrated French courtier in the age of Louis XIV.; he greatly distinguished himself in the army, as also at the court by his lively wit and gallant bearing, and soon established himself in the king's favour, but an intrigue with one of the royal mistresses brought about his exile from France; at the profligate court of Charles II of England he found a warm welcome and congenial surroundings; left memoirs which were mainly the work of his brother-in-law, Anthony Hamilton, and which give a marvellously witty and brilliant picture of the licentiousness and intrigue of the 17th-century court life (1621-1707).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Protestant

Protestant

one who protests; -- originally applied to those who adhered to Luther, and protested against, or made a solemn declaration of dissent from, a decree of the Emperor Charles V. and the Diet of Spires, in 1529, against the Reformers, and appealed to a general council; -- now used in a popular sense to designate any Christian who does not belong to the Roman Catholic or the Greek Church

— Webster Dictionary

Cor Caroli

Cor Caroli

Cor Caroli is the brightest star in the northern constellation Canes Venatici. It is a binary star consisting of two distantly separated components. The name Cor Caroli means "Charles' Heart", and was named in the 17th century to honour the murdered King Charles I of England.

— Freebase

King Charles Spaniel

King Charles Spaniel

The King Charles Spaniel is a small dog breed of the spaniel type. In 1903, the Kennel Club combined four separate toy spaniel breeds under this single title. The other varieties merged into this breed were the Blenheim, Ruby and Prince Charles Spaniels, each of which contributed one of the four colours available in the breed. Thought to have originated in the Far East, toy spaniels were first seen in Europe during the 16th century. They were made famous by their association with King Charles II of England and have been linked with English royalty since the time of Queen Mary I. Members of the breed have been owned by Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaevna of Russia, Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth II. The King Charles Spaniel and the other types of toy spaniels were crossbred with the Pug in the early 19th century to reduce the size of the nose, as was the style of the day. The 20th century saw attempts to restore lines of King Charles Spaniels to the breed of Charles II's time. These included the unsuccessful Toy Trawler Spaniel and the now popular Cavalier King Charles Spaniel. The Cavalier is slightly larger, with a flat head and a longer nose, while the King Charles is smaller, with a domed head and a flat face.

— Freebase

Charles the Bald, Holy Roman Emperor

Charles the Bald, Holy Roman Emperor

Charles the Bald or Charles II, Holy Roman Emperor and King of West Francia, with the borders of his land defined by the Treaty of Verdun, 843, was the youngest son of the Emperor Louis the Pious by his second wife Judith, and grandson of Charlemagne.

— Freebase

Lawe

Lawe

The Lawe is a river of northern France, right tributary of the Lys. Its source is near Magnicourt-en-Comte. It flows generally northeast through Houdain, Bruay-la-Buissière, Béthune and Lestrem. It flows into the Lys in La Gorgue.

— Freebase

Joseph Bonaparte

Joseph Bonaparte

Joseph-Napoleon Bonaparte was the elder brother of Napoleon Bonaparte, who made him King of Naples and Sicily, and later King of Spain. After the fall of Napoleon, Joseph styled himself Comte de Survilliers.

— Freebase

Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley

Charles Wesley was an English leader of the Methodist movement, son of Anglican clergyman and poet Samuel Wesley, the younger brother of Anglican clergyman John Wesley and Anglican clergyman Samuel Wesley. He was father of musician Samuel Wesley and grandfather of musician Samuel Sebastian Wesley. Despite their closeness, Charles and his brother John did not always agree on questions relating to their beliefs. In particular, Charles was strongly opposed to the idea of a breach with the Church of England into which they had both been ordained. Charles Wesley is chiefly remembered for the many hymns he wrote. He ministered for part of his life in The New Room Chapel in Bristol. His house, located nearby, can still be visited.

— Freebase

Louis Antoine de Bougainville

Louis Antoine de Bougainville

Louis-Antoine, Comte de Bougainville was a French admiral and explorer. A contemporary of James Cook, he took part in the French and Indian War against Britain. He later gained fame for his expeditions, the first recorded settlement on the Falkland Islands and his voyages into the Pacific Ocean.

— Freebase

Clementine, the Lady

Clementine, the Lady

a lady, accomplished and beautiful, in Richardson's novel, "Sir Charles Grandison," in love with Sir Charles, who marries another he has no partiality for.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Ar`lington, Henry Bennet, Earl of

Ar`lington, Henry Bennet, Earl of

served under Charles I., and accompanied Charles II. in his exile; a prominent member of the famous Cabal; being impeached when in office, lost favour and retired into private life (1618-1685).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Chambord

Chambord

spacious château in the dep. of Loire-et-Cher, France, built by Francis I.; after being long a residence for royalty and people of distinction, was presented in 1821 to the Duc de Bordeaux, the Comte de Chambord.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Sleeping Beauty

Sleeping Beauty

"The Sleeping Beauty by Charles Perrault or "Little Briar Rose" by the Brothers Grimm is a classic fairytale involving a beautiful princess, enchantment of sleep, and a handsome prince. Written as an original literary tale, it was first published by Charles Perrault in Histoires ou contes du temps passé in 1697. In 1959 the story was made into a Walt Disney animated film.

— Freebase

House of Bernadotte

House of Bernadotte

The House of Bernadotte, the current royal house of Sweden, has reigned since 1818. Between 1818 and 1905, it was also the royal house of Norway. Its founder, Charles XIV John of Sweden, was adopted by Charles XIII of Sweden, who belonged to the House of Holstein-Gottorp which was becoming extinct.

— Freebase

Buckingham, George Villiers, Duke of

Buckingham, George Villiers, Duke of

son of the preceding; served under Charles I. in the Civil War, was at the battle of Worcester; became minister of Charles II.; a profligate courtier and an unprincipled man (1627-1688).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

It Should've Been Me

It Should've Been Me

"It Should've Been Me" is a 1954 rhythm and blues song written by Memphis Curtis, produced by Ahmet Ertegun and recorded and released as a single by American singer Ray Charles. Recorded at the same May 10, 1953 session as the boogie-woogie-like R&B hit "Mess Around", which was written by Ertegun and released first, "It Should've Been Me" played on a comedic rap vibe/jive in which Charles talked about certain instances where he was smitten with "fine chicks" only to be dismayed that they had partners causing Charles, to say "it should have been with real fine chick." Released in early 1954, the song became Charles' first charted hit for Atlantic Records and soon reached number five on the Billboard R&B singles chart.

— Freebase

Whig

Whig

one of a political party which grew up in England in the seventeenth century, in the reigns of Charles I. and II., when great contests existed respecting the royal prerogatives and the rights of the people. Those who supported the king in his high claims were called Tories, and the advocates of popular rights, of parliamentary power over the crown, and of toleration to Dissenters, were, after 1679, called Whigs. The terms Liberal and Radical have now generally superseded Whig in English politics. See the note under Tory

— Webster Dictionary

Foragers

Foragers

Foragers is a book written by Charles Oberndorf.

— Freebase

Lobsters

Lobsters

Lobsters is a novelette written by Charles Stross.

— Freebase

Charles Kemble

Charles Kemble

Charles Kemble was a British actor.

— Freebase

Cavendish, William

Cavendish, William

English courtier and cavalier in the reigns of James I. and Charles I.; joined Charles II. in exile; returned at the Restoration; was made Duke of Newcastle; wrote on horsemanship (1592-1676).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Rutebeuf

Rutebeuf

Rutebeuf, a trouvère, was born in the first half of the 13th century, possibly in Champagne; he was evidently of humble birth, and he was a Parisian by education and residence. His name is nowhere mentioned by his contemporaries. He frequently plays in his verse on the word Rutebeuf, which was probably a nom de guerre, and is variously explained by him as derived from rude boeuf and rude oeuvre. Paulin Paris thought that he began life in the lowest rank of the minstrel profession as a jongleur. Some of his poems have autobiographical value. In Le Mariage de Rutebeuf he says that on the 2 January 1261 he married a woman old and ugly, with neither dowry nor amiability. In the Complainte de Rutebeuf he details a series of misfortunes which have reduced him to abject destitution. In these circumstances he addresses himself to Alphonse, comte de Poitiers, brother of Louis IX, for relief. Other poems in the same vein reveal that his own miserable circumstances were chiefly due to a love of play, particularly a game played with dice; which was known as griesche. It would seem that his distress could not be due to lack of patrons; for his metrical Life of Saint Elizabeth of Hungary was written by request of Erard de Valery, who wished to present it to Isabel, queen of Navarre; and he wrote elegies on the deaths of Anceau de l'Isle Adam, the third of the name, who died about 1251, Eudes, comte de Nevers, Theobald II of Navarre, and Alphonse, comte de Poitiers, which were probably paid for by the families of the personages celebrated. In the Pauvreté de Rutebeuf, he addresses Louis IX himself.

— Freebase

Porcelaine

Porcelaine

The Porcelaine is a breed of dog originating from France. It is believed to be the oldest of the French scent hounds. Its alternate name is the Chien de Franche-Comté, named after a French region bordering Switzerland. This caused some debate over the dog's origin, but it has been decided that it is a French dog.

— Freebase

Messier

Messier

Charles Messier (1730-1817); a French astronomer who in 1774 published Nebulae and Star Clusters, a catalogue of 45 deep sky objects such as nebulae and star clusters. The purpose of the catalogue was to help comet hunters (like himself) and other astronomical observers to distinguish between permanent and transient objects in the sky. Objects in Messier's catalog are numbered, and the letter M (for Messier) is prepended to these numbers, as in M31 (the Andromeda Galaxy) or M13 (the globular cluster in Hercules).

— Wiktionary

Charles Lever

Charles Lever

Charles James Lever was an Irish novelist.

— Freebase

William Macready

William Macready

William Charles Macready was an English actor.

— Freebase

President Abraham Lincoln

President Abraham Lincoln

"President Abraham Lincoln" is a drawing by Charles Vogan.

— Freebase

English Civil War

English Civil War

The English Civil War was a series of armed conflicts and political problems between Parliamentarians and Royalists. The first and second civil wars pitted the supporters of King Charles I against the supporters of the Long Parliament, while the third war saw fighting between supporters of King Charles II and supporters of the Rump Parliament. The Civil War ended with the Parliamentary victory at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651. The English Civil War led to the trial and execution of Charles I, the exile of his son, Charles II, and replacement of English monarchy with, first, the Commonwealth of England, and then with a Protectorate, under Oliver Cromwell's personal rule. The monopoly of the Church of England on Christian worship in England ended with the victors consolidating the established Protestant Ascendancy in Ireland. Constitutionally, the wars established the precedent that an English monarch cannot govern without Parliament's consent, although this concept was legally established only with the Glorious Revolution later in the century.

— Freebase

Saint Charles

Saint Charles

St. Charles is a city in and the county seat of St. Charles County, Missouri, United States. The population was 65,794 at the 2010 census, making St. Charles the 2nd largest city in St. Charles County. It lies just to the northwest of St. Louis, Missouri on the Missouri River, and, for a time, played a significant role in the United States' westward expansion. It is the third oldest city west of the Mississippi, founded in 1765 as Les Petites Côtes, "The Little Hills", by Louis Blanchette, a French Canadian fur trader, and was the last "civilized" stop for the Lewis and Clark Expedition in 1804. The city served as the first Missouri capital from 1821 to 1826. It is the site for the Saint Rose Philippine Duchesne shrine. It is also the home base for the St. Louis National Weather Service Forecast Office, serving central, east-central and northeastern Missouri, as well as west-central and southwest Illinois.

— Freebase


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