Definitions containing rémusat, abel

We've found 59 definitions:

Blueback

Blueback

Blueback is a Short novel by critically acclaimed Australian author Tim Winton, published in 1985. It is subtitled: A fable for all ages. Blueback details the life of Abel Jackson, a diver and later marine biologist, from when he was 10 years old into his adult life. The title of the book originates from a fish Abel meets while diving in the bay near his house; a giant blue groper. Abel and his mother, Dora, name it Blueback, and they repeatedly visit it as it spends its life on the reef there. Abel lives with Blueback through many hard times, including protecting him from a poacher. Abel grows up to become a marine biologist as a result of his passion for the sea and love of Blueback. The novel isn't all about the life of Abel Jackson. The novel also outlines a message: "The decisions made in ones childhood can greatly affect his life during adulthood". Described by the author as a "contemporary fable", Blueback explores universal human themes such as love for family, passion, growing up, and belonging. It has been variously described by reviews as "a clearly articulated call for ecological responsibility" in which "Winton pulls deftly on the heartstrings" and a "mawkish [tale] about world ecology that as message is indisputably bad"

— Freebase

Mods

Mods

Mods was a Norwegian rock band formed in Stavanger in 1980. The band recorded their first album Revansj! in 1981. The original members were vocalist Morten Abel, guitarist Runar Bjålid, guitarist Kurt Øyvind Olsen, bassist Torkild Viig, keyboardist Helge Hummervoll and drummer Leif Arne Bergvin Nilsen. After the first album, Bjålid and Olsen left the band and were replaced by Tor Øyvind Syvertsen. The second album Amerika was released in 1982. They recorded their last album, Time Machine, in 1984. They played some reunion concerts in 1990 in the Stavanger area. Morten Abel has on several occasions dismissed the band and their songs. Nevertheless, they are considered legends, especially in their home county Rogaland. Drummer Leif Nilsen later formed Leif & Kompisane, they sometimes play Mods songs live. Abel, Hummervoll and Syvertsen later formed the band The September When in 1987, and Abel eventually went on to become a very successful solo artist in Norway. In 1992, a CD re-issue set of two first Mods albums was released with the title Originaler. A "Best of" CD/DVD was released in 2006.

— Freebase

abel

Abel

(Old Testament) Cain and Abel were the first children of Adam and Eve born after the Fall of Man; Abel was killed by Cain

— Princeton's WordNet

cain

Cain

(Old Testament) Cain and Abel were the first children of Adam and Eve born after the Fall of Man; Cain killed Abel out of jealousy and was exiled by God

— Princeton's WordNet

Cain and Abel

Cain and Abel

Cain and Abel is a password recovery tool for Microsoft Windows, produced independently of Microsoft. It can recover many kinds of passwords using methods such as network packet sniffing, cracking various password hashes by using methods such as dictionary attacks, brute force and cryptanalysis attacks. Cryptanalysis attacks are done via rainbow tables which can be generated with the winrtgen.exe program provided with Cain and Abel. Cain and Abel is maintained by Massimiliano Montoro and Sean Babcock.

— Freebase

Seth

Seth

Seth, in Judaism, Christianity and Islam, was the third son of Adam and Eve and brother of Cain and Abel, who were the only other of their children mentioned by name. According to Genesis 4:25, Seth was born after the slaying of Abel by Cain, and Eve believed God had appointed him as a replacement for Abel.

— Freebase

John Jacob Abel

John Jacob Abel

John Jacob Abel was a significant American biochemist and pharmacologist. Born to George M. and Mary Abel near Cleveland, Ohio, he graduated with a B.A. in 1883 from the University of Michigan, where he studied with Henry Sewall. Abel received a M.D. at Strasburg in 1888. In 1891 he founded and chaired the first department of pharmacology in the United States at the University of Michigan. In 1893, he went on to chair the pharmacology department at Johns Hopkins University. In 1897, he was the second to isolate epinephrine, also known as adrenaline, although the extracts he produced have been shown to be mostly an inactive metabolite and the first pure extracts were produced by the Japanese Jokichi Takamine who patented the formulation under the name adrenalin. He later formulated the idea of the artificial kidney and in 1914 he isolated amino acids from the blood. He spent years unsuccessfully searching for the pituitary hormone, unaware that he was in fact looking for several hormones. In 1926, he reported the isolation and crystallization of insulin, though this announcement was met with considerable scepticism and not generally accepted for many years.

— Freebase

Abelian

Abelian

A member of a sect in fourth-century Africa mentioned by St. Augustine, who states that they married but lived in continence after the manner, as they claimed, of Abel.

— Wiktionary

Cain

Cain

The eldest son of Adam and Eve as described in Genesis. (see Cain and Abel).

— Wiktionary

Abelia

Abelia

Abelia is a genus of about 15-30 species and many hybrids in the honeysuckle family Caprifoliaceae. Some authors, including the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group, consider Abelia and related genera to belong instead in the segregate family Linnaeaceae, also including such genera as Linnaea, Abelia, Dipelta, Kolkwitzia, and Zabelia, but not such others as Lonicera or Symphoricarpos, included by them instead in a more narrowly viewed Caprifoliaceae. Abelias are shrubs from 1–6 m tall, native to eastern Asia and southern North America; the species from warm climates are evergreen, and colder climate species deciduous. The leaves are opposite or in whorls of three, ovate, glossy, dark green, 1.5–8 cm long, turning purplish-bronze to red in autumn in the deciduous species. The flowers appear in the upper leaf axils and stem ends, 1-8 together in a short cyme; they are pendulous, white to pink, bell-shaped with a five-lobed corolla, 1–5 cm long, and usually scented. Flowering continues over a long and continuous period from late spring to fall. Type species of this genus is Abelia chinensis. The generic name commemorates Clarke Abel, a keen naturalist who accompanied Lord Amherst's unsuccessful embassy to China in 1816 as surgeon, under the sponsorship of Sir Joseph Banks. All of Abel's seeds and plants were lost in a shipwreck on the homeward voyage, however; living plants of Abelia chinensis were first imported to England in 1844 by Robert Fortune, who introduced A. uniflora the following year.

— Freebase

Abila

Abila

Abila – also, Biblical: Abel-Shittim or Ha-Shittim – was an ancient city east of the Jordan River in Moab, later Peraea, near Livias, about twelve km northeast of the north shore of the Dead Sea; the site is now that of Abil-ez-Zeit, Jordan. Abel-Shittim, is found only in Num. xxxiii.49; but Ha-Shittim, evidently the same place, is mentioned in Num. xxv.1, Josh. iii.1, and Micah, vi.5. It was the forty-second encampment of the Israelites and the final headquarters of Joshua before he crossed the Jordan. Josephus states that there was in his time a town, Abila, full of palmtrees, at a distance of sixty stadia from the Jordan, and describes it as the spot where Moses delivered the exhortations of Deuteronomy. There is to this day an acacia grove not far from the place, although the palms mentioned by Josephus are no longer there.

— Freebase

Niels Henrik Abel

Niels Henrik Abel

Niels Henrik Abel was a Norwegian mathematician who proved the impossibility of solving the quintic equation by radicals. The Abel Prize is named for him.

— Freebase

Kein

Kein

Kein is an EP released by Unsraw on September 26, 2007. It is part of a dual-album release campaign with Abel. The pair of EPs are named after the biblical story of Cain and Abel.

— Freebase

Abelonian

Abelonian

one of a sect in Africa (4th century), mentioned by St. Augustine, who states that they married, but lived in continence, after the manner, as they pretended, of Abel

— Webster Dictionary

Oath

Oath

a solemn affirmation, connected with a sacred object, or one regarded as sacred, as the temple, the altar, the blood of Abel, the Bible, the Koran, etc

— Webster Dictionary

book of genesis

Genesis, Book of Genesis

the first book of the Old Testament: tells of Creation; Adam and Eve; the Fall of Man; Cain and Abel; Noah and the flood; God's covenant with Abraham; Abraham and Isaac; Jacob and Esau; Joseph and his brothers

— Princeton's WordNet

genesis

Genesis, Book of Genesis

the first book of the Old Testament: tells of Creation; Adam and Eve; the Fall of Man; Cain and Abel; Noah and the flood; God's covenant with Abraham; Abraham and Isaac; Jacob and Esau; Joseph and his brothers

— Princeton's WordNet

seth

Seth

(Old Testament) third son of Adam and Eve; given by God in place of the murdered Abel

— Princeton's WordNet

Fiji

Fiji

A republic consisting of an island group in Melanesia, in the southwest Pacific Ocean. Its capital is Suva. It was discovered by Abel Tasman in 1643 and was visited by Captain Cook in 1774. It was used by escaped convicts from Australia as early as 1804. It was annexed by Great Britain in 1874 but achieved independence in 1970. The name Fiji is of uncertain origin. In its present form it may represent that of Viti, the main island in the group. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p396 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p186)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

New Zealand

New Zealand

A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Tasmania

Tasmania

An island south of Australia and the smallest state of the Commonwealth. Its capital is Hobart. It was discovered and named Van Diemen's Island in 1642 by Abel Tasman, a Dutch navigator, in honor of the Dutch governor-general of the Dutch East Indian colonies. It was renamed for the discoverer in 1853. In 1803 it was taken over by Great Britain and was used as a penal colony. It was granted government in 1856 and federated as a state in 1901. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1190 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, p535)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Abelian group

Abelian group

In abstract algebra, an abelian group, also called a commutative group, is a group in which the result of applying the group operation to two group elements does not depend on their order. Abelian groups generalize the arithmetic of addition of integers. They are named after Niels Henrik Abel. The concept of an abelian group is one of the first concepts encountered in undergraduate abstract algebra, with many other basic objects, such as a module and a vector space, being its refinements. The theory of abelian groups is generally simpler than that of their non-abelian counterparts, and finite abelian groups are very well understood. On the other hand, the theory of infinite abelian groups is an area of current research.

— Freebase

Zeehan

Zeehan

Zeehan is a town on the west coast of Tasmania, Australia 139 kilometres south-west of Burnie. At the 2011 census, Zeehan had a population of 728. It is part of the Municipality of West Coast. The town was named after the nearby Mount Zeehan which had been named by George Bass and Matthew Flinders after Abel Tasman's brig Zeehaen.

— Freebase

Land of Nod

Land of Nod

The Land of Nod is a place in the Book of Genesis of the Hebrew Bible, located "on the east of Eden", where Cain was exiled by the Lord God after Cain had murdered his brother Abel. According to Genesis 4:16: "Nod" is the Hebrew root of the verb "to wander". Genesis 4:17 relates that after arriving in the Land of Nod, Cain's wife bore him a son, Enoch, in whose name he built the first city.

— Freebase

Rhodesia

Rhodesia

Rhodesia was an unrecognised state located in southern Africa during the Cold War. From 1965 to 1979, it comprised the region now known as Zimbabwe. The country, with its capital in Salisbury, was considered a de facto successor state to the former British colony of Southern Rhodesia. During an effort to delay an immediate transition to indigenous African rule, Rhodesia's predominantly white government issued its own Unilateral Declaration of Independence from the United Kingdom on 11 November 1965. The UDI administration initially sought recognition as an autonomous realm within the Commonwealth of Nations, but reconstituted itself as a republic in 1970. Following a brutal guerrilla war waged by two rival black nationalist organisations, Rhodesian premier Ian Smith conceded to biracial democracy in 1978. However, a provisional government subsequently headed by Smith and his moderate colleague Abel Muzorewa failed in appeasing international critics or halting the bloodshed. By December 1979, Muzorewa had replaced Smith as Prime Minister and secured an agreement with the militant African factions, allowing Rhodesia to briefly revert to her colonial status pending popular elections. Independence deemed legitimate by Britain and the United Nations was finally achieved in April 1980; the nation was concurrently renamed the Republic of Zimbabwe. The country would never again see the prosperity enjoyed by the former Rhodesia.

— Freebase

Tasman Sea

Tasman Sea

The Tasman Sea is a southwesterly marginal sea of the South Pacific Ocean between Australia and New Zealand, approximately 2,000 kilometres across. It extends 2,800 km from north to south. The sea was named after the Dutch explorer Abel Janszoon Tasman, the first recorded European to encounter New Zealand and Tasmania. The British explorer Captain James Cook later extensively navigated the Tasman Sea in the 1770s as part of his first voyage of exploration. The Tasman Sea is commonly referred to in both Australia and New Zealand as The Ditch; for example, crossing the ditch means going to Australia from New Zealand or vice versa. In Māori, the Tasman Sea is called Te Tai-o-Rehua.

— Freebase

Imaginate...

Imaginate...

Imagínate... is Menudo's 34th album. It features Abel Talamántez, Alexis Grullón, Andy Blázquez, Ashley Ruiz and Ricky López. This is the second album recorded by this line-up.

— Freebase

Sturm und Drang

Sturm und Drang

Sturm und Drang is a proto-Romantic movement in German literature and music taking place from the late 1760s to the early 1780s, in which individual subjectivity and, in particular, extremes of emotion were given free expression in reaction to the perceived constraints of rationalism imposed by the Enlightenment and associated aesthetic movements. The period is named for Friedrich Maximilian Klinger's play Sturm und Drang, which was first performed by Abel Seyler's famed theatrical company in 1777. The philosopher Johann Georg Hamann is considered to be the ideologue of Sturm und Drang, with Jakob Michael Reinhold Lenz, H. L. Wagner and Friedrich Maximilian Klinger also significant figures. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was also a notable proponent of the movement, though he and Friedrich Schiller ended their period of association with it by initiating what would become Weimar Classicism.

— Freebase

Mandaeism

Mandaeism

Mandaeism or Mandaeanism is a gnostic religion with a strongly dualistic worldview. Its adherents, the Mandaeans, revere Adam, Abel, Seth, Enosh, Noah, Shem, Aram and especially John the Baptist, but reject Abraham, Moses and Jesus of Nazareth. According to most scholars, Mandaeans migrated from the Southern Levant to Mesopotamia in the first centuries CE and are certainly of pre-Arab and pre-Islamic origin. They are Semites and speak a dialect of Eastern Aramaic known as Mandaic. They may well be related to the "Nabateans of Iraq" who were pagan, Aramaic speaking indigenous pre-Arab and pre-Islamic inhabitants of southern Iraq. Mandaeans appear to have settled in northern Mesopotamia, but the religion has been practised primarily around the lower Karun, Euphrates and Tigris and the rivers that surround the Shatt-al-Arab waterway, part of southern Iraq and Khuzestan Province in Iran. There are thought to be between 60,000 and 70,000 Mandaeans worldwide, and until the 2003 Iraq war, almost all of them lived in Iraq. Many Mandaean Iraqis have since fled their country because of the turmoil created by the War on Terror and subsequent rise in sectarian violence by Muslim extremists. By 2007, the population of Mandaeans in Iraq had fallen to approximately 5,000. Most Mandaean Iraqis have sought refuge in Iran with the fellow Mandaeans there. Others have moved to northern Iraq. There has been a much smaller influx into Syria and Jordan, with smaller populations in Sweden, Australia, the United States, and other Western countries.

— Freebase

Southern Rhodesia

Southern Rhodesia

Southern Rhodesia was the name of the self-governing British colony situated north of the Limpopo River and the Union of South Africa, now known as Zimbabwe. Following its Unilateral Declaration of Independence in 1965, it was known as simply Rhodesia until 1979, when it reconstituted itself under majority rule as the unrecognised state of Zimbabwe Rhodesia, headed by Bishop Abel Muzorewa. It reverted to colonial status with the Lancaster House Agreement of December 1979, and became the recognised state of Zimbabwe in April 1980, with Robert Mugabe elected as prime minister. A policy of Africanization was soon adopted, with the goal of replacing traces of former British, Rhodesian and white rule, laws, property and nomenclature with alternatives regarded as more indigenous.

— Freebase

Abel Tasman

Abel Tasman

Abel Janszoon Tasman was a Dutch seafarer, explorer and merchant, best known for his voyages of 1642 and 1644 in the service of the VOC. He was the first known European explorer to reach the islands of Van Diemen's Land and New Zealand, and to sight the Fiji islands. His navigator François Visscher, and his merchant Isaack Gilsemans, mapped substantial portions of Australia, New Zealand and some Pacific Islands.

— Freebase

Spermine

Spermine

Spermine is a polyamine involved in cellular metabolism found in all eukaryotic cells. Formed from spermidine, it is found in a wide variety of organisms and tissues and is an essential growth factor in some bacteria. It is found as a polycation at physiological pH. Spermine is associated with nucleic acids and is thought to stabilize helical structure, in particular, in viruses. Crystals of spermine phosphate were first described in 1678, in human semen, by Anton van Leeuwenhoek. The name spermin was first used by the German chemists Ladenburg and Abel in 1888, and the correct structure of spermine was not finally established until 1926, simultaneously in England and Germany.

— Freebase

Death Toll

Death Toll

Death Toll is a 2008 action film starring DMX, Lou Diamond Phillips, Leila Arcieri and Keshia Knight Pulliam, written and produced by Daniel Garcia of the rap group Kane & Abel and directed by Phenomenon. Filming was done in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and New Orleans, Louisiana.

— Freebase

Woodenhead

Woodenhead

Woodenhead is the name of a 2003 New Zealand film directed by Florian Habicht. The film is a dark fairy tale in the style of the Brothers Grimm, and is based around the life of a dump-hand called Gert and a mute princess called Plum. The two wander into the forest with a donkey and mysterious things start to happen. The film explores the dark sexual material in this mythic context. The film is unusual in that the sound and music were recorded before the film was shot, and does not match the visuals. It is in crisp black and white and was shot in the Northland Region. The voices of the main two characters are musicians Steve Abel and Mardi Potter and the actors are Nicholas Butler and Teresa Peters. The film was shown in the 2003 Auckland, Wellington and Melbourne international film festivals and has been released on DVD. Florian Habicht has also made a film called Kaikohe Demolition, a loving look at the demolition derby in his hometown Kaikohe, and Rubbings from a Live Man, an intimate documentary about New Zealand actor, writer and director Warwick Broadhead.

— Freebase

Great Expectations

Great Expectations

Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel. It is the second novel, after David Copperfield, to be fully narrated in the first person. Great Expectations is a bildungsroman, or a coming-of-age novel, and it is a classic work of Victorian literature. It depicts the growth and personal development of an orphan named Pip. The novel was first published in serial form in Dickens' weekly periodical All the Year Round, from 1 December 1860 to August 1861. In October 1861, Chapman and Hall published the novel in three volumes. Great Expectations was to be twice as long, but constraints imposed by the management of All the Year Round limited the novel's length. Collected and dense, with a conciseness unusual for Dickens, the novel represents Dickens' peak and maturity as an author. According to G. K. Chesterton, Dickens penned Great Expectations in "the afternoon of [his] life and fame." It was the penultimate novel Dickens completed, preceding Our Mutual Friend. It is set among the marshes of Kent and in London in the early to mid-1800s. From the outset, the reader is "treated" by the terrifying encounter between Pip, the protagonist, and the escaped convict, Abel Magwitch. Great Expectations is a graphic book, full of extreme imagery, poverty, prison ships, "the hulks," barriers and chains, and fights to the death. It therefore combines intrigue and unexpected twists of autobiographical detail in different tones. Regardless of its narrative technique, the novel reflects the events of the time, Dickens' concerns, and the relationship between society and man.

— Freebase

Plane curve

Plane curve

In mathematics, a plane curve is a curve in a Euclidean plane. The most frequently studied cases are smooth plane curves, and algebraic plane curves. A smooth plane curve is a curve in a real Euclidean plane R² and is a one-dimensional smooth manifold. Equivalently, a smooth plane curve can be given locally by an equation ƒ = 0, where ƒ : R² → R is a smooth function, and the partial derivatives ∂ƒ/∂x and ∂ƒ/∂y are never both 0. In other words, a smooth plane curve is a plane curve which "locally looks like a line" with respect to a smooth change of coordinates. An algebraic plane curve is a curve in an affine or projective plane given by one polynomial equation ƒ = 0 Algebraic curves were studied extensively in the 18th to 20th centuries, leading to a very rich and deep theory. Some founders of the theory are considered to be Isaac Newton and Bernhard Riemann, with main contributors being Niels Henrik Abel, Henri Poincaré, Max Noether, among others. Every algebraic plane curve has a degree, the degree of the defining equation, which is equal, in case of an algebraically closed field, to the number of intersections of the curve with a line in general position. For example, the circle given by the equation x² + y² = 1 has degree 2.²²

— Freebase

Van Diemen's Land

Van Diemen's Land

Van Diemen's Land was the original name used by most Europeans for the island of Tasmania, now part of Australia. The Dutch explorer Abel Tasman was the first European to land on the shores of Tasmania. Landing at Blackman's Bay and later having the Dutch flag flown at North Bay, Tasman named the island Anthoonij van Diemenslandt in honour of Anthony van Diemen, the Governor-General of the Dutch East Indies who had sent Tasman on his voyage of discovery in 1642. Between 1772 and 1798 only the southeastern portion of the island was visited. Tasmania was not known to be an island until Matthew Flinders and George Bass circumnavigated it in the Norfolk in 1798-99. In 1803, the island was colonised by the British as a penal colony with the name Van Diemen's Land, and became part of the British colony of New South Wales. Major-General Ralph Darling was appointed Governor of New South Wales In 1825, and in the same year he visited Hobart Town, and on December 3 proclaimed the establishment of the independent colony, of which he actually became Governor for three days. The demonym for Van Diemen's Land was 'Van Diemonian', though contemporaries used Vandemonian, possibly as a play on words relating to the colony's penal origins.

— Freebase

Democide

Democide

Democide is a term revived and redefined by the political scientist R. J. Rummel as "the murder of any person or people by a government, including genocide, politicide and mass murder." Rummel created the term as an extended concept to include forms of government murder that are not covered by the term genocide, and it has become accepted among other scholars. Rummel presents his definition without referencing any previous uses, but the term democide was defined and used in English more than 40 years earlier by Theodore Abel. In the 20th century, democide passed war as the leading cause of non-natural death.

— Freebase

Pentachord

Pentachord

A pentachord in music theory may be either of two things. In pitch-class set theory, a pentachord is defined as any five pitch classes, regarded as an unordered collection. In other contexts, a pentachord may be any consecutive five-note section of a diatonic scale. A pentad is a five-note chord. Under the latter definition, a diatonic scale comprises five non-transpositionally equivalent pentachords rather than seven because the Ionian and Mixolydian pentachords and the Dorian and Aeolian pentachords are intervallically identical. The name "pentachord" was also given to a musical instrument, now in disuse, built to the specifications of Sir Edward Walpole. It was demonstrated by Karl Friedrich Abel at his first public concert in London, on 5 April 1759, when it was described as "newly invented". In the dedication to Walpole of his cello sonatas op. 3, the cellist/composer James Cervetto praised the pentachord, declaring: "I know not a more fit Instrument to Accompany the Voice". Performances on the instrument are documented as late as 1783, after which it seems to have fallen out of use. It appears to have been similar to a five-string violoncello.

— Freebase

Elliptic function

Elliptic function

In complex analysis, an elliptic function is a meromorphic function that is periodic in two directions. Just as a periodic function of a real variable is defined by its values on an interval, an elliptic function is determined by its values on a fundamental parallelogram, which then repeat in a lattice. Such a doubly periodic function cannot be holomorphic, as it would then be a bounded entire function, and by Liouville's theorem every such function must be constant. In fact, an elliptic function must have at least two poles in a fundamental parallelogram, as it is easy to show using the periodicity that a contour integral around its boundary must vanish, implying that the residues of any simple poles must cancel. Historically, elliptic functions were first discovered by Niels Henrik Abel as inverse functions of elliptic integrals, and their theory improved by Carl Gustav Jacobi; these in turn were studied in connection with the problem of the arc length of an ellipse, whence the name derives.Jacobi's elliptic functions have found numerous applications in physics, and were used by Jacobi to prove some results in elementary number theory. A more complete study of elliptic functions was later undertaken by Karl Weierstrass, who found a simple elliptic function in terms of which all the others could be expressed. Besides their practical use in the evaluation of integrals and the explicit solution of certain differential equations, they have deep connections with elliptic curves and modular forms.

— Freebase

Classical period

Classical period

The dates of the Classical period in Western music are generally accepted as being between about 1730 and 1820. However, the term classical music is used in a colloquial sense to describe a variety of Western musical styles from the ninth century to the present, and especially from the sixteenth or seventeenth to the nineteenth. This article is about the specific period from 1750 to 1820. The Classical period falls between the Baroque and the Romantic periods. The best known composers from this period are Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and Ludwig van Beethoven; other notable names include Luigi Boccherini, Muzio Clementi, Antonio Soler, Antonio Salieri, François Joseph Gossec, Johann Stamitz, Carl Friedrich Abel, Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, and Christoph Willibald Gluck. Ludwig van Beethoven is also sometimes regarded either as a Romantic composer or a composer who was part of the transition to the Romantic. Franz Schubert is also something of a transitional figure, as are Johann Nepomuk Hummel, Mauro Giuliani, Friedrich Kuhlau, Fernando Sor, Luigi Cherubini, Jan Ladislav Dussek, and Carl Maria von Weber. The period is sometimes referred to as the era of Viennese Classic or Classicism, since Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Joseph Haydn, Antonio Salieri, and Ludwig van Beethoven all worked at some time in Vienna, and Franz Schubert was born there.

— Freebase

Roman Polański

Roman Polański

Roman Polanski is a Polish-French film director, producer, writer, and actor. Having made films in Poland, the United Kingdom, France and the United States, he is considered one of the few "truly international filmmakers." Polanski's films have inspired diverse directors, including the Coen brothers, Wes Anderson, David Fincher, Atom Egoyan, Darren Aronofsky, Park Chan-wook, Abel Ferrara, and Wes Craven. Born in Paris to Polish parents, he moved with his family back to Poland in 1937, shortly before the outbreak of World War II. He survived the Holocaust and was educated in Poland and became a director of both art house and commercial films. Polanski's first feature-length film, Knife in the Water, made in Poland, was nominated for a United States Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film but was beaten by Federico Fellini's 8½. He has since received five more Oscar nominations, along with two Baftas, four Césars, a Golden Globe Award and the Palme d'Or of the Cannes Film Festival in France. In the United Kingdom he directed three films, beginning with Repulsion. In 1968 he moved to the United States, and cemented his status by directing the horror film Rosemary's Baby for which Ruth Gordon won an Academy Award as Best Supporting Actress.

— Freebase

Phaistos

Phaistos

Phaistos, also transliterated as Phaestos, Festos and Latin Phaestus, currently refers to a Bronze Age archaeological site at Faistos, a municipality in south central Crete. Ancient Phaistos was located about 5.6 km east of the Mediterranean Sea. The name, Phaistos, survives from ancient Greek references to a city in Crete of that name, shown to be, in fact, at or near the current ruins. The name is substantiated by the coins of the classical city. They display motifs such as Europa sitting on a bull, Talos with wings, Heracles without beard and being crowned, or Zeus in a form of a naked youth sitting on a tree. On either the obverse or the reverse the name of the city, or its abbreviation, is inscribed, such as ΦΑΙΣ or ΦΑΙΣΤΙ, for Phaistos or Phaistios written either right-to-left or left-to-right. These few dozen coins were acquired by collectors from uncontrolled contexts. They give no information on the location of Phaistos. Phaistos was located by Thomas Abel Brimage Spratt, commander of the Spitfire, a paddle steamer, in the Mediterranean Survey of 1853, which surveyed the topography, settlements and monuments of Crete. Spratt followed the directions of Strabo, who said:

— Freebase

Simar

Simar

A simar, as defined in the 1913 Webster's Dictionary, is "a woman's long dress or robe; also light covering; a scarf." The word is derived from French simarre, and is also written as cimar, cymar, samare, and simare. Collins English Dictionary defines "simar" and its variant "cymar" as "a woman's short fur-trimmed jacket, popular in the 17th and 18th centuries". The form "cymar" was used by John Dryden: "Her body shaded with a light cymar". Walter Scott used the spelling "simarre": "her sable tresses, which, each arranged in its own little spiral of twisted curls, fell down upon as much of a lovely neck and bosom as a simarre of the richest Persian silk, exhibiting flowers in their natural colors embossed upon a purple ground, permitted to be visible". In his 1909 book, Costume of Prelates of the Catholic Church, John Abel Felix Prosper Nainfa proposed the use of the English word "simar", instead of the word "cassock", for the cassock with the pellegrina worn by Catholic clergy, which he treated as distinct from the cassock proper. Others too have made the same distinction between the "simar" and the "cassock", but many scholars disagree with Nainfa's distinction. More particularly, the documents of the Holy See do not make this distinction, and use the term "cassock" or "vestis talaris" whether a pellegrina is attached or is not. Thus the Instruction on the Dress, Titles and Coats-of-Arms of Cardinals, Bishops and Lesser Prelates of 28 March 1969 states that, for cardinals and bishops, "the elbow-length cape, trimmed in the same manner as this cassock, may be worn over it". "Cassock", rather than "simar" is the term that is usually applied to the dress of Popes and other Catholic ecclesiastics. The Instruction also gives no support to Nainfa's claim that the cassock with shoulder cape should not be worn in church services. Nainfa wrote that the garment with the shoulder cape was at that time called a zimarra in Italian. However, the Italian term zimarra is today used rather of a historical loose-fitting overgown, quite unlike the close-fitting cassock with shoulder cape worn today by some Catholic clergy, and similar to the fur-lined Schaube that was used in northern Europe. Images of the historical zimarra as worn by women can be seen at Dressing the Italian Way and The Italian Showcase On the ecclesiastical simar, as defined by Nainfa, see Cassock.

— Freebase

James Quin

James Quin

James Quin was an English actor of Irish descent. Quin was born in London. He was educated at Dublin, and probably spent a short time at Trinity College. Soon after his father's death in 1710, he made his first appearance on the stage at Abel in Sir Robert Howard's The Committee at the Smock Alley Theatre. Quin's first London engagement was in small parts at Drury Lane, and he secured his first triumph at Bajazet in Nicholas Rowe's Tamerlane, on 8 November 1715. The next year he appeared as Hotspur at Lincoln's Inn, where he remained for fourteen years. On 10 July 1718 he was convicted of manslaughter for having killed Bowen, another actor, in a duel which the victim had himself provoked. Quin was not severely punished, the affair being regarded as more of an accident than a crime. The public took a similar view of another episode in which Quin, on being attacked by a young actor who had been angered by the sarcastic criticism of his superior, drew upon him and killed him. But if he was eager in his own defence he was no less so in that of others. In 1721 a drunken nobleman reeled on to the stage of the theatre and assaulted the manager, Rich, whose life was saved by Quin's prompt armed interference. This resulted in a riot, and thereafter a guard was stationed in all theatres. In 1732 Quin appeared at Covent Garden, returning to Drury Lane from 1734 to 1741, and in 1742 was again at Covent Garden, where he remained until the close of his career. On 14 November 1746 Quin played Horatio and Garrick Lothario to the Calista of Mrs Cibber in Rose's Fair Penitent. The applause of the audience was so great as to disconcert if not actually to alarm the two actors.

— Freebase

XHDL-FM

XHDL-FM

XHDL-FM or Radioactivo 98.5 was a Mexico City commercial radio station, transmitting rock music and Hip hop format from 1992 to 2004. It used to transmit on 98.5 FM until bought by Grupo Imagen by Olegario Vazquez Raña. Today, the name of station XHDL-FM is Reporte 98.5, a talk radio format. Some known speakers were: Ilana Sod, Olallo Rubio, El Sopitas, Julio Martínez Rios, Rulo, Martín Hernández, Arturo López Gavito, Fernanda Tapia, Claudia Arellano, Ricardo Zamora, Uriel Waizel, José Álvarez, Luis Roberto Márquez “El Boy”, Lucinda “La Doctora”, Esteban Silva, Lucila Zetina, Abel Membrillo, Jordi Soler, Jaime Camil, Gonzalo, Erich Martino, José Enrique Fernández, Cha!, El Paella and Edgar David Aguilera. Their slogan was "Fuck everyone else". Various international artists, such as Metallica, Rammstein, The Mars Volta, Fabolous, Snoop Dogg and the Red Hot Chili Peppers, visited the station. This radio station was known by its particular way of making fun of others, via their own programs and their commercials. They poked fun at politics and politicians, artists, rich people and rock bands. After the breakup in 2004, most of its best-known speakers moved on to public radio or other media. Rulo, El Sopitas, Julio Martinez and Erich Martino went on to work at Reactor 105.7 FM, IMER public radio. Others have moved on to TV, such as Fernanda Tapia who hosts the talk and discussion forum show "Diálogos en confianza", at IPN's Canal 11, she hosts "Almohadazo" too, where satirizes the news of Mexico at 52MX, and she co-hosts "Las del estribo" at RadioMVS. Ilana Sod is editor-in-chief and anchor for MTV LA news, working currently in pro-social matters along with UNICEF, Inter-American Development Bank, Staying Alive Foundation and MTV International. Olallo Rubio has been working with others who used to work at Radioactivo on a magazine called R&R and, most recently, on a Podcast called "El Podcast de Olallo Rubio", and has also released a documentary feature in 2007 titled: So, What's your price?. Some others are working at a variety of radio stations including Neurótica F.M, WRadio, and writing blogs or podcasting at dixo.com, Company that after ally with Prodigy /MSN for his generation of content. Arturo López Gavito became one of the most hated judges on the TV Azteca show La Academia, a Mexican TV show similar to American Idol or Operación Triunfo.

— Freebase

Tonante

Tonante

Tonante, initially called Ao Rei dos Violões Limitada, was started on April 5 of 1954 by the Portuguese brothers Abel and Samuel Tonante who artisanelly built musical instruments, thirteen years after their arrival in Brazil. Tonante is well known for making highly affordable stringed instruments in Brazil, together with companies such as Giannini, Del Vecchio and Di Giorgio.

— Freebase

George Huntington

George Huntington

George Huntington was an American physician who contributed a classic clinical description of the disease that bears his name -- Huntington's disease. Huntington described this condition in the first of only two scientific papers he ever wrote. He wrote this paper when he was 22, a year after receiving his medical degree from Columbia University in New York. He first read the paper before the Meigs and Mason Academy of Medicine in Middleport, Ohio on February 15, 1872 and then published it in the Medical and Surgical Reporter of Philadelphia on April 13, 1872. Huntington's father and grandfather, George Lee Huntington and Abel Huntington, were also physicians in the same family practice. Their longitudinal observations combined with his own were invaluable in precisely describing this hereditary disease in multiple generations of a family in East Hampton on Long Island. In a 1908 review, the eminent physician William Osler said of this paper: "In the history of medicine, there are few instances in which a disease has been more accurately, more graphically or more briefly described." In 1874 George Huntington returned to Duchess County, New York to practice medicine. He joined a number of medical associations and started working for the Matteawan General Hospital. In 1908 the scientific journal Neurograph dedicated him a special edition.

— Freebase

Gotthold Eisenstein

Gotthold Eisenstein

Ferdinand Gotthold Max Eisenstein was a German mathematician. He specialized in number theory and analysis, and proved several results that eluded even Gauss. Like Galois and Abel before him, Eisenstein died before the age of 30. He was born and died in Berlin, Prussia.

— Freebase

Leeuwin

Leeuwin

Leeuwin was a Dutch galleon that discovered and mapped some of the southwest corner of Australia in March 1622. In this way it became only the seventh European ship to sight the continent. Unfortunately the Leeuwin's logbook has been lost, so very little is known of the voyage. For example it is not known who captained the ship. However, Dutch East India Company letters indicate that the voyage from Texel to Batavia took more than a year, whereas other vessels had made the same voyage in less than four months; this suggests that poor navigation may have been responsible for the discovery. The same is suggested by the 1644 instructions to Abel Tasman, which states that The land discovered by the Leeuwin is recorded in Hessel Gerritsz' 1627 Caert van't Landt van d'Eendracht. This map includes a section of coastline labelled 't Landt van de Leeuwin beseylt A° 1622 in Maert, which is thought to represent the coast between present-day Hamelin Bay and Point D'Entrecasteaux. Portions of this coastline are labelled Duynich landt boven met boomen ende boseage, Laegh ghelijck verdroncken landt and Laegh duynich landt.

— Freebase

Body Snatchers

Body Snatchers

Body Snatchers is a 1993 American science fiction horror film loosely based on the 1955 novel The Body Snatchers by Jack Finney. The film was directed by Abel Ferrara, starring Gabrielle Anwar, Billy Wirth, Terry Kinney, Meg Tilly, R. Lee Ermey and Forest Whitaker. Body Snatchers is the third film adaptation of Finney's novel, the first adaptation being Invasion of the Body Snatchers in 1956, followed by a remake of the same name in 1978. The plot revolves around the discovery that people working at a military base in Alabama are being replaced by perfect physical imitations grown from plant-like pods. The duplicates are indistinguishable from normal people except for their utter lack of emotion.

— Freebase

BigMachines

BigMachines

BigMachines is a software company, founded in 2000 by Godard Abel and Christopher Shutts and headquartered in Deerfield, Illinois, United States with development offices in San Mateo, California and Hyderabad, India. BigMachines also has European operations with offices in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, and London served by BigMachines AG as well as offices in Singapore, Tokyo, and Sydney, serving Asia-pacific. The company's software is designed to integrate with existing ERP, CRM, and other business systems. Vista Equity Partners, a private equity firm based in San Francisco, acquired majority ownership of BigMachines through several transactions starting January 2001. Vista Equity acquired majority ownership of the company in December 2010. Oracle announced it was acquiring BigMachines on October 23, 2013.

— Freebase

Abel

Abel

the second son of Adam and Eve; slain by his brother. The death of Abel is the subject of a poem by Gessner and a tragedy by Legouvé.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Cain

Cain

according to Genesis, the first-born of Adam and Eve, and therefore of the race, and the murderer of his brother Abel.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Cordite

Cordite

a smokeless powder, invented by Sir F. A. Abel, being composed principally of gun-cotton and glycerine.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Diemen, Antony van

Diemen, Antony van

governor of the Dutch possessions in India, born in Holland; was a zealous coloniser; at his instance Abel Tasman was sent to explore the South Seas, when he discovered the island which he named after him Van Diemen's Land, now Tasmania after the discoverer (1593-1645).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Gessner, Salomon

Gessner, Salomon

Swiss poet and artist, born at Zurich; served an apprenticeship to a bookseller in Berlin, and after a sojourn in Hamburg returned to Zurich, where the rest of his life was spent; he published several volumes of poetry, chiefly pastoral and of no great value; his "Death of Abel" is his most notable performance; his paintings are mainly landscapes of a conventional type, several of which he engraved, revealing better abilities as an engraver than as an artist (1730-1788).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Exploder

Exploder

(a) A small magneto-generator for producing a current for heating the wire in an electric fuse of the Abel type (see Fuse, Electric), and thereby determining an explosion.

(b) The term may also be applied to a small frictional or influence machine for producing a spark for exploding a spark fuse.

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

abel focus

abel focus

abel is a focus of the katota philosophy aimed at business owners currently running successful businesses but in need of expansion capital

— Editors Contribution


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