Definitions containing public-service

We've found 250 definitions:

Public Health Service Commissioned Corps

Public Health Service Commissioned Corps

The Public Health Service Commissioned Corps is the uniformed service of the Public Health Service and organized under the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). The Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHS Corps) is one of the seven United States Uniformed Services. The Surgeon General of the United States, a vice admiral, directs the PHS Corps, which provides licensed medical and health sciences professionals to the PHS, DHHS, other United States Uniformed Services and other government agencies.

— Wiktionary

NewScale

NewScale

About newScale, Inc. newScale is the leader in IT Service Portfolio Management and Service Catalog software solutions, with more than one million users worldwide. newScale solutions enable IT organizations and outsourcers to define a portfolio of standardized services, manage service demand, automate service requests, streamline service delivery, and optimize service quality. With support across the full spectrum of end user, application, infrastructure, and business-oriented services, IT operations can provide an actionable IT Service Catalog for their internal customers. Faced with continued cost pressures, as well as growing business unit demand for new services and higher service levels, the IT organizations of most Global 2000 corporations are embarking on a fundamental transformation. CIOs and other IT executives must align their services with the needs of the business, improve internal customer satisfaction, and deploy standardized processes to achieve greater operational efficiency. By focusing on standardization and process automation, IT leaders can drive down costs while still achieving a high level of service. The IT Service Catalog provides the foundation to: Define IT services and service level agreements (SLAs) that align with business needs. Manage service ordering processes and adapt to customer demand. Ensure efficient service delivery by automating fulfillment and monitoring service quality. Communicate the value that those services represent to the business. newScale’s market-leading Service Portfolio Management solutions enable IT operations to achieve higher service levels, improve operational efficiency, and demonstrate value to the business. With its newScale RequestCenter® and newScale AlignmentCenter® solutions, together with pre-built Service Catalog content, newScale enables IT organizations to become more business-oriented and customer-focused – resulting in increased internal customer satisfaction and improved IT-business alignment. newScale customers also achieve rapid, quantifiable financial benefits that directly impact their bottom line – reducing service delivery costs by 30% or more, with a positive ROI in as little as 6-9 months. newScale is a privately held company founded in 1999 with top-tier investors including Chess Ventures, Crosslink Capital, Menlo Ventures, Montagu Newhall Associates, New Enterprise Associates (NEA), and Parker Price Venture Capital.

— Freebase

E-services

E-services

The concept of e-service represents one prominent application of utilizing the use of information and communication technologies in different areas. However, providing an exact definition of e-service is hard to come by as researchers have been using different definitions to describe e-service. Despite these different definitions, it can be argued that they all agree about the role of technology in facilitating the delivery of services which make them more of electronic services. It seems compelling to adopt Rowley approach who defines e-services as: “…deeds, efforts or performances whose delivery is mediated by information technology. Such e-service includes the service element of e-tailing, customer support, and service delivery”. This definition reflect three main components- service provider, service receiver and the channels of service delivery. For example, as concerned to public e-service, public agencies are the service provider and citizens as well as businesses are the service receiver. The channel of service delivery is the third requirement of e-service. Internet is the main channel of e-service delivery while other classic channels are also considered.

— Freebase

Service provider

Service provider

A service provider is a company that provides organizations with consulting, legal, real estate, education, communications, storage, processing, and many other services. Although the term service provider can refer to organizational sub-units, it is more generally used to refer to third party or outsourced suppliers, including telecommunications service providers, application service providers, storage service providers, and Internet service providers. IT professionals sometimes differentiate between service providers by categorizing them as type I, II, or III. The three service types are recognized by the IT industry although specifically defined by ITIL and the US Telecommunications Act of 1996 ⁕Type I: internal service provider ⁕Type II: shared service provider ⁕Type III: external service provider Type III SPs provide IT services to external customers and subsequently can be referred to as external service providers which range from a full IT organization/service outsource via managed services or MSPs to limited product feature delivery via ASPs.

— Freebase

public key infrastructure

public key infrastructure

An enterprise-wide service (i.e. data integrity, user identification and authentication, user non-repudiation, data confidentiality, encryption, and digital signature) that supports digital signatures and other public key-based security mechanisms for Department of Defense functional enterprise programs, including generation, production, distribution, control, and accounting of public key certificates. A public key infrastructure provides the means to bind public keys to their owners and helps in the distribution of reliable public keys in large heterogeneous networks. Public keys are bound to their owners by public key certificates. These certificates contain information such as the owner

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

public affairs guidance

public affairs guidance

Normally, a package of information to support the public discussion of defense issues and operations. Such guidance can range from a telephonic response to a specific question to a more comprehensive package. Included could be an approved public affairs policy, contingency statements, answers to anticipated media questions, and community relations guidance. The public affairs guidance also addresses the method(s), timing, location, and other details governing the release of information to the public. Public affairs guidance is approved by the Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs. Also called PAG. See also community relations; public affairs.

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

Public

Public

In public relations and communication science, publics are groups of individual people, and the public is the totality of such groupings. This is a different concept to the sociological concept of the Öffentlichkeit or public sphere. The concept of a public has also been defined in political science, psychology, marketing, and advertising. In public relations and communication science, it is one of the more ambiguous concepts in the field. Although it has definitions in the theory of the field that have been formulated from the early 20th century onwards, it has suffered in more recent years from being blurred, as a result of conflation of the idea of a public with the notions of audience, market segment, community, constituency, and stakeholder. The name "public" originates with the Latin "populus" or "poplicus", and in general denotes some mass population in association with some matter of common interest. So in political science and history, a public is a population of individuals in association with civic affairs, or affairs of office or state. In social psychology, marketing, and public relations, a public has a more situational definition. John Dewey defined a public as a group of people who, in facing a similar problem, recognize it and organize themselves to address it. Dewey's definition of a public is thus situational: people organized about a situation. Built upon this situational definition of a public is the situational theory of publics by James E. Grunig, which talks of nonpublics, latent publics, aware publics, and active publics.

— Freebase

Civil service

Civil service

The term civil service can refer to either: a A branch of governmental service in which individuals are employed on the basis of professional merit as proven by competitive examinations, or b the body of employees in any government agency other than the military. A civil servant or public servant is a person in the public Sector employed for a government department or agency. The extent of civil servants of a state as part of the "Civil Service" varies from country to country. In the United Kingdom, for instance, only Crown employees are referred to as civil servants whereas county or city employees are not. Many consider the study of civil service to be a part of the field of public administration. Workers in "non-departmental public bodies" may also be classed as civil servants for the purpose of statistics and possibly for their terms and conditions. Collectively a state's civil servants form its Civil Service or Public Service. An international civil servant or international staff member is a civilian employee that is employed by an international organization. These international civil servants do not resort under any national legislation but are governed by an internal staff regulation. All disputes related to international civil service are brought before special tribunals created by these international organizations such as, for instance, the Administrative Tribunal of the ILO.

— Freebase

Customer service

Customer service

Customer service is the provision of service to customers before, during and after a purchase. According to Turban et al., "Customer service is a series of activities designed to enhance the level of customer satisfaction – that is, the feeling that a product or service has met the customer expectation." The importance of customer service may vary by product or service, industry and customer. The perception of success of such interactions will be dependent on employees "who can adjust themselves to the personality of the guest," according to Micah Solomon. From the point of view of an overall sales process engineering effort, customer service plays an important role in an organization's ability to generate income and revenue. From that perspective, customer service should be included as part of an overall approach to systematic improvement. A customer service experience can change the entire perception a customer has of the organization. Some have argued that the quality and level of customer service has decreased in recent years, and that this can be attributed to a lack of support or understanding at the executive and middle management levels of a corporation and/or a customer service policy. To address this argument, many organizations have employed a variety of methods to improve their customer satisfaction levels, and other key performance indicators.

— Freebase

helpline

helpline

A telephone (or by extension email, web or SMS) service which offers help to those that call, either as an public emergency service or customer service.

— Wiktionary

British Broadcasting Corporation

British Broadcasting Corporation

The British Broadcasting Corporation is a British public service broadcasting statutory corporation. Its main responsibility is to provide impartial public service broadcasting in the United Kingdom, the Channel Islands, and the Isle of Man. It is the largest broadcaster in the world by number of employees, with about 23,000 staff. The BBC is headquartered at Broadcasting House in London and has major production centres in Belfast, Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, Glasgow, London and Salford Quays and smaller production centres throughout the UK. The BBC is a semi-autonomous public service broadcaster that operates under a Royal Charter and a Licence and Agreement from the Home Secretary. Within the United Kingdom its work is funded principally by an annual television licence fee, which is charged to all British households, companies and organisations using any type of equipment to receive live television broadcasts; the level of the fee is set annually by the British Government and agreed by Parliament. Outside the UK, the BBC World Service has provided services by direct broadcasting and re-transmission contracts by sound radio since the inauguration of the BBC Empire Service on 19 December 1932, and more recently by television and online. Though sharing some of the facilities of the domestic services, particularly for news and current affairs output, the World Service has a separate Managing Director, and its operating costs have historically been funded mainly by direct grants from the British government. These grants were determined independently of the domestic licence fee and were usually awarded from the budget of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office. As such, the BBC's international content has traditionally represented – at least in part – an effective foreign policy tool of the British Government. The recent BBC World Service spending review has announced plans for the funding for the world service to be drawn from the domestic licence fee.

— Freebase

Distinguished Service Medal

Distinguished Service Medal

The Distinguished Service Medal is a military award of the United States Army that is presented to any person who, while serving in any capacity with the United States military, has distinguished himself or herself by exceptionally meritorious service to the Government in a duty of great responsibility. The performance must be such as to merit recognition for service that is clearly exceptional. Exceptional performance of normal duty will not alone justify an award of this decoration. Separate Distinguished Service Medals exist for the different branches of the military as well as a fifth version of the medal which is a senior award of the United States Department of Defense. The Army version of the Distinguished Service Medal is typically referred to simply as the "Distinguished Service Medal" while the other branches of service use the service name as a prefix. For service not related to actual war, the term "duty of a great responsibility" applies to a narrower range of positions than in time of war, and requires evidence of conspicuously significant achievement. However, justification of the award may accrue by virtue of exceptionally meritorious service in a succession of high positions of great importance.

— Freebase

Service design

Service design

Service design is the activity of planning and organizing people, infrastructure, communication and material components of a service in order to improve its quality and the interaction between service provider and customers. The purpose of service design methodologies is to design according to the needs of customers or participants, so that the service is user-friendly, competitive and relevant to the customers. The backbone of this process is to understand the behavior of the customers, their needs and motivations. Service designers draw on the methodologies of fields such as ethnography and journalism to gather customer insights through interviews and by shadowing service users. Many observations are synthesized to generate concepts and ideas that are typically portrayed visually, for example in sketches or service prototypes. Service design may inform changes to an existing service or creation of new services.

— Freebase

requisition

requisition

demand and take for use or service, especially by military or public authority for public service

— Princeton's WordNet

Public figure

Public figure

In United States law, public figure is a term applied in the context of defamation actions as well as invasion of privacy. A public figure cannot base a sample on incorrect harmful statements unless there is proof that the writer or publisher acted with actual malice. The burden of proof in defamation actions is higher in the case of a public figure. The controlling precedent in the United States was set in 1964 by the United States Supreme Court in New York Times Co. v. Sullivan. It is considered a key decision in supporting the First Amendment and freedom of the press. A fairly high threshold of public activity is necessary to elevate people to public figure status. Typically, they must either be: ⁕a public figure, either a public official or any other person pervasively involved in public affairs, or ⁕a limited purpose public figure, meaning those who have "thrust themselves to the forefront of particular public controversies in order to influence the resolution of the issues involved." A "particularized determination" is required to decide whether a person is a limited purpose public figure, which can be variously interpreted.

— Freebase

Public library

Public library

A public library is a library that is accessible by the general public and is generally funded from public sources and operated by civil servants. There are five fundamental characteristics shared by public libraries. The first is that they are generally supported by taxes; they are governed by a board to serve the public interest; they are open to all and every community member can access the collection; they are entirely voluntary in that no one is ever forced to use the services provided; and public libraries provide basic services without charge. Public libraries exist in many countries across the world and are often considered an essential part of having an educated and literate population. Public libraries are distinct from research libraries, school libraries, and other special libraries in that their mandate is to serve the general public's information needs. Public Libraries also provide free services such as preschool story times to encourage early literacy, quiet study and work areas for students and professionals, or book clubs to encourage appreciation of literature in adults. Public libraries typically allow users to take books and other materials off the premises temporarily; they also have non-circulating reference collections and provide computer and Internet access to patrons.

— Freebase

Public lecture

Public lecture

A public lecture is one means employed for educating the public in the sciences and medicine. The Royal Institution has a long history of public lectures and demonstrations given by prominent experts in the field. In the 19th century, the popularity of the public lectures given by Sir Humphry Davy at the Royal Institution was so great that the volume of carriage traffic in Albemarle Street caused it to become the first one way street in London. The Royal Institution's Christmas Lectures for young people are nowadays also shown on television. Alexander von Humboldt delivered a series of public lectures at the University of Berlin in the winter of 1827–1828, that formed the basis for his later work Kosmos. Besides public lectures, public autopsies have been important in promoting knowledge of medicine. The public autopsy of Dr. Johann Gaspar Spurzheim, advocate of phrenology, was conducted after his death, and his brain, skull, and heart were removed, preserved in jars of alcohol, and put on display to the public. Public autoposies have sometimes verged on entertainment: American showman P. T. Barnum held a public autopsy of Joice Heth after her death. Heth was a woman whom Barnum had been featuring as being over 160 years old. Barnum charged 50 cents admission. The autopsy demonstrated that she had in fact been between 76 and 80 years old.

— Freebase

United States Office of Research Integrity

United States Office of Research Integrity

An office of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE organized in June 1992 to promote research integrity and investigate misconduct in research supported by the Public Health Service. It consolidates the Office of Scientific Integrity of the National Institutes of Health and the Office of Scientific Integrity Review in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Spoilsman

Spoilsman

one who serves a cause or a party for a share of the spoils; in United States politics, one who makes or recognizes a demand for public office on the ground of partisan service; also, one who sanctions such a policy in appointments to the public service

— Webster Dictionary

MI5

MI5

The Security Service, commonly known as MI5, is the United Kingdom's domestic counter-intelligence and security agency and is part of its core intelligence machinery alongside the Secret Intelligence Service focused on foreign threats, Government Communications Headquarters and Defence Intelligence. All come under the direction of the Joint Intelligence Committee. The service has a statutory basis in the Security Service Act 1989 and the Intelligence Services Act 1994. Its remit includes the protection of British parliamentary democracy and economic interests, counter-terrorism and counter-espionage within the UK. Although mainly concerned with internal security, it does have an overseas role in support of its mission. Within the civil service community the service is colloquially known as Box 500. The service has had a national headquarters at Thames House on Millbank in London since 1995, drawing together personnel from a number of locations into a single HQ facility. Thames House is shared with the Northern Ireland Office and is also home to the Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre, a subordinate organisation to the Security Service. The service has offices across the United Kingdom including an HQ in Northern Ireland.

— Freebase

Online service provider

Online service provider

An online service provider can for example be an internet service provider, email provider, news provider, entertainment provider, search, e-shopping site, e-finance or e-banking site, e-health site, e-government site, Wikipedia, Usenet. In its original more limited definition, it referred only to a commercial computer communication service in which paid members could dial via a computer modem the service's private computer network and access various services and information resources such a bulletin boards, downloadable files and programs, news articles, chat rooms, and electronic mail services. The term "online service" was also used in references to these dial-up services. The traditional dial-up online service differed from the modern Internet service provider in that they provided a large degree of content that was only accessible by those who subscribed to the online service, while ISP mostly serves to provide access to the internet and generally provides little if any exclusive content of its own. In the U.S., the Online Copyright Infringement Liability Limitation Act portion of the U.S. Digital Millennium Copyright Act has expanded the legal definition of online service in two different ways for different portions of the law. It states in section 512:

— Freebase

Car phone

Car phone

A car phone is a mobile phone device specifically designed for and fitted into an automobile. This service originated with the Bell System, and was first used in St. Louis on June 17, 1946. The original equipment weighed 80 pounds, and there were initially only 3 channels for all the users in the metropolitan area, later more licenses were added bringing the total to 32 channels across 3 bands. This service was used at least into the 1980s in large portions of North America. On October 2, 1946, Motorola communications equipment carried the first calls on Illinois Bell Telephone Company's new car radiotelephone service in Chicago. Due to the small number of radio frequencies available, the service quickly reached capacity. In the 1980s, the car phone was more popular than the regular mobile phone. However, since the mobile phone boom in the 1990s, when mobile phones became much more affordable, the car phone has suffered, as most people carry their mobile phone around with them, and the availability of hands free kits installed in many cars allow the driver to talk and listen to a call while driving. In Finland, car phone service was first available in 1971 on the zero-generation ARP service. This was succeeded in 1982 by the 1G system NMT, used across Scandinavia and in other often remote areas. In North America, car phone typically used the Mobile Telephone Service, which was first used in St. Louis, or Improved Mobile Telephone Service before giving way to analog cellular service in 1984. AMPS technology was discontinued in the United States in 2008.

— Freebase

WildBlue

WildBlue

WildBlue's mission is to make affordable broadband internet access available to everyone. WildBlue delivers affordable two-way broadband Internet access via satellite to virtually any home and small business in small cities and rural America. WildBlue uses a 26-inch satellite minidish equipped with both a transmitter and receiver for two-way satellite connectivity to the Internet. WildBlue service does not require cable or phone lines. It is accessible to virtually every home and small business in the contiguous U.S., including the estimated 20-25 million homes and small offices that are not wired for terrestrial (DSL or cable modem) service. WildBlue's approach is based on next generation, two-way wireless Ka-band spot beam satellite technology, which lowers the cost of providing high bandwidth access to the Internet. WildBlue uses industry standard technology in its consumer premise equipment. The resulting low cost structure enables an affordably priced high-speed Internet service that is available across the country. WildBlue has attracted blue chip strategic investors including Intelsat, the National Rural Telecommunications Cooperative (NRTC), Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers, Liberty Media, and Telesat. In addition, the company has a seasoned management team of executives with vast experience in the Internet, satellite and cable industries. WildBlue's management and technical team is composed of terrestrial and satellite data communications experts from top companies including EchoStar, Tele-Communications Inc., Time Warner Cable, Loral, and Pac Bell. All have been brought together to serve the single objective of accelerating customer access to broadband. WildBlue's core service offers homes and small offices/home offices (SOHO) an Internet connection that is easy to use, reliable, always on, and more than 30 times faster than standard dial-up service (See our speed demo). WildBlue Internet service for consumers includes typical Internet Service Provider features (email, web space, etc.). It opens up a window to a world of rich content that is largely unavailable through dial-up service and largely unavailable in areas unserved by cable modem or DSL service. With WildBlue, for example, consumers can download a movie on demand, attend University courses hundreds of miles away or quickly email a family photo. Though these services are familiar to some, 20-25 million homes and small offices across the country cannot access high-speed internet services because the technology has not reached them. . . until now.

— Freebase

Public toilet

Public toilet

A public toilet is a room or small building containing one or more toilets and possibly also urinals which is available for use by the general public, or in a broader meaning of "public", by customers of other services. Public toilets are commonly separated by gender into male and female facilities, although some can be unisex, particularly the smaller or single occupancy types. Increasingly, public toilets incorporate accessible toilets and features to cater for people with disabilities. Public toilets may be unattended or be staffed by a janitor, or attendant, provided by the local authority or the owner of the larger building. In many cultures, it is customary to tip the attendant, while other public toilets may charge a small fee for entrance, sometimes through use of a coin operated turnstile. Some venues such as nightclubs may feature a grooming service provided by an attendant in the toilet. They are typically found in railway stations, schools, bars, restaurants, nightclubs or filling stations as well as on longer distance public transport vehicles. Portable toilets are often provided at festivals and at temporary events for public use.

— Freebase

Public broadcasting

Public broadcasting

Public broadcasting includes radio, television and other electronic media outlets whose primary mission is public service. Public broadcasters receive funding from diverse sources including license fees, individual contributions, public financing and commercial financing. Public broadcasting may be nationally or locally operated, depending on the country and the station. In some countries, public broadcasting is run by a single organization. Other countries have multiple public broadcasting organizations operating regionally or in different languages. Historically, in many countries, public broadcasting was once the only form or the dominant form of broadcasting. Commercial broadcasting now also exists in most of these countries; the number of countries with only public broadcasting declined substantially during the latter part of the 20th century.

— Freebase

Initial public offering

Initial public offering

An initial public offering or stock market launch is a type of public offering where shares of stock in a company are sold to the general public, on a securities exchange, for the first time. Through this process, a private company transforms into a public company. Initial public offerings are used by companies to raise expansion capital, to possibly monetize the investments of early private investors, and to become publicly traded enterprises. A company selling shares is never required to repay the capital to its public investors. After the IPO, when shares trade freely in the open market, money passes between public investors. Although an IPO offers many advantages, there are also significant disadvantages. Chief among these are the costs associated with the process, and the requirement to disclose certain information that could prove helpful to competitors, or create difficulties with vendors. Details of the proposed offering are disclosed to potential purchasers in the form of a lengthy document known as a prospectus. Most companies undertaking an IPO do so with the assistance of an investment banking firm acting in the capacity of an underwriter. Underwriters provide a valuable service, which includes help with correctly assessing the value of shares, and establishing a public market for shares. Alternative methods such as the dutch auction have also been explored. In terms of size and public participation, the most notable example of this method is the Google IPO. China has recently emerged as a major IPO market, with several of the largest IPOs taking place in that country.

— Freebase

Public administration

Public administration

Public administration is concerned with the implementation of government policy, and is an academic discipline that studies this implementation and prepares civil servants for working in the public service. As a "field of inquiry with a diverse scope" its "fundamental goal... is to advance management and policies so that government can function." Some of the various definitions which have been offered for the term are: "the management of public programs"; the "translation of politics into the reality that citizens see every day"; and "the study of government decision making, the analysis of the policies themselves, the various inputs that have produced them, and the inputs necessary to produce alternative policies." Public administration is "centrally concerned with the organization of government policies and programmes as well as the behavior of officials formally responsible for their conduct" Many unelected public servants can be considered to be public administrators, including heads of city, county, regional, state and federal departments such as municipal budget directors, human resources administrators, city managers, census managers, state mental health directors, and cabinet secretaries. Public administrators are public servants working in public departments and agencies, at all levels of government.

— Freebase

Public-key cryptography

Public-key cryptography

Public-key cryptography refers to a cryptographic system requiring two separate keys, one of which is secret and one of which is public. Although different, the two parts of the key pair are mathematically linked. One key locks or encrypts the plaintext, and the other unlocks or decrypts the ciphertext. Neither key can perform both functions by itself. The public key may be published without compromising security, while the private key must not be revealed to anyone not authorized to read the messages. Public-key cryptography uses asymmetric key algorithms and can also be referred to by the more generic term "asymmetric key cryptography." The algorithms used for public key cryptography are based on mathematical relationships that presumably have no efficient solution. Although it is computationally easy for the intended recipient to generate the public and private keys, to decrypt the message using the private key, and easy for the sender to encrypt the message using the public key, it is extremely difficult for anyone to derive the private key, based only on their knowledge of the public key. This is why, unlike symmetric key algorithms, a public key algorithm does not require a secure initial exchange of one secret keys between the sender and receiver. The use of these algorithms also allows the authenticity of a message to be checked by creating a digital signature of the message using the private key, which can then be verified by using the public key. In practice, only a hash of the message is typically encrypted for signature verification purposes.

— Freebase

NPR

NPR

NPR, formerly National Public Radio, is a privately and publicly funded non-profit membership media organization that serves as a national syndicator to a network of 900 public radio stations in the United States. NPR produces and distributes news and cultural programming. Individual public radio stations are not required to broadcast all NPR programs that are produced. Most public radio stations broadcast a mixture of NPR programs, content from rival providers American Public Media, Public Radio International and Public Radio Exchange, and locally produced programs. NPR's flagships are two drive time news broadcasts, Morning Edition and the afternoon All Things Considered; both are carried by most NPR member stations, and are two of the most popular radio programs in the country. NPR manages the Public Radio Satellite System, which distributes NPR programs and other programming from independent producers and networks such as American Public Media and Public Radio International. Its content is also available on-demand via the web, mobile, and podcasts.

— Freebase

Rest area

Rest area

A rest area, travel plaza, rest stop, or service area is a public facility, located next to a large thoroughfare such as a highway, expressway, or freeway at which drivers and passengers can rest, eat, or refuel without exiting on to secondary roads. Other names include motorway service area or service station in the UK, rest and service area, resto, service plaza,service center, and service centre. Facilities may include park-like areas, fuel stations, restrooms, and restaurants. A rest area or rest stop with limited or no public facility is a parking area or scenic area. Along some highways and roads are rest stops known as a wayside parks, roadside parks, or picnic areas. Rest areas are common in the United States, Canada, Australia and parts of Europe and Asia.

— Freebase

United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps

United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps

The United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps is the federal uniformed service of the United States Public Health Service and is one of the seven uniformed services of the United States. The Public Health Service Commissioned Corps is one of two uniformed services that only consist of commissioned officers and has no enlisted or warrant officer ranks, although warrant officers have been authorized for use within the service. Officers of the PHS are classified as noncombatants, unless directed to serve as part of the armed forces by the President or detailed to a service branch of the armed forces. Members of the PHSCC wear the same uniforms as the United States Navy with special corps insignia, and hold ranks equivalent to those of naval officers. Officers of the PHSCC receive their commissions through the PHSCC's direct commissioning program. As with its parent division, the PHS, the PHSCC is under the direction of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. The PHSCC is led by the Surgeon General who holds grade of vice admiral. The Surgeon General reports directly to the Assistant Secretary for Health who may hold the rank of admiral if he or she is a serving member of the PHSCC.

— Freebase

public affairs assessment

public affairs assessment

An analysis of the news media and public environments to evaluate the degree of understanding about strategic and operational objectives and military activities and to identify levels of public support. It includes judgments about the public affairs impact of pending decisions and recommendations about the structure of public affairs support for the assigned mission. See also assessment; public affairs.

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

accolade

accolade

Written Presidential certificate recognizing service by personnel who died or were wounded in action between 1917 and 1918, or who died in service between 1941 and 1947, or died of wounds received in Korea between June 27, 1950 and July 27, 1954. Service of civilians who died overseas or as a result of injury or disease contracted while serving in a civilian capacity with the United States Armed Forces during the dates and/or in areas prescribed is in like manner recognized.

— Wiktionary

Mass

Mass

The principal liturgical service of the Church, including a scripture service and a eucharistic service, which includes the consecration and oblation (offering) of the host and wine. One of the seven sacraments.

— Wiktionary

service level agreement

service level agreement

A contract between the provider of a service and a user of that service, specifying the level of service that will be provided.

— Wiktionary

first come first served

first come first served

A service policy in which the first to arrive for service receives the service first.

— Wiktionary

Public transport

Public transport

Public transport is a shared passenger transport service which is available for use by the general public, as distinct from modes such as taxicab, car pooling or hired buses which are not shared by strangers without private arrangement. Public transport modes include buses, trolleybuses, trams and trains, rapid transit and ferries. Public transport between cities is dominated by airlines, coaches, and intercity rail. High-speed rail networks are being developed in many parts of the world. Most public transport runs to a scheduled timetable with the most frequent services running to a headway. Share taxi offers on-demand services in many parts of the world and some services will wait until the vehicle is full before it starts. Paratransit is sometimes used in areas of low-demand and for people who need a door-to-door service. Urban public transport may be provided by one or more private transport operators or by a transit authority. Public transport services are usually funded by government subsidies and fares charged to each passenger. Services are normally regulated and possibly subsidized from local or national tax revenue. Fully subsidized, zero-fare services operate in some towns and cities.

— Freebase

Military journalism

Military journalism

According to JP 1-02, Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms, a military journalist is "A US Service member or Department of Defense civilian employee providing photographic, print, radio, or television command information for military internal audiences. See also command information." Military journalists are part of Public Affairs, defined by JP 1-02 as "Those public information, command information, and community relations activities directed toward both the external and internal publics with interest in the Department of Defense." Command information, therefore, is just one of the responsibilities of Public Affairs set by Department of Defense policy. DoDD 5122.5 sets forth these Principles of Information: E2.1. INFORMATION It is DoD policy to make available timely and accurate information so that the public, the Congress, and the news media may assess and understand the facts about national security and defense strategy. Requests for information from organizations and private citizens shall be answered quickly. In carrying out that DoD policy, the following principles of information shall apply: E2.1.1. Information shall be made fully and readily available, consistent with statutory requirements, unless its release is precluded by national security constraints or valid statutory mandates or exceptions. The "Freedom of Information Act" will be supported in both letter and spirit. E2.1.2. A free flow of general and military information shall be made available, without censorship or propaganda, to the men and women of the Armed Forces and their dependents. E2.1.3. Information will not be classified or otherwise withheld to protect the Government from criticism or embarrassment. E2.1.4. Information shall be withheld when disclosure would adversely affect national security, threaten the safety or privacy of U.S. Government personnel or their families, violate the privacy of the citizens of the United States, or be contrary to law. E2.1.5. The Department of Defense's obligation to provide the public with information on DoD major programs may require detailed Public Affairs planning and coordination in the Department of Defense and with the other Government Agencies. Such activity is to expedite the flow of information to the public; propaganda has no place in DoD public affairs programs. DODD 5122.5, Sep. 27, 2000

— Freebase

pension

pension

A regularly paid gratuity paid regularly as benefit due to a person in consideration of past services; notably to one retired from service, on account of retirement age, disability or similar cause; especially, a regular stipend paid by a government to retired public officers, disabled soldiers; sometimes passed on to the heirs, or even specifically for them, as to the families of soldiers killed in service.

— Wiktionary

Service club

Service club

A service club or service organization is a voluntary non-profit organization where members meet regularly to perform charitable works either by direct hands-on efforts or by raising money for other organizations. A service club is defined first by its service mission. Second its membership benefits, such as social occasions, networking, and personal growth opportunities encourage involvement. A service organization is not necessarily exclusive of ideological motives, although organizations with such defined motives are more likely to identify themselves through their association. Much like the historical religious organizations formed the basis for many of societal institutions, such as hospitals, service organizations perform many essential services for their community and other worthy causes. In the United States, some of these clubs usually also have a component club organization that is a tax exempt, 501 non-profit organization. Many of today's service clubs got their start as social clubs for business networking, but quickly evolved into organizations devoted more to service and less for networking, although networking is still a primary reason for many members to join.

— Freebase

Cassatt

Cassatt

CASSATT OVERVIEW Virtualization and Automation from Cassatt— Serving Your Needs Cassatt delivers innovative software and services that make your organization's current IT infrastructure more agile. We enable you to quickly respond to ever-changing business requirements— boosting the service levels you get from your applications, and better utilizing your assets, all while reducing IT costs and complexity. In this way, we address your concerns over spiraling costs, low agility, and increasing service-level expectations. Better application service levels? How? We use virtualization and automation to improve your application service levels. Our software creates a virtual pool of an organization's application resources— including hardware, operating systems, Java middleware, and virtual machines— freeing them to be used by all applications. Then, the Cassatt software automatically and continuously matches applications to appropriate computing resources as needed in order to maintain the service levels that your business requires for each critical application. The result? Server consolidation without the risks Cassatt can make server consolidation safe, helping you reduce capital and operational expenses along the way. By leveraging virtualization technologies, we allow server consolidation that is not just safe, but effective, highly automated, and easily managed. And we have a range of solutions that can protect and manage your physical and virtual resources and help turn your current IT infrastructure into a dynamic, virtual pool of resources that can be tapped on demand. Our flagship product is Cassatt Collage, a real-time infrastructure for service-level automation. And to help you create a completely automated, agile infrastructure, we offer two additional modules: one for automated management and optimization of J2EE applications, middleware and hardware; and another for automating management of virtual machines. Key benefits (or differentiators) of our product offering include: Cost reduction fewer resources result in significant savings. As an example, servers and licenses are shared among applications; resources are automatically deployed, managed and updated.Agility the ability to quickly respond. For example, you can easily add new applications with automatic resource assignment; and applications can be tested and deployed quickly without dedicated resource acquisition.Guaranteed service levels better utilization with less complexity, and improved availability. All takes place without human intervention.Benefits the entire application lifecycle from development and test (reducing cycle time) to deployment (repurposing hardware, launching new applications without dedicated hardware), and operation (automating service level delivery, failure detection and replacement). Cassatt offers a range of services that can help you deploy the Collage Platform throughout all stages of your implementation cycle. And to ensure product compatibility, technology alignment and the highest level of support, we team up with solutions partners (including HP, IBM, Informatica) and technology partners such as BEA, Intel, Microsoft, Symantec and more. Founded in September 2003 by BEA Founding CEO Bill Coleman, Cassatt has a stellar management team with years of experience, and funding from Warburg Pincus and New Enterprise Associates.

— Freebase

Xbox Live

Xbox Live

Xbox Live is an online multiplayer gaming and digital media delivery service created and operated by Microsoft. It was first made available to the Xbox system in November 2002. An updated version of the service became available for the Xbox 360 console at the system's launch in November 2005, and a further enhanced version was released in 2013 with the Xbox One. Xbox LIVE is a competitor of Sony's PlayStation Network and Nintendo's relatively new Nintendo Network. The service was extended in 2007 on the Windows platform, named Games for Windows – Live, which makes most aspects of the system available on Windows computers. Microsoft has announced plans to extend Live to other platforms such as handhelds and mobile phones as part of the Live Anywhere initiative. With Microsoft's mobile operating system, Windows Phone, full Xbox Live functionality is integrated into new Windows Phones that launched since late 2010. The service shut down for the original Xbox on April 15, 2010 and original Xbox Games are now only playable online through Lan Tunneling applications such as XLink Kai. The Xbox Live service is available as both a free and subscription-based service, known as Xbox Live Free and Xbox Live Gold respectively, with most features such as online gaming restricted to the Gold service. Prior to October 2010, the free service was known as Xbox Live Silver.

— Freebase

Foreign Service Officer

Foreign Service Officer

A Foreign Service Officer is a commissioned member of the United States Foreign Service. As diplomats, Foreign Service Officers formulate and implement the foreign policy of the United States. FSOs spend most of their careers overseas as members of U.S. embassies, consulates, and other diplomatic missions, though some receive assignments to combatant command, Congress, and educational institutions such as the various U.S. War Colleges. Within the Foreign Service, they are also known as Generalists. Foreign Service Officers, who occupy most of the top tiers of the Foreign Service, are one of five categories of Foreign Service employees. Other categories include Foreign Service Nationals and Specialists.

— Freebase

advertise

advertise

To provide public information about (a product, service etc.) in order to attract public awareness and increase sales.

— Wiktionary

impressment

impressment

The act of seizing for public use; impressing into public service.

— Wiktionary

Public Health Service

Public Health Service

The Public Health Service is a major division of the Department of Health and Human Services dedicated to promoting the public health of the United States.

— Wiktionary

Chivalry

Chivalry

a tenure of lands by knight's service; that is, by the condition of a knight's performing service on horseback, or of performing some noble or military service to his lord

— Webster Dictionary

Militia

Militia

in the widest sense, the whole military force of a nation, including both those engaged in military service as a business, and those competent and available for such service; specifically, the body of citizens enrolled for military instruction and discipline, but not subject to be called into actual service except in emergencies

— Webster Dictionary

Socage

Socage

a tenure of lands and tenements by a certain or determinate service; a tenure distinct from chivalry or knight's service, in which the obligations were uncertain. The service must be certain, in order to be denominated socage, as to hold by fealty and twenty shillings rent

— Webster Dictionary

community relations

community relations

1. The relationship between military and civilian communities. 2. Those public affairs programs that address issues of interest to the general public, business, academia, veterans, Service organizations, military-related associations, and other non-news media entities. These programs are usually associated with the interaction between US military installations and their surrounding or nearby civilian communities. Interaction with overseas non-news media civilians in an operational area is handled by civil-military operations with public affairs support as required. See also public affairs.

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

police power

police power

The inherent power, incident to sovereignty, of a state to regulate and exercise reasonable control over matters of public health, public morals, public safety, and in general, all things relating to the general welfare.

— Wiktionary

Pension

Pension

a stated allowance to a person in consideration of past services; payment made to one retired from service, on account of age, disability, or other cause; especially, a regular stipend paid by a government to retired public officers, disabled soldiers, the families of soldiers killed in service, or to meritorious authors, or the like

— Webster Dictionary

Serve

Serve

to be in service; to do duty; to discharge the requirements of an office or employment. Specifically, to act in the public service, as a soldier, seaman. etc

— Webster Dictionary

United States Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

United States Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE established in 1990 to "provide indexing, abstracting, translating, publishing, and other services leading to a more effective and timely dissemination of information on research, demonstration projects, and evaluations with respect to health care to public and private entities and individuals engaged in the improvement of health care delivery..." It supersedes the National Center for Health Services Research. The United States Agency for Health Care Policy and Research was renamed Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) under the Healthcare Research and Quality Act of 1999.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

United States Indian Health Service

United States Indian Health Service

A division of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that is responsible for the public health and the provision of medical services to NATIVE AMERICANS in the United States, primarily those residing on reservation lands.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Disease Notification

Disease Notification

Notification or reporting by a physician or other health care provider of the occurrence of specified contagious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV infections to designated public health agencies. The United States system of reporting notifiable diseases evolved from the Quarantine Act of 1878, which authorized the US Public Health Service to collect morbidity data on cholera, smallpox, and yellow fever; each state in the US has its own list of notifiable diseases and depends largely on reporting by the individual health care provider. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

Public Law 104-91, enacted in 1996, is designed to protect health insurance coverage for workers and their families when they change or lose their jobs. HIPAA has separate provisions for the large and small group markets, and the individual market. HIPAA amends the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), the Public Health Service Act, and the Internal Revenue Code to provide improved portability and continuity of health insurance coverage, extending earlier provisions under the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985 ("COBRA").

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Public-Private Sector Partnerships

Public-Private Sector Partnerships

An organizational enterprise between a public sector agency, federal, state or local, and a private sector entity. Skills and assets of each sector are shared to deliver a service or facility for the benefit or use of the general public.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Public nudity

Public nudity

Public nudity or nude in public refers to nudity not in an entirely private context. It refers to a person appearing nude in a public place or to be seen from a public place. It also includes nudity in a semi-public place, where the general public is free to enter, such as a shopping mall. Nudity in the privacy of a person's home or private grounds or facilities is not public nudity, nor is nudity at privately owned facilities, such as fitness facilities, swimming pools, saunas, or gymnasia, nudist or naturist clubs or resorts, when nudity at those places commonly takes place. Naturism promotes social nudity. Not all people who engage in public nude events see themselves as nudists or naturists or belong to traditional naturist or nudist organizations. Several activists, such as Vincent Bethell, claim that association with naturism or nudism is unnecessary. Others will point out that many people who participate in events such as clothing-optional bike rides or visit clothing-optional beaches do so casually and without association or formal affiliation to groups or movements. Activist Daniel Johnson believes that labels and affiliations overly complicate a relatively simple phenomenon, alienate others from a fear of over-commitment or undesirable stereotypes, and thus get in the way of integrating nudity into everyday life.

— Freebase

Certified Public Accountant

Certified Public Accountant

Certified Public Accountant is the statutory title of qualified accountants in the United States who have passed the Uniform Certified Public Accountant Examination and have met additional state education and experience requirements for certification as a CPA. Individuals who have passed the Exam but have not either accomplished the required on-the-job experience or have previously met it but in the meantime have lapsed their continuing professional education are, in many states, permitted the designation "CPA Inactive" or an equivalent phrase. In most U.S. states only CPAs who are licensed are able to provide to the public attestation opinions on financial statements. The exceptions to this rule are Arizona, Kansas, North Carolina, and Michigan where the "CPA" designation and the practice of auditing are not restricted. Many states have a lower tier of accountant qualification below that of CPA, usually entitled "Public Accountant" or "Licensed Public Accountant", although other titles have included "Registered Public Accountant", "Accounting Practitioner", and "Registered Accounting Practitioner". Such designations were originally intended to license non-certified accountants who were practicing public accounting before a state accountancy law was enacted which would serve to regulate the accounting profession. The majority of states have closed the designation "Public Accountant" to new entrants, with only six states continuing to offer the designation. Many PAs belong to the National Society of Accountants.

— Freebase

Charter school

Charter school

In the United States, charter schools are primary or secondary schools that receive public money. They are subject to some of the rules, regulations, and statutes that apply to other public schools, but generally have more flexibility than traditional public schools. Charter schools are expected to produce certain results, set forth in each school's charter. Charter schools are attended by choice. In exchange for flexibility, charter schools receive less funding than public schools in the same area - typically, they receive only 'head' funds and do not receive any facilities funding which typically pays for a public school's maintenance and janitorial needs. Although charter schools provide an alternative to other public schools, they are part of the public education system and are not allowed to charge tuition. Where enrollment in a charter school is oversubscribed, admission is frequently allocated by lottery-based admissions systems. However, the lottery is open to all students. In a 2008 survey of United States charter schools, 59% of the schools reported that they had a waiting list, averaging 198 students. Some charter schools provide a curriculum that specializes in a certain field—e.g., arts, mathematics, or vocational training. Others attempt to provide a better and more cost efficient general education than nearby non-charter public schools. Charter school students take state-mandated exams.

— Freebase

Constitution Day

Constitution Day

Constitution Day is a holiday to honor the constitution of a country. Constitution Day is often celebrated on the anniversary of the signing, promulgation or adoption of the constitution, or in some cases, to commemorate the change to constitutional monarchy: ⁕Abkhazia, November 26. See Constitution of Abkhazia, Public holidays in Abkhazia. ⁕Andorra, March 14. See Constitution of Andorra. ⁕Armenia, July 5. See Public holidays in Armenia. ⁕Australia, 9 July. See Constitution of Australia. Not a public holiday. ⁕Azerbaijan, November 12. See Public holidays in Azerbaijan. ⁕Belarus, March 15. See Public holidays in Belarus. ⁕Belgium, November 15. Dag van de Dynastie – Jour de la Dynastie ⁕Brazil, November 15. Dia da Proclamação da República public holiday ⁕Cambodia, September 24. See Public holidays in Cambodia. ⁕Cook Islands, August 4. Te Maevea Nui Celebrations. See Cook Islands#Public holidays and Politics of the Cook Islands#Constitution. ⁕Denmark, June 5. See Constitution Day. ⁕Dominican Republic, November 6. See History of the Dominican Republic. ⁕Faroe Islands, June 5

— Freebase

Special library

Special library

A special library is a term for a library that is neither an academic, school, public or national library. Special libraries include corporate libraries, law libraries, medical libraries, museum libraries, news libraries, and nonprofit libraries.These libraries are not usually open to the general public, though many are available to specific elements of the public or scheduled appointments. Special libraries are also sometimes known as information centers. They are generally staffed by librarians, although many librarians employed in special libraries are specialists in the library's field rather than generally trained librarians, and often are not required to have advanced degrees in specifically library-related field due to the specialized content and clientele of the library. Special libraries often have a more specific clientele than libraries in traditional educational or public settings, and deal with more specialized kinds of information. They are developed to support the mission of their sponsoring organization and their collections and services are more targeted and specific to the needs of their clientele. Depending on the particular library, special libraries may or may not be open to the general public or elements thereof. Those that are open to the public may offer services similar to research, reference, public, academic, or children's libraries, often with restrictions such as only lending books to patients at a hospital or restricting the public from parts of a military collection. Given the highly individual nature of special libraries, visitors to a special library are often advised to check what services and restrictions apply at that particular library.

— Freebase

Service pack

Service pack

In computing, a service pack or SP or a feature pack comprises a collection of updates, fixes, or enhancements to a software program delivered in the form of a single installable package. Companies often release a service pack when the number of individual patches to a given program reaches a certain limit, or the software release has shown to be stabilized with a limited number of remaining issues based on users feedback and bug tracking such as bugzilla. In large software applications such as Office Suites, operating systems, database software, or network management, it is not uncommon to have a service pack issued every four to six months in the first year or two a product is out. Installing a service pack is easier and less error-prone than installing many individual patches, even more so when updating multiple computers over a network, where service packs are common. Service packs are usually numbered, and thus shortly referred to as SP1, SP2, SP3 etc. They may also bring, besides bug fixes, entirely new features, as is the case of SP2 of Windows XP, or Service Packs SP3 and SP4 of the heavily database dependent Trainz 2009:World Builder edition, which introduced licensed Speedtree technology into the popular series of Railway simulators.

— Freebase

Conscription

Conscription

Conscription is the compulsory enlistment of people in some sort of national service, most often military service. Conscription dates back to antiquity and continues in some countries to the present day under various names. The modern system of near-universal national conscription for young men dates to the French Revolution in the 1790s, where it became the basis of a very large and powerful military. Most European nations later copied the system in peacetime, so that men at a certain age would serve 1–3 years on active duty and then transfer to the reserve force. In China, the State of Qin instituted universal military service following the registration of every household. This allowed huge armies to be levied, and was instrumental in the creation of the Qin Empire that conquered the whole of China in 221BC. Conscription is controversial for a range of reasons, including conscientious objection to military engagements on religious or philosophical grounds; political objection, for example to service for a disliked government or unpopular war; and ideological objection, for example, to a perceived violation of individual rights. Those conscripted may evade service, sometimes by leaving the country. Some selection systems accommodate these attitudes by providing alternative service outside combat-operations roles or even outside the military, such as Zivildienst in Austria and Switzerland. Most post-Soviet countries conscript soldiers not only for Armed Forces but also for paramilitary organizations which are dedicated to police-like domestic only service or non-combat rescue duties - none of which is considered alternative to the military conscription.

— Freebase

Royal Maundy

Royal Maundy

Royal Maundy is a religious service in the Church of England held on Maundy Thursday, the day before Good Friday. At the service, the British Monarch or a royal official ceremonially distributes small silver coins known as "Maundy money" as symbolic alms to elderly recipients. The coins are legal tender but do not circulate because of their silver content and numismatic value. A small sum of ordinary money is also given in lieu of gifts of clothing and food that the sovereign once bestowed on Maundy recipients. The name "Maundy" and the ceremony itself derive from an instruction, or mandatum, of Jesus Christ at the Last Supper that his followers should love one another. In the Middle Ages, English monarchs washed the feet of beggars in imitation of Jesus, and presented gifts and money to the poor. Over time, additional money was substituted for the clothing and other items that had once been distributed. Beginning in 1699 the monarch did not attend the service, sending an official in his place. The custom of washing the feet did not survive the 18th century. In 1931 Princess Marie Louise was at Royal Maundy, and afterwards suggested that her cousin, King George V, make the distributions the following year, which he did, beginning a new royal custom. Traditionally, the service was held in or near London, in most years in the early 20th century at Westminster Abbey. Today, Queen Elizabeth II almost always attends, and the service is held in a different church every year. Recipients were once chosen for their poverty and were entitled to remain as Maundy recipients for life; today new recipients are chosen every year for service to their churches or communities, on the recommendation of clergymen of various Christian denominations. Generally, recipients live in the diocese where the service is held, although this was altered for the 2011 and 2012 services.

— Freebase

Distinguished Service Cross

Distinguished Service Cross

The Distinguished Service Cross is the second highest military award that can be given to a member of the United States Army, for extreme gallantry and risk of life in actual combat with an armed enemy force. Actions that merit the Distinguished Service Cross must be of such a high degree that they are above those required for all other U.S. combat decorations but do not meet the criteria for the Medal of Honor. The Distinguished Service Cross is equivalent to the Navy Cross and the Air Force Cross. The Distinguished Service Cross was first awarded during World War I. In addition, a number of awards were made for actions before World War I. In many cases, these were to soldiers who had received a Certificate of Merit for gallantry which, at the time, was the only other honor for gallantry the Army could award, or recommend a Medal of Honor. Others were belated recognition of actions in the Philippines, on the Mexican Border and during the Boxer Rebellion. The Distinguished Service Cross is distinct from the Distinguished Service Medal, which is awarded to persons in recognition of exceptionally meritorious service to the government of the United States in a duty of great responsibility.

— Freebase

Bulk billing

Bulk billing

Bulk billing is a payment option under the Medicare system of universal health insurance in Australia. The health service provider, usually a Doctor is paid 85% of the scheduled fee directly by the government by billing the patient via their Medicare card. The service provider receives only 85% of the scheduled fee but avoids the costs and risks of billing and debt collection. It could be described as a form of factoring. The alternative to bulk billing is for the service provider to collect the fee directly from the patient. In order to claim the Medicare rebate, the patient then has to visit a Medicare office, fill out a claim form and claim 75% of the scheduled fee from the government. Under Medicare, it is not permissible to charge the patient a co-payment with bulk billing: a service provider who bulk bills for a service may not charge the patient further for that service. Service providers may choose whether or not to use bulk billing. Most general practitioner services are bulk-billed, but less so in more affluent areas and in rural, regional and remote areas of Australia where there is a greater shortage of doctors and health care services. The key purpose of bulk billing is to provide an economic constraint on medical fees and charges.

— Freebase

Conscientious objector

Conscientious objector

A conscientious objector is an "individual who has claimed the right to refuse to perform military service" on the grounds of freedom of thought, conscience, and/or religion. In general, conscientious objector status is only considered in the context of military conscription and is not applicable to volunteer military forces. In some countries, conscientious objectors are assigned to an alternative civilian service as a substitute for conscription or military service. Some conscientious objectors consider themselves pacifist, non-interventionist, non-resistant, or antimilitarist. The international definition of conscientious objection officially broadened on March 8, 1995 when the United Nations Commission on Human Rights resolution 1995/83 stated that "persons performing military service should not be excluded from the right to have conscientious objections to military service." That definition was re-affirmed in 1998, when the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights document called "Conscientious objection to military service, United Nations Commission on Human Rights resolution 1998/77" officially recognized that "persons [already] performing military service may develop conscientious objections."

— Freebase

Security Assertion Markup Language

Security Assertion Markup Language

Security Assertion Markup Language is an XML-based open standard data format for exchanging authentication and authorization data between parties, in particular, between an identity provider and a service provider. SAML is a product of the OASIS Security Services Technical Committee. SAML dates from 2001; the most recent update of SAML is from 2005. The single most important problem that SAML addresses is the web browser single sign-on problem. Single sign-on solutions are abundant at the intranet level but extending these solutions beyond the intranet has been problematic and has led to the proliferation of non-interoperable proprietary technologies. The SAML specification defines three roles: the principal, the identity provider, and the service provider. In the use case addressed by SAML, the principal requests a service from the service provider. The service provider requests and obtains an identity assertion from the identity provider. On the basis of this assertion, the service provider can make an access control decision - in other words it can decide whether to perform some service for the connected principal.

— Freebase

Service management

Service management

Service management is integrated into supply chain management as the intersection between the actual sales and the customer. The aim of high performance service management is to optimize the service-intensive supply chains, which are usually more complex than the typical finished-goods supply chain. Most service-intensive supply chains require larger inventories and tighter integration with field service and third parties. They also must accommodate inconsistent and uncertain demand by establishing more advanced information and product flows. Moreover, all processes must be coordinated across numerous service locations with large numbers of parts and multiple levels in the supply chain. Among typical manufacturers, post-sale services comprise less than 20 percent of revenue. But among the most innovative companies in Service, those same activities often generate more than 50 percent of the profits.

— Freebase

Service

Service

In economics, a service is an intangible commodity. That is, services are an example of intangible economic goods. Service provision is often an economic activity where the buyer does not generally, except by exclusive contract, obtain exclusive ownership of the thing purchased. The benefits of such a service, if priced, are held to be self-evident in the buyer's willingness to pay for it. Public services are those society as a whole pays for through taxes and other means. By composing and orchestrating the appropriate level of resources, skill, ingenuity, and experience for effecting specific benefits for service consumers, service providers participate in an economy without the restrictions of carrying inventory or the need to concern themselves with bulky raw materials. On the other hand, their investment in expertise does require consistent service marketing and upgrading in the face of competition.

— Freebase

Impressment

Impressment

the act of seizing for public use, or of impressing into public service; compulsion to serve; as, the impressment of provisions or of sailors

— Webster Dictionary

Job

Job

to seek private gain under pretense of public service; to turn public matters to private advantage

— Webster Dictionary

public easement

public easement

any easement enjoyed by the public in general (as the public's right to use public streets)

— Princeton's WordNet

Cambus

Cambus

Cambus is a public transport bus system, primarily serving the University of Iowa campus in Iowa City, IA. The service is intended to provide transportation for students, faculty, and staff around the main campus, University of Iowa Research Park, residence halls, and commuter parking lots. Cambus is a no fare service open to the general public. Cambus provides approximately 4,000,000 rides per year. The service is operated by the Department of Parking and Transportation for the University of Iowa with funding from the Parking & Transportation Department, a UI Student fee, and the Federal Transportation Administration. Cambus was originally founded by University of Iowa students and has been in operation since 1972. The University of Iowa campus is divided into east and west halves by the Iowa River. Most Liberal Arts and Sciences classes take place on the east side of the river; thus the purpose of the new bus service was to facilitate easier transportation between the west-side dormitories and the east-side classrooms. At first there was no name for this service, so the founding students created a contest open to all U of I students to select one. "Cambus" was the name eventually chosen after Cambuskenneth, and the winner was awarded a free pizza.

— Freebase

Posten AB

Posten AB

Posten AB is the name of the Swedish postal service. The word "posten" means "the post" or "the mail" in Swedish. Posten was established in 1636 by Axel Oxenstierna under the name Kungliga Postverket, although its origins can be traced further back, and it was operated as a government agency into the 1990s when it was transformed into a government-owned limited company. One of the most visible changes to the postal service was the decision in 2000 to abandon the service maintained at the public post offices in 2001. The public today deals with its postal business at Postal Service Points, which are maintained in grocery shops and gas stations. Postal Service Centres are maintained for business clients. In addition to regular mail, Posten is also the largest distributor of direct mail in Sweden. Mail and package delivery is seen as very reliable in Sweden, but it has undergone large scale organisational changes and rationalisation in the last decade. Nevertheless, it is under ever increasing competition from private companies on the Swedish deregulated postal market. Their main competitor is the formerly private company CityMail, nationalised by Norway as of 2006.

— Freebase

connection

connection

the process of joining to a service supplier, or the service supplied

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

tip

tip

money you give sb who provides a service, in addition to payment for the service

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

GEDS

GEDS

The Government Electronic Directory Services provide a directory of the Public Service of Canada for all regions across Canada. It is managed by Public Works and Government Services Canada. The Canadian government's Information Technology Services Branch developed GEDS to integrate two directory services that it manages. Individual federal departments are responsible for maintaining information in GEDS. However, there is often a considerable lag-time in updating information due to the significant number of employee changes in the federal public service. Users can search for federal employees by surname, given name, telephone number, title, role, or organization. It is also a useful system to learn the hierarchical structure of organizations within the Canadian public service.

— Freebase

Ban

Ban

a public proclamation or edict; a public order or notice, mandatory or prohibitory; a summons by public proclamation

— Webster Dictionary

Liturgy

Liturgy

an established formula for public worship, or the entire ritual for public worship in a church which uses prescribed forms; a formulary for public prayer or devotion. In the Roman Catholic Church it includes all forms and services in any language, in any part of the world, for the celebration of Mass

— Webster Dictionary

Public sector

Public sector

The public sector refers to "the part of the economy concerned with providing basic government services. The composition of the public sector varies by country, but in most countries the public sector includes such services as the police, military, public roads, public transit, primary education and healthcare for the poor. The public sector might provide services that non-payer cannot be excluded from, services which benefit all of society rather than just the individual who uses the service, and services that encourage equal opportunity."

— Freebase

Public works

Public works

Public works are a broad category of infrastructure projects, financed and constructed by the government, for recreational, employment, and health and safety uses in the greater community. They include public buildings, transport infrastructure, public spaces, public services, and other, usually long-term, physical assets and facilities. Though often interchangeable with public infrastructure and public capital, public works does not necessarily carry an economic component, thereby being a broader term.

— Freebase

Public law

Public law

Public law is that part of law which governs relationships between individuals and the government, and those relationships between individuals which are of direct concern to the society. Public law comprises constitutional law, administrative law, tax law and criminal law, as well as all procedural law. In public law, mandatory rules prevail. Laws concerning relationships between individuals belong to private law. The relationships public law governs are asymmetric and unequal – government bodies can make decisions about the rights of individuals. However, as a consequence of the rule of law doctrine, authorities may only act within the law. The government must obey the law. For example, a citizen unhappy with a decision of an administrative authority can ask a court for judicial review. Rights, too, can be divided into private rights and public rights. A paragon of a public right is the right to welfare benefits – only a natural person can claim such payments, and they are awarded through an administrative decision out of the government budget. The distinction between public law and private law dates back to Roman law. It has been picked up in the countries of civil law tradition at the beginning of the 19th century, but since then spread to common law countries, too.

— Freebase

Public good

Public good

In economics, a public good is a good that is both non-excludable and non-rivalrous in that individuals cannot be effectively excluded from use and where use by one individual does not reduce availability to others. Examples of public goods include fresh air, knowledge, lighthouses, national defense, flood control systems and street lighting. Public goods that are available everywhere are sometimes referred to as global public goods. Many public goods may at times be subject to excessive use resulting in negative externalities affecting all users; for example air pollution and traffic congestion. Public goods problems are often closely related to the "free-rider" problem, in which people not paying for the good may continue to access it, or the tragedy of the commons, where consumption of a shared resource by individuals acting in their individual and immediate self-interest diminishes or even destroys the original resource. Thus, the good may be under-produced, overused or degraded. Public goods may also become subject to restrictions on access and may then be considered to be club goods or private goods; exclusion mechanisms include copyright, patents, congestion pricing, and pay television.

— Freebase

Public art

Public art

The term public art properly refers to works of art in any media that have been planned and executed with the specific intention of being sited or staged in the physical public domain, usually outside and accessible to all. The term is especially significant within the art world, amongst curators, commissioning bodies and practitioners of public art, to whom it signifies a particular working practice, often with implications of site specificity, community involvement and collaboration. The term is sometimes also applied to include any art which is exhibited in a public space including publicly accessible buildings. In recent years, public art has increasingly begun to expand in scope and application — both into other wider and challenging areas of artform, and also across a much broader range of what might be called our 'public realm'. Such cultural interventions have often been realised in response to creatively engaging a community's sense of 'place' or 'well-being' in society. Such commissions can still result in physical, permanent artworks and sculptures. These also often involve increasingly integrated and applied arts type applications. However, they are also beginning to include other, much more process-driven and action-research based artistic practices as well. As such, these do not always rely on the production of a physical or permanent artwork at all. This expanded scope of public art can embrace many diverse practices and artforms. These might be implemented as stand-alone, or as collaborative hybrids involving a multi-disciplinary approach. The range of its potential is of course endless, ever-changing, and subject to continual debate and differences of opinion among artists, funders, curators, and commissioning clients.

— Freebase

Web service

Web service

A web service is a method of communication between two electronic devices over the World Wide Web. A web service is a software function provided at a network address over the web or the cloud, it is a service that is "always on" as in the concept of utility computing. The W3C defines a "Web service" as: The W3C also states: We can identify two major classes of Web services: ⁕REST-compliant Web services, in which the primary purpose of the service is to manipulate XML representations of Web resources using a uniform set of "stateless" operations; and ⁕arbitrary Web services, in which the service may expose an arbitrary set of operations.

— Freebase

Service bureau

Service bureau

A service bureau is a company which provides business services for a fee. The term has been extensively used to describe technology based services to financial services companies, particularly banks. Customers of service bureaus typically do not have the scale or expertise to incorporate these services in their internal operations and prefer to outsource them to a service bureau. Outsourced payroll services is a commonly provisioned service from a service bureau. The service bureau's value to its customers is a combination of technology, process and business domain expertise. Their business model is based on their ability to productize their services and deploy them in volume to a very large customer base. In the modern context, technology is a key enabler to achieving this scale.

— Freebase

Fee

Fee

A fee is the price one pays as remuneration for services. Fees usually allow for overhead, wages, costs, and markup. Traditionally, professionals in Great Britain received a fee in contradistinction to a payment, salary, or wage, and would often use guineas rather than pounds as units of account. Under the feudal system, a Knight's fee was what was given to a knight for his service, usually the usage of land. A contingent fee is an attorney's fee which is reduced or not charged at all if the court case is lost by the attorney. A service fee, service charge, or surcharge is a fee added to a customer's bill. The purpose of a service charge often depends on the nature of the product and corresponding service provided. Examples of why this fee is charged are: travel time expenses, truck rental fees, liability and workers' compensation insurance fees, and planning fees. UPS and FedEx have recently begun surcharges for fuel. Restaurants and banquet halls charging service charges in lieu of tips must distribute them to their wait staff in some US states, but in the State of Kentucky may keep them. A fee may be a flat fee or a variable one, or part of a two-part tariff.

— Freebase

Special Air Service

Special Air Service

The Special Air Service or SAS is a regiment of the British Army constituted on 31 May 1950. They are part of the United Kingdom Special Forces and have served as a model for the special forces of many other countries all over the world. The SAS together with the Special Boat Service, Special Reconnaissance Regiment, Special Forces Support Group, 18 Signal Regiment and the Joint Special Forces Aviation Wing form the UKSF under the command of the Director Special Forces. The SAS traces its origins to 1941 and the Second World War, and was reformed as part of the Territorial Army in 1947, and named the 21st Battalion, SAS Regiment,. The Regular Army 22 SAS later gained fame and recognition worldwide after successfully assaulting the Iranian Embassy in London and rescuing hostages during the 1980 Iranian Embassy siege, lifting the regiment from obscurity outside the military establishment. The Special Air Service presently comprises 22 Special Air Service Regiment of the Regular Army, 21 Special Air Service Regiment and 23 Special Air Service Regiment from the Territorial Army. It is tasked primarily with counter-terrorism in peacetime and special operations in wartime.

— Freebase

Service-level agreement

Service-level agreement

A service-level agreement is a part of a service contract where a service is formally defined. In practice, the term SLA is sometimes used to refer to the contracted delivery time. As an example, internet service providers will commonly include service level agreements within the terms of their contracts with customers to define the level of service being sold in plain language terms. In this case the SLA will typically have a technical definition in terms of mean time between failures, mean time to repair or mean time to recovery; various data rates; throughput; jitter; or similar measurable details.

— Freebase

Winter service vehicle

Winter service vehicle

A winter service vehicle, or snow removal vehicle, is used to clear thoroughfares of ice and snow. Winter service vehicles are usually based on a dump truck chassis, with adaptations allowing them to carry specially designed snow removal equipment. Many authorities also use smaller vehicles on sidewalks, footpaths, and cycleways. Road maintenance agencies and contractors in temperate or polar areas often own several winter service vehicles, using them to keep the roads clear of snow and ice and safe for driving during winter. Airports use winter service vehicles to keep both aircraft surfaces, and runways and taxiways free of snow and ice, which, besides endangering aircraft takeoff and landing, can interfere with the aerodynamics of the craft. The earliest winter service vehicles were snow rollers, designed to maintain a smooth, even road surface for sleds, although horse-drawn snowplows and gritting vehicles are recorded in use as early as 1862. The increase in motor car traffic and aviation in the early 20th century led to the development and popularisation of large motorised winter service vehicles.

— Freebase

Newborn Emergency Transport Service

Newborn Emergency Transport Service

NETS is an acronym for newborn emergency transport service or system. Such services provide critical care transport for newborn babies requiring care not available in the hospital of birth. Some provide other services; such as outreach education, return transport and coordination of high-risk obstetric transfer. Others provide transport services in older age-groups. NETS is the emergency transport service for newborn babies in the state of Victoria, parts of southern NSW and northern Tasmania. The base of operations and clinical coordination centre is at the Royal Women's Hospital in Carlton, Victoria. Outreach education services are also provided throughout the state of Victoria. All newborn patients needing intensive care in Victoria are transported to one of 4 neonatal ICUs by NETS. Hotline 1300 137 650. NETS is the emergency transport service for babies for the state of NSW. Starting originally as a service for newborns in 1979, the service expanded to include infants and children in 1995 and now treats and transports older children up to the age of 16 years. The service's clinical coordination centre takes calls from physicians in any of over 240 hospitals and a number of private surgical facilities. Clinical advice is provided and critical care transport teams are launched, as required, by road or air. Newly born patients are moved to one of 10 neonatal ICUs in NSW and the ACT. Infants and children are transported to one of 3 pædiatric ICUs. Calls are also received seeking assistance with emergency transfer of high risk obstetric patients. Clinical conference call techniques are used to make decisions about these obstetric transfers. Medical retrieval teams, a fleet of purpose-built ambulances and two multi-engined, IFR helicopters are housed within the Base to provide rapid response to clinical emergencies. Hotline 1300 36 2500. In addition, satellite services operate in the ACT and the Hunter Region of NSW for the transport of newborn infants by road. NETS operates a fleet of 8 ambulances from these three bases.

— Freebase

Platform as a service

Platform as a service

Platform as a service is a category of cloud computing services that provides a computing platform and a solution stack as a service. Along with software as a service and infrastructure as a service, it is a service model of cloud computing. In this model, the consumer creates the software using tools and/or libraries from the provider. The consumer also controls software deployment and configuration settings. The provider provides the networks, servers, storage, and other services. PaaS offerings facilitate the deployment of applications without the cost and complexity of buying and managing the underlying hardware and software and provisioning hosting capabilities. There are various types of PaaS vendors; however, all offer application hosting and a deployment environment, along with various integrated services. Services offer varying levels of scalability and maintenance. PaaS offerings may also include facilities for application design, application development, testing, and deployment as well as services such as team collaboration, web service integration, and marshalling, database integration, security, scalability, storage, persistence, state management, application versioning, application instrumentation, and developer community facilitation.

— Freebase

Postpaid mobile phone

Postpaid mobile phone

The postpaid mobile phone is a mobile phone for which service is provided by a prior arrangement with a mobile network operator. The user in this situation is billed after the fact according to their use of mobile services at the end of each month. Typically, the customer's contract specifies a limit or "allowance" of minutes, text messages etc., and the customer will be billed at a flat rate for any usage equal to or less than that allowance. Any usage above that limit incurs extra charges. Theoretically, a user in this situation has no limit on use of mobile services and, as a consequence, unlimited credit. This service is better for people with a secured income. Postpaid service mobile phone typically requires two essential components in order to make the 'post-usage' model viable: Credit history/Contractual commitment: This is the basis on which the service provider is able to trust the customer with paying their bill when its due and to have legal resource in case of non-payment Service tenure: Most postpaid providers require customers to sign long term contracts committing to use of the service. Failure to complete the term would make the customer liable for early terminiation fees.

— Freebase

Community service

Community service

Community service is donated service or activity that is performed by someone or a group of people for the benefit of the public or its institutions. Performing community service is not the same as volunteering, since it is not always done voluntarily. It may be done for a variety of reasons: ⁕governments may require it as a part of citizenship requirements, typically in lieu of military service; ⁕courts may demand it in lieu of, or in addition to, other criminal justice sanctions; ⁕school may mandate it to meet the requirements of a class, such as in the case of service-learning or to meet the requirements of graduation.

— Freebase

NHS Direct

NHS Direct

NHS Direct is the health advice and information service provided by the National Health Service for residents and visitors in England, with advice offered 24 hours a day, every day of the year through telephone contact on the national non-geographic 0845 46 47 number, web based symptom checkers at www.nhsdirect.nhs.uk and via mobile, both as apps for iPhone and Android smart phones and a mobile website. As a part of the National Health Service, NHS Direct services are free, although the 0845 number is usually chargeable as a non-geographic number. Some landline providers allow 0845 calls within "inclusive" minutes. The website remains free, including call backs. Users of the service, through whichever channel, are asked questions about their symptoms or problem. Common problems are often given simple self care advice, which they can follow thereby avoiding an expensive visit to a health care professional. More complex problems are assessed by a nurse and can then be given treatment advice or referred on to another service within the NHS. As well as these core services, NHS Direct provides a number of commissioned services throughout the NHS, such as specialised support for patients with long term conditions, access to GP and dental healthcare out of hours, and a professional response system for times of public health anxiety.

— Freebase

Corps

Corps

A corps is either a large military formation composed of two or more divisions, or an administrative grouping of troops within an armed force with a common function such as Artillery or Signals representing an arm of service. Corps may also refer to a particular unit or a particular branch of service, such as the United States Marine Corps, the Corps of Royal Marines, the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen at Arms, or the Corps of Commissionaires. The military term was subsequently adopted for public service organizations with a paramilitary command structure, volunteer public service organizations, such as the Peace Corps, various ambulance corps, some NGOs, and other civic volunteer organizations. Due to this use of the term, it has also spread to some other civic or volunteer organizations that lack the paramilitary structure.

— Freebase

Public service

Public service

A public service is a service which is provided by government to people living within its jurisdiction, either directly or by financing private provision of services. The term is associated with a social consensus that certain services should be available to all, regardless of income. Even where public services are neither publicly provided nor publicly financed, for social and political reasons they are usually subject to regulation going beyond that applying to most economic sectors. Public service is also a course that can be studied at a college and/or university.

— Freebase

United States Public Health Service

United States Public Health Service

The Public Health Service Act of 1944 structured the United States Public Health Service as the primary division of the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, which later became the United States Department of Health and Human Services. The PHS comprises all Agency Divisions of Health and Human Services and the Commissioned Corps. The Assistant Secretary for Health oversees the PHS and the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps.

— Freebase

Create

Create

Create is a digital television public television network in the United States. The network was created after the closure of PBS YOU in 2006. Create airs how-to, cooking, DIY, and other non-commercial educational television shows from the libraries of Public Broadcasting Service and American Public Television. The non-profit public broadcasting service airs its television programs through PBS affiliate member stations' and digital subchannels nationwide. NETA also provides services and programming to this network. Many of PBS' charter affiliates are also its major providers of programming, such as WGBH Boston, and WLIW and WNET in New York City. On Saturdays, the network has marathons based on themes, food related holidays or of a particular program.

— Freebase

Public service announcement

Public service announcement

There are many different definitions for a public service announcement or public service ad, but the simplified version of PSAs are messages in the public interest disseminated by the media without charge, with the objective of raising awareness, changing public attitudes and behavior towards a social issue.

— Freebase

twenty-four seven

twenty-four seven

An abbreviation which stands for "24 hours a day, 7 days a week", including holidays and days otherwise that may alter limitations of work. In commerce and industry, it identifies a round-the-clock service, as might be offered by a supermarket, ATM, gas station, concierge service or manned data center.

— Wiktionary

entertainment

entertainment

Admission into service; service.

— Wiktionary

congregation

congregation

A gathering of faithful in a Christian church, Jewish synagogue, Muslim mosque or other place of worship. It can also refer to the people who are present at a devotional service in the building, particularly in contrast to the pastor, minister, imam, rabbi etc. and/or choir, who may be seated apart from the general congregation or lead the service (notably in responsary form).

— Wiktionary

operational service period

operational service period

A performance measurement period, or succession of performance measurement periods, during which a telecommunications service remains in an operational service state.

— Wiktionary

ticket

ticket

A service request, used to track complaints or requests that an issue be handled. (Generally Internet Service Provider related).

— Wiktionary

servo

servo

Abbreviation of service station, being a place to buy petrol for cars etc., as well as various convenience items, with or without actual car service facilities.

— Wiktionary

volunteer

volunteer

One who enters into military service voluntarily, but who, when in service, is subject to discipline and regulations like other soldiers; -- opposed to conscript; specifically, a voluntary member of the organized militia of a country as distinguished from the standing army.

— Wiktionary

text

text

To send a text message to; i.e. to transmit text using the Short Message Service (SMS), or a similar service, between communications devices, particularly mobile phones.

— Wiktionary

burgage

burgage

a medieval tenure in socage under which property in England and Scotland was held under the king or a lord of a town, and was maintained for a yearly rent or for rendering an inferior service (not knight's service) such as watching and warding.

— Wiktionary

absolute error

absolute error

Error of a sight consisting of its error in relation to a master service sight with which it is tested, including the known error of the master service sight.

— Wiktionary

collocation

collocation

A service allowing multiple customers to locate network, server, and storage gear, connect them to a variety of telecommunications and network service providers, with a minimum of cost and complexity.

— Wiktionary

call out

call out

To order into service; to summon into service.

— Wiktionary

remote access

remote access

A PABX service feature that allows a user at a remote location to access by telephone PABX features, such as access to Wide Area Telephone Service (WATS) lines.

— Wiktionary

bustitution

bustitution

The substitution of a rail (train, tram, etc) or trolleybus service by a bus service.

— Wiktionary

meet-and-greet

meet-and-greet

A method of contact between a service provider, such as a hotel collection service, or car hire provider, and the arriving client at an airport or railway station. Usually involving the display of a board with the client's name written on it.

— Wiktionary

network effect

network effect

The higher growth rate of businesses with higher market share in those segments of economy in which the value of a product or a service depends on the number of existing users of the product or a service, as is the case with telephone networks.

— Wiktionary

second serve

second serve

Another attempt at a service, after a faulty first service.

— Wiktionary

non-military service

non-military service

Service in a non-military organisation, instead of serving in the military. Service done by conscientious objector.

— Wiktionary

payment service

payment service

Any service provided by a financial institution to allow one person or organization to pay another for a product or service

— Wiktionary

teletex

teletex

A text and document communications service provided over telephone lines, designed as an upgrade to the conventional telex service but rapidly superseded by electronic mail.

— Wiktionary

DADT

DADT

The policy restricting the United States military from efforts to discover or reveal closeted gay, lesbian, and bisexual service members or applicants, while barring those who are openly gay, lesbian, or bisexual from military service.

— Wiktionary

funeralize

funeralize

To officiate at a funeral service for, to hold a funeral service for.

— Wiktionary

Acela

Acela

The service mark of Amtrak's high-speed rail service in the Northeast Corridor of the United States.

— Wiktionary

Notary public

Notary public

A notary public in the common law world is a public officer constituted by law to serve the public in non-contentious matters usually concerned with estates, deeds, powers-of-attorney, and foreign and international business. A notary's main functions are to administer oaths and affirmations, take affidavits and statutory declarations, witness and authenticate the execution of certain classes of documents, take acknowledgments of deeds and other conveyances, protest notes and bills of exchange, provide notice of foreign drafts, prepare marine or ship's protests in cases of damage, provide exemplifications and notarial copies, and perform certain other official acts depending on the jurisdiction. Any such act is known as a notarization. The term notary public only refers to common-law notaries and should not be confused with civil-law notaries. With the exceptions of Louisiana, Puerto Rico, Quebec, whose private law is based on civil law, and British Columbia, whose notarial tradition stems from scrivener notary practice, a notary public in the rest of the United States and most of Canada has powers that are far more limited than those of civil-law or other common-law notaries, both of whom are qualified lawyers admitted to the bar: such notaries may be referred to as notaries-at-law or lawyer notaries. Therefore, at common law, notarial service is distinct from the practice of law, and giving legal advice and preparing legal instruments is forbidden to lay notaries such as those appointed throughout most of the United States of America.

— Freebase

Public utility

Public utility

A public utility is an organization that maintains the infrastructure for a public service. Public utilities are subject to forms of public control and regulation ranging from local community-based groups to state-wide government monopolies. The term utilities can also refer to the set of services provided by these organizations consumed by the public: electricity, natural gas, water, and sewage. Telephony may occasionally be included within the definition.

— Freebase

Modesty

Modesty

Modesty is a mode of dress and deportment intended not to encourage sexual attraction in others; actual standards vary widely. In this use, it can be considered inappropriate or immodest to reveal certain parts of the body. A modest woman would not behave so as to encourage the sexual attention of men. In some societies women must cover their bodies completely and may never talk to men who are not immediate family members; in others a fairly revealing but one-piece bathing costume is considered modest when other women wear bikinis. Modesty in dress and deportment is usually encouraged by peer pressure, although a few countries enforce rigid dress codes. In some countries, exposure of the body in breach of community standards of modesty is also considered to be public indecency, and public nudity is generally illegal in most of the world and regarded as indecent exposure. However, nudity is at times tolerated in some societies; for example, during a world naked bike ride, while a lone man attempting to walk naked from south to north Britain was repeatedly imprisoned. Small children are widely not expected to be fully clothed in public until they are grown up. In semi-public contexts standards of modesty vary. Nudity may be acceptable in public single-sex changing rooms at swimming baths, for example, or for mass medical examination of men for military service. In private, standards again depend upon the circumstances. A person who would never disrobe in the presence of a physician of the opposite sex in a social context might unquestioningly do so for a medical examination; others might allow examination, but only by a person of the same sex.

— Freebase

Aedile

Aedile

Aedile was an office of the Roman Republic. Based in Rome, the aediles were responsible for maintenance of public buildings and regulation of public festivals. They also had powers to enforce public order. There were two pairs of aediles. Two aediles were from the ranks of plebeians and the other were called curule aediles. The office of the curule aedile was open to plebeians and patricians, and they were considered curule magistrates. The office was generally held by young men intending to follow the cursus honorum to high political office, traditionally after their quaestorship but before their praetorship. It was not a compulsory part of the cursus, and hence a former quaestor could be elected to the praetorship without having held the aedileship. However, it was an advantageous position to hold because it demonstrated the aspiring politician's commitment to public service, as well as giving him the opportunity to hold public festivals and games, an excellent way to increase his name recognition and popularity.

— Freebase

demobilise

demobilize, inactivate, demobilise

release from military service or remove from the active list of military service

— Princeton's WordNet

demobilize

demobilize, inactivate, demobilise

release from military service or remove from the active list of military service

— Princeton's WordNet

inactivate

demobilize, inactivate, demobilise

release from military service or remove from the active list of military service

— Princeton's WordNet

inter-service support

inter-service support

action by one military service to provide logistic (or administrative) support to another military service

— Princeton's WordNet

launderette

launderette, Laundromat

a self-service laundry (service mark Laundromat) where coin-operated washing machines are available to individual customers

— Princeton's WordNet

laundromat

launderette, Laundromat

a self-service laundry (service mark Laundromat) where coin-operated washing machines are available to individual customers

— Princeton's WordNet

serviceable

serviceable

ready for service or able to give long service

— Princeton's WordNet

socage

socage

land tenure by agricultural service or payment of rent; not burdened with military service

— Princeton's WordNet

wats

WATS, WATS line

a telephone line;long distance service at fixed rates for fixed zones; an acronym for wide area telephone service

— Princeton's WordNet

wats line

WATS, WATS line

a telephone line;long distance service at fixed rates for fixed zones; an acronym for wide area telephone service

— Princeton's WordNet

Public limited company

Public limited company

A public limited company is a kind of public company in the United Kingdom, some Commonwealth jurisdictions, and the Republic of Ireland. It is a limited company whose shares are freely sold and traded to the public, with a minimum share capital of £50,000 and the letters PLC after its name. Similar companies in the United States are called publicly traded companies. A PLC can be either an unlisted or listed company on the stock exchanges. In the United Kingdom, a public limited company usually must include the words "public limited company" or the abbreviation "PLC" or "plc" at the end and as part of the legal company name. Welsh companies may instead choose to end their names with ccc, an abbreviation for cwmni cyfyngedig cyhoeddus. However, some public limited companies incorporated under special legislation are exempted from bearing any of the identifying suffixes.

— Freebase

Public policy

Public policy

Public policy is the principled guide to action taken by the administrative executive branches of the state with regard to a class of issues in a manner consistent with law and institutional customs. In general, the foundation is the pertinent national and substantial constitutional law and implementing legislation such as the US Federal code. Further substrates include both judicial interpretations and regulations which are generally authorized by legislation. Other scholars define it as a system of "courses of action, regulatory measures, laws, and funding priorities concerning a given topic promulgated by a governmental entity or its representatives." Public policy is commonly embodied "in constitutions, legislative acts, and judicial decisions." In the United States, this concept refers not only to the result of policies, but more broadly to the decision-making and analysis of governmental decisions. As an academic discipline, public policy is studied by professors and students at public policy schools of major universities throughout the country. The U.S. professional association of public policy practitioners, researchers, scholars, and students is the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management.

— Freebase

Public Relations

Public Relations

Public relations is the practice of managing the spread of information between an individual or an organization and the public. Public relations may include an organization or individual gaining exposure to their audiences using topics of public interest and news items that do not require direct payment. The aim of public relations by a company often is to persuade the public, investors, partners, employees, and other stakeholders to maintain a certain point of view about it, its leadership, products, or of political decisions. Common activities include speaking at conferences, winning industry awards, working with the press, and employee communication.

— Freebase

Publicist

Publicist

A publicist is a person whose job is to generate and manage publicity for a public figure, especially a celebrity, a business, or for a work such as a book, film or album. Most top-level publicists work in private practice, handling multiple clients. The term "publicist" was coined by Columbia law professor Francis Lieber to describe the public-like role of internationalists during the late nineteenth century. In the world of celebrities, unlike agents or managers, publicists typically take a monthly fee for serving a client. Publicists can be at local, regional or national level. They can also have special expertise in areas such as entertainment or literary publicity. One of the publicist's main functions is to generate press coverage on behalf of clients and to serve as the bridge between clients, their public and media outlets. A publicist writes press releases, manages campaigns and performs other public relations functions. It usually takes many years to develop the media contacts, experience and relationships necessary to be an effective publicist. Some publicists specialize in representing ordinary members of the public to procure the maximum possible fee for stories they wish to sell to newspapers, television stations and magazines. A number have now sprung up on the internet and work as media agents gaining members of the public multiple deals with publications.

— Freebase

Indecent exposure

Indecent exposure

Indecent exposure is the deliberate exposure in public or in view of the general public by a person of a portion or portions of his or her body, in circumstances where the exposure is contrary to local moral or other standards of appropriate behavior. Social and community attitudes to the exposing of various body parts and laws covering what is referred to as indecent exposure vary significantly in different countries. It ranges from prohibition of exposure of genital areas, buttocks and female breasts. In some conservative countries the exposure of any part of the female body is considered indecent. Not all countries have indecent exposure laws. The applicable standard of decency is generally that of the local community, which is sometimes codified in law, but may also be based in religion, morality, or, in some justifications, on the basis of "necessary to public order". Indecent exposure sometimes refers to exhibitionism or to nudity in public and does not require any other sexual act to be performed. If sexual acts are performed, with or without an element of nudity, this can be considered public indecency, which may be a more serious criminal offense. In some countries, exposure of the body in breach of community standards of modesty is also considered to be public indecency.

— Freebase

Public trust

Public trust

The concept of the public trust relates back to the origins of democratic government and its seminal idea that within the public lies the true power and future of a society; therefore, whatever trust the public places in its officials must be respected. One of the reasons that bribery is regarded as a notorious evil is that it contributes to a culture of political corruption in which the public trust is eroded. Other issues related to political corruption or betrayal of public trust are lobbying, special interest groups and the public cartel.

— Freebase

Public health

Public health

Public health is "the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through the organized efforts and informed choices of society, organizations, public and private, communities and individuals." It is concerned with threats to health based on population health analysis. The population in question can be as small as a handful of people or as large as all the inhabitants of several continents. The dimensions of health can encompass "a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity", as defined by the United Nations' World Health Organization. Public health incorporates the interdisciplinary approaches of epidemiology, biostatistics and health services. Environmental health, community health, behavioral health, health economics, public policy, insurance medicine and occupational health are other important subfields. The focus of public health intervention is to improve health and quality of life through the prevention and treatment of disease and other physical and mental health conditions, through surveillance of cases and health indicators, and through the promotion of healthy behaviors. Promotion of hand washing and breastfeeding, delivery of vaccinations, and distribution of condoms to control the spread of sexually transmitted diseases are examples of common public health measures.

— Freebase

Public key certificate

Public key certificate

In cryptography, a public key certificate is an electronic document that uses a digital signature to bind a public key with an identity — information such as the name of a person or an organization, their address, and so forth. The certificate can be used to verify that a public key belongs to an individual. In a typical public key infrastructure scheme, the signature will be of a certificate authority. In a web of trust scheme, the signature is of either the user or other users. In either case, the signatures on a certificate are attestations by the certificate signer that the identity information and the public key belong together. For provable security this reliance on something external to the system has the consequence that any public key certification scheme has to rely on some special setup assumption, such as the existence of a certificate authority.

— Freebase

Public Agenda

Public Agenda

Public Agenda is a nonprofit organization that helps diverse leaders and citizens navigate divisive and complex issues. Through nonpartisan research and engagement, it provides people with insights and support they need to arrive at workable solutions on critical issues, regardless of their differences. Since 1975, Public Agenda has helped foster progress on K-12 and higher education reform, health care, federal and local budgets, energy and immigration. The organization was founded by social scientist Daniel Yankelovich and former Secretary of State Cyrus Vance. According to Caroline L. Gilson of DePauw University, "The audience for Public Agenda Online is wide-ranging: from researchers and policy-makers to concerned citizens and activists. For an academic audience, this site serves as a starting point for students exploring a topic who want to understand how the public weighs in on key issues". One of Public Agenda's self-described goals is to bridge the divide that so often exists between American leaders and the American people. The current president of Public Agenda is Will Friedman. Ruth A.

— Freebase

church

church

A time of public worship; a worship service.

— Wiktionary

minister

minister

A politician who heads a ministry (national or regional government department for public service).

— Wiktionary

administration

administration

The act of administering; government of public affairs; the service rendered, or duties assumed, in conducting affairs; the conducting of any office or employment; direction.

— Wiktionary

lieutenant

lieutenant

A commissioned officer in the United States Coast Guard, Public Health Service, or National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration whose rank is above that of ensign and below lieutenant commander. There are two ranks of lieutenant: lieutenant junior grade and lieutenant.

— Wiktionary

lieutenant junior grade

lieutenant junior grade

A commissioned officer in the United States Coast Guard, Public Health Service, or National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration whose rank is above an ensign and below a lieutenant.

— Wiktionary

public library

public library

A library provided essentially as a public service rather than as a commercial venture.

— Wiktionary

laundromat

laundromat

A self-service laundry facility with coin-operated washing machines, dryers, and sometimes ironing or pressing machines, open to the public for washing clothing and household cloth items.

— Wiktionary

institution

institution

An established organisation, especially one dedicated to education, public service, culture or the care of the destitute, poor etc.

— Wiktionary

vice admiral

vice admiral

A flag officer in the United States Navy, Coast Guard, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps, or Public Health Service Commissioned Corps having a grade superior to rear admiral (upper half) and junior to admiral. A vice admiral is equal in grade or rank to a lieutenant general, which is indicated by a 3-star insignia.

— Wiktionary

identikit

identikit

A general description for a composite sketch generated by a sketch artist, software, or a box of facial features on transparent foils that police officers and other public service professionals use to create a likeness of a person from a witness description.

— Wiktionary

emergency service

emergency service

Any public service that deals with emergencies; especially the police, fire, ambulance and lifeboat services.

— Wiktionary

address of record

address of record

The SIP or SIPS URI that points to a domain with a location service that can map the URI to another URI where the user might be available, frequently thought of as the "public address" of the user.

— Wiktionary

newswire

newswire

A service used for the transmission of breaking news to the media or to the public

— Wiktionary

public office

public office

A position or occupation established by law or by the act of a government body, for the purpose of exercising the authority of the government in the service of the public.

— Wiktionary

ghost train

ghost train

(UK) A rail service which does not appear in the public timetables.

— Wiktionary

public service

public service

A service asserted to be for the public good provided by a for-profit enterprise or trade association.

— Wiktionary

public service

public service

A service, usually provided by the government, for the general public or its specific section.

— Wiktionary

United States Uniformed Services

United States Uniformed Services

The United States Uniformed Services is a group of seven (7) uniformed services of the United States federal government defined by federal law. The United States Uniformed Services includes the five armed services (military) and two non-military services. The armed services are the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard. The non-military services are the Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps.

— Wiktionary

rear admiral upper half

rear admiral upper half

A flag officer in the United States Navy, United States Coast Guard, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Commissioned Corps, or Public Health Service Commissioned Corps of a grade superior to a rear admiral (lower half) and junior to a vice admiral. A rear admiral (upper half) is equal in grade or rank to an Army, Marine Corps, or Air Force major general. A rear admiral (upper half) wears a two star insignia on most uniforms and a gold stripe above a broad gold stripe on the sleeve of certain dress uniforms.

— Wiktionary

divine service

divine service

A service of public Christian worship.

— Wiktionary

contractorization

contractorization

The act of providing a public service by a private contractor

— Wiktionary

liberal profession

liberal profession

A liberal profession is an occupation pursued in relation to an ideal of public service and requiring substantial mastery of complex skills in the liberal arts or sciences which cannot be delegated to assistants.

— Wiktionary

community relations program

community relations program

That command function that evaluates public attitudes, identifies the mission of a military organization with the public interest, and executes a program of action to earn public understanding and acceptance.

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

public diplomacy

public diplomacy

1. Those overt international public information activities of the United States Government designed to promote United States foreign policy objectives by seeking to understand, inform, and influence foreign audiences and opinion makers, and by broadening the dialogue between American citizens and institutions and their counterparts abroad. 2. In peace building, civilian agency efforts to promote an understanding of the reconstruction efforts, rule of law, and civic responsibility through public affairs and international public diplomacy operations. Its objective is to promote and sustain consent for peace building both within the host nation and externally in the region and in the larger international community.

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

Relative Value Scales

Relative Value Scales

Coded listings of physician or other professional services using units that indicate the relative value of the various services they perform. They take into account time, skill, and overhead cost required for each service, but generally do not consider the relative cost-effectiveness. Appropriate conversion factors can be used to translate the abstract units of the relative value scales into dollar fees for each service based on work expended, practice costs, and training costs.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Fee-for-Service Plans

Fee-for-Service Plans

Method of charging whereby a physician or other practitioner bills for each encounter or service rendered. In addition to physicians, other health care professionals are reimbursed via this mechanism. Fee-for-service plans contrast with salary, per capita, and prepayment systems, where the payment does not change with the number of services actually used or if none are used. (From Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Flight information region

Flight information region

In aviation, a flight information region is a specified region of airspace in which a flight information service and an alerting service are provided. It is the largest regular division of airspace in use in the world today. Every portion of the atmosphere belongs to a specific FIR. Smaller countries' airspace is encompassed by a single FIR; larger countries' airspace is subdivided into a number of regional FIRs. Some FIRs encompass the territorial airspace of several countries. Oceanic airspace is divided into Oceanic Information Regions and delegated to a controlling authority bordering that region. The division among authorities is done by international agreement through the International Civil Aviation Organization. There is no standard size for FIRs – it is a matter for administrative convenience of the country concerned. In some cases there is a vertical division of the FIR, in which case the lower portion remains named as such, whereas the airspace above is named Upper Information Region. An information service and alerting service are the basic levels of air traffic service, providing information pertinent to the safe and efficient conduct of flights and alerting the relevant authorities should an aircraft be in distress. These are available to all aircraft through a FIR. Higher levels of Air Traffic Advisory and Control services may be available within certain portions of airspace within a FIR, according to the ICAO class of that portion of airspace, and the existence of a suitably equipped authority to provide the services.

— Freebase

HH

HH

HH was the last of the letters assigned to original routes of the Independent Subway System of the New York City Subway in the 1930s. It was designated as the dedicated service letter of the IND Fulton Street Line in Brooklyn. The letter was intended to be used for a service running local from Court Street, a stub-end station in Downtown Brooklyn, to the future Euclid Avenue station near the border with Queens. Express service on the four-track line was to be provided by trains coming from Jay Street – Borough Hall and Manhattan. When service on the Fulton Street Line began on April 9, 1936, all trains serving it ran into Manhattan and the HH ran only as a two-stop shuttle to connect Court Street with Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets. The HH ran on weekdays and Sat. from 7AM to 7PM. At that latter station, it stopped at the outermost tracks and platforms and connections to the Fulton Street and Crosstown trains were available. Since the two stations the HH served were just three blocks apart in distance, it was discontinued on June 1, 1946. Since then, the two outermost tracks and island platforms of Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets have not been used in revenue service. The Court Street station is now the site of the New York Transit Museum. The tracks leading to the station from the IND Fulton Street Line are still operable and used to move trains to and from the exhibit.

— Freebase

TGV

TGV

The TGV is France's high-speed rail service, operated by SNCF Voyages, the long-distance rail branch of SNCF, the national rail operator. It was developed during the 1970s by GEC-Alsthom and SNCF. Originally designed to be powered by gas turbines, the prototypes evolved into electric trains with the petrol crisis of 1973. Following the inaugural TGV service between Paris and Lyon in 1981 on the LGV Sud-Est, the TGV network, centred on Paris, has expanded to connect cities across France and in adjacent countries on both high-speed and conventional lines. A TGV test train set the record for the fastest wheeled train, reaching 574.8 km/h on 3 April 2007. In mid-2011, scheduled TGV trains operated at the highest speeds in conventional train service in the world, regularly reaching 320 km/h on the LGV Est and the LGV Méditerranée. A TGV service held the record for the fastest scheduled rail journey with a start to stop average speed of 279.4 km/h, surpassed by the Chinese CRH service Harmony express on the Wuhan–Guangzhou High-Speed Railway from December 2009 until July 2011.

— Freebase

United States Department of Homeland Security

United States Department of Homeland Security

The Department of Homeland Security is a cabinet department of the United States federal government, created in response to the September 11 attacks, and with the primary responsibilities of protecting the United States of America and U.S. territories from and responding to terrorist attacks, man-made accidents, and natural disasters. The Department of Homeland Security, and not the United States Department of the Interior, is equivalent to the Interior ministries of other countries. In fiscal year 2011, DHS was allocated a budget of $98.8 billion and spent, net, $66.4 billion. Where the Department of Defense is charged with military actions abroad, the Department of Homeland Security works in the civilian sphere to protect the United States within, at, and outside its borders. Its stated goal is to prepare for, prevent, and respond to domestic emergencies, particularly terrorism. On March 1, 2003, DHS absorbed the Immigration and Naturalization Service and assumed its duties. In doing so, it divided the enforcement and services functions into two separate and new agencies: Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Citizenship and Immigration Services. The investigative divisions and intelligence gathering units of the INS and Customs Service were merged forming Homeland Security Investigations. Additionally, the border enforcement functions of the INS, including the U.S. Border Patrol, the U.S. Customs Service, and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service were consolidated into a new agency under DHS: U.S. Customs and Border Protection. The Federal Protective Service falls under the National Protection and Programs Directorate.

— Freebase

Distinguished Service Order

Distinguished Service Order

The Distinguished Service Order is a military decoration of the United Kingdom, and formerly of other parts of the British Commonwealth and Empire, awarded for meritorious or distinguished service by officers of the armed forces during wartime, typically in actual combat. Instituted on 6 September 1886 by Queen Victoria in a Royal Warrant published in the London Gazette on 9 November, the first DSOs awarded were dated 25 November 1886. It is typically awarded to officers ranked Major or higher, but the honour has sometimes been awarded to especially valorous junior officers. 8,981 DSOs were awarded during the First World War, each award being announced in the London Gazette. The order was established for rewarding individual instances of meritorious or distinguished service in war. It was a military order, until recently for officers only, and normally given for service under fire or under conditions equivalent to service in actual combat with the enemy, although it was awarded between 1914 and 1916 under circumstances which could not be regarded as under fire. After 1 January 1917, commanders in the field were instructed to recommend this award only for those serving under fire. Prior to 1943, the order could be given only to someone Mentioned in Despatches. The order is generally given to officers in command, above the rank of Captain. A number of more junior officers were awarded the DSO, and this was often regarded as an acknowledgement that the officer had only just missed out on the award of the Victoria Cross. In 1942, the award of the DSO was extended to officers of the Merchant Navy who had performed acts of gallantry while under enemy attack.

— Freebase

Service Call

Service Call

"Service Call" is a science fiction short story by Philip K. Dick. It was first published in Science Fiction Stories, July 1955. The plot centers on a man, Courtland, who one evening at his home is visited by a nervous and peculiar repairman. The repairman states he's answering a service call made from Courtland's address and wishes to repair some sort of appliance. Courtland is irritated by the disturbence. Having not made any appointment, nor having the slightest clue about the product the man wishes to service, Courtland angrily sends the man away. Shortly later, Courtland gets curious about the man. He goes back to his door to see if he is still there. There's no sign of the man save for the crumpled service order on the ground. Courtland examines the paper to discover that the company the man works for will be founded 9 years in the future. Courtland phones his colleagues with an idea. The service man returns, confused and sure he has the correct address. Courtland and his colleagues discover the man works for an authoritarian bio-technology company from an alternate future.

— Freebase

Kitchener line

Kitchener line

Kitchener is one of the seven train lines of the GO Transit system in the Greater Toronto Area, Ontario, Canada. It extends from Union Station in Toronto to Kitchener. GO Bus service to Guelph to and from Georgetown and Bramalea is provided Monday to Friday with evening and weekend service directly to Union Station via Brampton. The Georgetown line was, after the then-combined Lakeshore West line and Lakeshore East line, the second line established by GO Transit, opened on April 29, 1974 with service from Brampton and Union Station. From October 29, 1990 to July 2, 1993, train service on the line extended beyond Georgetown to Guelph. On December 19, 2011, the Georgetown Line was renamed the Kitchener Line with the opening of an extension to Kitchener, including a restoration of Guelph service.

— Freebase

Bottle service

Bottle service

Bottle service is the sale of liquor by the bottle in bars and nightclubs. The purchase of bottle service typically includes a reserved table for the patron's party and mixers of the patron's choice. Bottle service can include the service of a VIP host, who will ensure that patrons have sufficient mixers and will often make drinks using the patrons' liquor bottle and mixers. The purchase of bottle service sometimes results in cover charge being waived for the purchaser's party, and often allows patrons to bypass entrance lines. The tip is also often included in the price. The cost of a bottle at such a bar or club is usually extremely marked up—often by 2000% or more—and can account for a significant portion of an establishment's revenue.

— Freebase

Clickwrap

Clickwrap

A clickwrap agreement is a common type of agreement often used in connection with software licenses. Such forms of agreement are mostly found on the Internet, as part of the installation process of many software packages, or in other circumstances where agreement is sought using electronic media. The name "clickwrap" came from the use of "shrink wrap contracts" commonly used in boxed software purchases, which "contain a notice that by tearing open the shrinkwrap, the user assents to the software terms enclosed within". The content and form of clickwrap agreements vary widely. Most clickwrap agreements require the end-user to manifest his or her assent by clicking an "ok" or "agree" button on a dialog box or pop-up window. A user indicates rejection by clicking cancel or closing the window. Upon rejection, the user cannot use or purchase the product or service. Classically, such a take-it-or-leave-it contract was described as a "contract of adhesion, which is a contract that lacks bargaining power, forcing one party to be favored over the other". The terms of service or license do not always appear on the same webpage or window, but are always accessible before acceptance, such as through a hyperlink embedded in the product's webpage or a pop-up screen prior to installation. In order to be deemed to have accepted the terms of service, the purchaser must be put on notice that certain terms of service may apply. If the terms of service are not visible and/or accessible, courts have found the notice requirement to be lacking and as such, the purchaser may not be bound to the terms of the agreement.

— Freebase

General Packet Radio Service

General Packet Radio Service

General packet radio service is a packet oriented mobile data service on the 2G and 3G cellular communication system's global system for mobile communications. GPRS was originally standardized by European Telecommunications Standards Institute in response to the earlier CDPD and i-mode packet-switched cellular technologies. It is now maintained by the 3rd Generation Partnership Project. GPRS usage is typically charged based on volume of data transferred, contrasting with circuit switched data, which is usually billed per minute of connection time. 5 GB per month for a fixed fee or on a pay-as-you-use basis. Usage above the bundle cap is either charged per megabyte or disallowed. GPRS is a best-effort service, implying variable throughput and latency that depend on the number of other users sharing the service concurrently, as opposed to circuit switching, where a certain quality of service is guaranteed during the connection. In 2G systems, GPRS provides data rates of 56–114 kbit/second. 2G cellular technology combined with GPRS is sometimes described as 2.5G, that is, a technology between the second and third generations of mobile telephony. It provides moderate-speed data transfer, by using unused time division multiple access channels in, for example, the GSM system. GPRS is integrated into GSM Release 97 and newer releases.

— Freebase

United States Secret Service

United States Secret Service

The United States Secret Service is a U.S. federal law enforcement agency that is part of the United States Department of Homeland Security. The sworn members are divided among the Special Agents and the Uniformed Division. Until March 1, 2003, the Service was part of the United States Department of the Treasury. The U.S. Secret Service has two distinct areas of responsibility: ⁕Financial Crimes, covering missions such as prevention and investigation of counterfeiting of U.S. currency and U.S. treasury securities, and investigation of major fraud. ⁕Protection, which entails ensuring the safety of current and former national leaders and their families, such as the President, past presidents, vice presidents, presidential candidates, visiting heads of state, and foreign embassies The Secret Service's initial responsibility was to investigate counterfeiting of U.S. currency, which was rampant following the U.S. Civil War. The agency then evolved into the United States' first domestic intelligence and counterintelligence agency. Many of the agency's missions were later taken over by subsequent agencies such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, and Internal Revenue Service.

— Freebase

Flight information service

Flight information service

A 'flight information service' is a form of air traffic service which is available to any aircraft within a flight information region, as agreed internationally by ICAO. It is defined as information pertinent to the safe and efficient conduct of flight, and includes information on other potentially conflicting traffic, possibly derived from radar, but stopping short of providing positive separation from that traffic. Flight Information also includes: ⁕Meteorological information ⁕Information on aerodromes ⁕Information on possible hazards to flight An FIS shall be provided to all aircraft which are provided with any ATC service or are otherwise known to Air Traffic Service units. All Air Traffic Service units will provide an FIS to any aircraft, in addition to their other tasks.

— Freebase

CompuServe

CompuServe

CompuServe was the first major commercial online service in the United States. It dominated the field during the 1980s and remained a major player through the mid-1990s, when it was sidelined by the rise of services such as AOL with monthly subscriptions rather than hourly rates. Since the purchase of CompuServe's Information Services Division by AOL, it has operated as an online service provider and an Internet service provider. The original CompuServe Information Service, later rebranded as CompuServe Classic, was shut down July 1, 2009. The newer version of the service, CompuServe 2000, continues to operate.

— Freebase

Service desk

Service desk

A Service Desk is a primary IT service for in IT service management (ITSM) as defined by the Information Technology Infrastructure Library. It is intended to provide a Single Point of Contact to meet the communication needs of both Users and IT employees. But also to satisfy both Customer and IT Provider objectives. "User" refers to the actual user of the service, while "Customer" refers to the entity that is paying for service.

— Freebase

MSN

MSN

MSN is a collection of Internet sites and services provided by Microsoft. The Microsoft Network debuted as an online service and Internet service provider on August 24, 1995, to coincide with the release of the Windows 95 operating system. The range of services offered by MSN has changed since its initial release in 1995. MSN was once a simple online service for Windows 95, an early experiment at interactive multimedia content on the Internet, and one of the most popular dial-up Internet service providers. MSN was primarily a popular Internet portal. Microsoft used the MSN brand name to promote numerous popular web-based services in the late 1990s, most notably Hotmail and Microsoft Messenger service, before reorganizing many of them in 2005 under another brand name, Windows Live. MSN.com was the 17th most visited domain name on the Internet.

— Freebase

Xsigo

Xsigo

Xsigo Systems is a privately held, venture funded startup with offices in Sunnyvale, California. It's worlwide headquarters is based in San Jose, CA,The principal business of the company is to design, manufacture and sell datacenter solutions that help customers reduce complexity and lower costs. The solutions are aimed at improving cost of ownership by helping customers reduce capital outlay in a number of areas, as well as significantly save on operating costs by eliminating waste and avoiding operational errors.Xsigo is working with industry leaders to allow customers to quickly and efficiently assess, optimize and manage data center resources in order to accelerate application deployment. This consists of strategic relationships with the industry’s leading systems, software, services, middleware and open source providers. Xsigo's goal is to improve data center resource utilization in order to meet service level agreements and reap greater operational efficiencies. Service Oriented Connectivity is the strategic enabler for turning a data center into a highly responsive environment. Service Oriented Connectivity consists of virtualizing the physical I/O resources so they can be automatically and dynamically re-purposed, based on business policies, user demands and service level requirements. This allows organizations to deliver applications based on current and changing service level requirements.

— Freebase

Teleflip

Teleflip

Teleflip was a free service providing two-way email to/from SMS text-message conversion. These two parts are: ⁕Flipout, their free email-to-SMS/text service. To use this service, the user sent an email to @teleflip.com. For example, 3105551212@teleflip.com; 555-1212@teleflip.com; and 310-555-1212@teleflip.com were valid email addresses. Teleflip was strongly anti-spam and implemented spam filters to block spammers. ⁕FlipMail was Teleflip's free SMS-to-email, enabling cellphones to receive e-mail via SMS rather than a Carrier-provided SMS-to-Email. FlipMail supported only cell phone carriers in North America, including cell phone carriers in the USA. The Teleflip service was free, but cellphone carriers frequently collected fees for SMS messages delivered to the recipient. Teleflip was founded by Guy Botham and developed by Scott Stephany in 2003 in Los Angeles, California and the Teleflip services debuted in 2005. The service was featured in many publications such as the New York Times, PC Magazine, Seattle Times, and Popular Science. On August 12, 2008 Chief Executive Tony Davis e-mailed subscribers that the company, which at one time had as many as 25 employees, was shutting down its services and would explore selling its technology.

— Freebase

RGB Networks

RGB Networks

RGB Networks is revolutionizing an industry. RGB is building the first family of video-intelligent processors — powerful video and bandwidth management products that harness the power of standards-based data networking technology to deliver advanced, revenue-generating services at exceptional returns on investment that will change forever the television viewing experience. Using the RGB solutions, multiple system operators (MSOs) and other video service providers can deploy cost-effective, truly switched video networks that easily scale to meet the demands of emerging high-density digital video and data environments — while significantly reducing operational costs. The future isn't coming — it's here. And it's brought to you by RGB Networks. The Challenge Competitive pressures, customer demands and technological advances are pushing MSOs and other video service providers to develop and deliver new value-added services to their subscribers. To effectively deliver these services, video service providers need to empower their current video delivery environment and bridge the gap between today's digital broadcast capabilities and emerging on-demand switched digital offerings. The first step in this process — the deployment of high-performance IP data networking systems that enhance the flexibility and reliability of video delivery solutions — is already underway. The next step, and the greater challenge, requires something entirely new: a family of solutions that complements this high-performance infrastructure by adding sophisticated, video-intelligent processing capabilities that support increasingly advanced services, delivered at a high return on investment, without requiring wholesale changes or forklift upgrades. RGB Networks: Cornerstone of the Future RGB Networks, founded by a team of seasoned veterans and proven innovators who have shaped the digital television industry, is building those solutions today. RGB's new family of video intelligent processors promise to revolutionize the delivery and distribution of high-quality video services while leveraging existing low-cost, high-performance Layer 2 Gigabit Ethernet switching infrastructures. With the RGB product family, video service providers will be able to route, process and distribute video streams at rates and densities that are an order of magnitude greater than today's video processing and distribution equipment — at dramatically lower costs. Video Intelligence Architecture (VIA) The key to RGB Networks' groundbreaking technology is its Video Intelligence Architecture™ (VIA™), an innovative design methodology that overcomes existing technological barriers to deliver the industry's highest-density solution that dramatically lowers the cost of delivering advanced services in today's digital video environments. Leveraging a core set of sophisticated video processing capabilities that work with Gigabit Ethernet networking and switching technologies, VIA delivers scalable, future-proofed solutions that easily adapt to the changing landscape, ensuring high-performance, cost-effective processing for digital video, high definition, on-demand, and all-digital applications — all from a single programmable platform. RGB Networks' VIA-enabled products allow MSOs and other video service providers to implement switched digital networks where viewers are free to watch whatever they want, when they want, creating new, revenue-generating personalized video services that will change the industry. RGB Media Network is a privately owned company dedicated to providing many of the services that are high in demand in this Information Technology age. It is a web resourse and solutions provider. The purpose at RGB Media Network is to provide many of the services that are high in demand.

— Freebase

chello

chello

chello is the brand of internet service provider-activities of Liberty Global Europe, a provider of broadband internet access via cable in Europe, with estimated 1.3 million customers across its markets. LGE operates in 15 European, 4 Latin American and 2 Asian/Pacific countries. The chello branded internet service is currently available in seven of these: Austria, Belgium, France, Hungary, The Netherlands, Norway, Poland and Slovakia. The chello brand was introduced in the European market in 1998. Features of the chello service are standardized according to the cable provider. In each market chello delivers open-access content portals that feature local news and entertainment content. Also, all users of the service are granted email addresses. chello products are typically available at many speeds and are named chello starter, chello easy, chello classic, chello plus and chello extreme. The chello brand appears to be replaced by other brands. For example, in The Netherlands, chello is renamed to UPC Live. UPC Live also has replaced chello in Austria, the Czech Republic, Poland and Hungary. In Sweden chello has been replaced by ComHem and in Norway by Get. In Ireland, UPC Ireland replaced the Irish broadband and cable service NTL which was formally Cable-link. In Belgium, chello was a product of UPC that has been absorbed by Telenet in 2006 when Liberty Global bought a majority stake in Telenet.

— Freebase

SNSD

SNSD

The Scattered Name Service Disgregation is the ANDNA equivalent of the SRV Record of the Internet Domain Name System, which is defined by RFC 2782. SNSD isn't the same as the "SRV Record", it has its own unique features. With SNSD it is possible to associate IP addresses and hostnames to another hostname. Each assigned record has a service number, in this way the IP addresses and hostnames which have the same service number are grouped in an array. In the resolution request the client will specify the service number too, therefore it will get the record of the specified service number which is associated to the hostname.

— Freebase

Consecrate

Consecrate

to make, or declare to be, sacred; to appropriate to sacred uses; to set apart, dedicate, or devote, to the service or worship of God; as, to consecrate a church; to give (one's self) unreservedly, as to the service of God

— Webster Dictionary

Conversion

Conversion

a spiritual and moral change attending a change of belief with conviction; a change of heart; a change from the service of the world to the service of God; a change of the ruling disposition of the soul, involving a transformation of the outward life

— Webster Dictionary

Desert

Desert

to abandon a service without leave; to quit military service without permission, before the expiration of one's term; to abscond

— Webster Dictionary

Deserter

Deserter

one who forsakes a duty, a cause or a party, a friend, or any one to whom he owes service; especially, a soldier or a seaman who abandons the service without leave; one guilty of desertion

— Webster Dictionary

Desertion

Desertion

the act of deserting or forsaking; abandonment of a service, a cause, a party, a friend, or any post of duty; the quitting of one's duties willfully and without right; esp., an absconding from military or naval service

— Webster Dictionary

Engage

Engage

to gain for service; to bring in as associate or aid; to enlist; as, to engage friends to aid in a cause; to engage men for service

— Webster Dictionary

Entertainment

Entertainment

admission into service; service

— Webster Dictionary

Escuage

Escuage

service of the shield, a species of knight service by which a tenant was bound to follow his lord to war, at his own charge. It was afterward exchanged for a pecuniary satisfaction. Called also scutage

— Webster Dictionary

Midshipman

Midshipman

in the English naval service, the second rank attained by a combatant officer after a term of service as naval cadet. Having served three and a half years in this rank, and passed an examination, he is eligible to promotion to the rank of lieutenant

— Webster Dictionary

Ministrant

Ministrant

performing service as a minister; attendant on service; acting under command; subordinate

— Webster Dictionary

Press

Press

to force into service, particularly into naval service; to impress

— Webster Dictionary

Pressman

Pressman

one of a press gang, who aids in forcing men into the naval service; also, one forced into the service

— Webster Dictionary

Report

Report

to present one's self, as to a superior officer, or to one to whom service is due, and to be in readiness for orders or to do service; also, to give information, as of one's address, condition, etc.; as, the officer reported to the general for duty; to report weekly by letter

— Webster Dictionary

Service

Service

the act and manner of bringing food to the persons who eat it; order of dishes at table; also, a set or number of vessels ordinarily used at table; as, the service was tardy and awkward; a service of plate or glass

— Webster Dictionary

Tenement

Tenement

that which is held of another by service; property which one holds of a lord or proprietor in consideration of some military or pecuniary service; fief; fee

— Webster Dictionary

Volunteer

Volunteer

one who enters into service voluntarily, but who, when in service, is subject to discipline and regulations like other soldiers; -- opposed to conscript; specifically, a voluntary member of the organized militia of a country as distinguished from the standing army

— Webster Dictionary

Fastnote

Fastnote

Public Email… to AnyoneFastnote.com is a new website, where users write civil, anonymous notes to anyone, and those notes are posted publicly where everyone can read them.Fastnote is unique in that anyone can add someone’s name to Fastnote and post public notes to them. Fastnote is like “public email,” and reading Fastnotes is like reading someone’s public inbox. Fastnote notifies celebrities, organizations, and “public” people as new notes are posted to them. Also, 100% of the content on Fastnote is open to the public and indexed by search engines. So if you post a note to someone, there’s a good chance that they will eventually see it.All Fastnotes must be civil and anonymous. Obscenities, accusations, threats, spam, and personal information are not allowed. Fastnote was created to give everyone a greater voice. Many people are difficult or impossible to reach, and email addresses are often hard to find. Fastnote was designed to give everyone a new way to tell others what they think – to speak their minds, to praise what’s good, and to change what isn’t.

— CrunchBase

a.d.

ad, advertisement, advertizement, advertising, advertizing, advert

a public promotion of some product or service

— Princeton's WordNet

ad

ad, advertisement, advertizement, advertising, advertizing, advert

a public promotion of some product or service

— Princeton's WordNet

advert

ad, advertisement, advertizement, advertising, advertizing, advert

a public promotion of some product or service

— Princeton's WordNet

advertisement

ad, advertisement, advertizement, advertising, advertizing, advert

a public promotion of some product or service

— Princeton's WordNet

advertising

ad, advertisement, advertizement, advertising, advertizing, advert

a public promotion of some product or service

— Princeton's WordNet

advertizement

ad, advertisement, advertizement, advertising, advertizing, advert

a public promotion of some product or service

— Princeton's WordNet

advertizing

ad, advertisement, advertizement, advertising, advertizing, advert

a public promotion of some product or service

— Princeton's WordNet

citation

citation, commendation

an official award (as for bravery or service) usually given as formal public statement

— Princeton's WordNet

civil servant

civil servant

a public official who is a member of the civil service

— Princeton's WordNet

commendation

citation, commendation

an official award (as for bravery or service) usually given as formal public statement

— Princeton's WordNet

community service

community service, public service

a service that is performed for the benefit of the public or its institutions

— Princeton's WordNet

community service

community service

an unpaid service for the benefit of the public that is performed by lawbreakers as part (or all) of their sentence

— Princeton's WordNet

evensong

vespers, evensong

the sixth of the seven canonical hours of the divine office; early evening; now often made a public service on Sundays

— Princeton's WordNet

phone company

telephone company, telephone service, phone company, phone service, telco

a public utility that provides telephone service

— Princeton's WordNet

phone service

telephone company, telephone service, phone company, phone service, telco

a public utility that provides telephone service

— Princeton's WordNet

public-service corporation

utility, public utility, public utility company, public-service corporation

a company that performs a public service; subject to government regulation

— Princeton's WordNet

public service

community service, public service

a service that is performed for the benefit of the public or its institutions

— Princeton's WordNet

public utility

utility, public utility, public utility company, public-service corporation

a company that performs a public service; subject to government regulation

— Princeton's WordNet

service

service

a company or agency that performs a public service; subject to government regulation

— Princeton's WordNet

surgeon general

Surgeon General

the head of the United States Public Health Service

— Princeton's WordNet

telco

telephone company, telephone service, phone company, phone service, telco

a public utility that provides telephone service

— Princeton's WordNet

telephone company

telephone company, telephone service, phone company, phone service, telco

a public utility that provides telephone service

— Princeton's WordNet

telephone service

telephone company, telephone service, phone company, phone service, telco

a public utility that provides telephone service

— Princeton's WordNet

utility

utility, public utility, public utility company, public-service corporation

a company that performs a public service; subject to government regulation

— Princeton's WordNet

utility

utility

the service (electric power or water or transportation) provided by a public utility

— Princeton's WordNet

vespers

vespers, evensong

the sixth of the seven canonical hours of the divine office; early evening; now often made a public service on Sundays

— Princeton's WordNet

infamous

infamous

in England / Great Britain, a judicial punishment which deprived the infamous person of certain rights; this included a prohibition against holding public office, exercising the franchise, receiving a public pension, serving on a jury, or giving testimony in a court of law.

— Wiktionary

saloon

saloon

A lounge bar in an English public house, contrast with public bar.

— Wiktionary

divulge

divulge

To make public; to several or communicate to the public; to tell (a secret) so that it may become generally known; to disclose; -- said of that which had been confided as a secret, or had been before unknown; as, to divulge a secret.

— Wiktionary

declamation

declamation

The act or art of declaiming; rhetorical delivery; haranguing; loud speaking in public; especially, the public recitation of speeches as an exercise in schools and colleges; as, the practice declamation by students.

— Wiktionary

busker

busker

A person who makes money by passing the hat (soliciting donations) while entertaining the public (often by playing a musical instrument) on the streets or in other public area such as a park or market.

— Wiktionary

publicly

publicly

In public, openly, in an open and public manner.

— Wiktionary

keyserver

keyserver

In public key cryptography, the server that stores and distributes the public key files.

— Wiktionary

general public

general public

Those members of the public who have no special role in a specific public area, such as an airport, hospital or railway station; there will typically be restrictions on their access.

— Wiktionary

general public

general public

Members of the public not in the attentive public of any given issue; laypeople.

— Wiktionary

rear gunner

rear gunner

One whose function in an organization is to defend it from attackers, for example, in public relations or public affairs.

— Wiktionary

accountable officer

accountable officer

Individual required to maintain accounting, including records thereof, of property and funds, whether public or quasi-public. The accountable officer may or may not have physical possession of the property or funds.

— Wiktionary

public key certificate

public key certificate

a certificate which uses a digital signature to bind together a public key with an identity u2014 used to verify that a public key belongs to an individual

— Wiktionary


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