Definitions containing play

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Draw play

Draw play

A draw play, or simply draw for short, is a type of American football play. The draw appears to be a passing play, but is actually a running play; in this way, it can be considered the opposite of the play action pass. Historically, the draw play was first developed by the Cleveland Browns during their years in the All-America Football Conference. A botched play, originally designed to be a pass play, caused quarterback Otto Graham to improvise a hand-off to fullback Marion Motley. A surprised Motley, who had been expecting to block on the play, ran instead for a big gain. Coach Paul Brown noted the success of the improvised play and began to work it in as a regular play, quickly creating four different versions of it. The idea behind a draw play is to attack aggressive, pass-rushing defenses by "drawing" them downfield, leaving more open space to run the ball. Draw plays are often run out of the shotgun formation, but can also be run when the quarterback is under center. These types of draw plays are sometimes referred to as delayed handoffs. The running back will most often run straight upfield in the "A-Gap", although there are more complicated versions.

— Freebase

Edward IV

Edward IV

Edward IV, Parts 1 and 2 is a two-part Elizabethan history play, often attributed to Thomas Heywood, perhaps with collaborators. The two parts were entered into the Stationers' Register together on 28 August 1599, and were published together later that year in a quarto issued by the bookseller John Oxenbridge. The title page of the first edition states that the play was acted by "the Earl of Derby his servants," that is, by Lord Strange's Men. A second quarto was released in 1600 by Oxenbridge and Humphrey Lownes. The play was popular, and was reprinted in 1605, 1613, 1619, and 1626. All of the early quartos were anonymous; Heywood was first connected with the plays by Francis Kirkman in his 1661 play list. The plot of the play concerns the historical events of the reign of Edward IV, and involves Lady Jane Shore, "the bastard Faulconbridge," the "Tanner of Tamworth," and other figures of the era. The play draws material from the 1587 edition of Holinshed's Chronicles. The play has often been attributed to Heywood; the normally cautious W. W. Greg regarded it as "undoubtedly Heywood's" — though the rarely cautious F. G. Fleay demurred. Some scholars have dated the play as early as 1594; others have favored a date toward the end of that decade. The records of theatre manager Philip Henslowe show that Henry Chettle and John Day were working on a play about Jane Shore in May 1603 for Worcester's Men, the company with which Heywood was associated at the time. A play on Jane Shore was popular in the first decade of the 17th century, and is mentioned in The Knight of the Burning Pestle and Pimlico or Run Red-Cap. In Part 1 of Edward IV, Act III scene ii, is a three-part song about the Battle of Agincourt that strongly resembles Michael Drayton's The Ballad of Agincourt — and Drayton was a regular writer for Henslowe c. 1600 and frequently collaborated with Chettle and others. All of these facts and factors, taken together, suggest that Edward IV was composed by Heywood, perhaps with other Henslowe house dramatists, and perhaps revised over a span of years by various hands.

— Freebase

Play

Play

to act or perform (a play); to represent in music action; as, to play a comedy; also, to act in the character of; to represent by acting; to simulate; to behave like; as, to play King Lear; to play the woman

— Webster Dictionary

Double play

Double play

In baseball, a double play for a team or a fielder is the act of making two outs during the same continuous playing action. In baseball slang, making a double play is referred to as "turning two". Double plays are also known as "the pitcher's best friend" because they disrupt offense more than any other play, except for the rare triple play. Pitchers often select pitches that make a double play more likely and teams on defense alter infield positions to make a ground ball more likely to be turned into a double play. Because a double play ends an inning in a one-out situation, it often makes the scoring of a run impossible in that inning. In a no-out situation with runners at first base and third base, the double play may be so desirable that the defensive team allows a runner to score from third base so that two outs are made and further scoring by the batting team is more difficult.

— Freebase

Play-action pass

Play-action pass

A play-action pass is a type of American football play. The play action appears to be a running play, but is actually a pass play; in this way, it can be considered the opposite of a draw play. Play-action passes are often used against defenses that are focused on stopping the run. By initially simulating a running play, the offense attempts to deceive the defense into acting on the fake run and being out of position in their pass coverage, giving receivers more time and room to be free to receive passes behind the linebackers.

— Freebase

Frolic

Frolic

to play wild pranks; to play tricks of levity, mirth, and gayety; to indulge in frolicsome play; to sport

— Webster Dictionary

Play

Play

action; use; employment; exercise; practice; as, fair play; sword play; a play of wit

— Webster Dictionary

infield fly rule

infield fly rule

A rule providing that a fair fly ball hit with a force play at third base, which is deemed catchable by an umpire, be ruled an out irrespective of the fielder's play, eliminating the force play at all bases.

— Wiktionary

Short-handed

Short-handed

Short handed is a term used in ice hockey and refers to having fewer skaters on the ice during play, as a result of a penalty. The player removed from play serves the penalty in the penalty box for a set amount of time proportional to the severity of the infraction. If a goaltender commits a minor infraction, another player who was on the ice at the time of the penalty serves, often but not necessarily the team captain. The penalized team is said to be on the penalty kill, abbreviated as "PK" for recording purposes, while their players are in the penalty box. The opposing team is usually referred to as having an "advantage" until the penalized player returns to play. This situation is often called a power play for the opposing team, due to the increased likelihood of scoring during this time. Not only does the power play team have the main advantage, the penalized team is frequently trapped in their zone and often cannot make line changes, resulting in their players being on the ice for longer-than-normal shifts. As a result, the penalized team's players are often exhausted when the penalty expires and they are often scored on shortly afterward. The team on the power play often only has one defenseman at the rear rather than the typical two, in favor of adding another attacker. Rarely, teams have pulled their goalie for the sixth on-ice player. Players assigned to power play or penalty killing duties are often known as "special teams".

— Freebase

Adventure Story

Adventure Story

Adventure Story is a 1949 play by the English dramatist Terence Rattigan. The play tells the story of Alexander the Great and his conquests. In this play Mr.Rattigan portrays the historical Alexander very faithfully, at the same time revealing that his life was what it was because he was the kind of person who very well might have wept because nothing remained to conquer. The play focuses on the transformation of Alexander after his conquest of Persia from a military adventurist to an uncompromising despot with grand vision of a world empire which estranges him from his erstwhile friends. Driven by a deep-felt insecurity, he has to kill people close to him including even the father figure Cleitus. He tries to justify his actions in the name of his dreams of the world empire, but is haunted by loneliness in the end The play holds a deeper significance, that the conquests of Alexander were actually trials to find himself and achieve spiritual enlightenment, through becoming a god. The play ends with a nihilistic tone, that Alexander was to die and fade after all, his last words in the play are 'Who is to succeed me to the throne of Asia? Who shall I condemn to death?'

— Freebase

Chimneys

Chimneys

Chimneys is a play by crime writer Agatha Christie and is based upon her own 1925 novel The Secret of Chimneys. The play was written in 1931 and was due to open at the Embassy Theatre in Swiss Cottage in December of that year. One year previously, Black Coffee, Christie's first performed stage play, had opened at the same theatre. As was the law at the time, the play was vetted by the Lord Chamberlain's Office and passed for performance. Several press articles referred to the new play but suddenly, and without explanation, the theatre substituted Mary Broome, a four-act comedy from 1912 by Allan Monkhouse, in its place. The play was all-but-forgotten until December 2001 when John Paul Fischbach, the artistic director of the Vertigo Mystery Theatre in Calgary, Canada was looking to re-launch the company after it had been forced to vacate its home in the Calgary Science Centre and was opening in its new home of the Vertigo Theatre Centre. In looking for something special and relatively unknown to celebrate the opening, Fischbach contacted Agatha Christie Limited, who handle the author's rights, and was told by its chairman that the only relatively unknown stage work that could be performed was the 1930s play A Daughter's a Daughter which was performed once in the 1950s but had previously been revised into a 1952 novel published under the nom-de-plume of Mary Westmacott.

— Freebase

Stroke play

Stroke play

Stroke play, also known as medal play, is a scoring system in the sport of golf. It involves counting the total number of strokes taken on each hole during a given round, or series of rounds. The winner is the player who has taken the fewest number of strokes over the course of the round, or rounds. Although most professional tournaments are played using the stroke play scoring system, there are, or have been, some notable exceptions, for example the WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship and Volvo World Match Play Championship, which are both played in a match play format, and The International, a former PGA Tour event that used a modified stableford system. In addition, most team events, for example the Ryder Cup, are also contested using the match play format.

— Freebase

Free-to-play

Free-to-play

Free-to-play refers to any video game or social or mobile application that has the option of allowing its players/users to play/download without paying. The model was first popularly used in early massively multiplayer online games targeted towards casual gamers, before finding wider adoption among games released by major video game publishers to combat video game piracy and high system requirements. Since games using the concept are available at no cost to players, they use other means to gather revenue, such as charging money for certain in-game items or integrating advertisements into the game. Free-to-play can be contrasted with pay-to-play, in which payment is required before using a service. Pay-to-play games usually offer equal gaming experience for all players while free-to-play games give advantage to premium players. Free-to-play games are similar to freemium, a more general term and a business model in which a product is offered free of charge while a micropayment is charged for users to access premium features and virtual goods. Shareware by contrast typically only offers a portion of the game, such as Id Software's first-episode shareware versions of many of their early first-person shooters. If there is no charge payable for any feature in a game, it's known as freeware.

— Freebase

Launchpad Toys

Launchpad Toys

We’re creating digital toys and tools that empower kids to create, learn & share their ideas through play.Give a young child a couple of toys or a box of crayons and he or she is likely to play for hours, deeply engrossed in an imaginary world. In both art and dramatic play, children construct settings, create fictional characters, and act out fantastic storylines that would be the envy of many Hollywood scriptwriters. Yet, ask that same child to write out a story in a blank notebook or a word processor and you would be lucky to capture a fraction of the depth and splendor of his or her imagination. Play inspires and scaffolds the creative process from an early age, but there is a persistent gap between the origins of imaginative play (ages 4-5) and kids’ adoption of the formal discipline of creative writing (ages 8-10).At Launchpad Toys, we’re using mobile devices like the iPad to bridge this gap between informal and formal learning, to harness the power of play to help children capture and share their ideas with other kids around the world. Our first product, Toontastic an app for the iPad, is a creative learning tool that blends constructionist and social development theories to empower young children to create, learn, and share their ideas through play.

— CrunchBase

Independent Means

Independent Means

Independent Means is a stage play written by Stanley Houghton, a leading member of the Manchester School of dramatists. The play was Houghton's first professional full length play which was written in 1908. Its first title was The Unemployed, but this was changed to avoid confusion with a one-act play with a similar title. It was chosen by Annie Horniman to open the second season at the Gaiety Theatre, Manchester, on 30 August 1909. It was an immediate success and was chosen to open the next two seasons, and it was published in 1911. It was broadcast by Granada Television in 1960. Otherwise the play remained unknown until it was discovered in the British Library by Chris Homer, artistic director of the Library Theatre, Manchester. It was decided to produce the play at the Library Theatre in 2008 to celebrate the centenary of the Gaiety Theatre.

— Freebase

Bent

Bent

Bent is a 1979 play by Martin Sherman. It revolves around the persecution of gays in Nazi Germany, and takes place during and after the Night of the Long Knives. The title of the play refers to the slang word "bent" used in some European countries to refer to homosexuals. When the play was first performed, there was only a trickle of historical research or even awareness about the Nazi persecution of homosexuals. In some regards, the play helped increase that historical research and education in the 1980s and 1990s. The play starred Ian McKellen in its original 1979 West-End production, and Richard Gere in its original 1980 Broadway production. In 1989, Sean Mathias directed a revival of the play, performed as a one-night benefit for Stonewall, featuring Ian McKellen, Richard E Grant, Ian Charleson, and Ralph Fiennes. After receiving critical acclaim, Mathias directed a full run in 1990, with Ian McKellen, Paul Rhys, and Christopher Eccleston, which won the City Limits Award for Revival of the Year. In 1997, Martin Sherman adapted Bent into a film of the same name, which was directed by Sean Mathias.

— Freebase

Play Away

Play Away

Play Away is a British television children's programme. A sister programme to the infants' series Play School, it was aimed at slightly older children. It ran from 1971 until 1984, and was broadcast on Saturday afternoons on BBC 2. While Play School had a more gentle, intimate feel, featuring just two presenters in a studio with the usual collection of toys, Play Away was much more lively, including songs, games and many jokes. The first eight series were shot in a studio, usually at BBC Television Centre, London, although certain episodes were recorded in Bristol or Manchester. Later episodes were recorded in front of a live studio audience. The format was a little like a music-hall variety show or 'end-of-the-pier' show. The Musical Director was Jonathan Cohen on piano, with Spike Heatley on double bass and Alan Rushton on drums, often with accomplished guest musicians such as trombonist George Chisholm. Presenters throughout the thirteen-year run included familiar Play School presenters such as Brian Cant, Toni Arthur, Derek Griffiths, Floella Benjamin, Chloe Ashcroft, Johnny Ball, and Julie Stevens, as well as lesser known presenters including Janine Sharp, Roger Martin and Carol Chell. Play Away also played host to future stars such as Anita Dobson, Jeremy Irons and Tony Robinson.

— Freebase

Fair Play

Fair Play

Fair Play was an American-bred Thoroughbred racehorse who was successful on the track, but even more so as a sire. His grandsire was Spendthrift, whose grandsire was the English Triple Crown champion West Australian. While successful on the track until an injury cut short his racing career, Fair Play gained his most fame as a sire. Among his better progeny were: ⁕Display - 1926 Preakness Stakes winner and sire of Discovery ⁕Man o' War - chosen #1 in the Blood-Horse magazine List of the Top 100 U.S. Racehorses of the 20th Century ⁕Mad Play - 1924 Belmont Stakes winner ⁕Ladkin - 1924 International Stakes No.2 winner ⁕Mad Hatter - 1921 U.S. Champion Older Male Horse ⁕Chance Play - 1927 United States Horse of the Year ⁕Chance Shot - 1927 Belmont Stakes winner; sire of Belmont Stakes winner Peace Chance ⁕Fairmount - U.S. Hall of Fame steeplechase champion Following the death of owner August Belmont, Jr. in 1924, Fair Play was sold to Joseph E. Widener, proprietor of Elmendorf Farm in Lexington, Kentucky, where he remained until his death on December 17, 1929. Widener, a dedicated horseman, buried Fair Play in the Elmendorf Farm cemetery and erected a nearly life-size bronze statue at the head of his grave.

— Freebase

Revoke

Revoke

To annul by withdrawing. In trick-taking card games, a revoke is a violation of important rules regarding the play of tricks serious enough to render the round invalid. A revoke is a violation ranked in seriousness somewhat below overt cheating, with the status of a more minor offense only because, when it happens, it is usually accidental. Trick-taking games normally have several rules regarding which cards may and may not be played to a trick. For example, most games require a player to follow suit or play in the suit led, if possible. Rules of this sort are sometimes called "honor rules", because there is no way to detect a violation at the moment of its commission. However, the irregularity will normally be discovered later, and there are usually strict penalties for revokes. Some "honor rules" in different trick-taking games ⁕Spades, Euchre and 500 require that players play to the suit led, unless void in it. ⁕Hearts requires that players follow the suit led. In some variants, a player holding the Queen of Spades and void in the led suit is required to play it. ⁕Pinochle requires players to ⁕play to the led suit unless void in it, with a potentially winning card if possible;if void in the led suit, trump with a potentially winning card;if unable to do any of those things, play anything.

— Freebase

Legacy Plug and Play

Legacy Plug and Play

The term Legacy Plug and Play, also shortened to PnP, describes a series of specifications and Microsoft Windows features geared towards operating system configuration of devices. The standards were primarily aimed at the IBM PC standard bus, later dubbed ISA. Related specifications are also defined for the common external or specialist busses commonly attached via ISA at the time of development, including RS-232 and parallel port devices. As a Windows feature, Plug and Play refers to operating system functionality that supports connectivity, configuration and management with native plug and play devices. Originally considered part of the same feature set as the specifications, Plug and Play in this context refers primarily to the responsibilities and interfaces associated with Windows driver development. Plug and Play allows for detection of devices without user intervention, and occasionally for minor configuration of device resources, such as I/O ports and device memory maps. PnP is a specific set of standards, not be confused with the generic term plug and play, which describes any hardware specification that alleviates the need for user configuration of device resources.

— Freebase

Chickenhead

Chickenhead

Chickenhead is a 1986 play by Hungarian playwright György Spiró. It is a tragedy, set among low-lifes on the outskirts of Budapest. Dramatic Exchange describes it as "Widely considered to be the most important Hungarian play of the last 20 years". The odd title of the play refers in the first instance to the chicken heads that an old woman feeds to her cat. However, it can also be taken to refer more broadly to the obtuse behaviour of the main characters in the play. The play is an odd mixture of pathos and nihilism, written against the bleak background of Stalinist totalitarianism from which Hungary was emerging. As with much modern drama, there is no hero in the play. The only noble behaviour that one can find belongs to one of the characters in the past, when he was a child, but he is no longer as he was. The hint that what once existed might be achieved again is the only faint ray of hope in a very bleak view of the human condition.

— Freebase

Staging

Staging

Staging is the process of selecting, designing, adapting to, or modifying the performance space for a play or film. This includes the use or absence of stagecraft elements as well as the structure of the stage and its components. Staging is also used to mean the result of this process, in other words the spectacle that a play presents in performance, its visual detail. This can include such things as positions of actors on stage, their gestures and movements, the scenic background, the props and costumes, lighting, and sound effects. Besides costume, any physical object that appears in a play has the potential to become an important dramatic symbol. The first thing that the audience of a play sees is the stage set, the physical objects that suggest the world of the play. The stage set is usually indicated by the playwright, but the degree of detail and specificity of this rendering vary from one playwright to another and from one literary period to another. In film, staging is generally called set dressing. While from a critical standpoint, "staging" can refer to the spectacle that a play presents in performance, the term is also frequently used interchangeably with the term "blocking", referring to how the performers are placed and moved around the stage. Many audience members may believe that performers move spontaneously on the stage, but blocking/staging is rarely spontaneous. Major points of blocking are often set down by the playwright, but blocking is usually done by the director, sometimes in collaboration with performers and designers.

— Freebase

Malcontent

Malcontent

The Malcontent is a character type that often appeared in early modern drama. The character is discontent with the social structure and other characters in the play—and is often an outsider who observes and comments on the action, and may even acknowledge they are in a play. Shakespeare's Richard III and Iago in Othello are typical malcontents. The role is usually both political and dramatic, with the malcontent voicing dissatisfaction with the usually 'Machiavellian' political atmosphere and often using asides to build up a kind of self-consciousness and awareness of the text itself that other characters in the play lack. Important malcontents include Bosola in Webster's The Duchess of Malfi, Vindice in Middleton's The Revenger's Tragedy, Malevole in Marston's The Malcontent, and Hamlet in Shakespeare's Hamlet. The morality and sympathy of the malcontent is highly variable, as in the examples above. Sometimes, as in Hamlet and The Malcontent, they are the sympathetic centre of the play, whereas Iago is a very unsympathetic character. The most important thing about the malcontent is that the character is malcontent—unhappy, unsettled, displeased with the world of the play, eager to change it somehow, or to dispute with it. The malcontent is an objective or quasi-objective voice that comments on the play's concerns as though somehow above or beyond them. The concept has much to do with the Renaissance idea of 'humours' and a surfeit of 'black bile' which caused melancholy.

— Freebase

Quarterback sneak

Quarterback sneak

A quarterback sneak is a play in Canadian football and American football in which the quarterback, upon taking the center snap, dives ahead while the offensive line surges forward. It is usually only used in very short yardage situations. The advantages of this play are that there are no further ball exchanges beyond the center snap, and that the quarterback receives the ball almost at the line of scrimmage so that it is unlikely that significant yardage could be lost on the play. However, it is also very unlikely that the play will gain more than one or two yards. For this reason, it is almost solely used when the ball is very close to the goal-line or on third and fourth down with a yard or less to go. The origins of this play date back to 1912 where standout Yale quarterback Graham Winkelbaum first used it in a game against rival Harvard. QB sneaks have drawbacks in that they tend to expose the quarterback to hits from opposing defensive backs. Perhaps the most famous quarterback sneak in football history was executed by Bart Starr of the Green Bay Packers in the famous "Ice Bowl" NFL championship game against the Dallas Cowboys on December 31, 1967. The play has also been favored by current Packers head coach Mike McCarthy, and QB Aaron Rodgers has made frequent use of sneaks, especially during the team's 2010 championship season.

— Freebase

Peter and Wendy

Peter and Wendy

Peter Pan; or, the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up or Peter and Wendy is J. M. Barrie's most famous work, in the form of a 1904 play and a 1911 novel, respectively. Both versions tell the story of Peter Pan, a mischievous little boy who can fly, and his adventures on the island of Neverland with Wendy Darling and her brothers, the fairy Tinker Bell, the Lost Boys, the Indian princess Tiger Lily, and the pirate Captain Hook. The play and novel were inspired by Barrie's friendship with the Llewelyn Davies family. Barrie continued to revise the play for years after its debut; the novel reflects one version of the story. The play debuted in London on 27 December 1904 with Nina Boucicault, daughter of playwright Dion Boucicault, in the title role. A Broadway production was mounted in 1905 starring Maude Adams. It was later revived with such actresses as Marilyn Miller and Eva Le Gallienne. The play has since seen adaptation as a pantomime, stage musical, a television special, and several films, including a 1924 silent film, a 1953 animated Disney full-length feature, and a 2003 live action production. The play is now rarely performed in its original form on stage in the United Kingdom, whereas pantomime adaptations are frequently staged around Christmas. In the U.S., the original version has also been supplanted in popularity by the 1954 musical version, which became popular on television.

— Freebase

One-act play

One-act play

A one-act play is a play that has only one act, as distinct from plays that occur over several acts. One-act plays may consist of one or more scenes. In recent years, the 10-minute play known as "flash drama" has emerged as a popular sub-genre of the one-act play, especially in writing competitions. The origin of the one-act play may be traced to the very beginning of drama: in ancient Greece, Cyclops, a satyr play by Euripides, is an early example.

— Freebase

Camino Real

Camino Real

Camino Real is a 1953 play by Tennessee Williams. In the introduction to the Penguin edition of the play, Williams directs the reader to use the Anglicized pronunciation "Cá-mino Réal." The play takes its title from its setting, alluded to El Camino Real, a dead-end place in a Spanish-speaking town surrounded by desert with sporadic transportation to the outside world. It is described by Williams as "nothing more nor less than my conception of the time and the world I live in." Kilroy, a young American visitor, fulfills some of the functions of the play's narrator, as does Gutman, manager of the hotel Siete Mares, whose terrace occupies part of the stage. Williams also employs a large cast of characters including many famous literary characters who appear in dream sequences. They include Don Quixote and his partner Sancho, Marguerite "Camille" Gautier, Casanova, Lord Byron, and Esmeralda, among others. Taking place in the main plaza, the play goes through a series of confusing and almost logic-defying events, including the revival of the Gypsy's daughter's virginity and then the loss of it again. A main theme that the play deals with is coming to terms with the thought of growing older and possibly becoming irrelevant.

— Freebase

End Play

End Play

The power to move horizontally in its bearings sometimes given to armature shafts. This secures a more even wearing of the commutator faces. End play is not permissible in disc armatures, as the attraction of the field upon the face of the armature core would displace it endwise. For such armatures thrust-bearings preventing end play have to be provided.

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

Macbeth

Macbeth

Macbeth is a play written by William Shakespeare. It is considered one of his darkest and most powerful tragedies. Set in Scotland, the play dramatizes the corrosive psychological and political effects produced when its protagonist, the Scottish lord Macbeth, chooses evil as the way to fulfill his ambition for power. He commits regicide to become king and then furthers his moral descent with a reign of murderous terror to stay in power, eventually plunging the country into civil war. In the end, he loses everything that gives meaning and purpose to his life, before losing his life itself. The play is believed to have been written between 1603 and 1607, and is most commonly dated 1606. The earliest account of a performance of what was probably Shakespeare's play is April 1611, when Simon Forman recorded seeing such a play at the Globe Theatre. It was first published in the Folio of 1623, possibly from a prompt book. It was most likely written during the reign of James I, who had been James VI of Scotland before he succeeded to the English throne in 1603. James was a patron of Shakespeare’s acting company, and of all the plays Shakespeare wrote during James’s reign, Macbeth most clearly reflects the playwright’s relationship with the sovereign.

— Freebase

Amadeus

Amadeus

Amadeus is a play by Peter Shaffer, which gives a highly fictionalized account of the lives of the composers Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Antonio Salieri. First performed in 1979, Amadeus was inspired by a short 1830 play by Alexander Pushkin called Mozart and Salieri. In the play, significant use is made of the music of Mozart, Salieri and other composers of the period. The premieres of Mozart's operas The Abduction from the Seraglio, The Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, and The Magic Flute are each the setting for key scenes of the play. Amadeus won the 1981 Tony Award for Best Play. It was adapted by Shaffer for the 1984 Academy Award winning film of the same name.

— Freebase

Golf

Golf

Golf is a precision club and ball sport in which competing players use many types of clubs to hit balls into a series of holes on a course using the fewest number of strokes. Golf is defined, in the rules of golf, as "playing a ball with a club from the teeing ground into the hole by a stroke or successive strokes in accordance with the Rules." It is one of the few ball games that does not require a standardized playing area. Instead, the game is played on a golf course, generally consisting of an arranged progression of either 9 or 18 "holes". Each hole on the course must contain a "tee box" to start from and a "putting green" with the actual hole, and there are various other standardized forms of terrain in between such as the fairway, rough, and hazards, but each hole on a course and indeed among virtually all courses is unique in its specific layout and arrangement. Golf competition is generally played for the lowest number of strokes by an individual, known simply as stroke play, or the lowest score on the most individual holes during a complete round by an individual or team, known as match play. Stroke play is the most commonly seen format at virtually all levels of play, although variations of match play such as "skins" games are also seen in televised events. Other forms of scoring also exist.

— Freebase

Da

Da

Da is a 1978 comedy play by Irish playwright Hugh Leonard. The play had its New York City premiere at the off-off-Broadway Hudson Guild Theatre in 1978, and this production transferred to Broadway shortly after the completion of its run. It was directed by Melvin Bernhardt and produced on Broadway by Lester Osterman, Marilyn Strauss and Marc Howard. It opened at the Morosco Theatre on 1 May 1978 and closed on 1 January 1980 after 697 performances. The scenic design was by Marjorie Kellogg, the costume design by Jennifer von Mayrhauser, and the lighting Design by Arden Fingerhut. The original cast included Barnard Hughes as Da, Brian Murray as Charlie Now, Lois De Banzie as Mrs. Prynne, Mia Dillon as Mary Tate, Sylvia O'Brien as Mother, Lester Rawlins as Drumm, Richard Seer as Young Charlie, and Ralph Williams as Oliver. Brian Keith replaced Barnard Hughes towards the end of the Broadway run, when Hughes went out on a National Tour across the US and Canada. It won 1978 Drama Desk Award Outstanding New Play, the 1978 New York Drama Critics' Circle Award Best Play and the 1978 Tony Award for Best Play.

— Freebase

Foul

Foul

A foul in association football is an unfair act by a player which is deemed by the referee to contravene Law 12 of the Laws of the Game. For an act to be a foul it must: ⁕be a specific offence listed in Law 12 of the Laws of the Game; ⁕be committed by a player; ⁕occur on the field of play; ⁕be committed against an opponent, when applicable; ⁕occur while the ball is in play. As can be seen from the above not all infractions of the Laws are fouls, rather they may constitute – and be punished as – technical infractions and/or misconduct. 'Misconduct,' in association football, is any conduct by a player that is deemed by the referee to warrant a disciplinary sanction in accordance with Law 12 of the Laws of the Game. Misconduct may occur at any time, including when the ball is out of play, during half-time and before and after the game, and both players and substitutes may be sanctioned for misconduct. This is unlike a foul, which is committed by a player, on the field of play, and only against an opponent when the ball is in play.

— Freebase

Playground

Playground

A playground, playpark, or play area is a place with a specific design for children to be able to play there. It may be indoors but is typically outdoors. Modern playgrounds often have recreational equipment such as the seesaw, merry-go-round, swingset, slide, jungle gym, chin-up bars, sandbox, spring rider, monkey bars, overhead ladder, trapeze rings, playhouses, and mazes, many of which help children develop physical coordination, strength, and flexibility, as well as providing recreation and enjoyment. Common in modern playgrounds are play structures that link many different pieces of equipment. Playgrounds often also have facilities for playing informal games of adult sports, such as a baseball diamond, a skating arena, a basketball court, or a tether ball. Public playground equipment refers to equipment intended for use in the play areas of parks, schools, child care facilities, institutions, multiple family dwellings, restaurants, resorts, and recreational developments, and other areas of public use. A type of playground called a playscape is designed to provide a safe environment for play in a natural setting.

— Freebase

Nim

Nim

Nim is a mathematical game of strategy in which two players take turns removing objects from distinct heaps. On each turn, a player must remove at least one object, and may remove any number of objects provided they all come from the same heap. Variants of Nim have been played since ancient times. The game is said to have originated in China, but the origin is uncertain; the earliest European references to Nim are from the beginning of the 16th century. Its current name was coined by Charles L. Bouton of Harvard University, who also developed the complete theory of the game in 1901, but the origins of the name were never fully explained. The name is probably derived from German nimm meaning "take [imperative]", or the obsolete English verb nim of the same meaning. Nim can be played as a misère game, in which the player to take the last object loses. Nim can also be played as a normal play game, which means that the person who makes the last move wins. This is called normal play because most games follow this convention, even though Nim usually does not. Normal play Nim is fundamental to the Sprague-Grundy theorem, which essentially says that in normal play every impartial game is equivalent to a Nim heap that yields the same outcome when played in parallel with other normal play impartial games.

— Freebase

Snug

Snug

Snug is a minor character from William Shakespeare's play A Midsummer Night's Dream. He is a joiner who is hired by Peter Quince to play the part of the lion in the play "Pyramus and Thisbe". When he is first assigned the part, he is afraid it may take him a while to finally remember his lines for it. Bottom offers to play the part of the lion, but he is rejected by Quince, who worries that his loud and ferocious roar in the play will frighten off the ladies of power in the audience. In the end the lion's part is revised to explain that he is in fact not a lion. Snug does this so that the ladies and children don’t get scared. If they get scared the actors might get hanged. This is a subtle reminder by Shakespeare that the mechanicals are not learned men, for they think that Snug's lion costume is fearsome and that they will be sentenced to death if the ladies are afraid. Note: although the fear of roaring too loud was at first applied to Bottom, it seems to have settled into the players' minds, as they warn the ladies even when it isn't Bottom who plays the part in the end.

— Freebase

Force play

Force play

In baseball, a force is a situation when a baserunner is compelled to vacate his time-of-pitch base—and thus try to advance to the next base—because the batter became a runner. A runner at first base is always forced to attempt to advance to second base when the batter becomes a runner. Runners at second or third base are forced only when all bases preceding their time-of-pitch base are occupied by other baserunners and the batter becomes a runner. A forced runner's force base is the next base beyond his time-of-pitch base. Any attempt by fielders to put a forced runner out is called a force play. A forced runner is out when a fielder with the ball touches the runner's force base before the runner reaches that base. A forced runner also may be tagged out in the usual fashion as well; such a tag is still considered a force play if the tag is made before the runner reaches his force base. Any play on the batter-runner before he reaches first base is the same as a force play, though the rules do not include this in the definition of a force play. A force on a runner is "removed" when the batter or a following runner is put out. This most often happens on fly outs—on such, the batter-runner is out, and the other runner must return to their time-of-pitch base, known as tagging up.

— Freebase

Fumed Oak

Fumed Oak

Fumed Oak is a short play in two scenes by Noël Coward, one of ten that make up Tonight at 8:30, a cycle written to be performed across three evenings. Coward billed the work as an "unpleasant comedy in two scenes". The play concerns a downtrodden, middle-aged salesman who, having saved up enough money to cut all ties, walks out on his wife, mother-in-law and "horrible adenoidal daughter", having first told all three what he thinks of them. In the introduction to a published edition of the plays, Coward wrote, "A short play, having a great advantage over a long one in that it can sustain a mood without technical creaking or over padding, deserves a better fate, and if, by careful writing, acting and producing I can do a little towards reinstating it in its rightful pride, I shall have achieved one of my more sentimental ambitions." The play was first produced in 1935 in Manchester and on tour and played in London, New York and Canada. It has enjoyed several major revivals and has been adapted for film. At its premières in Manchester and London Fumed Oak was played on the same evening as Hands Across the Sea and Shadow Play. Like all the other plays in the cycle it originally starred Gertrude Lawrence and Coward himself.

— Freebase

Donkeys' Years

Donkeys' Years

Donkeys' Years is a play by English playwright Michael Frayn that premiered at the Globe Theatre, London, in 1976. The play is a West End farce, a genre that Frayn parodied five years later in his play within a play "Nothing On" from Noises Off. In Donkeys' Years six former students spend the weekend at their old university college for their 25th year reunion. The wife of the Master of the college becomes locked within its walls for the night, supplying the material for a classical bedroom farce. A cabinet minister is placed in a series of embarrassing positions. The play was revived in 2006 at the Comedy Theatre.

— Freebase

Sir Thomas More

Sir Thomas More

Sir Thomas More is a collaborative Elizabethan play by Anthony Munday and others depicting the life and death of Thomas More. It survives only in a single manuscript, now owned by the British Library. The manuscript is notable because three pages of it are considered to be in the hand of William Shakespeare and for the light it sheds on the collaborative nature of Elizabethan drama and the theatrical censorship of the era. In 1871, Richard Simpson proposed that some additions to the play had been written by Shakespeare, and a year later James Spedding, editor of the works of Sir Francis Bacon, while rejecting some of Simpson's suggestions, supported the attribution to Shakespeare of the passage credited to Hand D. In 1916, the paleographer Sir Edward Maunde Thompson published a minute analysis of the handwriting of the addition and judged it to be Shakespeare's. The case was strengthened with the publication of Shakespeare's Hand in the Play of Sir Thomas More by five noted scholars who analysed the play from multiple perspectives, all of which led to the same affirmative conclusion. Although some dissenters remain, the attribution has been generally accepted since the mid-20th century and most authoritative editions of Shakespeare's works, including The Oxford Shakespeare and the Arden Shakespeare, include the play. It was performed with Shakespeare's name included amongst the authors by the Royal Shakespeare Company in 2005.

— Freebase

Hamlet

Hamlet

The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark is a tragedy by William Shakespeare. Set in the Kingdom of Denmark, the play dramatizes the revenge Prince Hamlet exacts on his uncle Claudius for murdering King Hamlet, Claudius's brother and Prince Hamlet's father, and then succeeding to the throne and taking as his wife Gertrude, the old king's widow and Prince Hamlet's mother. The play vividly portrays both true and feigned madness – from overwhelming grief to seething rage – and explores themes of treachery, revenge, incest, and moral corruption. Hamlet is Shakespeare's longest play and among the most powerful and influential tragedies in English literature, with a story capable of "seemingly endless retelling and adaptation by others." The play was one of Shakespeare's most popular works during his lifetime and still ranks among his most-performed, topping the Royal Shakespeare Company's performance list since 1879. It has inspired writers from Goethe and Dickens to Joyce and Murdoch, and has been described as "the world's most filmed story after Cinderella". Shakespeare based Hamlet on the legend of Amleth, preserved by 13th-century chronicler Saxo Grammaticus in his Gesta Danorum as subsequently retold by 16th-century scholar François de Belleforest. He may also have drawn on or perhaps written an earlier Elizabethan play known today as the Ur-Hamlet. He almost certainly created the title role for Richard Burbage, the leading tragedian of Shakespeare's time. In the 400 years since, the role has been performed by highly acclaimed actors and actresses from each successive age.

— Freebase

Blasted

Blasted

Blasted is the first play by British author Sarah Kane. It was first performed in 1995 at the Royal Court Theatre Upstairs in London. This performance was highly controversial and the play was fiercely attacked by most newspaper critics, many of whom regarded it as a rather immature attempt to shock the audience. However, critics have subsequently reassessed it; for example The Guardian's Michael Billington, who savaged the play in his first review, later recanted in the wake of Kane's suicide: "I got it wrong, as I keep saying. She was a major talent. Apparently, Harold Pinter said at her memorial service that she was a poet, and I think that's dead right." After seeing a revival of the play, an Evening Standard reviewer wrote "How shrill and silly the 1995 hullabaloo and hysteria seemed last night when Blasted returned to the Royal Court. It is, and always was, a play with a fine, moral purpose."

— Freebase

Blood rule

Blood rule

The Blood rule is a rule used in many sports that states that an athlete that receives an open wound, is bleeding, or who has blood on them or their clothes, must immediately leave the playing area to receive medical attention. Though they may be able to play again later, they cannot go back and play again until the wound is taken care of, bleeding has stopped, and all contaminated equipment has been replaced. The main concern addressed by this rule is the spread of infectious diseases like Human immunodeficiency virus, Hepatitis, and other diseases that can be spread through the contact of blood. Before this rule was enforced, the chance of spreading diseases through blood to teammates of the injured player, the opposing team, the officials, and even the injured player himself/herself in some cases where it could be spread through contact of saliva, mucus, or blood from another injured player, was great since an injured player's wound may have ended up touching all the other players by the end of the game as the player would continue playing unless they were bleeding enough for them to possibly die from a loss of a blood. Though there are two options that can be chosen: The first option is that the player be substituted and play resumes, or the official can halt play until the player has returned, the former being the most commonly chosen. In the National Rugby League, the latter option in first employed; play stops whilst the player's medical staff attends to the wound. If the bleeding is not staunched to the referee's satisfaction, the player must then leave the field for further attention.

— Freebase

Table stakes

Table stakes

In poker, table stakes limits the amount a player can win or lose in the play of a single hand. A player may bet no more money than he had on the table at the beginning of that hand and consequently cannot go back to his pocket for more money once a hand is dealt. In between hands however, a player is free to rebuy or addon so long as his entire stack after the rebuy or addon does not exceed the maximum buy-in. This rule generally applies to cash or ring games of poker rather than tournament games and is intended to level the stakes by creating a maximum and minimum buy-in as well as rules for adding and removing chips from play when playing with cash. A player also may not take a portion of his money off the table, unless he leaves the game and takes his entire stack out of play. Common among inexperienced players is the act of "going south" after winning a big pot, which is to take a portion of your stack out of play often as an attempt to hedge one's risk after a win. Table stakes is the rule in most cash poker games because it allows players with vastly different bankrolls a reasonable amount of protection when playing with one another. Contrary to classic Hollywood poker movie scenes, money taken from the wallet during a hand does not play under table stakes.

— Freebase

Color commentator

Color commentator

A colour commentator is a sports commentator who assists the play-by-play announcer, often by filling in any time when play is not in progress. The color analyst and main commentator will often exchange comments freely throughout the broadcast, when the play-by-play announcer is not describing the action. The color commentator provides expert analysis and background information, such as statistics, strategy and injury reports on the teams and athletes, and occasionally anecdotes or light humor. Color commentators are often former athletes or coaches of the sport being broadcast.

— Freebase

Tchin-Tchin

Tchin-Tchin

Tchin-Tchin is a 1962 play written by Sidney Michaels. It opened on Broadway at the Plymouth Theatre, on October 25, 1962 and closed on May 18, 1963 after 222 performances and 3 previews. Directed by Peter Glenville, the play starred Margaret Leighton and Anthony Quinn, and featured Charles Grodin. Arlene Francis and Jack Klugman took over the star roles for the last month of the run. Tchin-Tchin received Tony Award nominations for Best Play, Best Actress in a Play, Best Scenic Design, and Best Direction of a Play. Time Magazine wrote: "Tchin-Tchin is magical. It is also fragile, but it is saved from wispiness by Leighton and Quinn. Excellence is an acting habit with Margaret Leighton, and her Pamela is expectably perfect. Anthony Quinn brings his subtlest gifts to Caesario, a character in whom anguish and sentiment sprout like city flowers between slabs of concrete."

— Freebase

Marc Blitzstein

Marc Blitzstein

Marcus Samuel Blitzstein, better known as Marc Blitzstein, was an American composer. He won national attention in 1937 when his pro-union musical The Cradle Will Rock, directed by Orson Welles, was shut down by the Works Progress Administration. He is known for The Cradle Will Rock and for his Off-Broadway translation/adaptation of The Threepenny Opera by Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill. His works also include the opera Regina, an adaptation of Lillian Hellman's play The Little Foxes; the Broadway musical Juno, based on Seán O'Casey's play Juno and the Paycock; and No for an Answer. He completed translation/adaptations of Brecht's and Weill's musical play Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny and of Brecht's play Mother Courage and Her Children with music by Paul Dessau. Blitzstein also composed music for films, such as Surf and Seaweed and The Spanish Earth, and he contributed two songs to the original 1960 production of Hellman's play Toys in the Attic.

— Freebase

Sive

Sive

Sive is a play by Irish playwright John B. Keane that depicts Irish rural life in the 1950s. The main character of the play is Sive, yet she rarely speaks in the play. This ultimately enhances the impact of the whole play on the audience. We get a clear sense of how she is being used: her voice is literally drained out by the power-hungry nature of the society in which she lives. The drama is a clear—a tragedy that never has any real sense of escapism amid the selfishness and greed. Money dominates almost every line of the play, which brings to light the moral—that innocent people suffer greatly in a society that is so self-absorbed and dominated by powerful authoritarian people.

— Freebase

Hotseat

Hotseat

Hotseat or hot seat is a multiplayer mode provided by some turn-based video games, which allows two or more players to play on the same device by taking turns playing the game. The name hotseat started as a reference to playing a PC game and trading seats with the other player. Hotseat play allows players to play a multiplayer game with only one copy of the game or only one device. Since hotseat play is usually defined as turn-based by nature, the duration of a game may extend beyond that of a real-time networked multiplayer game. Some games allow hotseat and networked players to compete with each other in the same game, while maintaining turn-based play.

— Freebase

Immaculate Reception

Immaculate Reception

The Immaculate Reception is the nickname given to one of the most famous plays in the history of American football. It occurred in the AFC divisional playoff game of the National Football League, between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Oakland Raiders at Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on December 23, 1972. With the Steelers trailing in the last 30 seconds of the game, Pittsburgh quarterback Terry Bradshaw threw a pass to John Fuqua, who was immediately hit and lost possession of the ball. As the ball fell towards the ground, Steelers fullback Franco Harris scooped it up and ran for a game-winning touchdown. The play has been a source of unresolved controversy and speculation ever since, as many have contested that the ball hit the ground and should have been ruled an incomplete pass. Kevin Cook's The Last Headbangers cites the play as the beginning of a bitter rivalry between Pittsburgh and Oakland that fueled a historically brutal Raiders team during the NFL's most controversially physical era. NFL Films has chosen it as the greatest play of all time, as well as the most controversial. The play was a turning point for the Steelers, who reversed four decades of futility with their first playoff win ever, and went on to win four Super Bowls by the end of the decade. The play's name is a pun derived from the Immaculate Conception, a dogma in the Roman Catholic Church. The phrase was first used on air by Myron Cope, a Pittsburgh sportscaster who was reporting on the Steelers' victory. A Pittsburgh woman, Sharon Levosky, called Cope before his 11 PM sports broadcast on the 23rd and suggested the name, which was coined by her friend Michael Ord. Cope used the term on television and the phrase stuck.

— Freebase

Wasp's Nest

Wasp's Nest

Wasp's Nest was a television play broadcast on the BBC Television Service on 18 June 1937. It was adapted from the short story of the same name by crime writer Agatha Christie which had first appeared in the Daily Mail on 20 November 1928 and first appeared in book form in the US collection Double Sin and Other Stories in 1961. It first appeared in a UK collection in Poirot's Early Cases in 1974. The play is unique in that it is the only instance of Christie adapting one of her works for television, a medium she later came to dislike. It was broadcast live from Alexandra Palace as part of the programme Theatre Parade. The broadcast took place at 3.35 pm and lasted for twenty-five minutes. It was then repeated the same evening at 9.40 pm and lasted for twenty minutes. Theatre Parade usually showcased successful stage shows of the time but in this instance presented an original work. The play was only broadcast in the London area as this was the only part of the UK that could receive television transmissions at this time. Neither transmissions were recorded for future viewing as television recording equipment had not been invented at this point in time. The play is notable for starring Francis L. Sullivan in the part of Hercule Poirot, reprising his portrayal of the character following his success in the stage play Black Coffee in 1930.

— Freebase

Blithe Spirit

Blithe Spirit

Blithe Spirit is a comic play by Noël Coward which takes its title from Shelley's poem "To a Skylark". The play concerns the socialite and novelist Charles Condomine, who invites the eccentric medium and clairvoyant, Madame Arcati, to his house to conduct a séance, hoping to gather material for his next book. The scheme backfires when he is haunted by the ghost of his annoying and temperamental first wife, Elvira, after the séance. Elvira makes continual attempts to disrupt Charles's marriage to his second wife, Ruth, who cannot see or hear the ghost. The play was first seen in the West End in 1941, creating a new long-run record for non-musical British plays of 1,997 performances. It also did well on Broadway later that year, running for 657 performances. Coward adapted the play for film in 1945, starring Rex Harrison, and directed a musical adaptation, High Spirits, on Broadway in 1964. It was also adapted for television in the 1950s and 1960s and for radio. The play enjoyed several West End and Broadway revivals in the 1970s and 1980s and was revived again in London in 2004, 2011 and 2014. It returned to Broadway in February 2009.

— Freebase

Act

Act

a performance of part of a play; one of the principal divisions of a play or dramatic work in which a certain definite part of the action is completed

— Webster Dictionary

Battledoor

Battledoor

an instrument, with a handle and a flat part covered with parchment or crossed with catgut, used to strike a shuttlecock in play; also, the play of battledoor and shuttlecock

— Webster Dictionary

Bob

Bob

to have a short, jerking motion; to play to and fro, or up and down; to play loosely against anything

— Webster Dictionary

Coquet

Coquet

to trifle in love; to stimulate affection or interest; to play the coquette; to deal playfully instead of seriously; to play (with); as, we have coquetted with political crime

— Webster Dictionary

Double

Double

to play tricks; to use sleights; to play false

— Webster Dictionary

Flirt

Flirt

to run and dart about; to act with giddiness, or from a desire to attract notice; especially, to play the coquette; to play at courtship; to coquet; as, they flirt with the young men

— Webster Dictionary

Harlequinade

Harlequinade

a play or part of play in which the harlequin is conspicuous; the part of a harlequin

— Webster Dictionary

Harp

Harp

to play on, as a harp; to play (a tune) on the harp; to develop or give expression to by skill and art; to sound forth as from a harp; to hit upon

— Webster Dictionary

Interlude

Interlude

a short entertainment exhibited on the stage between the acts of a play, or between the play and the afterpiece, to relieve the tedium of waiting

— Webster Dictionary

Part

Part

a particular character in a drama or a play; an assumed personification; also, the language, actions, and influence of a character or an actor in a play; or, figuratively, in real life. See To act a part, under Act

— Webster Dictionary

Play

Play

to put in action or motion; as, to play cannon upon a fortification; to play a trump

— Webster Dictionary

Rig

Rig

to play the wanton; to act in an unbecoming manner; to play tricks

— Webster Dictionary

Rogue

Rogue

to wander; to play the vagabond; to play knavish tricks

— Webster Dictionary

Romp

Romp

to play rudely and boisterously; to leap and frisk about in play

— Webster Dictionary

Rubber

Rubber

in some games, as whist, the odd game, as the third or the fifth, when there is a tie between the players; as, to play the rubber; also, a contest determined by the winning of two out of three games; as, to play a rubber of whist

— Webster Dictionary

Scene

Scene

so much of a play as passes without change of locality or time, or important change of character; hence, a subdivision of an act; a separate portion of a play, subordinate to the act, but differently determined in different plays; as, an act of four scenes

— Webster Dictionary

Scenery

Scenery

assemblage of scenes; the paintings and hangings representing the scenes of a play; the disposition and arrangement of the scenes in which the action of a play, poem, etc., is laid; representation of place of action or occurence

— Webster Dictionary

Shuttlecock

Shuttlecock

a cork stuck with feathers, which is to be struck by a battledoor in play; also, the play itself

— Webster Dictionary

Thumb

Thumb

to play with the thumb or thumbs; to play clumsily; to thrum

— Webster Dictionary

Toyhouse

Toyhouse

a house for children to play in or to play with; a playhouse

— Webster Dictionary

Wanton

Wanton

to sport in lewdness; to play the wanton; to play lasciviously

— Webster Dictionary

Play-i

Play-i

Play-i is making programming fun and accessible for children while they play. A shift has already occurred in the way we relate to technology. Our role is to give children the means to respond and the head start they will need to be successful in tomorrow's society. Today most of us are consumers of technology. Tomorrow's children will need to be active participants and creators. We're leading a movement to make programming for kids fun and accessible, for ages 5 and above, as well as the adults around them. We are developing clever, imaginative, and unconventional ways of open-ended play that naturally leads to kids experiencing the joy of programming. Play-i is a small team of programmers, designers, and dreamers who are extremely passionate about making programming fun and accessible for kids. Check us out at our Hacking Play Blog (hackingplay.com)

— CrunchBase

Sifteo

Sifteo

Sifteo, Inc. is a venture-backed startup based in San Francisco, California. Sifteo makes Sifteo cubes, a tactile interactive game system for hands-on fun and Intelligent Play, and a growing number of games exclusive to its platform. Sifteo is also a publisher of games for its platform, and runs regular game jams using its freely-available SDK for developers around the country.Sifteo cubes is a next generation game system consisting of physical blocks with full-color graphics that sense each other and their motion. The system offers a new type of interface that allows computer interactions to be more direct and physical in nature: a hands-on computer the size and shape of a building block. Gesture-detection technology makes interactive play with Sifteo cubes natural and allows players to shake, flip, tilt, press, and neighbor Sifteo cubes to control the action.Sifteo began as a collaboration between co-founders Dave Merrill and Jeevan Kalanithi at the MIT Media Lab. They wanted to re-think human-computer interaction by designing new, physical interfaces. One afternoon they sat around a table in the lab's kitchen and imagined sorting through a pile of digital data as if it were a pile of LEGOs. The idea for Sifteo cubes was born.Several generations of prototypes later, Dave was invited to share their early work by giving a presentation on the main stage at the TED conference in 2009 - and the talk went viral. This public enthusiasm galvanized the pair to found Sifteo Inc., and four months later Dave and Jeevan were at work in San Francisco building a company. Sifteo games embody Intelligent Play, combining classic tactile play patterns and social aspects of activities like chess and building blocks with the richness of interactive game technology. The Sifteo game library includes challenging games for adults, fun learning puzzles for kids, and games families can play together.

— CrunchBase

skylark

skylark

To jump about joyfully, frolic; to play around, play tricks.

— Wiktionary

pair

pair

A double play, two outs recorded in one play

— Wiktionary

erase

erase

To remove a runner from the bases via a double play or pick off play

— Wiktionary

shotgun

shotgun

A play formation in which the quarterback is a few feet behind the snapper when the ball is hiked, ideally allowing for an easier pass play.

— Wiktionary

premiere

premiere

Of a film or play, to play for the first time.

— Wiktionary

scene

scene

So much of a play as passes without change of locality or time, or important change of character; hence, a subdivision of an act; a separate portion of a play, subordinate to the act, but differently determined in different plays; as, an act of four scenes.

— Wiktionary

metadrama

metadrama

A play that features another play as part of its plot.

— Wiktionary

session

session

Any of the three scheduled two hour playing sessions, from the start of play to lunch, from lunch to tea and from tea to the close of play.

— Wiktionary

first session

first session

The session of a day's play between start of play and lunch.

— Wiktionary

playful

playful

liking play, prone to play frequently, such as a child or kitten; rather sportive.

— Wiktionary

induction

induction

The use of rumors to twist and complicate the plot of a play or to narrate in a way that does not have to state truth nor fact within the play.

— Wiktionary

third session

third session

the session of a day's play between tea and close of play

— Wiktionary

on-side kick

on-side kick

A play in American Football whereby the team performing the kick-off kicks the ball the minimum distance (ten yards in most levels of play) in an attempt to immediately regain possession of the ball. This tactic is seldom successful.

— Wiktionary

corner kick

corner kick

: A kick awarded to the attacking team when the ball leaves the field of play by wholly crossing the goal line without a goal having been scored, having last touched a player from the defending team. For the kick, the ball is placed within the corner arc closest to where the ball went out of play.

— Wiktionary

free agent

free agent

(Sports) A professional athlete who is free to play for or sign a contract to play for any team.

— Wiktionary

double play depth

double play depth

When the infielders play in a few steps from their normal position because of the possibility of getting a double play at second base and first base.

— Wiktionary

color commentator

color commentator

At a sporting event, a member of the announcing team who assists a play-by-play announcer. Provides insight into strategy, player performance, background information, etc., and often light humor.

— Wiktionary

ducks and drakes

ducks and drakes

squandering of resources, especially money; used in expressions like to make ducks and drakes of , to play ducks and drakes with , to play at ducks and drakes with

— Wiktionary

endplay

endplay

A tactical play in which a defender is put on lead at a strategic moment, and then has to make a play that loses one or more tricks

— Wiktionary

no room at the inn

no room at the inn

A phrase used by play-by-play announcers to describe a situation in which an ineffective pitcher is pitching with the bases loaded.

— Wiktionary

bug out

bug out

miss school, play truant, play hooky.

— Wiktionary

antiplay

antiplay

A play (dramatical production) that deliberately avoids the typical conventions of the play, such as a coherent plot and resolution.

— Wiktionary

autoreverse

autoreverse

A device in a cassette player that reverses the direction of play when a tape gets to the end (so as to play the other side).

— Wiktionary

checkback

checkback

A play of a designated card as a prompt to one's partner to respond with a play indicating the kinds of card he/she holds.

— Wiktionary

cast

cast

select to play,sing, or dance a part in a play, movie, musical, opera, or ballet

— Princeton's WordNet

casting

casting

the choice of actors to play particular roles in a play or movie

— Princeton's WordNet

curtain raiser

curtain raiser

a short play presented before the main play

— Princeton's WordNet

misplay

misplay

play incorrectly, e.g., play a wrong note

— Princeton's WordNet

power play

power play

a play in which there is a concentration of players in one location on the field of play

— Princeton's WordNet

scrum

scrum, scrummage

(rugby) the method of beginning play in which the forwards of each team crouch side by side with locked arms; play starts when the ball is thrown in between them and the two sides compete for possession

— Princeton's WordNet

scrummage

scrum, scrummage

(rugby) the method of beginning play in which the forwards of each team crouch side by side with locked arms; play starts when the ball is thrown in between them and the two sides compete for possession

— Princeton's WordNet

improvise

improvise

to act, sing, play an instrument, etc. without planning what to say, sing, or play; = ad-lib

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

controlled exercise

controlled exercise

An exercise characterized by the imposition of constraints on some or all of the participating units by planning authorities with the principal intention of provoking types of interaction. See also free play exercise.

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

Bye

Bye

A bye in sports and other competitive activities can have two different meanings. First, in leagues where almost all teams play on the same days, the team that does not play on that day is said to be on bye., which is really a corruption of the older sense of the term "bye" in the context of tournament play. In the traditional and more common usage, a bye is the practice of allowing a player or team to advance to the next round of a single-elimination tournament without playing. It is always necessary to grant byes when the number of entrants in the competition is not a power of two; any such tournament without a power of two in a given round must grant the number of byes indicated by the difference in order to complete the field. In a seeded tournament, the byes are granted to the top seeds, whereas in an unseeded tournament the byes are usually awarded by random draw. For instance, the NCAA Basketball Tournament must grant 60 byes for its "play-in" round, since it has 68 participants and had to grant 16 first-round byes when it had 48 participants. Each of the NFL conferences playoff first rounds must grant two, since there are six teams each, which only confuses matters since they also use the term "bye weeks" to refer to what really should be called "scheduled off weeks" during the regular season. Both of the NCAA tournament and the NFL post-season are seeded, single-elimination tournaments, so the highest-seeded participants are granted the necessary byes.

— Freebase

Screen pass

Screen pass

A screen pass is a type of play in gridiron football. During a screen pass, a number of things happen concurrently in order to fool the defense into thinking a long pass is being thrown, when in fact the pass is merely a short one, just beyond the defensive linemen. Screens are usually deployed against aggressive defenses that rush the passer. Because screens invite the defense to rush the quarterback, they are designed to leave fewer defenders behind the rushers to stop the play. A screen pass can be effective, but can also be risky in that it is rather easy for a defensive player, even a lineman, to intercept the pass if a defender gets between the quarterback and the intended receiver. If the pass is intercepted, there are often few offensive players in front of the intercepting player, thus making it much easier for the intercepting team to earn a large return or to score a touchdown. Screens come in many forms. A screen to a running back to either the strong or short side of the field in the flats is often just called a screen. Screens to wide receivers come in four forms: the bubble screen, middle screen, slot screen, and slip screen. The bubble screen was essentially created by Don Read when he was head coach of the Montana Grizzlies, and Lou Holtz, head coach of the Notre Dame Fighting Irish, brought the play into prominence after calling Read and asking for the play. The bubble screen involves a receiver taking a step forward, then darting toward the quarterback to receive the ball while the offensive linemen release to clear a path for the receiver. The benefit of the bubble screen is that it works against either zone or man-to-man coverage. A downside is that it is dependent on proper timing; a zone blitz or defensive end dropping into coverage can disrupt the timing, and may result in the quarterback being sacked.

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Disc jockey

Disc jockey

A disc jockey, also known as DJ, is a person who plays recorded music for an audience. Originally, "disc" referred to phonograph records, not the later Compact Discs. Today, the term includes all forms of music playback, no matter the medium. There are several types of disc jockeys. Radio DJs or radio personalities introduce and play music that is broadcast on AM, FM, shortwave, digital, or internet radio stations. Club DJs select and play music in bars, nightclubs, or discothèques, or at parties or raves, or even in stadiums. Hip hop DJs select and play music using multiple turntables to back up one or more MCs/rappers, perform turntable scratching to create percussive sounds, and are also often music producers who use turntablism and sampling to create backing instrumentals for new tracks. In reggae, the DJ is a vocalist who raps, "toasts", or chats over pre-recorded rhythm tracks while the individual choosing and playing them is referred to as a selector. Mobile DJs travel with portable sound systems and play recorded music at a variety of events. Some Mobile DJs also serve as the Master of Ceremonies or MC directing the attention of attendees, and maintaining a room-wide focus on what is included in the event's agenda. According to a 2012 study there are approximately 1¼ million professional disc jockeys in the world.

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Football team

Football team

A football team is the collective name given to a group of players selected together in the various team sports known as football. Such teams could be selected to play in a match against an opposing team, to represent a football club, group, state or nation, an All-star team or even selected as a hypothetical team and never play an actual match. There are several varieties of football, with the most notable being Association football, Gridiron football, Australian rules football, Gaelic football, rugby league and rugby union. The number of players selected for each team within these varieties and their associated codes can vary substantially. In some, use of the word "team" is sometimes limited to those who play on the field in a match and does not always include other players who may take part as replacements or emergency players. "Football squad" may be used to be inclusive of these support and reserve players. The term football club is the most commonly used for a sports club which is an organised or incorporated body with a president, committee and a set of rules responsible for ensuring the continued playing existence of one or more teams which are selected for regular competition play. The oldest football clubs date back to the early 19th century. The word team and club are sometimes used interchangeably by supporters, although typically refers to the team within the club playing in the highest division or competition.

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Line of scrimmage

Line of scrimmage

In American and Canadian football, a line of scrimmage is an imaginary transverse line beyond which a team cannot cross until the next play has begun. Its location is based on the spot where the ball is placed after the end of the most recent play and following the assessment of any penalty yards. A line of scrimmage is parallel to the goal lines and touches one edge of the ball where it sits on the ground prior to the snap. Under NFL, NCAA, and NFHS rules, there are actually two lines of scrimmage at the outset of each play: one that restricts the offense and one that restricts the defense. The area between the two lines is called the neutral zone. Only the center, the offensive player who snaps the ball, is allowed to have any part of his body in the neutral zone. In order for there to be a legal beginning of a play, a certain number of the players on the offensive team, including certain eligible receivers, must be at, on or within a few inches off their line of scrimmage. In Canadian football, the team on defense must line up no nearer than a yard to the line of scrimmage. In American football, they must only be beyond the line.

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FOB

FOB

FOB is a 1980 Obie Award-winning play by American playwright David Henry Hwang. Hwang's first play, it depicts the contrasts and conflicts between established Asian Americans and "fresh off the boat" newcomer immigrants. The play premiered at the Stanford Asian American Theatre Project in 1979 under the direction of the author and was further developed at the National Playwrights Conference at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center. It received its professional debut on June 8, 1980 Off-Broadway at the Joseph Papp Public Theater. It was directed by Mako, with John Lone and Tzi Ma in the cast. It is published as part of Trying to Find Chinatown: The Selected Plays by Theatre Communications Group and also in an acting edition published by Dramatists Play Service.

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Translations

Translations

Translations is a three-act play by Irish playwright Brian Friel, written in 1980. It is set in Baile Beag, a Donegal village in 19th century agricultural Ireland. Friel has said that Translations is "a play about language and only about language", but it deals with a wide range of issues, stretching from language and communication to Irish history and cultural imperialism. Friel responds strongly to both political and language questions in modern-day Northern Ireland. He said that his play "should have been written in Irish" but, despite this fact, he crafted carefully the verbal action in English which makes the dynamics of the play come alive, and brings its political questions into true focus. Baile Beag is a fictional village, created by Friel as a setting for several of his plays, although there are many real places called Ballybeg throughout Ireland.

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Loot

Loot

Loot is a two-act play by the English playwright Joe Orton. The play is a dark farce that satirises the Roman Catholic Church, social attitudes to death, and the integrity of the police force. Loot was Orton's third major production, following Entertaining Mr Sloane and the television play The Good and Faithful Servant. Playing with the conventions of popular farce, Orton creates a hectic world and examines English attitudes and perceptions in the mid twentieth century. The play won several awards in its London run and has since gained a reputation as a comic masterpiece and has had many revivals.

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Toy

Toy

A toy is any item that can be used for play. Toys are generally played with by children and pets. Playing with toys is an enjoyable means of training the young for life in society. Different materials are used to make toys enjoyable to both young and old. Many items are designed to serve as toys, but goods produced for other purposes can also be used. For instance, a small child may pick up a household item and "fly" it through the air as to pretend that it is an airplane. Another consideration is interactive digital entertainment. Some toys are produced primarily as collector's items and are intended for display only. The origin of toys is prehistoric; dolls representing infants, animals, and soldiers, as well as representations of tools used by adults are readily found at archaeological sites. The origin of the word "toy" is unknown, but it is believed that it was first used in the 14th century. Toys, and play in general, are important when it comes to growing up and learning about the world around us. The young use toys and play to discover their identity, help their bodies grow strong, learn cause and effect, explore relationships, and practice skills they will need as adults. Adults use toys and play to form and strengthen social bonds, teach, remember and reinforce lessons from their youth, discover their identity, exercise their minds and bodies, explore relationships, practice skills, and decorate their living spaces.

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Pygmalion

Pygmalion

Pygmalion is a 1912 play by George Bernard Shaw, named after a Greek mythological character. Professor of phonetics Henry Higgins makes a bet that he can train a bedraggled Cockney flower girl, Eliza Doolittle, to pass for a duchess at an ambassador's garden party by teaching her to assume a veneer of gentility, the most important element of which, he believes, is impeccable speech. The play is a sharp lampoon of the rigid British class system of the day and a commentary on women's independence. In ancient Greek mythology, Pygmalion fell in love with one of his sculptures that came to life and was a popular subject for Victorian era English playwrights, including one of Shaw's influences, W. S. Gilbert, who wrote a successful play based on the story in 1871, called Pygmalion and Galatea. Shaw also would have been familiar with the burlesque version, Galatea, or Pygmalion Reversed. Shaw's play has been adapted numerous times, most notably as the musical My Fair Lady and the film of that name.

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Ernie

Ernie

Ernie is a fictional character, a Muppet on the Public Broadcasting Service's long-running children's television show, Sesame Street. He and his roommate Bert form a comic duo that is one of the program's centerpieces, with Ernie acting the role of the naïve troublemaker and Bert the world-weary foil. Ernie's birthday is January 28. Ernie is well known for his fondness for baths with his Rubber Duckie, and for trying to learn to play the saxophone although he would not "put down the duckie." Ernie is also known for keeping Bert awake at night, for reasons such as wanting to play the drums, wanting to count something, to observe something like a blackout, or even because he is waiting for his upstairs neighbor to drop his shoes. That happens also in Play with Me Sesame. He has a distinctive, chuckling laugh. His appearance and clothing contrast noticeably with Bert, as he is the shorter and stouter of the pair, wears a shirt with horizontal stripes as opposed to Bert's vertical ones, and has a head that is wider than it is high. In addition, Ernie has no visible eyebrows, while Bert displays a unibrow. Many Ernie and Bert sketches involve Ernie wanting to play a game with Bert, who would much rather do something else. Ernie keeps annoying Bert with the game until Bert joins in – and usually, by the time Bert starts enjoying the game, Ernie is tired of playing the game and wants to do something else. Other sketches have involved them sharing some food by dividing it equally, only for one of them to have a bit more than the other, leading Ernie to make it even by eating the extra piece.

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Exhibition game

Exhibition game

An exhibition game is a sporting event in which there is no competitive value of any significant kind to any competitor regardless of the outcome of the competition. The games can be held between separate teams or between parts of the same team. Quality of play is generally valued over the result. The term scrimmage is also sometimes used, especially with regard to team sports, but is ambiguous because it has other meanings even in that context. Another synonym is preparation match. A related concept is a warmup match, where teams who will play in a tournament with one another first play in unrelated matches in order to select players for the tournament and to familiarise themselves with the playing fields. Throughout the world, many team and one-on-one sports and games feature exhibition matches. For example, two professional snooker or chess players, or two ice hockey teams, may play an exhibition to settle a challenge, to provide professional entertainment, or often to raise money for charities. In some sports exhibition games also take the form of a handful of pre-season games that are intended to familiarize teammates with each other and prepare for upcoming matches. In professional sports, pre-season games also help teams decide which players to keep for the regular season.

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Drop goal

Drop goal

A drop goal, also referred to as a dropped goal or field goal, is a method of scoring points in rugby union and rugby league and also, rarely, in American football and Canadian football. A drop goal cannot be scored in open play by punting the ball, and instead must be scored by drop kicking the ball over the crossbar and between the uprights. After the kick, the ball may touch the crossbar or goalposts, but not the ground, before it goes over and through. A drop goal is worth three points in rugby union and one point in rugby league. If the drop goal attempt is successful, play stops and the non-scoring team restarts play with a kick from the centre spot. If the kick is unsuccessful, the offside rules for a kick apply and play continues until a normal stoppage occurs, usually by the kicked ball going dead or into touch. Defenders may tackle the kicker while he is in possession of the ball, or attempt to charge down or block the kick.

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Power forward

Power forward

Power forward is a position in the sport of basketball. The position is referred to in playbook terms as the four position and is commonly abbreviated "PF". It has also been referred to as the "post" position. Power forwards play a role similar to that of center in what is called the "post" or "low blocks". They typically play offensively with their backs towards the basket and position themselves defensively under the basket in a zone defense or against the opposing power forward in man-to-man defense. The power forward position entails a variety of responsibilities. Many power forwards are noted for their mid-range jump-shot, and several players have become very accurate from 12 to 18 feet. These skills are more typically exhibited in the European style of play. In the NBA, power forwards usually range from 6' 8" to 7' and 240 to 260 pounds or more. Despite the averages, a variety of players fit "tweener" roles which finds them in the small forward and/or center position depending upon matchups and coaching decisions. Some "natural" power forwards often play the center position and have the skills but lack the height that is associated with that position.

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Nightwatchman

Nightwatchman

In the sport of cricket, a nightwatchman is a lower-order batsman who comes in to bat higher up the order than usual near the end of the day's play. This nightwatchman's job is to maintain most of the strike until the close of play and so protect other, more capable batsmen from being out cheaply in what may be a period of tiredness or in poor light. The theory is that losing two top-order batsmen in quick succession would be worse than losing one top-order batsman and a tailender. However the nightwatchman's effort is not considered to be wasted, nor is he expected to play foolishly; otherwise he would not last very long. The role of nightwatchman is generally given to players who emphasise defensive technique over quick run-scoring. However there have been occasions when nightwatchmen have made a big score, and six have made centuries in test matches. Generally speaking, the nightwatchman plays conservatively on the night, but the next day may be allowed a freer role to score runs. The tactic has its drawbacks; in particular, if the nightwatchman does survive until the end of the day, the beginning of the next day's play will see refreshed bowlers with better light facing a less capable batsman. As a result, not all captains utilise the tactic; Steve Waugh, for example, abandoned the tactic during his captaincy of Australia.

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Saint Joan

Saint Joan

Saint Joan is a play by George Bernard Shaw, based on the life and trial of Joan of Arc. Published not long after the canonization of Joan of Arc by the Roman Catholic Church, the play dramatises what is known of her life based on the substantial records of her trial. Shaw studied the transcripts and decided that the concerned people acted in good faith according to their beliefs. He wrote in his preface to the play: There are no villains in the piece. Crime, like disease, is not interesting: it is something to be done away with by general consent, and that is all [there is] about it. It is what men do at their best, with good intentions, and what normal men and women find that they must and will do in spite of their intentions, that really concern us. Michael Holroyd has characterised the play as "a tragedy without villains" and also as Shaw's "only tragedy". John Fielden has discussed further the appropriateness of characterising Saint Joan as a tragedy.

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Wide receiver

Wide receiver

A wide receiver is an offensive position in American and Canadian football, and is the key player in most of the passing plays. The wide receiver position requires speed and agility. Only players in the backfield or the ends on the line are eligible to catch a forward pass. The two players who begin play at the ends of the offensive line are eligible receivers, as are all players in the backfield. The backs and ends who are relatively near the sidelines are referred to as "wide" receivers. At the start of play, one wide receiver may begin play in the backfield, at least a yard behind the line of scrimmage, as is shown in the diagram at the right. The wide receiver on the right begins play in the backfield. Such positioning allows another player, usually the tight end, to become the eligible receiver on that side of the line. Such positioning defines the strong side of the field. This is the right side of the field in the diagram shown. The wide receiver is a position in American and Canadian football that functions as the pass-catching specialist. Wide receivers are among the fastest and most agile players in the game, and they are frequent highlight-reel favorites. Examples of modern wide receivers include Larry Fitzgerald, Andre Johnson, Calvin Johnson, A.J. Green, and Julio Jones.

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Swingman

Swingman

A Swingman is a basketball term denoting a player who can play both the small forward and shooting guard positions, and, in essence, swing between the shooting guard and small forward positions." Swingmen males are often between 6'4" and 6'8". John Havlicek, who played for the Boston Celtics in the 1960s and 70s, is an example of a swingman. However, he played before the term came widely into use. The "swingman" concept first came into vogue in the late 1970s and early 1980s, when star players such as George "The Iceman" Gervin defied traditional pigeonholing into the 2 or 3 position. The best swingmen use their "in-between" height and athleticism to exploit defensive mismatches: they will use speed and quickness to run past bigger players, and they can post up using power and length against smaller players, or they can shoot over the top of smaller players with their jump shots. Some swingmen have been known to play both the small forward and shooting guard positions equally effectively, having the size and strength to play the small forward position, as well as the outside jump shot and quickness to play the shooting guard position. These swingmen prove to cause match-up problems and to be very difficult to guard due to their versatility.

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Cleansed

Cleansed

Cleansed is the third play by the English playwright Sarah Kane. It was first performed in 1998 at the Royal Court Theatre Downstairs in London. The play is set in a university which has been converted into some form of bizarre institution under the rule of the sadistic Tinker. When the play premiered at the Royal Court in April 1998, Kane played the part of Grace for the last three performances because of an injury that the original actress suffered. It is sometimes claimed that Tinker was named after the theatre critic for British newspaper The Daily Mail, Jack Tinker, whose review of Kane's first play Blasted was headlined "this disgusting feast of filth", but there does not appear to be any evidence of Kane confirming this.

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Word play

Word play

Word play or wordplay is a literary technique and a form of wit in which the words that are used become the main subject of the work, primarily for the purpose of intended effect or amusement. Puns, phonetic mix-ups such as spoonerisms, obscure words and meanings, clever rhetorical excursions, oddly formed sentences, and telling character names are common examples of word play. Word play is quite common in oral cultures as a method of reinforcing meaning. Examples of visual orthographic and sound-based word play abound in both alphabetically and non-alphabetically written literature.

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Deathtrap

Deathtrap

Deathtrap is a play by Ira Levin in 1978 with many plot twists and references itself as a play within a play. It is in two acts with one set and five characters. It holds the record for the longest running comedy-thriller on Broadway and was also nominated for the Tony Award for Best Play. Deathtrap was well received by many and has been frequently revived. It was adapted into a film starring Christopher Reeve, Michael Caine, and Dyan Cannon in 1982.

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Richard III

Richard III

Richard III is a history play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in approximately 1592. It depicts the Machiavellian rise to power and subsequent short reign of Richard III of England. The play is grouped among the histories in the First Folio and is most often classified as such. Occasionally, however, as in the quarto edition, it is termed a tragedy. Richard III concludes Shakespeare's first tetralogy. It is the second longest play in the canon after Hamlet, and is the longest of the First Folio, whose version of Hamlet is shorter than its Quarto counterpart. The play is rarely performed unabridged; often, certain peripheral characters are removed entirely. In such instances extra lines are often invented or added from elsewhere in the sequence to establish the nature of characters' relationships. A further reason for abridgment is that Shakespeare assumed that his audiences would be familiar with the Henry VI plays, and frequently made indirect references to events in them, such as Richard's murder of Henry VI or the defeat of Henry's queen Margaret.

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Old Times

Old Times

Old Times is a play by the Nobel Laureate Harold Pinter. It was first performed by the Royal Shakespeare Company at the Aldwych Theatre in London on June 1, 1971. It starred Colin Blakely, Dorothy Tutin, and Vivien Merchant, and was directed by Peter Hall. The play was dedicated to Hall to celebrate his 40th birthday. Peter Hall also directed the Broadway première, which opened at the Billy Rose Theater in New York on November 16, 1971, starring Robert Shaw, Rosemary Harris and Mary Ure; and a year later, the German language premiére of the play at the Burgtheater in Vienna, with Maximilian Schell, Erika Pluhar and Anna-Marie Duringer. In February 2007 Hall returned again to the play directing a new production with his Theatre Royal, Bath company.

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Punchball

Punchball

Punchball is a sport spawned by and similar to baseball, but without a pitcher, catcher, or bat. The "batter" essentially plays "fungo" without a bat, bouncing or tossing up the ball and then using a volleyball-type approach to put the ball in play, punching the ball with his closed fist. Stealing and bunting are not allowed. Historian and baseball enthusiast Stephen Jay Gould referred to it as "the canonical recess game", and in The Boys of Summer baseball writer Roger Kahn described how when he grew up it was a boys game, as the girls played "slapball". Baseball Hall of Famers Jackie Robinson, Sandy Koufax, and Yogi Berra played it growing up, as did sports team owner Jerry Reinsdorf, educator Frank Marascio, and former US Secretary of State and general Colin Powell. Major league outfielder Rocky Colavito, when asked if he played punchball, answered "Play it? Man, that was my game. I liked to play that more than anything else ... anything. We used to play for money, too." It was also a pastime of football announcer Al Michaels, who often played with former Chicago Bears quarterback Sid Luckman.

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Gone Too Far!

Gone Too Far!

Gone Too Far! is a 2007 play written by British playwright Bola Agbaje. Drawing on Agbaje's ethnic Nigerian background and London upbringing, the play focuses on one day in the lives of several young black people who live in a London council estate. The play explores the numerous tensions and conflicts between the various identities - Nigerian, British, West Indian, black, white, mixed-race and Asian. The play premiered at the Royal Court Theatre in February 2007 and received generally positive reviews.

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Forward pass

Forward pass

In several forms of football a forward pass is a throwing of the ball in the direction that the offensive team is trying to move, towards the defensive team's goal line. The forward pass is one of main distinguishers between gridiron football in which the play is legal and widespread, and rugby football from which the North American games evolved, in which the play is illegal. In some football codes, such as association football, the kicked forward pass is used so ubiquitously that it is not thought of as a distinct kind of play at all. In these sports, the concept of offside is used to regulate who can be in front of the play or be nearest to the goal. However, this has not always been the case. Some earlier incarnations of football allowed unlimited forward passing, while others had strict offside rules similar to rugby. The development of the forward pass in American football shows how the game has evolved from its rugby roots into the distinctive game it is today. Illegal and experimental forward passes had been attempted as early as 1876, but the first legal forward pass in American football took place in 1906, after a change in rules. Another change in rules occurred on January 18, 1951, which established that no center, tackle, or guard could receive a forward pass. Today, the only linemen who can receive a forward pass are the ends. Current rules regulate who may throw and who may receive a forward pass, and under what circumstances, as well as how the defensive team may try to prevent a pass from being completed. The primary pass thrower is the quarterback, and statistical analysis is used to determine a quarterback's success rate at passing in various situations, as well as a team's overall success at the "passing game."

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Macduff

Macduff

Macduff, the Thane of Fife, is a character in William Shakespeare's Macbeth. Macduff plays a pivotal role in the play: he suspects Macbeth of regicide and eventually kills Macbeth in the final act. He is the main antagonist, yet the hero, in the play. The character is first known from Chronica Gentis Scotorum and Orygynale Cronykil of Scotland. Shakespeare drew mostly from Holinshed's Chronicles. Although characterized sporadically throughout the play, Macduff serves as a foil to Macbeth, a figure of morality, and an instrument to the play’s desired excision of femininity.

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Stage Door

Stage Door

Stage Door is a 1937 RKO film, adapted from the play by the same name, that tells the story of several would-be actresses who live together in a boarding house at 158 West 58th Street in New York City. The film stars Katharine Hepburn, Ginger Rogers, Adolphe Menjou, Gail Patrick, Constance Collier, Andrea Leeds, Samuel S. Hinds and Lucille Ball. Eve Arden and Ann Miller, who became notable in later films, play minor characters. The film was adapted by Morrie Ryskind and Anthony Veiller from the play by Edna Ferber and George S. Kaufman, but the play's storyline and the characters' names were almost completely changed for the movie, so much so in fact that Kaufman joked the film should be called "Screen Door". Stage Door was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture and Leeds was nominated as Best Supporting Actress.

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Piaf

Piaf

Piaf is a play by Pam Gems that focuses on the life and career of French chanteuse Edith Piaf. The biographical drama with music portrays the singer in a most unflattering light. She is presented as a self-destructive, promiscuous alcoholic and junkie who, in one controversial scene, urinates in public. It premiered in 1978 at RSC. The Other Place in Stratford-upon-Avon, after which it moved to The Donmar theatre London and then Aldwych Theatre, then The Piccadilly then Wyndham's theatres, before going to the USA, first Philadelphia, then opened on Broadway at the Plymouth theater 1980. Jane Lapotaire won the TONY award 1981 The production starred Jane Lapotaire in the title role, and included Ian Charleson as Pierre. The play was performed in Argentina from 1983-86 with Virginia Lago in the role of Piaf. Lago won the Premio Estrella de Mar award in 1984 for Best Actress and in 1984 the Prensario Award for Best Actress. A London revival occurred in 1993/94 with Elaine Paige in the role of Piaf. In 1994 the play won the Gold Badge of Merit Award from BASCA. In 1994 Paige gained a nomination for the Olivier Award for Best Actress in a Musical. The play was performed in Uruguay from 1994 to 1995 with Laura Canoura in the role of Piaf. In 1995 she won the Iris de Plata Award.

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Edward III

Edward III

The Raigne of King Edvvard the Third, commonly shortened to Edward III, is an Elizabethan play printed anonymously in 1596. It has frequently been claimed that it was at least partly written by William Shakespeare, a view that Shakespeare scholars have increasingly endorsed. The rest of the play was probably written by Thomas Kyd. The play contains many gibes at Scotland and the Scottish people, which has led some critics to think that it is the work that incited George Nicolson, Queen Elizabeth's agent in Edinburgh, to protest against the portrayal of Scots on the London stage in a 1598 letter to William Cecil, Lord Burghley. This would explain why the play was not included in the First Folio of Shakespeare's works, which was published after the Scottish King James had succeeded to the English throne in 1603.

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Eredivisie

Eredivisie

The Eredivisie is the highest echelon of professional football in the Netherlands. The league was founded in 1956, two years after the start of professional football in the Netherlands. It is currently ranked the ninth best league in Europe by UEFA. The top division consists of 18 clubs. Each club faces every other club twice during the season, once at home and once away. At the end of each season, the bottom club is automatically relegated to the second level of the Dutch league system, the Eerste Divisie, with the champion of the Eerste Divisie automatically promoted to the Eredivisie. The next two clubs from the bottom of the Eredivisie go to separate promotion/relegation play-offs. The play-offs are played in two groups. Each group has one Eredivisie club and three high-placed clubs from the Eerste Divisie. In both promotion/relegation play-off groups, each club plays a home-and-away series with the other clubs. The winner of each play-off group plays in the following season's Eredivisie, with the other teams going to the Eerste Divisie. The winner of the Eredivisie claims the Dutch national championship. AFC Ajax have won the most titles, 24. PSV Eindhoven are next with 18, and Feyenoord follow with 9. Since 1965, these three clubs have won all except for three titles.

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Paul Morphy

Paul Morphy

Paul Charles Morphy was an American chess player. He is considered to have been the greatest chess master of his era and an unofficial World Chess Champion. He was a chess prodigy. He was called "The Pride and Sorrow of Chess" because he had a brief and brilliant chess career, but then retired from the game while still young. Morphy was born in New Orleans, Louisiana to a wealthy and distinguished family. He learned to play chess by simply watching games between his father and uncle. His family soon realized the boy's talent and encouraged him to play at family gatherings and by age nine he was considered one of the best players in New Orleans. At just twelve years old, Morphy defeated visiting Hungarian master Johann Löwenthal in a match of three games. After receiving his degree in 1857, Morphy was not yet of legal age to practice law and found himself with free time. He received an invitation to play at the First American Chess Congress in New York City and, at his uncle's urging, accepted. Morphy won the tournament which included strong players of the day, such as Alexander Meek and Louis Paulsen. Morphy was hailed as the chess champion of the United States and stayed in New York playing chess through 1857, winning the vast majority of his games. In 1858, Morphy travelled to Europe to play European Champion Howard Staunton. While negotiations for a match proved problematic, Morphy played every strong player in Europe, usually winning easily. While the match with Staunton never came about, Morphy was hailed by most in Europe as the world's best player.

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Triple play

Triple play

In baseball, a triple play is the rare act of making three outs during the same continuous play. There are many ways a triple play can be performed; most of them are done with runners on first and second base. Typically, a ball hit to the shortstop or third baseman is fielded, the runner heading to third is forced out or tagged out, the ball is thrown to second base for a force play, and then finally to first to throw out the batter. Another common sequence is a line drive to the shortstop or second baseman that is caught without the runners noticing or after they have taken large leads, the runners then being forced or tagged out when they fail to tag up.

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Playwork

Playwork

Playwork is the work of creating and maintaining spaces for children to play. The theory and practice of playwork recognises that children's play must be 'Freely chosen, personally driven and intrinsically motivated.' Children's playing must not be 'Adulterated' by any adult or external agendas. It is the job of a playworker to ensure that the broadest possible range of Play Types is available to children, to observe, reflect and analyse the playing that is happening and select a mode of intervention or make a change to the playspace if needed. The profession has its roots in the early Adventure Playground movement and can now be studied to degree and masters levels. Playwork should not be confused with Childcare, Childcare is entirely structured play. Being qualified in Playwork can lead to a wide range of jobs, including working for Early Years, Sure Start, Out of School Clubs, Youth Clubs and other community groups.

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Tenuki

Tenuki

Tenuki is a Japanese go term also commonly used among Western players. It describes ignoring a local sequence on the board in order to play elsewhere. The maneuver is related to the concepts of sente, or taking the initiative, and gote, deferring to the opponent by responding to the last play. A player will tenuki when he feels that his opponent's last move does not pose an urgent threat, and he judges that playing elsewhere would be to his advantage. Experienced players try to control the flow of the game by making moves that leave them with effective follow-ups, thus forcing the opponent to respond. They look for weaknesses in the opponent's position and wait for a chance to tenuki so they can exploit those weaknesses. Novice players are less consistent, sometimes jumping carelessly away from situations in a risky way, and on other occasions being reluctant to play tenuki, a failing identified as following the opponent around. A player may also tenuki even though the opponent's last move is somewhat damaging, if he feels that his play will be even more damaging to the opponent. He would be willing to accept the loss he anticipates, because he expects a greater gain from the move he makes instead of answering. Players also tenuki when they believe that the opponent will be required to answer. If this happens, they can then go back and answer the previous move.

— Freebase

You Never Can Tell

You Never Can Tell

You Never Can Tell is an 1897 four-act play by George Bernard Shaw that debuted at the Royalty Theatre. It was published as part of a volume of Shaw's plays entitled Plays Pleasant. In June 2011, the play was revived at the Coliseum Theatre in Aberystwyth, Wales, where it had been performed exactly one century earlier. The play is set in a seaside town and tells the story of Mrs Clandon and her three children, Dolly, Phillip and Gloria, who have just returned to England after an eighteen-year stay in Madeira. The children have no idea who their father is and, through a comedy of errors, end up inviting him to a family lunch. At the same time a dentist named Mr Valentine has fallen in love with the eldest daughter, Gloria. However, Gloria considers herself a modern woman and claims to have no interest in love or marriage. The play continues with a comedy of errors and confused identities, with the friendly and wise waiter, Walter, dispensing his wisdom with the titular phrase "You Never Can Tell."

— Freebase

Kjeld Abell

Kjeld Abell

Kjeld Abell was a Danish playwright and theatrical designer. Born in Ribe, Denmark, Abell's first designs were seen in ballets directed by George Balanchine at Copenhagen's Royal Danish Theatre and London's Alhambra Theatre. Roughly the dramatic work of Abell might be divided into three phases: a criticism of middle class conventions, b fighting Nazism and c criticism of post-war pessimism and urge for death. Perhaps he is the first consequent modernist among Danish playwrights with his use of a flash back Chinese box system and a growing use of symbols and parallel actions. His first play was Melodien, der blev vœk 1935,. The play is an expressionistic piece that utilizes non-verbal and unrealistic elements, undoubtedly inspired by ballet. The first production of this play was in 1935 in Copenhagen followed by a production a year later in London by the Arts Theatre. In this play Abell describes the life of the "white-collar worker" limited by old-fashioned conventions and it is a fantasy about the mental emancipation of “the little man”. A young, disrespectful attitude together with a both lyric and imaginative dialogue has let it remain his most popular work and some of its song lines have become classics.

— Freebase

Whores

Whores

Whores is a play by Lee Blessing. Whores features Raoul de Raoul, a fictional Central American dictator of an unnamed country. The play alternates between what is presumably reality, where he is living in Florida and defending himself against charges of war crimes, and his imagination, where four nuns play out roles such as his family, pornographic video stars, or dance teachers. The four women are based on the real life death of three nuns and one social worker who were beaten, raped, and murdered by five members of the National Guard of El Salvador, which was armed and supported by the United States. The play attacks both the dictatorships and the United States policies that support them; Raoul complains: "You send us rifles and nuns. You are the least consistent people on the face of the earth." Raoul realizes that he has little power without the backing of the United States; his sexual impotence develops analogously.

— Freebase

WAUK

WAUK

WAUK is a radio station licensed to the Washington County community of Jackson, Wisconsin, serving the Milwaukee area. It is known on-air as 540 ESPN. WAUK airs a blend of ESPN Radio talk and sports play-by play, along with local sports talk and play-by-play programming. The station is owned by Beaver Dam-based Good Karma Broadcasting, LLC, and owned by Craig Karmazin, son of legendary radio executive and current Sirius XM Radio CEO Mel Karmazin. It is the local rival of Entercom's all-sports station WSSP, and to a lesser extent WOKY, which simulcasts Madison's WTSO. Programming from WAUK is shared with WTLX in Madison, which is its sister station to west in the state capital city.

— Freebase

Free Play

Free Play

Free Play is a literary concept from Jacques Derrida's 1966 essay, "Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences." In his essay, Derrida speaks of a philosophical “event” that has occurred to the historic foundation of structure. Before the “event,” man was the center of all things; therefore, everything was compared to the ideas and images of man. After the “event,” however, man could no longer be judged the center of the universe. Without this centralized reference, all that is left is “free play.” [U]p until the event which I wish to mark out and define, structure-or rather the structurality of structure-although it has always been involved, has always been neutralized or reduced, and this by a process of giving it a center or referring it to a point of presence, a fixed origin. The function of this center was not only to orient, balance, and organize the structure-one cannot in fact conceive of an unorganized structure-but above all to make sure that the organizing principle of the structure would limit what we might call the freeplay of the structure. No doubt that by orienting and organizing the coherence of the system, the center of a structure permits the freeplay of its elements inside the total form. And even today the notion of a structure lacking any center represents the unthinkable itself. – "Structure, Sign and Play" in Writing and Difference, p. 278

— Freebase

The Deputy

The Deputy

The Deputy, a Christian tragedy, also known as The Representative, is a controversial 1963 play by Rolf Hochhuth which portrayed Pope Pius XII as having failed to take action or speak out against the Holocaust. It has been translated into more than twenty languages. The play's implicit censure of a venerable if controversial pope has led to numerous counterattacks, of which one of the latest is the 2007 allegation that Hochhuth was the dupe of a KGB disinformation campaign. The Encyclopedia Britannica assesses the play as "a drama that presented a critical, unhistorical picture of Pius XII" and Hochhuth's depiction of the pope having been indifferent to the Nazi genocide as "lacking credible substantiation"." An English translation by Richard and Clara Winston of the complete text was published as The Deputy: A Play, by Grove Press in 1964. A letter from Albert Schweitzer to Hochhuth's German publisher serves as the foreword to the Grove edition. A film version titled Amen. was made by the Greek-born French filmmaker Costa-Gavras in 2002.

— Freebase

Association football pitch

Association football pitch

A football pitch is the playing surface for the game of football made of turf. Its dimensions and markings are defined by Law 1 of the Laws of the Game, "The Field of Play". All line markings on the pitch form part of the area which they define. For example, a ball on or above the touchline is still on the field of play; a ball on the line of the goal area is in the goal area; and a foul committed over the 16.5-metre line has occurred in the penalty area. Therefore a ball must completely cross the touchline to be out of play, and a ball must wholly cross the goal line before a goal is scored; if any part of the ball is still on or above the line, the ball is still in play. The field descriptions that apply to adult matches are described below. Note that due to the original formulation of the Laws in England and the early supremacy of the four British football associations within IFAB, the standard dimensions of a football pitch were originally expressed in imperial units. The Laws now express dimensions with approximate metric equivalents, but use of the imperial units remains common in some countries, especially in the United Kingdom.

— Freebase

Kick-in

Kick-in

In the sport of Australian rules football, a kick-in occurs when an opposition team scores a behind, with a defender kicking the ball out from the defensive goalsquare. The team kicking in may elect any one of its players to take the kick-in. The man on the mark stands five metres in front of the goal square. The player kicking in is given approximately ten to fifteen seconds from when they pick up the ball to take their kick before the umpire will call play-on, at which point the man on the mark may advance. Players kicking in may either kick to a teammate, or kick to themselves to allow themselves to play on. Whichever option is taken, the player must kick from wholly within the white lines of the goal square, even if the umpire has already called play-on for taking too much time - if their foot touches the line of the goal square, then play is stopped and the umpire will bounce the ball at the centre of the kick-off line. If a kick-in goes out of bounds without being touched by another player, the boundary umpire will signal out on the full and award a free kick to the opposition, whether or not the ball has bounced before going out. This is to prevent teams from getting their longest kicker to kick for touch. Kicking to oneself satisfies the kick-in condition, so any further kick taken will be treated normally.

— Freebase

The Suppliants

The Suppliants

The Suppliants is a play by Aeschylus. It was probably first performed sometime after 470 BC as the first play in a tetralogy, sometimes referred to as the Danaid Tetralogy, which probably included the lost plays The Egyptians, and The Daughters of Danaus, and the satyr play Amymone. It was long thought to be the earliest surviving play by Aeschylus due to the relatively anachronistic function of the chorus as the protagonist of the drama. However, evidence discovered in the mid-20th century shows it one of Aeschylus' last plays, definitely after The Persians and possibly after Seven Against Thebes.

— Freebase

The Misanthrope

The Misanthrope

The Misanthrope, or the Cantankerous Lover is a 17th-century comedy of manners in verse written by Molière. It was first performed on 4 June 1666 at the Théâtre du Palais-Royal, Paris by the King's Players. The play satirizes the hypocrisies of French aristocratic society, but it also engages a more serious tone when pointing out the flaws which all humans possess. The play differs from other farces at the time by employing dynamic characters like Alceste and Célimène as opposed to the traditionally flat characters used by most satirists to criticize problems in society. It also differs from most of Molière's other works by focusing more on character development and nuances than on plot progression. The play, though not a commercial success in its time, survives as Molière's best known work today. Because both Tartuffe and Dom Juan, two of Molière's previous plays, had already been banned by the French government, Molière may have subdued his actual ideas to make his play more socially acceptable.

— Freebase

DraftMix

DraftMix

On DraftMix fantasy sports fans can sign up and play pickup games against other players on the site for virtual dollars or for real money . Open games are listed in a lobby, where players can sign up in groups ranging from 4 to 10 players each paying into a prize pool. DraftMix also ponies up a nightly cash prize for a free game as well.When a game is full, players pick their teams from active profession players. Each fantasy manager’s team is scored on their players stats in the upcoming “real world” games. Since stats are needed to find the winning team, the time it takes to finish a game varies by sport. Football fantasy games are finished weekly, since all the teams play each Sunday. Basketball can finish a bit faster since teams play daily. The manager with the most points wins the money pot, with 10% of real cash games going to DraftMix.Now all this may sound fine playing fantasy sports for fantasy dollars, but doesn’t bringing real money into play amount to internet gambling? No, says co-founder Matt Maroon, who points the the fantasy sports exemption in the Internet Gambling Prohibition and Enforcement Act. The act, which was a big blow to sites like PartyPoker, specifically exempts “participation in any fantasy or simulation sports game or educational game or contest”. Fantasy sports is seen as a game of skill and played for a fixed cash prize. Although a quick perusal of the exemption leaves feeling they’re at least bending the rules.Also in the realm of fantasy sport startups are Screaming Sports and Fleaflicker.

— CrunchBase

EQUISO

EQUISO

Equiso Smart TV - Make your dumb tv… smart.Turn any TV into a Smart TV. Android 4.0. Control it with the wave of a hand, using our revolutionary gesture remote. Equiso puts the Power of an Android tablet on your TV. Combined with our interactive remote, Equiso will truly refine your TV experience.Watch stunning 1080p HD content from Netflix, Hulu Plus, YouTube and many more! Send emails, update your facebook status, play Angry Birds or Fruit Ninja like never before. Download new apps, create and display a powerpoint, listen to music, read books, and play most all those interactive games you love so much on your phone or tablet.Imagine showing up to do a presentation, and all you had to do, was plug it in, grab your remote, and you’re ready to go. Game night with your buddies is now easier than ever. Bring your device with you in your pocket, plug in and play. Our 1.4 HDMI 1080p port allows for direct plugin to any TV, Monitor, or Projector. This enables any of these devices to instantly become a Smart TV and eliminates the need for extra cables. A Remote like no otherThis remote is like nothing you have ever experienced before. Advanced accelerometers and gyros sense your gestures, turning them into life like interaction with your Smart TV. Soft touch buttons on top add to your Smart TV experience. Simply flip the remote over and it becomes a full keyboard, no pain staking tasks of typing letter by letter on the screen. Flip it back over and your gesture remote is back in full action to conquer that next level of Angry Birds or Tower Defense. Don’t worry about accidentally pressing the buttons on the keyboard. Our gyros sense the remotes position and turn off the keyboard as you glide your way around. This is truly the next step into a Smart TV.Under the HoodWe wanted to created a device that was affordable for everyone without sacrificing performance.Equiso is equipped with a new, powerful, redesigned 1Ghz Arm Cortex A5 Processor. Using the lastest technology in memory it features 512MB of DDR3 memory that compliments the performance of the system. Graphics was very important as we wanted to include 3D gaming. To achieve this we installed a Mali 400 graphics processor. High Definition Streaming of movies, gaming, and music was a must, so we added a Wireless N radio that is capable of speeds up 250 megabits, to ensure blazing fast downloads. Our 1.4 HDMI plug n play interface allows for direct plugin to any TV, Monitor, or Projector and supports 3D Video. Included is 8GB of internal storage for storing music, movies, documents, games and more. We put a USB port on the back for a keyboard, a mouse, external hard drives and anything else you can plug in. Heat was a major concern for a form factor this small. For this reason we chose the most energy efficient Arm CPU per watt. We worked tirelessly on a case that would disperse the heat but handle the dust. Equiso is very quiet as there are no moving parts. We truly hope your enjoy our product.

— CrunchBase

RockLive

RockLive

RockLive is a social network that allows users to share photos, videos and private messages in real time.The company behind RockLive was founded in 2009 by John Shahidi and Sam Shahidi, and was originally called Rock Software. The company previously developed mobile games in partnership with a number of celebrity athletes, including Mike Tyson, Cristiano Ronaldo and Usain Bolt. The games featured innovative gameplay, but also strong social features, including the ability to share scores and send private messages.In December 2011, Rock Software became RockLive and in 2012, it launched a mobile game called Play Blackjack that allowed users to play blackjack in real time with others. Play Blackjack bolstered the company's reputation for creating a real time social experience by giving users the option to send photos, messages and virtual gifts to other users without pausing gameplay.In 2013 a beta version of the RockLive app launched for iOS devices. While the RockLive app is a standalone social network, it linked the company's 6 million existing users, by allowing them to share photos, videos and private messages between the app and Play Blackjack.RockLive is headquartered in San Francisco, CA.

— CrunchBase

Ober-Ammergau

Ober-Ammergau

a small village in Bavaria, 45 m. SW. of Münich; famed for the Passion Play performed there by the peasants, some 500 in number, every ten years, which attracts a great many spectators to the spot; the play was instituted in 1634 in token of gratitude for the abatement of a plague.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Reade, Charles

Reade, Charles

English novelist, born at Ipsden, in Oxfordshire; studied at Oxford; became a Fellow of Magdalen College, and was called to the bar in 1842; began his literary life by play-writing; studied the art of fiction for 15 years, and first made his mark as novelist in 1852, when he was nearly 40, by the publication of "Peg Woffington," which was followed in 1856 by "It is Never too Late to Mend," and in 1861 by "The Cloister and the Hearth," the last his best and the most popular; several of his later novels are written with a purpose, such as "Hard Cash" and "Foul Play"; his most popular plays are "Masks and Faces" and "Drink" (1814-1884).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

CYNIC

CYNIC

A man who knows the price of everything and the value of nothing. All work and no play makes Jack A Dead One. D Out of fight, out of coin.--_The Pugilist's Plaint_. DABBLE v. t., To play in water. =DABBLE IN STOCKS=--Same thing.

— The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

Measure for Measure

Measure for Measure

Measure for Measure is a play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1603 or 1604. It was classified as comedy, but its mood defies those expectations. As a result and for a variety of reasons, some critics have labelled it as one of Shakespeare's problem plays. Originally published in the First Folio of 1623, the play's first recorded performance was in 1604. The play deals with the issues of mercy, justice, and truth and their relationship to pride and humility: "Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall".

— Freebase

Karuta

Karuta

Karuta is a Japanese card game. The basic idea of any karuta game is to be able to quickly determine which card out of an array of cards is required and then to grab the card before it is grabbed by an opponent. There are various types of cards which can be used to play karuta. It is also possible to play this game using two standard decks of playing cards. There are two kinds of cards used in karuta. One kind is yomifuda or "reading cards", and the other is torifuda or "grabbing cards." As they were denoted, the words in the yomifuda are read and players will have to find its associated torifuda before anybody else does. The two types of karuta cards that are most often seen are the "uta-garuta" and "iroha-garuta". In "uta-garuta", players try to find the last two lines of a waka given the first three lines. It is often possible to identify a poem by its first one or two syllables. The poems for this game are taken from the Ogura Hyakunin Isshu and are traditionally played on New Year's Day. Anyone who can read hiragana can play "iroha-garuta". In this type, a typical torifuda features a drawing with a kana at one corner of the card. Its corresponding yomifuda features a proverb connected to the picture with the first syllable being the kana displayed on the torifuda.

— Freebase

Away

Away

Away is a play written by the Australian playwright Michael Gow, published by Currency Press in 1986. First performed by the Griffin Theatre Company in 1986, it tells the story of three internally conflicted families holidaying on the coast for Christmas, 1968. It has become one of the most widely produced Australian plays of all time and is part of the Higher School Certificate syllabi or general High School Curriculum in many states, including Western Australia, New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria. Each of the three families hopes that the holiday will resolve the crisis that they face. Roy, a headmaster, and Coral, his wife, realise that their marriage is falling apart as they grieve the death of their son in the Vietnam War. Tom, an English immigrant and a pupil at Roy's school, knows that he is dying of leukaemia even though his parents, Harry and Vic, have yet to tell him. Tom's family know that this could be their last holiday together, so they are determined to have fun. The third family comprises uptight, martyrish mother, Gwen, her husband, Jim, and their daughter, Meg, who has become friends with Tom because of their mutual appearances in the recent school play. There is a mutual affection between Meg and Tom that is explored and challenged during a sex scene, where Tom - aware that his life is soon to end - transforms into a desperate weeping puppy and begs Meg to "Let do it to". After a storm the three families find themselves thrown together on the beach that is the play's setting and their antagonism is explored and resolved.

— Freebase

Professional golfer

Professional golfer

In golf the distinction between amateurs and professionals is rigorously maintained. An amateur who breaches the rules of amateur status may lose his or her amateur status. A golfer who has lost his or her amateur status may not play in amateur competitions until amateur status has been reinstated; a professional may not play in amateur tournaments unless the Committee is notified, acknowledges and confirms the participation. It is very difficult for a professional to regain his or her amateur status; simply agreeing not to take payment for a particular tournament is not enough. A player must apply to the governing body of the sport to have amateur status reinstated. "Under the rules of golf and amateur status of the R&A, the maximum an amateur can win is £500. Under the rules of golf and amateur status of the USGA the maximum an amateur can win is $750. If an amateur accepts a prize of greater than this they forfeit their amateur status, and are therefore by definition a professional golfer". Professional golfers are divided into two main groups, with a limited amount of overlap between them: ⁕The great majority of professional golfers make their living from teaching the game, running golf clubs and courses, and dealing in golf equipment. In American English the term golf pro refers to individuals involved in the service of other golfers. The senior professional golfer at a golf club is usually referred to as the club professional, but at a large golf club or resort with several courses his job title is likely to be director of golf. If he or she has assistants who are registered professional golfers, they are known as assistant professionals. A golfer who concentrates wholly or nearly so on giving golf lessons is a teaching professional, golf instructor or golf coach. Most of these people will enter a few tournaments against their peers each year, and occasionally they may qualify to play in important tournaments with the other group of professional golfers mentioned below. Many club and teaching professionals working in the golf industry start as caddies or a general interest in the game, finding employment at golf courses and eventually moving on to certifications in their chosen profession. These programs include independent institutions and universities, and those that eventually lead to a Class A golf professional certification.

— Freebase

Fumble

Fumble

A fumble in American and Canadian football occurs when a player, who has possession and control of the ball loses it before being downed or scoring. By rule, it is any act other than passing, kicking or successful handing that results in loss of player possession. A fumble may be forced by a defensive player who either grabs or punches the ball or butts the ball with his helmet. A fumbled ball may be recovered and advanced by either team. It is one of three events that can cause a turnover, where possession of the ball can change during play. Under American rules a fumble may be confused with a muff. A muff occurs where a player drops a ball that he does not have possession of, such as while attempting to catch a lateral pass or improperly fielding a kicking play such as a punt. Ball security is the ability of a player to maintain control over the football during play and thus avoid a fumble.

— Freebase

ReCycle

ReCycle

ReCycle is a music loop editor designed and developed by Swedish software developers Propellerhead Software. It runs on Microsoft Windows and Apple Macintosh based PCs. The software debuted in 1994. The principal idea of ReCycle is to alter the tempo of a music loop without changing its pitch or otherwise altering its sound. ReCycle does this by "slicing" loops into a series of separate "beats" or "hits" and altering their timing without altering the length of the individual slices, thus allowing the loop to play at a different speed whilst using the unmodified sounds for each individual slice/drum hit, a process which fully preserves the original pitch of the loop while allowing a great variety of speed/timing tweaks. ReCycle can also assign each successive slice to a respective MIDI note on a scale. ReCycle was the first program to popularize the idea of loop slicing. Propellerhead developed their own file format for this software: REX, and later REX2 adding support for stereo files, which has become a standard for music loops and is compatible with many third party programs, including Emagic Logic, MOTU Digital Performer, and Steinberg Cubase. Propellerhead's Reason has its own specialised REX2 playing device called the Dr. Octorex Loop Player. In versions prior to Reason 5.0, it was supported in the Dr.REX Loop Player. This device can play slices when requested or simply play the entire loop in sequence.

— Freebase

In Extremis

In Extremis

In Extremis: The Story of Abelard & Heloise is a play by Howard Brenton on the story of Heloise and Abelard, which premiered at the Globe Theatre on 27 August 2006 with a 15 performance run. The play was directed by John Dove with design by Michael Taylor, and music by William Lyons. It was revived for a 2 week run from 15 May 2007 with the same director and most of the same cast. An early draft of the play was written in 1997 at the University of California at Davis during Brenton's term as its Granada Fellow, and performed by MFA students of its Drama Department.

— Freebase

Equus

Equus

Equus is a play by Peter Shaffer written in 1973, telling the story of a psychiatrist who attempts to treat a young man who has a pathological religious fascination with horses. Shaffer was inspired to write Equus when he heard of a crime involving a 17-year-old who blinded six horses in a small town near Suffolk. He set out to construct a fictional account of what might have caused the incident, without knowing any of the details of the crime. The play's action is something of a detective story, involving the attempts of the child psychiatrist, Dr. Martin Dysart, to understand the cause of the boy's actions while wrestling with his own sense of purpose. The stage show ran in London between 1973 and 1975: later came the Broadway productions that starred Anthony Hopkins as Dysart, and from the London production, Peter Firth as Alan. The Broadway production ran for 1,209 performances. However, numerous other issues inform the narrative. Most important are religious and ritual sacrifice themes, and the manner in which character Alan Strang constructs a personal theology involving the horses and the supreme godhead, "Equus". Alan sees the horses as representative of God and confuses his adoration of his "God" with sexual attraction. Also important is Shaffer's examination of the conflict between personal values and satisfaction and societal mores, expectations and institutions. In reference to the play's classical structure, themes and characterization, Shaffer has discussed the conflict between Apollonian and Dionysian values and systems in human life.

— Freebase

Goal line

Goal line

The goal line is the chalked or painted line dividing the end zone from the field of play in American football and Canadian football. It is the line that must be crossed in order to score a touchdown If any part of the ball reaches any part of the imaginary vertical plane transected by this line while in-bounds and in possession of a player whose team is striving toward that end of the field, this is considered a touchdown and scores six points for the team whose player has advanced the ball to, or recovered the ball in, this position. This is in contrast with other sports like Association football and ice hockey, which require the puck or ball to pass completely over the goal line to count as a score. If any member of the offensive team is downed while in possession of the ball behind his own team's goal line, this is called a safety and scores two points for the defensive team. If, during the course of play, a loose ball travels past the goal line and is recovered within the end zone, then it is a touchdown if recovered by the kicking team, or a touchback if recovered and downed by the receiving team. In the event of a kick recovered in one's own end zone, the entirety of the ball must pass the goal line in order for the ball to be considered in the field of play, and not a touchback.

— Freebase

High-sticking

High-sticking

High-sticking is the name of two infractions in the sport of ice hockey that may occur when a player intentionally or inadvertently plays with his or her stick above the height of the shoulders or above the cross bar of a hockey goal. This can result in a stoppage of play or in a penalty. In the rules of the National Hockey League, high-sticking is defined as a penalty in Rule 60 and as a non-penalty foul in Rule 80. ⁕A stoppage in play results if a high stick comes in contact with the puck and the team who touched it regains control of the puck. However, play usually continues if a player touches the puck with a high stick and the opposing team gains control of the puck. If the puck goes into the opposing net after coming into contact with a high stick, the goal is disallowed. The level at which a stick is considered too high for a goal is the crossbar of the net. However, if a player knocks the puck into his own net with a high stick, the goal is allowed. ⁕A penalty is assessed if a player strikes another player with a high stick. The player is given a minor penalty unless his high stick caused an injury, in which case the referee has the option to assess a double-minor, major or match penalty. It is the referee's discretion which penalty to assess: the rule calls for a double minor for an accidental injury, or a match penalty for a deliberate attempt to injure. Injury is usually decided by the high stick causing bleeding, but the presence of blood does not automatically mean an extra penalty is awarded. Some referees have been known to award an extra penalty without the presence of blood if the referee determines that the injury sustained was sufficient to warrant a double-minor penalty.

— Freebase

Tovarich

Tovarich

Tovarich is a 1937 American comedy film directed by Anatole Litvak, based on the 1935 play by Robert E. Sherwood, which in turn was based on the 1933 French play Tovaritch by Jacques Deval. It was produced by Litvak through Warner Bros., with Robert Lord as associate producer and Hal B. Wallis and Jack L. Warner as executive producers. The screenplay was by Casey Robinson from the French play by Jacques Deval adapted into English by Robert E. Sherwood. The music score was by Max Steiner and the cinematography by Charles Lang. The film stars Claudette Colbert and Charles Boyer with Basil Rathbone, Anita Louise, Melville Cooper, Isabel Jeans, Morris Carnovsky and Curt Bois in his American debut role.

— Freebase

Penalty

Penalty

A penalty in ice hockey is a punishment for an infringement of the rules. Most penalties are enforced by detaining the offending player within a penalty box for a set number of minutes, during which the player can not participate in play. The offending team usually may not replace the player on the ice, leaving them short handed as opposed to full strength. The opposing team is said to be on a power play, having one player more on the ice than the short-handed team. The short handed team is said to be "penalty killing" until the penalty expires and the penalized player returns to play. While standards vary somewhat between leagues, most leagues recognize several common degrees of penalty, as well as common infractions. The statistic used to track penalties was traditionally called "Penalty Infraction Minutes", although the alternate term "Penalties in Minutes" has become common in recent years.

— Freebase

Enforcer

Enforcer

Enforcer is an unofficial role in ice hockey. The term is sometimes used synonymously with "fighter", "tough guy", or "goon". An enforcer's job is to deter and respond to dirty or violent play by the opposition. When such play occurs, the enforcer is expected to respond aggressively, by fighting or checking the offender. Enforcers are expected to react particularly harshly to violence against star players or goalies. Enforcers are different from pests, players who seek to agitate opponents and distract them from the game, without necessarily fighting them. The pest's primary role is to draw penalties from opposing players, thus "getting them off their game", while not actually intending to fight the opposition player. Pests and enforcers often play together on the same line, usually the fourth line.

— Freebase

Gloria

Gloria

"Gloria" is a rock song classic written by Northern Irish singer-songwriter Van Morrison and originally recorded by Morrison's band Them in 1964 as the B-side of "Baby, Please Don't Go". The song became a garage rock staple and a part of many rock bands' repertoires. It is particularly memorable for its "G–L–O–R–I–A" chorus. It is easy to play, as a simple three-chord song, and thus is popular with those learning to play guitar. The song continues to be played by thousands of bands from famous recording artists to unknown garage bands. Humourist Dave Barry joked that "You can throw a guitar off a cliff, and as it bounces off rocks on the way down, it will, all by itself, play Gloria." One explanation for the timeless popularity of the song was offered in Allmusic's review by Bill Janovitz: "Gloria" was rated number 69 on Dave Marsh's list in the 1989 book The Heart of Rock & Soul: The 1001 Greatest Singles Ever Made. He described the song as "one of the few rock songs that's actually as raunchy as its reputation." In his book Rock and Roll: The 100 Best Singles, Paul Williams said about the two sides of the "Baby Please Don't Go/Gloria" recording: "Into the heart of the beast... here is something so good, so pure, that if no other hint of it but this record existed, there would still be such a thing as rock and roll.... Van Morrison's voice a fierce beacon in the darkness, the lighthouse at the end of the world. Resulting in one of the most perfect rock anthems known to humankind."

— Freebase

Shannon

Shannon

Shannon Brenda Greene, better known by the mononym Shannon, is an American recording artist and singer/songwriter. She is possibly best known for her million-selling record single "Let the Music Play". Her albums include Let the Music Play, released in 1984, followed by Do You Wanna Get Away in 1985 and Love Goes All the Way in 1986. In 1999, Shannon appeared in a segment of VH1's One-Hit Wonders, and returned to music with her fourth album, The Best is Yet to Come, which was released in 2000. The album was followed by a compilation album released in 2004, Let The Music Play: The Best of Shannon. Shannon's most recent album is A Beauty Returns, released in 2007.

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Misalliance

Misalliance

Misalliance is a play written in 1909–1910 by George Bernard Shaw. Misalliance takes place entirely on a single Saturday afternoon in the conservatory of a large country house in Hindhead, Surrey in Edwardian era England. It is a continuation of some of the ideas on marriage that he expressed in 1908 in his play, Getting Married. It was also a continuation of some of his other ideas on Socialism, physical fitness, the Life Force, and "The New Woman": i.e. women intent on escaping Victorian standards of helplessness, passivity, stuffy propriety, and non-involvement in politics or general affairs. Shaw subtitled his play A Debate in One Sitting, and in the program of its first presentation in 1910 inserting this program note: "The debate takes place at the house of John Tarleton of Hindhead, Surrey, on 31 May 1909. As the debate is a long one, the curtain will be lowered twice. The audience is requested to excuse these interruptions, which are made solely for its convenience."

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Toss

Toss

In the sport of cricket, a coin is tossed to determine which team bats first. This is known as the toss. Before play begins, the captain of each side will inspect the pitch. Based on the pitch and weather conditions, the captains select their final eleven players. If the pitch is soft or dusty, the captain will tend to select more spin bowlers; if the pitch is hard, the choice tends to favour fast bowlers at the expense of spinners. Half an hour before the start of play, the two captains convene and exchange team selection sheets. These list the composition of each side, which cannot be changed for the duration of the match. Then, with the supervision of the umpires, a coin is tossed to determine who bats first. The umpires call of play marks the official beginning of the match. If the match is abandoned at any time after the toss, it stands as a match played and enters official statistical records. If a match is abandoned before the toss, it is not considered to have been played at all, and does not count for records. The captain who wins the toss must choose whether to bat or field. The decision is of great tactical importance, and the captain will have considered many variables before arriving at his decision. Because of the different natures of the games, it is considerably more common to choose to bat second in one-day cricket than it is in Test cricket.

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Instant replay

Instant replay

Instant replay is the replaying of video footage of an event or incident very soon after it has occurred. In television broadcasting of sports events, instant replay is often used during live broadcast, to show a passage of play which was important or remarkable, or which was unclear on first sight. Some sports organizations allow referees or other officials to consult replay footage before making or revising a decision about an unclear or dubious play. This is variously called video referee, video umpire, instant replay official, television match official or third umpire. Other associations allow video evidence only after the end of the contest, for example to penalize a player for misconduct not noticed by the officials during play.

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Banquo

Banquo

Banquo is a character in William Shakespeare's 1606 play Macbeth. In the play, he is at first an ally to Macbeth and they are together when they meet the Three Witches. After prophesying that Macbeth will become king, the witches tell Banquo that he will not be king himself, but that his descendants will be. Later, Macbeth in his lust for power sees Banquo as a threat and has him murdered; Banquo's son, Fleance, escapes. Banquo's ghost returns in a later scene, causing Macbeth to react with alarm during a public feast. Shakespeare borrowed the character of Banquo from Holinshed's Chronicles, a history of Britain published by Raphael Holinshed in 1587. In Chronicles Banquo is an accomplice to Macbeth in the murder of the king, rather than a loyal subject of the king who is seen as an enemy by Macbeth. Shakespeare may have changed this aspect of his character in order to please King James, who was thought at the time to be a descendant of the real Banquo. Critics often interpret Banquo's role in the play as being a foil to Macbeth, resisting evil where Macbeth embraces it. Sometimes, however, his motives are unclear, and some critics question his purity. He does nothing to accuse Macbeth of murdering the king, even though he has reason to believe Macbeth is responsible.

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Thirteenth

Thirteenth

In music or music theory, a thirteenth is the interval between the sixth and first scale degrees when the sixth is transposed up an octave, creating a compound sixth, or thirteenth. The thirteenth is most commonly major Play or minor Play. A thirteenth chord is the stacking of six thirds, the last being above the 11th of an eleventh chord. Thus a thirteenth chord is a tertian chord containing the interval of a thirteenth, and is an extended chord if it includes the ninth and/or the eleventh. "The jazzy thirteenth is a very versatile chord and is used in many genres." Since 13th chords tend to become unclear or confused with other chords when inverted they are generally found in root position. For example, depending on voicing, a major triad with an added major sixth is usually called a sixth chord Play, because the sixth serves as a substitution for the major seventh, thus considered a chord tone in such context. However, Walter Piston, writing in 1952, considered that, "a true thirteenth chord, arrived at by superposition of thirds, is a rare phenomenon even in 20th-century music." This may be due to four part writing, instrument limitations, and voice leading and stylistic considerations. For example, "to make the chord more playable [on guitar], thirteenth chords often omit the fifth and the ninth."

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Topless

Topless

Topless is a one-woman stage play by Miles Tredinnick. It is set on an open-top sightseeing bus and features tour guide Sandie revealing her personal life whilst pointing out the London sights. The play, produced by The Big Bus Company, ran for two seasons in London, firstly in 1999 and then in 2000. The role of Sandie was played by three actresses: Rachael Carter, Alexandra Moses and Serena Hanson. Although the play was written to be performed in theatres, the original production was actually performed on the open-top of a double-decker bus driving around the streets of London. An acting edition was published by Matador Books in 2006 and a Kindle ebook version came out in 2011.

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The pen is mightier than the sword

The pen is mightier than the sword

"The pen is mightier than the sword" is a metonymic adage coined by English author Edward Bulwer-Lytton in 1839 for his play Richelieu; Or the Conspiracy. The play was about Cardinal Richelieu, though in the author's words "license with dates and details... has been, though not unsparingly, indulged." The Cardinal's line in Act II, scene II, was more fully: True, This! — Beneath the rule of men entirely great The pen is mightier than the sword. Behold The arch-enchanters wand! — itself is nothing! — But taking sorcery from the master-hand To paralyse the Cæsars, and to strike The loud earth breathless! — Take away the sword — The play opened at London's Covent Garden Theatre on 7 March 1839 with William Charles Macready in the lead role. Macready believed its opening night success was "unequivocal"; Queen Victoria attended a performance on 14 March. In 1870, literary critic Edward Sherman Gould wrote that Bulwer "had the good fortune to do, what few men can hope to do: he wrote a line that is likely to live for ages." By 1888 another author, Charles Sharp, feared that repeating the phrase "might sound trite and commonplace". The Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress, which opened in 1897, has the adage decorating an interior wall. Though Bulwer's phrasing was novel, the idea of communication surpassing violence in efficacy had numerous predecessors.

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Satyr

Satyr

In Greek mythology, a satyr is one of a troop of male companions of Pan and Dionysus with goat-like features, including a goat-tail, goat-like ears, and sometimes a goat-like phallus. By contrast, in Roman Mythology there is a similar concept with goat-like features, the faun being half-man, half-goat. Greek-speaking Romans often use the Greek term saturos when referring to the Latin faunus, and eventually syncretize the two. The female "Satyresses" were a late invention of poets — that roamed the woods and mountains. In myths they are often associated with pipe-playing. The satyrs' chief was Silenus, a minor deity associated with fertility. These characters can be found in the only complete remaining satyr play, Cyclops, by Euripides, and the fragments of Sophocles' Ichneutae. The satyr play was a short, lighthearted tailpiece performed after each trilogy of tragedies in Athenian festivals honoring Dionysus. There is not enough evidence to determine whether the satyr play regularly drew on the same myths as those dramatized in the tragedies that preceded. The groundbreaking tragic playwright Aeschylus is said to have been especially loved for his satyr plays, but none of them have survived.

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Sure Thing

Sure Thing

Sure Thing is a short comic play by David Ives featuring a chance meeting of two characters, Betty and Bill, whose conversation is continually reset by the use of a ringing bell, starting over when one of them responds negatively to the other. The play begins with Bill approaching Betty in a café, asking "Is this chair taken?" To which she replies “Yes.” The bell rings and Bill repeats his question to which Betty says, “No, but I'm expecting somebody in a minute.” The bells rings again, and Bill poses his question again. This process continues until Bill is finally allowed to take a seat. The bell acts as a buffer against all topics of conversation that are potentially negative to building their relationship, allowing them to try another line. By the end of the play, their initial differences in opinion have reversed to become perfect companions. Both of them finally agree to fall in love and cherish the other forever. Ives takes away any words or beliefs that could be offensive, whether they be sexist remarks or political affiliations. As with Bill's line: Sure Thing was first presented at Manhattan Punch Line's Festival of One-Act Comedies, New York City, in February 1988.

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Poetaster

Poetaster

Poetaster, like rhymester or versifier, is a contemptuous name often applied to bad or inferior poets. Specifically, poetaster has implications of unwarranted pretentions to artistic value. The word was coined in Latin by Erasmus in 1521. It was first used in English by Ben Jonson in his 1600 play Cynthia's Revels; immediately afterwards Jonson chose it as the title of his 1601 play The Poetaster. In that play the "poetaster" character is a satire on John Marston, one of Jonson's rivals in the Poetomachia or War of the Theatres. While poetaster has always been a negative appraisal of a poet's skills, rhymester and versifier have held ambiguous meanings depending on the commentator’s opinion of a writer's verse. Versifier is often used to refer to someone who produces work in verse with the implication that while technically able to make lines rhyme they have no real talent for poetry. Rhymer on the other hand is usually impolite despite attempts to salvage the reputation of rhymers such as the Rhymers' Club and Rhymer being a common last name. The faults of a poetaster frequently include errors or lapses in their work's meter, badly rhyming words which jar rather than flow, oversentimentality, too much use of the pathetic fallacy and unintentionally bathetic choice of subject matter.

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Trifles

Trifles

Trifles is a one-act play by Susan Glaspell. Her short story, "A Jury of Her Peers", was adapted from the play a year after its debut. It was first performed by the Provincetown Players at the Wharf Theatre in Provincetown, Massachusetts on August 8, 1916. In the original play, Glaspell played the role of one of the characters, Mrs. Hale. It is frequently anthologized in American literature textbooks.

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Blocking

Blocking

Blocking is a theatre term that refers to the precise movement and positioning of actors on a stage in order to facilitate the performance of a play, ballet, film or opera. The term derives from the practice of 19th-century theatre directors such as Sir W. S. Gilbert who worked out the staging of a scene on a miniature stage using blocks to represent each of the actors. In contemporary theatre, the director usually determines blocking during rehearsal, telling actors where they should move for the proper dramatic effect, ensure sight lines for the audience and work with the lighting design of the scene. Each scene in a play is usually "blocked" as a unit, after which the director will move on to the next scene. The positioning of actors on stage in one scene will usually affect the possibilities for subsequent positioning unless the stage is cleared between scenes. Once all the blocking is completed a play is said to be "fully blocked" and then the process of "polishing" or refinement begins. During the blocking rehearsal usually the assistant director or the stage manager take notes about where actors are positioned and their movement patterns on stage.

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Flanker

Flanker

A flanker is a position in the sport of rugby union. Flankers play in the forwards, and are generally classified as either blindside, or openside flankers; numbers six and seven respectively. The name comes from their position in a scrum in which they flank each set of forwards. The set responsibilities of flankers are fewer than all other forwards in a rugby team, but generally consist of retaining and gaining possession in the various phases of play in a match—most commonly in rucks and mauls. Flankers also assist in pushing in a scrum, but are expected to detach from the scrum as early as possible in order to get to play before the opposition's forwards. Flankers also participate in line-outs, either being lifted to contest or win possession, or to lift other players. Rugby flankers are expected to make most of the tackles. When a team wins the scrum the flanker is expected to support their players by running behind and rucking over for their team to keep possession. Like other forward positions, flankers put more emphasis on strength than on speed.

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Endplay

Endplay

An endplay, in bridge and similar games, is a tactical play where a defender is put on lead at a strategic moment, and then has to make a play that loses one or more tricks. Most commonly the losing play either constitutes a free finesse, or else it gives declarer a ruff and discard. In a case where declarer has no entries to dummy, the defender may also be endplayed into leading a suit which can be won in that hand.

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Moby

Moby

Richard Melville Hall, known by his stage name Moby, is an American singer-songwriter, musician, DJ and photographer. He is well known for his electronic music, vegan lifestyle, and support of animal rights. Moby has sold over 20 million albums worldwide. Allmusic considers him "one of the most important dance music figures of the early '90s, helping bring the music to a mainstream audience both in the UK and in America". Moby gained attention in the early 1990s with his electronic dance music work, which experimented in the techno and breakbeat hardcore genres. With his fifth studio album, the electronica and house-influenced Play, he gained international success. Originally released in mid-1999, selling 6000 copies in its first week, it re-entered the charts in early 2000 and became an unexpected hit, producing eight singles and selling over 10 million copies worldwide. Moby followed the album in 2002 with 18, which was also successful, selling over 5 million copies worldwide and receiving mostly positive reviews, though some criticized it for being too similar to Play. His next offer, 2005's mostly upbeat Hotel was a stylistic departure, incorporating more alternative rock elements than previous albums, and received mixed reviews. It sold around 2 million copies worldwide. After 2008's dance-influenced Last Night, he returned to the downtempo electronica of Play and 18 with 2009's mostly-ambient Wait for Me, finding higher critical acclaim and moderate sales. Moby's latest album Destroyed., was released on May 13, 2011.

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Allods Online

Allods Online

Allods Online is a free-to-play 3D fantasy MMORPG developed by Astrum Nival and published by Mail.Ru Group in Russia, Turkey and Italy, Gala-Net in North America, Cayenne Tech in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macau, Gala Networks Europe in Europe, Level Up! Games in Brazil and the Philippines, and Game Power 7 in the MENA region. The third in the Rage of Mages series, Allods Online takes the RPG elements of the original games and presents them in an MMORPG. Developed with a $12 million budget, it is available as a free online game with a simple registration required to play and while no ongoing subscription is required to play, some items are only available in the Items Shop, which allows the developers to profit through a system of microtransactions.

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Extremities

Extremities

Extremities is a 1986 film starring Farrah Fawcett, Alfre Woodard, Diana Scarwid and James Russo. It was adapted from the successful, yet controversial, 1982 off-Broadway play of the same name by William Mastrosimone. Farrah Fawcett had also appeared in the play to great critical acclaim, taking over a role originated by Susan Sarandon. James Russo also appeared in the play as the attacker.

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Organist

Organist

An organist is a musician who plays any type of organ. An organist may play solo organ works, play with an ensemble or orchestra, or accompany one or more singers or instrumental soloists. In addition, an organist may accompany congregational hymn-singing and play liturgical music.

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Seascape

Seascape

Seascape is a play by American playwright Edward Albee. Directed by Albee himself, the production opened on Broadway on January 26, 1975, at the Sam S. Shubert Theatre, starring Deborah Kerr, Barry Nelson, Maureen Anderman and Frank Langella, who won a Tony Award for his performance as Leslie. The original three act version of the play ran in Europe and the second act was cut when it was moved to Broadway. Albee received his second Pulitzer Prize for Drama for the play. Seascape was revived in 2005 by Lincoln Center Theater at the Booth Theatre on Broadway, in a production directed by Mark Lamos and starring George Grizzard, Frances Sternhagen, Elizabeth Marvel, and Frederick Weller. The original three act version received its American premiere in Boston in a production by Zeitgeist Stage Company at the Boston Center for the Arts Plaza Theater in October 2008 through a special arrangement with the playwright. The director was David J. Miller, with lights by Jeff Adelberg, costumes by Fabian Aguilar, sound by Walter Eduardo, makeup by Judith Leonardo, and fights and movement by Meron Langsner. The stage manager was Deirdre Benson. The cast consisted of Michelle Dowd as Nancy, Peter Brown as Charlie, Claude Del as Leslie, and Emma Goodman as Sarah.

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Titania

Titania

Titania is a character in William Shakespeare's play A Midsummer Night's Dream. In the play, she is the queen of the fairies. Due to Shakespeare's influence, later fiction has often used the name "Titania" for fairy queen characters. In traditional folklore, the fairy queen has no name. Shakespeare took the name "Titania" from Ovid's Metamorphoses, where it is an appellation given to the daughters of Titans. Shakespeare's Titania is a very proud creature and as much of a force to contend with as her husband Oberon. The marital quarrel she and Oberon are engaged in over which of them should have the keeping of an Indian changeling boy is the engine that drives the mix ups and confusion of the other characters in the play. Due to an enchantment cast by Oberon's servant Puck, Titania magically falls in love with a 'rude mechanical', Nick Bottom the Weaver, who has been given the head of an ass by Puck, who feels it is better suited to his character. It has been argued that this incident is an inversion of the Circe story. In this case the tables are turned on the character and, rather than the sorceress turning her lovers into animals, she is made to love an ass after Bottom has been transformed.

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Pinball

Pinball

Pinball is a type of arcade game, usually coin-operated, in which points are scored by a player manipulating one or more steel balls on a play field inside a glass-covered cabinet called a pinball machine. The primary objective of the game is to score as many points as possible. Points are earned when the ball strikes different targets on the play field. A drain is situated at the bottom of the play field, protected by player-controlled plastic bats called flippers. A game ends after all the balls fall into the drain. Secondary objectives are to maximize the time spent playing and to earn bonus games.

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Blow football

Blow football

Blow football is a children/Adults game, popular in the United Kingdom where the object is to blow through some kind of pipe causing a small lightweight ball to pass through the opponent's goal, as in other forms of Football. The game is often played with whatever materials are at hand, such as drinking straws, and ping-pong balls but is also sold as a boxed game in some toy shops. Boxed games typically contain a few plastic pipes, a ball, and two plastic goals. Some versions may include two plastic goalkeepers on sticks for the players to defend the goal with, or a football pitch laid out on a piece of cloth that is then put on a table and used as the playing surface, or even supply a rigid surface to play on, with raised boundaries so the ball cannot go out of bounds. At least two players are involved, though some sets will supply more pipes so the whole family can play. The pipes may be simple, or may have mouthpieces after the fashion of a pea shooter. The ball may be designed to be hard to move, and correspondingly hard to stop, to make the game more interesting. One factor in the game is the tendency of players to hyperventilate, or in the case of older adults, run out of breath. Learning to play effectively means being careful when and how hard you blow.

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Chessboard

Chessboard

A chessboard is the type of checkerboard used in the board game chess, and consists of 64 squares arranged in two alternating colors. The colors are called "black" and "white", although the actual colors are usually dark green and buff for boards used in competition, and often natural shades of light and dark woods for home boards. Materials vary widely; while wooden boards are generally used in high-level games, vinyl and cardboard are common for low-level and informal play. Decorative glass and marble boards are available but not usually accepted for sanctioned games. The board is structurally similar to that used in English draughts. Some low-cost sets may use red and black squares and include pieces for both games; though suitable for informal play, such boards are often not accepted for sanctioned play, depending on the local authority's rules on equipment standards. The board is always placed so that the rightmost square on the row nearest each player is a "white" square. The size of the board is usually chosen to be appropriate for the chess pieces used, and squares should be between 50mm and 65mm in size. A square size approximately 1.25 to 1.3 times the size of the base of the king is preferred.

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Duckworth–Lewis method

Duckworth–Lewis method

In the sport of cricket, the Duckworth–Lewis method is a mathematical formulation designed to calculate the target score for the team batting second in a limited overs match interrupted by weather or other circumstances. It is generally accepted to be the most accurate method of setting a target score. The D/L method was devised by two English statisticians, Frank Duckworth and Tony Lewis. The basic principle is that each team in a limited-overs match has two resources available with which to score runs: wickets remaining, and overs to play. Where overs are lost, setting an adjusted target is not as simple as to reduce the batting team's run target proportionally, because a team batting second with ten wickets in hand and 25 overs to play can be expected to play more aggressively than one with ten wickets and a full 50 overs, and can consequently achieve a higher run rate. The Duckworth–Lewis method is an attempt to set a statistically fair target for the second team's innings, based on the score achieved by the first team, taking their wickets lost and overs played into account.

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Dogberry

Dogberry

Dogberry is a character from the Shakespeare play Much Ado About Nothing. He is described by The Nuttall Encyclopædia as a "self-satisfied night constable." In the play, Dogberry is the chief of the citizen-police in Messina. As is usual in Shakespearean comedy, and Renaissance comedy generally, he is a figure of comic incompetence. The humor of Dogberry's character is his frequent use of malapropism, a technique Shakespeare would use again in Elbow from Measure for Measure. In both plays, Shakespeare appears to be poking mild fun at the amateur police forces of his day, in which respectable citizens spent a fixed number of nights per year fulfilling an obligation to protect the public peace, a job for which they were, by and large, unqualified. Dogberry and his crew, however, are also given a thematic function, for it is they who uncover the plot of Don John and begin the process of restoration that leads to the play's happy conclusion. In that sense, Dogberry's comic ineptitude is made to serve the sense of a providential force overseeing the fortunate restoration of social and emotional order. When describing a criminal's offense, Dogberry tends to say it in many different ways as a numbered list out of order:

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Aristophanes

Aristophanes

Aristophanes, son of Philippus, of the deme Cydathenaus, was a comic playwright of ancient Athens. Eleven of his 40 plays survive virtually complete. These, together with fragments of some of his other plays, provide the only real examples of a genre of comic drama known as Old Comedy, and they are used to define the genre. Also known as the Father of Comedy and the Prince of Ancient Comedy, Aristophanes has been said to recreate the life of ancient Athens more convincingly than any other author. His powers of ridicule were feared and acknowledged by influential contemporaries; Plato singled out Aristophanes' play The Clouds as slander contributing to the trial and execution of Socrates although other satirical playwrights had also caricatured the philosopher. His second play, The Babylonians, was denounced by the demagogue Cleon as a slander against the Athenian polis. It is possible that the case was argued in court but details of the trial are not recorded and Aristophanes caricatured Cleon mercilessly in his subsequent plays, especially The Knights, the first of many plays that he directed himself. "In my opinion," he says through the Chorus in that play, "the author-director of comedies has the hardest job of all."

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Don Juan

Don Juan

Don Juan or Don Giovanni is a legendary, fictional libertine whose story has been told many times by many authors. El burlador de Sevilla y convidado de piedra by Tirso de Molina is a play set in the fourteenth century that was published in Spain around 1630. Evidence suggests it is the first written version of the Don Juan legend. Among the best known works about this character today are Molière's play Dom Juan ou le Festin de pierre, Byron's epic poem Don Juan, José de Espronceda's poem El estudiante de Salamanca and José Zorrilla's play Don Juan Tenorio. Along with Zorrilla's work, arguably the best known version is Don Giovanni, an opera composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart with libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte, first performed in Prague in 1787 and itself the source of inspiration for works by E. T. A. Hoffmann, Alexander Pushkin, Søren Kierkegaard, George Bernard Shaw and Albert Camus. Don Juan is used synonymously for "womanizer", especially in Spanish slang, and is often used in reference to hypersexuality.

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Capes

Capes

Capes is a role-playing game by Tony Lower-Basch, independently published by Muse of Fire Games. It is a superhero role-playing game played in "scenes", in which players choose what character to play before each new scene. The game is a competitive storytelling game without a GM. Players create and play the villains who oppose other players' heroes. Characters are generally co-owned, but controlled by one player at a time. Losers in conflicts can earn "story tokens" that can be used to influence the game, so it's sometimes beneficial to play a supervillain that gets beaten to get more story tokens. The game also has a "gloating rule" that emulates situations where the villain can easily kill the heroes.

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Blood Money

Blood Money

Blood Money is an album by Tom Waits, released in 2002 on the ANTI- label. The album contains songs written for the play Woyzeck, based on the play of the same name by Georg Büchner. The theatrical adaptation was directed by Robert Wilson, with whom Waits had worked on two previous plays: The Black Rider and Alice, both of which resulted in soundtrack albums. The latter was released simultaneously in 2002 with Blood Money. The play premiered at the Betty Nansen Theatre in Copenhagen in November 2000. The song "God's Away on Business" featured in the film Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room. This album ranked at #18 in Metacritic's Top 30 albums of 2002.

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Small ball

Small ball

In the sport of baseball, small ball is an informal term for an offensive strategy in which the batting team emphasizes placing runners on base and then advancing them into scoring position for a run in a deliberate, methodical way. This strategy places a high value on individual runs and attempts to score them without requiring extra base hits, or sometimes without base hits at all, instead using bases on balls, stolen bases, sacrifice bunt or sacrifice fly balls, the hit-and-run play, and aggressive baserunning with such plays as the contact play. A commonly used term for a run produced playing small ball is a "manufactured run". This style of play is more often found in National League game situations than in the American League due in large part to the absence of the designated hitter in the National League. Teams may incorporate a small-ball strategy for a variety of reasons, including: ⁕They are confident that their pitching staff will allow very few runs, thus one or two runs may win the game. ⁕The opposing pitching staff allows few hits, especially extra-base hits, and small ball may be the best way to score runs at all. ⁕The team lacks consistent hitters and must find a way to score runs with few base hits.

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Child's Play

Child's Play

Child's Play is a 1988 American horror film directed by Tom Holland and written by Don Mancini, John Lafia and Holland. It stars Catherine Hicks, Chris Sarandon, Alex Vincent and Brad Dourif. The official taglines of the film were "You'll wish it was only make-believe" and "Something's moved in with the Barclay family, and so has terror." The film was released on November 9, 1988 and met with moderate success. It has since developed a cult following among fans of the horror genre. The film is the first in the Child's Play film series and was the only film in the series released by MGM/UA, as the rights to the series were sold to Universal in 1990, right before production started on Child's Play 2.

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Check-raise

Check-raise

A check-raise in poker is a common deceptive play in which a player checks early in a betting round, hoping someone else will open. The player who checked then raises in the same round. This might be done, for example, when the first player believes that an opponent has an inferior hand and will not call a direct bet, but that he may attempt to bluff, allowing the first player to win more money than he would by betting straightforwardly. The key point is that if no one else is keen to bet, then the most a player can raise by is one single bet. If someone else bets first, he can raise, thus increasing the value of the pot by two bets. In a no-limit game, there is no restriction on the size of one's bet, and a raise is likely to be much larger than the second player's bet. Of course, if no other player chooses to open, the betting will be checked around and the play will fail. While it can be an important part of one's poker strategy, this play is not allowed by a house rule in some home games and certain small-stakes casino games. It is also frequently not allowed in the game of California lowball. In older poker material and among stud and draw poker players, it is sometimes referred to as sandbagging.

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Touchback

Touchback

In American football, a touchback is a ruling which is made and signaled by an official when the ball becomes dead behind or above a goal line and the team who is attacking that goal line is responsible for the ball being there. Responsibility is determined by which team gave the ball the impetus to travel over or across the goal line. Such impetus may be imparted by a kick, pass, fumble, or in certain instances by batting the ball. A touchback is not a play, but a result of events that may occur during a play. A touchback is the opposite of a safety with regard to impetus since a safety is scored when the defending team is responsible for the ball becoming dead behind or above its own goal. Examples of instances where a touchback would be awarded include when: ⁕A kickoff or punt enters the end zone and becomes dead behind the goal line without being advanced beyond the goal line by a player of the receiving team. Thus, a player on the receiving team could attempt to advance the ball out of his own end zone, but the original impetus from the kick remains as long as the ball does not completely cross the goal line into the field of play. Note that if a kick is fielded by the receiving team in its end zone, is advanced beyond the goal line, and then the ball carrier retreats back into his own end zone where the ball is downed, it is a safety because the impetus would then be charged to the receiving team.

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Traveling Salesman

Traveling Salesman

Traveling Salesman is a 1921 American comedy film starring Fatty Arbuckle. It is based on a 1908 play, The Traveling Salesman, by James Grant Forbes. A 1916 film of the play starred Frank McIntyre who had also starred in the play.

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PurePlay

PurePlay

PurePlay is a play-for-cash online poker website. The company that created the site was founded in 2004 by Silicon Valley entrepreneurs Jason Kellerman and Marc Marin. The site allows users to play in free poker tournaments and win cash, or play for larger cash prizes consisting of $100,000 and similar prizes each month by paying a monthly subscription fee of $25. It was named the 2008 "Innovation of the Year" by eGaming Review Magazine.

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Playscape

Playscape

Playscape A playful landscape characterised by the occurrence of enjoyment by the public & all those that interact with it. Sometimes used to refer to playspaces that look and feel like a natural environment. However, landscape architects and designers are increasingly using the term to express areas of cities that encourage interaction and enjoyment of all ages. The natural playscape is defined as a space with as little man made components as possible. Using native plants, rolling hills, lots of trees; playscapes represent a natural place such as a forest. Playscapes are designed with the intent of bringing children and people back to nature. Urban playscapes are similar to the natural playgrounds in so far as they break from the need for specific play equipment they are defined not by clear boundaries but through a shaping of the landscape to encourage play and interaction. A good example of this is redundant modernist public plazas that become skate parks. Playscapes offer a wide range of open-ended play options that allow people to be creative and use their imagination. Playscapes offer a wide range of developmental benefits to children, rehabilitation programs and all people in general.

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Philosophaster

Philosophaster

Philosophaster is a Latin satirical comedy by Robert Burton. He began writing the play in 1606 and completed it by 1615. It was performed by students in the Hall of Christ Church, Oxford on 16 February 1618. The play was not published in Burton's life-time and it remained in manuscript till 1862 when it was edited by William Edward Buckley and published by the Roxburghe Club. It was first translated into English by Paul Jordan-Smith and published by Stanford University Press, California in 1931. Since the play is about someone who pretends to be a philosopher, the term itself has been used in more recent times to refer to a pretender to philosophy.

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The Green Pastures

The Green Pastures

The Green Pastures is a play written in 1930 by Marc Connelly adapted from Ol' Man Adam an' His Chillun, a collection of stories written by Roark Bradford. The play portrays episodes from the Old Testament as seen through the eyes of a young African-American child in the Depression-era South, who interprets The Bible in terms familiar to her. Following Bradford's lead, Connelly set the biblical stories in New Orleans and in an all-black context. He diverged from Bradford's work, however, in enlarging the role of the character "De Lawd" played on stage by Richard B. Harrison, who was born in London, Ontario, Canada. The Green Pastures also featured numerous African American spirituals arranged by Hall Johnson and performed by The Hall Johnson Choir. The play was the winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1930.

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Inheritors

Inheritors

Inheritors is a play by the American dramatist Susan Glaspell, written in 1921. The play concerns the legacy of an idealistic farmer who wills his highly coveted midwest farmland to the establishment of a college Forty years later, when his granddaughter stands up for the rights of Hindu nationals to protest at the college her grandfather founded, she jeopardizes funding for the college itself and sets herself against her own uncle, the president of the institution's trustees Ultimately, she defies her family's wishes, and as a consequence is bound for prison herself The play was a stirring defense of free speech and an individual's ability to stand for his or her own ideal during a time of aggressive anti-Communist politics in the US. Inheritors was first performed at Provincetown Playhouse in 1922, the last of Glaspell's plays presented there. It was revived in New York City by Mirror Repertory in 1983 and Metropolitan Playhouse in 2005.

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Death of a Salesman

Death of a Salesman

Death of a Salesman is a 1949 play written by American playwright Arthur Miller. It was the recipient of the 1949 Pulitzer Prize for Drama and Tony Award for Best Play. The play premiered on Broadway in February 1949, running for 742 performances, and has been revived on Broadway four times, winning three Tony Awards for Best Revival.

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Dinner theater

Dinner theater

Dinner theater is a form of entertainment that combines a restaurant meal with a staged play or musical. Sometimes the play is incidental entertainment, secondary to the meal, in the style of a sophisticated night club, or the play may be a major production with dinner less important, or in some cases, optional. Dinner theater requires the management of three distinct entities: a live theater, a restaurant, and usually, a bar.

— Freebase

King Lear

King Lear

King Lear is a tragedy by William Shakespeare. The title character descends into madness after disposing of his estate between two of his three daughters based on their flattery, bringing tragic consequences for all. The play is based on the legend of Leir of Britain, a mythological pre-Roman Celtic king. It has been widely adapted for the stage and motion pictures, and the role of Lear has been coveted and played by many of the world's most accomplished actors. The play was written between 1603 and 1606 and later revised. Shakespeare's earlier version, The True Chronicle of the History of the Life and Death of King Lear and His Three Daughters, was published in quarto in 1608. The Tragedy of King Lear, a more theatrical version, was included in the 1623 First Folio. Modern editors usually conflate the two, though some insist that each version has its individual integrity that should be preserved. After the Restoration, the play was often revised with a happy ending for audiences who disliked its dark and depressing tone, but since the 19th century Shakespeare's original version has been regarded as one of his supreme achievements. The tragedy is particularly noted for its probing observations on the nature of human suffering and kinship. George Bernard Shaw wrote, "No man will ever write a better tragedy than Lear".

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Lady Macbeth

Lady Macbeth

Lady Macbeth is a character in Shakespeare's Macbeth. She is the wife to the play's protagonist, Macbeth, a Scottish nobleman. After goading him into committing regicide, she becomes Queen of Scotland, but later suffers pangs of guilt for her part in the crime. She dies off-stage in the last act, an apparent suicide. The character's origins lie in the accounts of Kings Duff and Duncan in Holinshed's Chronicles, a history of Britain familiar to Shakespeare. Shakespeare's Lady Macbeth appears to be a composite of two separate and distinct personages in Holinshed's work: Donwald's nagging, murderous wife in the account of King Duff, and Macbeth's ambitious wife Gruoch of Scotland in the account of King Duncan. Lady Macbeth is a powerful presence in the play, most notably in the first two acts. Following the murder of King Duncan, however, her role in the plot diminishes. She becomes an uninvolved spectator to Macbeth's plotting, and a nervous hostess at a banquet dominated by her husband's hallucinations. Her fifth act sleepwalking scene is a turning point in the play, and her line, "Out, damned spot!," has become a phrase familiar to many speakers of the English language. The report of her death late in the fifth act provides the inspiration for Macbeth's "Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow" speech.

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Shepherding

Shepherding

Shepherding is a tactic and skill in Australian rules football, a team sport. Shepherding is the act of legally pushing, bumping or blocking an opposing player from gaining possession of the ball or reaching the contest. The term originates from the word shepherd, someone who influences the movement of sheep in a paddock. Through shepherding, Australian football players are able to influence the movement of their opponents. The prevalence of shepherding is distinctive in Australian rules football as it is an illegal form of play in many other codes of football where it is subject to obstruction rules. It is completely banned in soccer. Even full contact rugby football codes and ice hockey which allow such contact only on a player in possession, as does gaelic football. The concept of shepherding, however, is very similar to blocking in American Football. Under the Laws of Australian Football, a player can shepherd an opposition player when the ball is within five metres, with the exception of contests where players contest the ball in the air, i.e. marking contests and ruck contests, or when the ball is not in play. In marking and ruck contests, no shepherding is allowed. Players may not make high or low contact during a shepherd, nor hold their opponents; free kicks should result from any of these infractions. Nevertheless, there have been a number of incidents in the professional Australian Football League which have caused controversy and have resulted in the rules regarding shepherding to be more strictly applied behind play.

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Hughie

Hughie

Hughie is a short two-character play by Eugene O’Neill set in the lobby of a small hotel on a West Side street in midtown New York during the summer of 1928. The play is essentially a long monologue delivered by a small time hustler named Erie Smith to the hotel’s new night clerk Charlie Hughes, lamenting how Smith’s luck has gone bad since the death of Hughie, Hughes' predecessor. O’Neill wrote Hughie in 1942, although it did not receive its world premiere until 1958, when it was staged in Sweden at the Royal Dramatic Theatre with Bengt Eklund as Erie Smith. It was first staged in English at the Theater Royal in Bath, England in 1963 with Burgess Meredith as Erie. The play was first presented on Broadway in 1964 starring Jason Robards as Erie and directed by José Quintero, who were famous for their depictions of O’Neill’s plays. Robards received a Tony Award nomination for his performance, and revived the production in 1975 in Berkeley, California with Jack Dodson as Charlie Hughes. Robards and Dodson returned to it at the Hyde Park Festival Theatre in 1981 and the Trinity Repertory Theatre in Providence, Rhode Island in 1991, also televising their performances in 1984 for PBS.

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Romeo and Juliet

Romeo and Juliet

Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy written early in the career of William Shakespeare about two young star-crossed lovers whose deaths ultimately reconcile their feuding families. It was among Shakespeare's most popular plays during his lifetime and, along with Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays. Today, the title characters are regarded as archetypal young lovers. Romeo and Juliet belongs to a tradition of tragic romances stretching back to antiquity. Its plot is based on an Italian tale, translated into verse as The Tragical History of Romeus and Juliet by Arthur Brooke in 1562 and retold in prose in Palace of Pleasure by William Painter in 1567. Shakespeare borrowed heavily from both but, to expand the plot, developed supporting characters, particularly Mercutio and Paris. Believed to have been written between 1591 and 1595, the play was first published in a quarto version in 1597. This text was of poor quality, and later editions corrected it, bringing it more in line with Shakespeare's original. Shakespeare's use of his poetic dramatic structure, especially effects such as switching between comedy and tragedy to heighten tension, his expansion of minor characters, and his use of sub-plots to embellish the story, has been praised as an early sign of his dramatic skill. The play ascribes different poetic forms to different characters, sometimes changing the form as the character develops. Romeo, for example, grows more adept at the sonnet over the course of the play.

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Yorick

Yorick

Yorick is a fictional character in William Shakespeare's play Hamlet. He is the dead court jester whose skull is exhumed by the gravedigger in Act 5, Scene 1, of the play. The sight of Yorick's skull evokes a monologue from Prince Hamlet on the vile effects of death: Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio; a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy; he hath borne me on his back a thousand times; and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! My gorge rises at it. Here hung those lips that I have kissed I know not how oft. Where be your gibes now? Your gambols? Your songs? Your flashes of merriment, that were wont to set the table on a roar? The opening words are very commonly misquoted as "Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him well." It has often been suggested that Shakespeare intended his audience to connect Yorick with the Elizabethan comedian Richard Tarlton, a star performer of the pre-Shakespearian stage, who had been dead for around the same time as Yorick in the play.

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Antony and Cleopatra

Antony and Cleopatra

Antony and Cleopatra is a tragedy by William Shakespeare. The play was first printed in the First Folio of 1623. The plot is based on Thomas North's translation of Plutarch's Lives and follows the relationship between Cleopatra and Mark Antony from the time of the Sicilian revolt to Cleopatra's suicide during the Final War of the Roman Republic. The major antagonist is Octavius Caesar, one of Antony's fellow triumviri and the future first emperor of Rome. The tragedy is a Roman play characterised by swift, panoramic shifts in geographical locations and in registers, alternating between sensual, imaginative Alexandria and the more pragmatic, austere Rome. Many consider the role of Cleopatra in this play one of the most complex female roles in Shakespeare's work. She is frequently vain and histrionic, provoking an audience almost to scorn; at the same time, Shakespeare's efforts invest both her and Antony with tragic grandeur. These contradictory features have led to famously divided critical responses.

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Cosplay

Cosplay

Cosplay, short for "costume play", is a type of performance art in which participants wear costumes and accessories to represent a specific character or idea from a work of fiction. Cosplayers often interact to create a subculture centered on role play. A broader use of the term cosplay applies to any costumed role play in venues apart from the stage, regardless of the cultural context. Favorite sources include manga, anime, comic books, video games, and films. Any entity from the real or virtual world that lends itself to dramatic interpretation may be taken up as a subject. Inanimate objects are given anthropomorphic forms and it is not unusual to see genders switched, with women playing male roles and vice versa. There is also a subset of cosplay culture centered on sex appeal, with cosplayers specifically choosing characters that are known for their attractiveness and/or revealing costumes. The Internet has enabled many cosplayers to create social networks and websites centered around cosplay activities, while forums allow cosplayers to share stories, photographs, news, and general information. The rapid growth in the number of people cosplaying as a hobby since 1990 has made the phenomenon a significant aspect of popular culture. This is particularly the case in Asia, where cosplay influences Japanese street fashion.

— Freebase

Clavigo

Clavigo

Clavigo is a five-act tragedy written by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe in 1774. The lead role is taken by Pierre Beaumarchais. The play was written in just eight days in May 1774. It was published by July 1774 and is the first printed work to which Goethe put his own name, although the play was received with disfavour. The first performance of the play was by the Ackermannschen Gesellschaft in Hamburg on 23 August 1774. It is based on the offer of marriage that the Canarian writer José Clavijo y Fajardo made to the sister of Beaumarchais.

— Freebase

Sidelines

Sidelines

The "sidelines" are the white or colored lines which mark the outer boundaries of a sports field, running parallel to each other and perpendicular to the goal lines. The sidelines are also where the coaching staff and players out of play operate during a game. The area outside the sidelines is said to be out of bounds. The term is predominantly in use in American football, Canadian football, field lacrosse and basketball. In rugby union, rugby league and association football, they are known as touch-lines. The foul line is a similar concept in baseball. Sports in which the playing surface is bounded by walls, such as ice hockey, box lacrosse, and indoor football, do not use sidelines; in these sports, coaches and reserve players are positioned in recessed benches behind the walls. The sideline can be used metaphorically to refer to players who have been "benched," meaning that they have been taken out of the game purposefully by the coaching staff due to poor performance in the game or previous play. Establishing shots of these players may be used by televised sports programs to indicate potential roster switches, or to build a narrative of the failure or success of the coaching staff's decision. Likewise, images of the sideline may suggest that the highlighted player had done something of interest outside of the confines of play. For example, in American football, dousing the head coach with water or sports drink is a popular way of celebrating crucial victories, established as a tradition by the New York Giants of the National Football League in the mid-1980s.

— Freebase

Corner kick

Corner kick

A corner kick is a method of restarting play in a game of association football. It was first devised in Sheffield under the Sheffield Rules 1867. It was adopted by the Football Association on 17 February 1872. A corner kick is awarded to the attacking team when the ball leaves the field of play by crossing the goal line without a goal having been scored, having been last touched by a defending player. The kick is taken from the corners of the field of play nearest to where the ball crossed the goal line. Corners are considered to be a reasonable goalscoring opportunity for the attacking side, though not as much as a penalty kick or a direct free kick near the edge of the penalty area. The assistant referee will signal that a corner should be awarded by first raising his flag, then using it to point at the corner arc on their side of the pitch; however, this is not an indication of which side the kick should be taken from. The referee then awards the corner by pointing to the relevant arc.

— Freebase

Jumpers

Jumpers

Jumpers is a play by Tom Stoppard which was first performed in 1972. It explores and satirises the field of academic philosophy, likening it to a less-than skilful competitive gymnastics display. Jumpers raises questions such as "What do we know?" and "Where do values come from?" It is set in an alternative reality where some British astronauts have landed on the moon and "Radical Liberals" have taken over the British government. It was inspired by the notion that a manned moon landing would ruin the moon as a poetic trope and possibly lead to a collapse of moral values. The play was first performed by the National Theatre Company at the Old Vic Theatre, London on 2 February 1972 with Michael Hordern and Diana Rigg in the leading roles of George and Dorothy. Peter Wood directed the original production and Carl Toms designed its sets and costumes. The play premiered on Broadway on April 22, 1974 at the Billy Rose Theatre and closed on June 1, 1974 after 48 performances. Directed again by Peter Wood, it featured Brian Bedford and Jill Clayburgh. Bedford won the Drama Desk Award, Outstanding Performance.

— Freebase

Match referee

Match referee

A match referee is an official appointed to oversee professional cricket matches. Match referees for Test matches and One Day Internationals are appointed by the International Cricket Council. Most matches below international level do not have a referee. A match referee remains off the field of play at all times during the actual play of the game, observing events from a spectator area. The referee makes no decisions of any relevance to the play or result of the game; such decisions are the sole responsibility of the appointed umpires. The match referee's responsibility is to ensure that the ICC Cricket Code of Conduct is upheld during the game, to assess any breaches of the Code, and to hand out penalties for any breaches. Following every game, the match referee composes and submits a match report to the ICC, noting any events or actions by players or umpires that may be a concern in terms of the Code of Conduct or the Laws of Cricket. Match referees are frequently former cricket players who have had distinguished careers on the field. In recent years the law regarding the unlawful delivery of the cricket ball by a bowler because of straightening of the arm at the elbow has been interpreted as the domain of the match referee and a system of reports to the ICC, rather than a matter for the umpires to decide and call on the field as a no ball at each incidence. This de facto migration of responsibility has caused controversy, with some commentators claiming it has eroded the official support and authority owed to the umpires.

— Freebase

Match play

Match play

Match play is a scoring system for golf in which a player, or team, earns a point for each hole in which they have bested their opponents; this is as opposed to stroke play, in which the total number of strokes is counted over one or more rounds of 18 holes. In professional golf, a small number of notable tournaments use the match play scoring system.

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Parabasis

Parabasis

In Greek comedy, the parabasis is a point in the play when all of the actors leave the stage and the chorus is left to address the audience directly. The chorus partially or completely abandons its dramatic role to talk to the audience on a topic completely irrelevant to the subject of the play. For example, in the play The Wasps by Aristophanes the first parabasis is about Aristophanes' career as a playwright to date, while the second parabasis is shorter, and contains a string of in-jokes about local characters who would be well known to the ancient Athenian audience. A parabasis usually consists of three songs alternating with three speeches in the order S-s-S-s-S-s. The first speech often ends with a passage which is to be rattled off very quickly. The parabasis is exclusively a feature of Old Comedy, and after the parabasis was abandoned the role of the chorus declined.

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You Can't Take It with You

You Can't Take It with You

You Can't Take It with You is a comedic play in three acts by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart. The original production of the play opened at the Booth Theater on December 14, 1936, and played for 837 performances. The play won the 1937 Pulitzer Prize for Drama.

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Handlebody

Handlebody

In the mathematical field of geometric topology, a handlebody is a decomposition of a manifold into standard pieces. Handlebodies play an important role in Morse theory, cobordism theory and the surgery theory of high-dimensional manifolds. Handles are used to particularly study 3-manifolds. Handlebodies play a similar role in the study of manifolds as simplicial complexes and CW complexes play in homotopy theory, allowing one to analyze a space in terms of individual pieces and their interactions.

— Freebase

Flyovers

Flyovers

Flyovers is a stage play by Jeffrey Sweet that premiered at the Victory Gardens Theater in Chicago and later ran at the 78th Street Theatre Lab in New York City. The play tells the story of Oliver, a film critic who returns to his hometown in Ohio for his high school reunion and confronts Ted, a bully who has lost his job at the local plant. The Chicago Tribune praised the play as "engaging" and a "deserved success."

— Freebase

Squeezebox

Squeezebox

The term squeezebox is a colloquial expression referring to any musical instrument of the general class of hand-held bellows-driven free reed aerophones such as the accordion and the concertina. The term is so applied because such instruments are generally in the shape of a rectangular prism or box, and the bellows is operated by squeezing in and drawing out. Accordions typically have right-hand buttons or keys that play single notes and left hand buttons that play chords and bass notes. Concertinas play single notes on both left and right hands.

— Freebase

Indirect free kick

Indirect free kick

An indirect free kick is a method of restarting play in a game of association football. Unlike a direct free kick, a goal may not be scored directly from the kick. The law was derived from the Sheffield Rules that stated that no goal could be scored from a free kick. This law was absorbed into the Laws of the Game in 1877 and later adapted to allow direct free kicks as a result of dangerous play. An indirect free kick is awarded to the opposing team when a player commits a foul other than a penalty foul or infringes certain technical requirements of the laws. An indirect free kick is also awarded to the opposing team when play is stopped to caution or send-off a player when no specific foul has occurred. The most common cause is the offside offence. Unlike a direct free kick, an offence punishable by an indirect free kick does not result in a penalty kick when it occurs in the penalty area; rather, it continues to be taken as an indirect free kick.

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Richard II

Richard II

King Richard the Second is a history play by William Shakespeare believed to have been written in approximately 1595. It is based on the life of King Richard II of England and is the first part of a tetralogy, referred to by some scholars as the Henriad, followed by three plays concerning Richard's successors: Henry IV, Part 1; Henry IV, Part 2; and Henry V. It may not have been written as a stand-alone work. Although the First Folio edition of Shakespeare's works lists the play as a history play, the earlier Quarto edition of 1597 calls it The tragedie of King Richard the second.

— Freebase

Fourball

Fourball

A Fourball match is a type of golf match used in match play competitions. A fourball match consists of two teams of two players competing directly against each other. Each golfer plays his own ball throughout the round. A team's number of strokes for a given hole is the lowest individual number of strokes of that team's players on that hole. In stroke play, the scores are added normally, and the team with the lower score at the end of the match wins. In match play, each hole is won by the team whose member has the lowest score on that hole, and that team is awarded a point for the hole. If the teams tie for a hole, the point for the hole is divided between the teams. At the end of the match, the team with the most points wins. This form of golf is commonly played in team golf competitions such as the Ryder Cup, Solheim Cup and the Presidents Cup.

— Freebase

Boot Black

Boot Black

"One of Chi Chi's best early achievements. While the fab drag director has certainly gotten a lot nastier as time went on (see the harsh-n-hot Link series for proof), this one still stands as a raunchy ode to the 'good old days'. Meaning, lots of leather play, sex in a sex club, and an unbridled torrent of hot men poking, prodding, pulling, and plunging. There's no plot whatsoever (again a precursor to the Link films), just a series of hot men in various situations. Shot in a sex club in West Hollywood, this type of flick wasn't really being done too much in the mid 90s. It also seems as though Chi Chi was trying to recreate an era gone by, as most of the men are buff but not steroidal, and most have left their natural chest, leg and facial hair intact. (Zak Spears and co-cover model Jake Andrews are the biggest beneficiaries!) Alert to jockstrap and vacuum pump fans, too. From a terrific circle jerk, to leather play, to full-on butthole poking, to actual boot slobbering and spitting, this one is most certain to please one and all. Production values are top-notch (although it gets a tad too dark to see at times), and there's no denying that this was the flick that many swooned over Wolff for the first time. Whether you're a fan of Chi Chi, Wolff, sex clubs, leather play, or just plain old hot gay porn, Boot Black is worth owning." Quoting a review by Mr. Powerbar

— Freebase

John Garner

John Garner

John R. Garner is an English professional golfer. During his playing career, Garner won one European Tour event, when he defeated Neil Coles in the final of the Benson & Hedges Match Play Championship in 1972. He didn't win again until 1998 at the Senior Tournament of Champions on the European Seniors Tour. Garner was a member of the Great Britain Ryder Cup team in 1971 and the Great Britain and Ireland team in 1973. He made just one appearance in 1971, teaming up with Neil Coles in a four-ball match against Americans Frank Beard and J. C. Snead, who won the match 2 up with 1 hole to play. Garner did not play a single match in 1973. Garner is currently the teaching professional at the Manukorihi Golf Club in Taranaki, New Zealand.

— Freebase

Willi Lippens

Willi Lippens

Willi Lippens is a former Dutch football player. He is nicknamed "Ente" due to his waddling. Born near the German-Dutch border to a Dutch father and a German mother, Lippens spent most of his career playing for German clubs. He played for Rot-Weiss Essen from 1965–76 and in 1980–81. Between 1976 and 1979 he played for Borussia Dortmund before leaving to play one season for the Dallas Tornado in the NASL. Lippens played in 242 Bundesliga matches, scoring 92 goals, making him the player who appeared most often for Rot-Weiss at that level of play, as well as their top scorer. Lippens also played an international match for the Netherlands, making him one of only six Dutch football players to have been selected for the Dutch national team while never having played in the Dutch Eredivisie. The other capped players are Jeffrey Bruma, Jordi Cruyff, Jerrel Hasselbaink, Rob Reekers and Wim Hofkens. Lippens, who spoke only very basic Dutch, is the only native German-speaker ever to have played for the Dutch national team. Lippens received several invitations to join the German National selection as well, but always declined as his Dutch father had forbidden him to play for Germany. Lippens has said that he would have liked to have played for Germany, but that his respect for his father, and the experiences his family lived through during the Second World War outweighed this.

— Freebase

Lost Colony

Lost Colony

The Lost Colony is a historical play by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Paul Green about Roanoke, the first English colony in North America. The play is based on the historical accounts of Sir Walter Raleigh's failed attempts to establish a permanent settlement in the 1580s in part of what was then the Colony of Virginia. The Lost Colony has been performed since 1937 in an outdoor theater located on the site of Sir Walter's colony on Roanoke Island in the Outer Banks region near present-day Manteo, North Carolina. The original music for the play was provided by acclaimed American composer and conductor Lamar Stringfield. As of 2012, it is the United States' second longest running historical outdoor drama, behind The Ramona Pageant.

— Freebase

The Field

The Field

The Field is a play written by John B. Keane, first performed in 1965. It tells the story of the hardened Irish farmer "Bull" McCabe and his love for the land he rents. The play debuted at Dublin's Olympia Theatre in 1965, with Ray McAnally as "The Bull" and Eamon Keane as "The Bird" O'Donnell. The play was published in 1966 by Mercier Press. A new version with some changes was produced in 1987. A film adaptation was released in 1990, directed by Jim Sheridan with Richard Harris in the lead role.

— Freebase

Thurgood

Thurgood

Thurgood is a one-man play about the life of Thurgood Marshall. It was written by George Stevens, Jr. The show premiered in 2006 at the Westport Country Playhouse, starring James Earl Jones and directed by Leonard Foglia. The play started on Broadway at the Booth Theatre on April 30, 2008 starring Laurence Fishburne. On 24th February 2011, HBO screened a filmed version of the play which Fishburne had performed at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. The production was described by the Baltimore Sun as "one of the most frank, informed and searing discussions of race you will ever see on TV.". On 16th February 2011 a screening of the film was hosted by the White House as part of its celebrations of Black History Month

— Freebase

Comps

Comps

In the context of casinos, comps are complimentary items and services given out by casinos to encourage players to gamble. The amount of comps that a player is given usually depends on what game they play, how much they bet, and how long they play. Most casinos have hosts who are responsible for giving out free items and contacting players to bring them back to the casino. Pit bosses can also award comps at table games. Most casinos now require a player to have a player's club or similar card, so that their play can be tracked and comps awarded.

— Freebase

Cyrano

Cyrano

Cyrano is a musical with a book and lyrics by Anthony Burgess and music by Michael J. Lewis. Based on Edmond Rostand's classic 1897 play of the same name, it focuses on a love triangle involving the large-nosed poetic Cyrano de Bergerac, his beautiful cousin Roxana, and his classically handsome but inarticulate friend Christian de Neuvillette who, unaware of Cyrano's unrequited passion for Roxana, imposes upon him to provide the romantic words he can use to woo her successfully in mid-17th century Paris. In the early 1960s, David Merrick had announced plans to produce a musical entitled Cyrano with a score by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley, but nothing came of the project. Burgess had translated the Rostand play for the Guthrie in Minneapolis, and director Michael Langham suggested he adapt it for a musical version. Burgess joined forces with film composer Lewis, replacing dialogue in his play with musical numbers, and the completed work was staged at the Guthrie, again with Langham at the helm. Following a tryout in Boston's Colonial Theatre and five previews, the Broadway production, directed and choreographed by Michael Kidd, opened on May 13, 1973 at the Palace Theatre, where it ran for 49 performances. The cast included Christopher Plummer as Cyrano, Leigh Beery as Roxana, and Mark Lamos as Christian, with Tovah Feldshuh making her Broadway debut in two small supporting roles.

— Freebase

Leading actor

Leading actor

A leading actor, leading actress, star, or simply lead, plays the role of the protagonist in a film or play. The word lead may also refer to the largest role in the piece and leading actor may refer to a person who typically plays such parts or an actor with a respected body of work. Some actors are typecast as leads, but most play the lead in some performances and supporting or character roles in others. Sometimes there is more than one significant leading role in a dramatic piece, and the actors are said to play co-leads; a large supporting role may be considered a secondary lead. Award nominations for acting often reflect such ambiguities. Thus, sometimes two actors in the same performance piece are nominated for Best Actor or Best Actress -- categories traditionally reserved for leads. For example, in 1935 Clark Gable, Charles Laughton and Franchot Tone were each nominated for the Best Actor Academy Award for Mutiny on the Bounty. There can even be controversy over whether a particular performance should be nominated in the Best Actor/Actress or Best Supporting Actor/Actress category. A title role is often but not necessarily the lead.

— Freebase

Squirrels

Squirrels

Squirrels is a one-act play by David Mamet. The 1974 comedy is about Arthur, a middle-aged, egotistical hack writer who has been working on the opening line of a story involving a man's encounter with a squirrel for fifteen years, and Edmond, the young fledgling writer he has hired as a secretary/collaborator. They soon discover that Arthur's flamboyant redundancy clashes with Edmond's mediocre melodramatic style as they each develop increasingly ridiculous scenarios for the story. They are joined by Arthur's cleaning lady, also an aspiring writer, whose suggestions seem to be the most promising, but they too eventually bog down in banality. Mamet directed the first production of the play at the St. Nicholas Theater Company in Chicago, Illinois The British premiere was presented by The Mandrake Theatre Company at the Kings Head Theatre, London in 1993. Directed by Aaron Mullen. . In more recent years it has been staged by the Philadelphia Fringe Festival, Upstairs at the Gatehouse in North London, and the Blue House Theatre Company and Criterion Theatre in Santa Monica. The play was published in a paperback edition by Samuel French in 1982.

— Freebase

Tosca

Tosca

Tosca is an opera in three acts by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa. It premiered at the Teatro Costanzi in Rome on 14 January 1900. The work, based on Victorien Sardou's 1887 French-language dramatic play, La Tosca, is a melodramatic piece set in Rome in June 1800, with the Kingdom of Naples's control of Rome threatened by Napoleon's invasion of Italy. It contains depictions of torture, murder and suicide, as well as some of Puccini's best-known lyrical arias, and has inspired memorable performances from many of opera's leading singers. Puccini saw Sardou's play when it was touring Italy in 1889 and, after some vacillation, obtained the rights to turn the work into an opera in 1895. Turning the wordy French play into a succinct Italian opera took four years, during which the composer repeatedly argued with his librettists and publisher. Tosca premiered at a time of unrest in Rome, and its first performance was delayed for a day for fear of disturbances. Despite indifferent reviews from the critics, the opera was an immediate success with the public. Musically, Tosca is structured as a through-composed work, with arias, recitative, choruses and other elements musically woven into a seamless whole. Puccini used Wagnerian leitmotifs to identify characters, objects and ideas. While critics have frequently dismissed the opera as a facile melodrama with confusions of plot—musicologist Joseph Kerman famously called it a "shabby little shocker"—the power of its score and the inventiveness of its orchestration have been widely acknowledged. The dramatic force of Tosca and its characters continues to fascinate both performers and audiences, and the work remains one of the most frequently performed operas. Many recordings of the work have been issued, both of studio and live performances.

— Freebase

The natural son

The natural son

The Natural Son is a comedy play by the British writer Richard Cumberland. It was first staged at the Drury Lane Theatre in London in December 1784. The play is notable for the return of the popular character Major O'Flaherty from Cumberland's 1771 play The West Indian.

— Freebase

Edgeplay

Edgeplay

In BDSM, edgeplay is a subjective term for types of sexual play that are considered to be pushing on the edge of the traditional S.S.C. creed. They would be considered more RACK. Edgeplay may involve the risk of serious, even permanent, harm, or death, exemplified by activities such as breathplay, fire play, knife play, and gunplay, as well as the increased risk of spreading disease, as with cutting, bloodplay, or barebacking. What constitutes edgeplay varies with the persons involved, and also over time. In the mid-nineties, the Living in Leather convention did not have panels on ageplay or scat because they were considered too edgy. By 2000 they were part of the regular list programming. Some activities, such as ageplay or rape roleplay, may be considered quite edgy by some and not at all for others. The definition is fairly subjective, although typically based on some level on what people are used to in their local scene.

— Freebase


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