Definitions containing play

We've found 250 definitions:

Play

Play

action; use; employment; exercise; practice; as, fair play; sword play; a play of wit

— Webster Dictionary

Frolic

Frolic

to play wild pranks; to play tricks of levity, mirth, and gayety; to indulge in frolicsome play; to sport

— Webster Dictionary

Play

Play

to act or perform (a play); to represent in music action; as, to play a comedy; also, to act in the character of; to represent by acting; to simulate; to behave like; as, to play King Lear; to play the woman

— Webster Dictionary

pair

pair

A double play, two outs recorded in one play

— Wiktionary

metadrama

metadrama

A play that features another play as part of its plot.

— Wiktionary

premiere

premiere

Of a film or play, to play for the first time.

— Wiktionary

curtain raiser

curtain raiser

a short play presented before the main play

— Princeton's WordNet

casting

casting

the choice of actors to play particular roles in a play or movie

— Princeton's WordNet

playful

playful

liking play, prone to play frequently, such as a child or kitten; rather sportive.

— Wiktionary

erase

erase

To remove a runner from the bases via a double play or pick off play

— Wiktionary

bug out

bug out

miss school, play truant, play hooky.

— Wiktionary

Shuttlecock

Shuttlecock

a cork stuck with feathers, which is to be struck by a battledoor in play; also, the play itself

— Webster Dictionary

infield fly rule

infield fly rule

A rule providing that a fair fly ball hit with a force play at third base, which is deemed catchable by an umpire, be ruled an out irrespective of the fielder's play, eliminating the force play at all bases.

— Wiktionary

misplay

misplay

play incorrectly, e.g., play a wrong note

— Princeton's WordNet

Toyhouse

Toyhouse

a house for children to play in or to play with; a playhouse

— Webster Dictionary

cast

cast

select to play,sing, or dance a part in a play, movie, musical, opera, or ballet

— Princeton's WordNet

third session

third session

the session of a day's play between tea and close of play

— Wiktionary

first session

first session

The session of a day's play between start of play and lunch.

— Wiktionary

skylark

skylark

To jump about joyfully, frolic; to play around, play tricks.

— Wiktionary

antiplay

antiplay

A play (dramatical production) that deliberately avoids the typical conventions of the play, such as a coherent plot and resolution.

— Wiktionary

Play

Play

to put in action or motion; as, to play cannon upon a fortification; to play a trump

— Webster Dictionary

Rig

Rig

to play the wanton; to act in an unbecoming manner; to play tricks

— Webster Dictionary

endplay

endplay

A tactical play in which a defender is put on lead at a strategic moment, and then has to make a play that loses one or more tricks

— Wiktionary

Thumb

Thumb

to play with the thumb or thumbs; to play clumsily; to thrum

— Webster Dictionary

no room at the inn

no room at the inn

A phrase used by play-by-play announcers to describe a situation in which an ineffective pitcher is pitching with the bases loaded.

— Wiktionary

Wanton

Wanton

to sport in lewdness; to play the wanton; to play lasciviously

— Webster Dictionary

free agent

free agent

(Sports) A professional athlete who is free to play for or sign a contract to play for any team.

— Wiktionary

color commentator

color commentator

At a sporting event, a member of the announcing team who assists a play-by-play announcer. Provides insight into strategy, player performance, background information, etc., and often light humor.

— Wiktionary

power play

power play

a play in which there is a concentration of players in one location on the field of play

— Princeton's WordNet

Rogue

Rogue

to wander; to play the vagabond; to play knavish tricks

— Webster Dictionary

Romp

Romp

to play rudely and boisterously; to leap and frisk about in play

— Webster Dictionary

improvise

improvise

to act, sing, play an instrument, etc. without planning what to say, sing, or play; = ad-lib

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

Double

Double

to play tricks; to use sleights; to play false

— Webster Dictionary

Bob

Bob

to have a short, jerking motion; to play to and fro, or up and down; to play loosely against anything

— Webster Dictionary

autoreverse

autoreverse

A device in a cassette player that reverses the direction of play when a tape gets to the end (so as to play the other side).

— Wiktionary

shotgun

shotgun

A play formation in which the quarterback is a few feet behind the snapper when the ball is hiked, ideally allowing for an easier pass play.

— Wiktionary

checkback

checkback

A play of a designated card as a prompt to one's partner to respond with a play indicating the kinds of card he/she holds.

— Wiktionary

double play depth

double play depth

When the infielders play in a few steps from their normal position because of the possibility of getting a double play at second base and first base.

— Wiktionary

Coquet

Coquet

to trifle in love; to stimulate affection or interest; to play the coquette; to deal playfully instead of seriously; to play (with); as, we have coquetted with political crime

— Webster Dictionary

Battledoor

Battledoor

an instrument, with a handle and a flat part covered with parchment or crossed with catgut, used to strike a shuttlecock in play; also, the play of battledoor and shuttlecock

— Webster Dictionary

Act

Act

a performance of part of a play; one of the principal divisions of a play or dramatic work in which a certain definite part of the action is completed

— Webster Dictionary

Interlude

Interlude

a short entertainment exhibited on the stage between the acts of a play, or between the play and the afterpiece, to relieve the tedium of waiting

— Webster Dictionary

induction

induction

The use of rumors to twist and complicate the plot of a play or to narrate in a way that does not have to state truth nor fact within the play.

— Wiktionary

Flirt

Flirt

to run and dart about; to act with giddiness, or from a desire to attract notice; especially, to play the coquette; to play at courtship; to coquet; as, they flirt with the young men

— Webster Dictionary

Harlequinade

Harlequinade

a play or part of play in which the harlequin is conspicuous; the part of a harlequin

— Webster Dictionary

Harp

Harp

to play on, as a harp; to play (a tune) on the harp; to develop or give expression to by skill and art; to sound forth as from a harp; to hit upon

— Webster Dictionary

Part

Part

a particular character in a drama or a play; an assumed personification; also, the language, actions, and influence of a character or an actor in a play; or, figuratively, in real life. See To act a part, under Act

— Webster Dictionary

scrummage

scrum, scrummage

(rugby) the method of beginning play in which the forwards of each team crouch side by side with locked arms; play starts when the ball is thrown in between them and the two sides compete for possession

— Princeton's WordNet

scrum

scrum, scrummage

(rugby) the method of beginning play in which the forwards of each team crouch side by side with locked arms; play starts when the ball is thrown in between them and the two sides compete for possession

— Princeton's WordNet

on-side kick

on-side kick

A play in American Football whereby the team performing the kick-off kicks the ball the minimum distance (ten yards in most levels of play) in an attempt to immediately regain possession of the ball. This tactic is seldom successful.

— Wiktionary

Scenery

Scenery

assemblage of scenes; the paintings and hangings representing the scenes of a play; the disposition and arrangement of the scenes in which the action of a play, poem, etc., is laid; representation of place of action or occurence

— Webster Dictionary

Scene

Scene

so much of a play as passes without change of locality or time, or important change of character; hence, a subdivision of an act; a separate portion of a play, subordinate to the act, but differently determined in different plays; as, an act of four scenes

— Webster Dictionary

End Play

End Play

The power to move horizontally in its bearings sometimes given to armature shafts. This secures a more even wearing of the commutator faces. End play is not permissible in disc armatures, as the attraction of the field upon the face of the armature core would displace it endwise. For such armatures thrust-bearings preventing end play have to be provided.

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

scene

scene

So much of a play as passes without change of locality or time, or important change of character; hence, a subdivision of an act; a separate portion of a play, subordinate to the act, but differently determined in different plays; as, an act of four scenes.

— Wiktionary

session

session

Any of the three scheduled two hour playing sessions, from the start of play to lunch, from lunch to tea and from tea to the close of play.

— Wiktionary

ducks and drakes

ducks and drakes

squandering of resources, especially money; used in expressions like to make ducks and drakes of , to play ducks and drakes with , to play at ducks and drakes with

— Wiktionary

Rubber

Rubber

in some games, as whist, the odd game, as the third or the fifth, when there is a tie between the players; as, to play the rubber; also, a contest determined by the winning of two out of three games; as, to play a rubber of whist

— Webster Dictionary

Played

Played

of Play

— Webster Dictionary

Pley

Pley

see Play

— Webster Dictionary

Playing

Playing

of Play

— Webster Dictionary

Miracle

Miracle

a miracle play

— Webster Dictionary

One-act play

One-act play

A one-act play is a play that has only one act, as distinct from plays that occur over several acts. One-act plays may consist of one or more scenes. In recent years, the 10-minute play known as "flash drama" has emerged as a popular sub-genre of the one-act play, especially in writing competitions. The origin of the one-act play may be traced to the very beginning of drama: in ancient Greece, Cyclops, a satyr play by Euripides, is an early example.

— Freebase

Sport

Sport

play; idle jingle

— Webster Dictionary

Horseplay

Horseplay

rude, boisterous play

— Webster Dictionary

Playing

Playing

a. & vb. n. of Play

— Webster Dictionary

Playgame

Playgame

play of children

— Webster Dictionary

funny money

funny money

Play money.

— Wiktionary

twin killing

twin killing

A double play.

— Wiktionary

midplay

midplay

During a play.

— Wiktionary

fourplay

fourplay

Quad play.

— Wiktionary

corner kick

corner kick

: A kick awarded to the attacking team when the ball leaves the field of play by wholly crossing the goal line without a goal having been scored, having last touched a player from the defending team. For the kick, the ball is placed within the corner arc closest to where the ball went out of play.

— Wiktionary

rollick

frolic, lark, rollick, skylark, disport, sport, cavort, gambol, frisk, romp, run around, lark about

play boisterously

— Princeton's WordNet

playlet

playlet

a short play

— Princeton's WordNet

replay

replay

play again

— Princeton's WordNet

cricket

cricket

play cricket

— Princeton's WordNet

ruff

trump, ruff

play a trump

— Princeton's WordNet

lark about

frolic, lark, rollick, skylark, disport, sport, cavort, gambol, frisk, romp, run around, lark about

play boisterously

— Princeton's WordNet

romp

frolic, lark, rollick, skylark, disport, sport, cavort, gambol, frisk, romp, run around, lark about

play boisterously

— Princeton's WordNet

riff

riff

play riffs

— Princeton's WordNet

run around

frolic, lark, rollick, skylark, disport, sport, cavort, gambol, frisk, romp, run around, lark about

play boisterously

— Princeton's WordNet

cavort

frolic, lark, rollick, skylark, disport, sport, cavort, gambol, frisk, romp, run around, lark about

play boisterously

— Princeton's WordNet

trump

trump, ruff

play a trump

— Princeton's WordNet

skittle

skittle

play skittles

— Princeton's WordNet

sport

frolic, lark, rollick, skylark, disport, sport, cavort, gambol, frisk, romp, run around, lark about

play boisterously

— Princeton's WordNet

frisk

frolic, lark, rollick, skylark, disport, sport, cavort, gambol, frisk, romp, run around, lark about

play boisterously

— Princeton's WordNet

frolic

frolic, lark, rollick, skylark, disport, sport, cavort, gambol, frisk, romp, run around, lark about

play boisterously

— Princeton's WordNet

disport

frolic, lark, rollick, skylark, disport, sport, cavort, gambol, frisk, romp, run around, lark about

play boisterously

— Princeton's WordNet

dice

dice

play dice

— Princeton's WordNet

gambol

frolic, lark, rollick, skylark, disport, sport, cavort, gambol, frisk, romp, run around, lark about

play boisterously

— Princeton's WordNet

lark

frolic, lark, rollick, skylark, disport, sport, cavort, gambol, frisk, romp, run around, lark about

play boisterously

— Princeton's WordNet

skylark

frolic, lark, rollick, skylark, disport, sport, cavort, gambol, frisk, romp, run around, lark about

play boisterously

— Princeton's WordNet

bang out

bang out

play loudly

— Princeton's WordNet

golf

golf

play golf

— Princeton's WordNet

Sycophantize

Sycophantize

to play the sycophant

— Webster Dictionary

Rhetoricate

Rhetoricate

to play the orator

— Webster Dictionary

Cricket

Cricket

to play at cricket

— Webster Dictionary

Mountebank

Mountebank

to play the mountebank

— Webster Dictionary

Rhetorize

Rhetorize

to play the orator

— Webster Dictionary

Duke

Duke

to play the duke

— Webster Dictionary

Niggle

Niggle

to trifle or play

— Webster Dictionary

Toyful

Toyful

full of trifling play

— Webster Dictionary

Giantize

Giantize

to play the giant

— Webster Dictionary

Fife

Fife

to play on a fife

— Webster Dictionary

Fiddle

Fiddle

to play on a fiddle

— Webster Dictionary

Gittern

Gittern

to play on gittern

— Webster Dictionary

Triumph

Triumph

to play a trump card

— Webster Dictionary

Prince

Prince

to play the prince

— Webster Dictionary

Fum

Fum

to play upon a fiddle

— Webster Dictionary

Sycophant

Sycophant

to play the sycophant

— Webster Dictionary

Bowl

Bowl

to play with bowls

— Webster Dictionary

Casuist

Casuist

to play the casuist

— Webster Dictionary

dice

dice

To play dice.

— Wiktionary

falsecard

falsecard

To play a falsecard

— Wiktionary

skittle

skittle

To play skittles.

— Wiktionary

fiddle

fiddle

To play aimlessly.

— Wiktionary

offside

offside

An offside play

— Wiktionary

snooker

snooker

To play snooker.

— Wiktionary

FTP

FTP

free-to-play

— Wiktionary

put on

put on

To play (a recording).

— Wiktionary

act

act

To play (a role).

— Wiktionary

golf

golf

To play golf.

— Wiktionary

dead

dead

Not in play.

— Wiktionary

bunk off

bunk off

To play truant

— Wiktionary

cubby house

cubby house

A child's play house.

— Wiktionary

dirty pool

dirty pool

Foul play, misconduct.

— Wiktionary

replay

replay

to play again

— Wiktionary

rattle the bones

rattle the bones

to play dice.

— Wiktionary

leather

leather

A good defensive play

— Wiktionary

staging

staging

A performance of a play

— Wiktionary

drum

drum

play a percussion instrument

— Princeton's WordNet

fiddle

fiddle

play on a violin

— Princeton's WordNet

field

field

play as a fielder

— Princeton's WordNet

skirl

skirl

play the bagpipes

— Princeton's WordNet

quarterback

quarterback

play the quarterback

— Princeton's WordNet

chip

chip

play a chip shot

— Princeton's WordNet

fullback

fullback

play the fullback

— Princeton's WordNet

harp

harp

play the harp

— Princeton's WordNet

theatrical performance

theatrical performance, theatrical, representation, histrionics

a performance of a play

— Princeton's WordNet

histrionics

theatrical performance, theatrical, representation, histrionics

a performance of a play

— Princeton's WordNet

make-believe

pretense, pretence, make-believe

imaginative intellectual play

— Princeton's WordNet

make believe

pretense, pretence, make-believe

imaginative intellectual play

— Princeton's WordNet

theatrical

theatrical performance, theatrical, representation, histrionics

a performance of a play

— Princeton's WordNet

replay

replay

play (a melody) again

— Princeton's WordNet

playmate

playmate, playfellow

a companion at play

— Princeton's WordNet

play out

play out

play to a finish

— Princeton's WordNet

representation

theatrical performance, theatrical, representation, histrionics

a performance of a play

— Princeton's WordNet

pipe

pipe

play on a pipe

— Princeton's WordNet

bugle

bugle

play on a bugle

— Princeton's WordNet

rag

rag

play in ragtime

— Princeton's WordNet

prelude

prelude

play as a prelude

— Princeton's WordNet

pretense

pretense, pretence, make-believe

imaginative intellectual play

— Princeton's WordNet

playfellow

playmate, playfellow

a companion at play

— Princeton's WordNet

pretence

pretense, pretence, make-believe

imaginative intellectual play

— Princeton's WordNet

play about

play about

play around

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

Bow

Bow

to play (music) with a bow

— Webster Dictionary

Playtime

Playtime

time for play or diversion

— Webster Dictionary

Pander

Pander

to play the pander for

— Webster Dictionary

Dice

Dice

to play games with dice

— Webster Dictionary

Disport

Disport

play; sport; pastime; diversion; playfulness

— Webster Dictionary

Disportment

Disportment

act of disporting; diversion; play

— Webster Dictionary

Toy

Toy

amorous dalliance; play; sport; pastime

— Webster Dictionary

Pedagogue

Pedagogue

to play the pedagogue toward

— Webster Dictionary

Harp

Harp

to play on the harp

— Webster Dictionary

Lusory

Lusory

used in play; sportive; playful

— Webster Dictionary

Personate

Personate

to play or assume a character

— Webster Dictionary

Fiddle

Fiddle

to play (a tune) on a fiddle

— Webster Dictionary

reverse sweep

reverse sweep

To play such a shot.

— Wiktionary

on drive

on drive

to play such a shot

— Wiktionary

slog-sweep

slog-sweep

to play such a shot

— Wiktionary

catenaccio

catenaccio

a system of defensive play

— Wiktionary

boast

boast

To play a boast shot

— Wiktionary

tickle the ivories

tickle the ivories

To play the piano.

— Wiktionary

basketbrawl

basketbrawl

Highly physical basketball play.

— Wiktionary

jazz

jazz

To play jazz music.

— Wiktionary

off drive

off drive

to play such a shot

— Wiktionary

act a fool

act a fool

to play the fool

— Wiktionary

rave

rave

An enthusiastic review (e.g., a play)

— Wiktionary

paragram

paragram

A play upon words; a pun.

— Wiktionary

equivoque

equivoque

A play on words, a pun.

— Wiktionary

block

block

To play a block shot.

— Wiktionary

playlet

playlet

A short play (dramatic work).

— Wiktionary

humbug

humbug

To play a trick on.

— Wiktionary

hoik

hoik

To play such a shot.

— Wiktionary

dalliance

dalliance

Playful flirtation; amorous play.

— Wiktionary

banjo

banjo

To play the banjo

— Wiktionary

ludophilia

ludophilia

The love of play.

— Wiktionary

sycophantize

sycophantize

To play the sycophant.

— Wiktionary

playstow

playstow

A place for play; playground.

— Wiktionary

trumpet

trumpet

To play the trumpet.

— Wiktionary

bongo

bongo

To play the bongo

— Wiktionary

piss around

piss around

to joke or play

— Wiktionary

piss about

piss about

to joke or play

— Wiktionary

bagpipe

bagpipe

To play the bagpipes.

— Wiktionary

kazoo

kazoo

to play the kazoo.

— Wiktionary

playette

playette

A short play (dramatic work).

— Wiktionary

flute

flute

To play on a flute.

— Wiktionary

hook

hook

To play a hook shot.

— Wiktionary

bassoon

bassoon

To play the bassoon.

— Wiktionary

guitar

guitar

To play the guitar.

— Wiktionary

sweep

sweep

To play a sweep shot.

— Wiktionary

inning

inning

A similar period of play.

— Wiktionary

soft-pedal

soft-pedal

play down or obscure

— Princeton's WordNet

play

act, play, represent

play a role or part

— Princeton's WordNet

play

play

play on an instrument

— Princeton's WordNet

pretend

make-believe, pretend

imagined as in a play

— Princeton's WordNet

soft pedal

soft-pedal

play down or obscure

— Princeton's WordNet

slur

slur

play smoothly or legato

— Princeton's WordNet

wanton

wanton

engage in amorous play

— Princeton's WordNet

gamble

gamble

play games for money

— Princeton's WordNet

wordplay

pun, punning, wordplay, paronomasia

a humorous play on words

— Princeton's WordNet

represent

act, play, represent

play a role or part

— Princeton's WordNet

horseplay

horseplay

rowdy or boisterous play

— Princeton's WordNet

pun

pun

make a play on words

— Princeton's WordNet

time-out

time-out

a brief suspension of play

— Princeton's WordNet

time out

time-out

a brief suspension of play

— Princeton's WordNet

cast of characters

cast, cast of characters, dramatis personae

the actors in a play

— Princeton's WordNet

tootle

tootle

play (a musical instrument) casually

— Princeton's WordNet

make-believe

make-believe, pretend

imagined as in a play

— Princeton's WordNet

prologue

prologue

an introduction to a play

— Princeton's WordNet

paronomasia

pun, punning, wordplay, paronomasia

a humorous play on words

— Princeton's WordNet

pun

pun, punning, wordplay, paronomasia

a humorous play on words

— Princeton's WordNet

cast

cast, cast of characters, dramatis personae

the actors in a play

— Princeton's WordNet

act

act, play, represent

play a role or part

— Princeton's WordNet

punning

pun, punning, wordplay, paronomasia

a humorous play on words

— Princeton's WordNet

make believe

make-believe, pretend

imagined as in a play

— Princeton's WordNet

dramatis personae

cast, cast of characters, dramatis personae

the actors in a play

— Princeton's WordNet

shoot craps

shoot craps

play a game of craps

— Princeton's WordNet

blast

blast

to play loudly

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

Play-action pass

Play-action pass

A play-action pass is a type of American football play. The play action appears to be a running play, but is actually a pass play; in this way, it can be considered the opposite of a draw play. Play-action passes are often used against defenses that are focused on stopping the run. By initially simulating a running play, the offense attempts to deceive the defense into acting on the fake run and being out of position in their pass coverage, giving receivers more time and room to be free to receive passes behind the linebackers.

— Freebase

Crotchet

Crotchet

to play music in measured time

— Webster Dictionary

Romp

Romp

a girl who indulges in boisterous play

— Webster Dictionary

Camp

Camp

to play the game called camp

— Webster Dictionary

Coruscation

Coruscation

a sudden flash or play of light

— Webster Dictionary

Tibicinate

Tibicinate

to play on a tibia, or pipe

— Webster Dictionary

Dramatis personae

Dramatis personae

the actors in a drama or play

— Webster Dictionary

melodize

melodize

To compose or play melodies

— Wiktionary

playfight

playfight

To engage in play fights.

— Wiktionary

player

player

An actor in a dramatic play.

— Wiktionary

baseline

baseline

To play from the baseline.

— Wiktionary

air-guitar

air-guitar

To play the air guitar.

— Wiktionary

Xs and Os

Xs and Os

The fundamental elements of a play.

— Wiktionary

show

show

A play, dance, or other entertainment.

— Wiktionary

fiddle away

fiddle away

To play the fiddle idly.

— Wiktionary

toy

toy

Love play, amorous dalliance; fondling.

— Wiktionary

sandlot

sandlot

A vacant lot where children play.

— Wiktionary

pluck

pluck

To play a string instrument pizzicato

— Wiktionary

playtime

playtime

Time for play or diversion.

— Wiktionary

drumstick

drumstick

A stick used to play drums.

— Wiktionary

descant

descant

To sing or play a descant.

— Wiktionary

chippy

chippy

Involving violence or unfair play.

— Wiktionary


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