Definitions containing pétion de villeneuve, jérôme

We've found 131 definitions:

Arnobius

Arnobius

Arnobius of Sicca was an Early Christian apologist, during the reign of Diocletian. According to Jerome's Chronicle, Arnobius, before his conversion, was a distinguished Numidian rhetorician at Sicca Veneria, a major Christian center in Proconsular Africa, and owed his conversion to a premonitory dream. Arnobius writes dismissively of dreams in his surviving book, so perhaps Jerome was projecting his own respect for the content of dreams. According to Jerome, to overcome the doubts of the local bishop as to the earnestness of his Christian belief he wrote an apologetic work in seven books that St. Jerome calls Adversus Gentes but which is entitled Adversus Nationes in the only manuscript that has survived. Jerome's reference, his remark that Lactantius was a pupil of Arnobius and the surviving treatise are all that we know about Arnobius.

— Freebase

Beauty and the Beast

Beauty and the Beast

"Beauty and the Beast" is a traditional fairy tale. The first published version of the fairy tale was a rendition by Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villeneuve, published in La jeune américaine, et les contes marins in 1740. The best-known written version was an abridgement of her work published in 1756 by Jeanne-Marie Le Prince de Beaumont, in Magasin des enfants, ou dialogues entre une sage gouvernante et plusieurs de ses élèves; an English translation appeared in 1757. Variants of the tale are known across Europe. In France, for example, Zémire et Azor is an operatic version of the story of Beauty and the Beast written by Marmontel and composed by Grétry in 1771. It had enormous success well into the 19th century. It is based on the second version of the tale. Amour pour amour, by Nivelle de la Chaussée, is a 1742 play based on Villeneuve's version.

— Freebase

Polytechnique

Polytechnique

Polytechnique is a 2009 Canadian film from Quebec written by Jacques Davidts and Denis Villeneuve and directed by Denis Villeneuve. Set in Montreal, Quebec and based on the École Polytechnique massacre, the film documents the events of December 6, 1989, through the eyes of two students who witness a gunman murder fourteen young women. The film was released on February 6, 2009, in Quebec and on March 20, 2009, in Toronto, Vancouver and Calgary. Its release has sparked controversy in Quebec. The film was screened at the 2009 Cannes Film Festival on May 17, 2009.

— Freebase

Jerome

Jerome

Saint Jerome is an ancient Latin Christian priest, confessor, theologian and historian, who also became a Doctor of the Church. Though often considered exclusively a saint of the Roman Catholic Church, Jerome was a Latin Christian who predated the East-West Schism which occurred in the 11th century. He was the son of Eusebius, of the city of Stridon, which was on the border of Dalmatia and Pannonia. He is best known for his translation of the Bible into Latin, and his commentaries on the Gospel of the Hebrews. His list of writings is extensive. He is recognised by the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Lutheran Church, and the Church of England as a saint. Jerome is commemorated on 30 September with a memorial.

— Freebase

Jeronymite

Jeronymite

one belonging of the mediaeval religious orders called Hermits of St. Jerome

— Webster Dictionary

church father

Church Father, Father of the Church, Father

(Christianity) any of about 70 theologians in the period from the 2nd to the 7th century whose writing established and confirmed official church doctrine; in the Roman Catholic Church some were later declared saints and became Doctor of the Church; the best known Latin Church Fathers are Ambrose, Augustine, Gregory the Great, and Jerome; those who wrote in Greek include Athanasius, Basil, Gregory Nazianzen, and John Chrysostom

— Princeton's WordNet

father

Church Father, Father of the Church, Father

(Christianity) any of about 70 theologians in the period from the 2nd to the 7th century whose writing established and confirmed official church doctrine; in the Roman Catholic Church some were later declared saints and became Doctor of the Church; the best known Latin Church Fathers are Ambrose, Augustine, Gregory the Great, and Jerome; those who wrote in Greek include Athanasius, Basil, Gregory Nazianzen, and John Chrysostom

— Princeton's WordNet

father of the church

Church Father, Father of the Church, Father

(Christianity) any of about 70 theologians in the period from the 2nd to the 7th century whose writing established and confirmed official church doctrine; in the Roman Catholic Church some were later declared saints and became Doctor of the Church; the best known Latin Church Fathers are Ambrose, Augustine, Gregory the Great, and Jerome; those who wrote in Greek include Athanasius, Basil, Gregory Nazianzen, and John Chrysostom

— Princeton's WordNet

vulgate

Vulgate

the Latin edition of the Bible translated from Hebrew and Greek mainly by St. Jerome at the end of the 4th century; as revised in 1592 it was adopted as the official text for the Roman Catholic Church

— Princeton's WordNet

Septuagint

Septuagint

An ancient translation of the Hebrew Bible into Greek, undertaken by Jews resident in Alexandria for the benefit of Jews who had forgotten their Hebrew (well before the birth of Jesus); abbreviated as LXX. The LXX is the untranslated standard version of the Old Testament for the Greek Orthodox Church, but not for the Western Church, which since Jerome, has adhered to the Masoretic text. In the original Greek New Testament, when Jesus quotes the Old Testament, he is made to quote the LXX, which tends to disagree with the Masoretic text.

— Wiktionary

Hieronymite

Hieronymite

A member of any of various mediaeval congregations of hermits named after St. Jerome.

— Wiktionary

Jeronymite

Jeronymite

A member of any of various mediaeval congregations of hermits named after St. Jerome.

— Wiktionary

Vulgate

Vulgate

the Latin translation of the Bible (from Hebrew and Greek) made by Saint Jerome

— Wiktionary

metopomancy

metopomancy

divination by interpreting the facial lines and wrinkles, especially the forehead. It was developed by 16th century astrologer and physician Jerome Cardan.

— Wiktionary

Hieronymus

Hieronymus

Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus, Saint Jerome.

— Wiktionary

ur-poem

ur-poem

A poem that is believed to be a precursor or prototype to a more modern class of poetry. The term most usually references a hypothetical 'mother poem' of a genre. Jerome McGann described the ur-poem as a work "whose existence is the Idea that can be abstracted out of all concrete and written texts which have ever existed or which ever will exist".

— Wiktionary

Nazarene

Nazarene

The Nazarenes were a sect of 4th-century Christianity first mentioned by Epiphanius of Salamis, who considered them heretics. The group was later mentioned by Jerome and Augustine of Hippo. Epiphanius, and other writers such as Jerome, distinguished the 4th Century Nazarenes from the earlier use of "Sect of the Nazarenes" applied to the New Testament Church in Acts 24:5, where Paul the Apostle is accused before Felix at Caesarea by Tertullus of being "a ringleader of the sect of the Nazarenes."

— Freebase

Henceforward...

Henceforward...

The play Henceforward... is the first comedy in which Alan Ayckbourn includes elements of science fiction. It concerns Jerome, a composer, who develops a plan to persuade his estranged wife Corinna that his home life is sufficiently stable for her to allow their daughter to stay with him. The plan involves both an actress and a gynoid. Henceforward... was Ayckbourn's thirty-fourth full-length play. It was first performed at the Stephen Joseph Theatre in Scarborough in 1987. It received its West End premiere at the Lyric Theatre on Shaftesbury Avenue in October 1988 where Jerome was played by Ian McKellen,. Corinna was played by Jane Asher. This production won the 1989 Best Comedy category at the Evening Standard Awards for London theatre.

— Freebase

nearLY

nearLY

Nearly is the solo musical project of former Nine Inch Nails drummer, Jerome Dillon. Dillon plays most of the music himself. The 2005 debut release is entitled Reminder. Claudia Sarne contributes the vocals. Jerome is currently in the studio with engineer/programmer Joshua Kincheloe working on the follow-up to reminder.

— Freebase

Belomancy

Belomancy

Belomancy, also bolomancy, is the ancient art of divination by use of arrows. Belomancy was anciently practised at least by Babylonians, Greeks, Arabs and Scythians. The arrows were typically marked with occult symbols and had to have feathers for every method. In one method, different possible answers to a given question were written and tied to each arrow. For example, three arrows would be marked with the phrases, God orders it me, God forbids it me, and the third would be blank. The arrow that flew the furthest indicated the answer. Another method involves the same thing, but without shooting the arrows. They would simply be shuffled in the quiver, worn preferably on the back, and the first arrow to be drawn indicated the answer. If a blank arrow was drawn, they would redraw. This was an ancient practice, and probably that mentioned in the Book of Ezekiel 21:21, shown below in the original Hebrew, and translated to English in the New American Standard Bible, St. Jerome agrees with this understanding of the verse, and observes that the practice was frequent among the Assyrians and Babylonians. Something like it is also mentioned in Hosea 4:12, although a staff or rod is used instead of arrows, which is rather rhabdomancy than belomancy. Grotius, as well as Jerome, confounds the two together, and shows that it prevailed much among the Magi, Chaldean, and Scythians, from which it passed to the Slavonians, and then to the Germans, whom Tacitus observes to make use of it.

— Freebase

Saint-Jérôme

Saint-Jérôme

Saint-Jérôme is a town in Quebec, Canada, near Mirabel, about 40 kilometres northwest of Montreal along Autoroute des Laurentides. The town is a gateway to the Laurentian Mountains and its resorts. The town is named after Saint Jerome, a church father best known as the translator of the Bible from Greek and Hebrew into Latin. His translation is known as the Vulgate.

— Freebase

Jérôme Bonaparte

Jérôme Bonaparte

Jérôme-Napoléon Bonaparte was the youngest brother of Napoleon I and as Jerome I, King of Westphalia between 1807 and 1813. After 1848, when his nephew, Louis Napoleon, became President of the second French Republic, he served in several official roles, being created first Prince of Montfort.

— Freebase

Jerome K. Jerome

Jerome K. Jerome

Jerome Klapka Jerome was an English writer and humorist, best known for the comic travelogue Three Men in a Boat. Other works include the essay collections Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow and Second Thoughts of an Idle Fellow; Three Men on the Bummel, a sequel to Three Men in a Boat; and several other novels.

— Freebase

Discovery learning

Discovery learning

Discovery learning is a technique of inquiry-based instruction and is considered a constructivist based approach to education. It is supported by the work of learning theorists and psychologists Jean Piaget, Jerome Bruner, and Seymour Papert. Although this form of instruction has great popularity, there is some debate in the literature concerning its efficacy. Jerome Bruner is often credited with originating discovery learning in the 1960s, but his ideas are very similar to those of earlier writers. Bruner argues that "Practice in discovering for oneself teaches one to acquire information in a way that makes that information more readily viable in problem solving". This philosophy later became the discovery learning movement of the 1960s. The mantra of this philosophical movement suggests that we should 'learn by doing'. In 1991, The Grauer School, a private secondary school in Encinitas, California, was founded with the motto, "Learn by Discovery", and integrated a series of world-wide expeditions into their program for high school graduation. The label of discovery learning can cover a variety of instructional techniques. According to a meta-analytic review conducted by Alfieri, Brooks, Aldrich, and Tenenbaum, a discovery learning task can range from implicit pattern detection, to the elicitation of explanations and working through manuals to conducting simulations. Discovery learning can occur whenever the student is not provided with an exact answer but rather the materials in order to find the answer themselves.

— Freebase

Véhicule Automatique Léger

Véhicule Automatique Léger

VAL is a type of automatic rubber-tired people mover technology, based on an invention by Professor Robert Gabillard. It was designed in the early 1980s by French Matra, for the then new metro system in Lille. The acronym was originally for Villeneuve d'Ascq à Lille, the route of the first line to be projected. It now officially stands for Véhicule Automatique Léger. In contrast to some other driverless metro systems like the Docklands Light Railway or Vancouver's SkyTrain, the VAL design uses platforms that are separated from the rollways by a glass partition, to prevent waiting passengers from straying or falling onto the rollways. Platform screen doors, which are produced by Swiss glass door manufacturer Kaba Gilgen AG, embedded in these partitions open in synchrony with the train doors when a train stops at the platform. The original platform edge doors were manufactured and installed by PLC Peters in Hayes Middlesex and were used on the first line. When VAL was introduced to Taipei, the term medium capacity system was coined to differentiate VAL from heavy rail. Thus this term is being applied mainly among Asian cities and railway planners though they are not using VAL's technology. In Siemens official site, VAL is advertised "first fully automated light metro", in which the term "light metro" can be traced back to Moscow Metro Butovskaya Light Metro Line.

— Freebase

Battle of Trafalgar

Battle of Trafalgar

The Battle of Trafalgar was a naval engagement fought by the British Royal Navy against the combined fleets of the French Navy and Spanish Navy, during the War of the Third Coalition of the Napoleonic Wars. The battle was the most decisive British naval victory of the war. Twenty-seven British ships of the line led by Admiral Lord Nelson aboard HMS Victory defeated thirty-three French and Spanish ships of the line under French Admiral Pierre-Charles Villeneuve off the south-west coast of Spain, just west of Cape Trafalgar. The Franco-Spanish fleet lost twenty-two ships, without a single British vessel being lost. The British victory spectacularly confirmed the naval supremacy that Britain had established during the previous century and was achieved in part through Nelson's departure from the prevailing naval tactical orthodoxy, which involved engaging an enemy fleet in a single line of battle parallel to the enemy to facilitate signalling in battle and disengagement, and to maximise fields of fire and target areas. Nelson instead divided his smaller force into two columns directed perpendicularly against the larger enemy fleet, with decisive results.

— Freebase

Circuit Zolder

Circuit Zolder

The Circuit Zolder, also known as Circuit Terlaemen, is an undulating 4.011 km motorsport race track in Heusden-Zolder, Belgium. Built in 1963, Zolder hosted the Formula One Belgian Grand Prix on 10 separate occasions in the 1970s and 1980s, as well as the 1980 Belgian motorcycle Grand Prix. F1 moved to Zolder in 1973 and with the exception of a race at Nivelles-Baulers in 1974, Zolder was the location of the Belgian Grand Prix until 1982. Zolder is the place where Gilles Villeneuve died during qualifying at the 1982 Belgian Grand Prix. The Belgian Grand Prix was held here only once more in 1984 before returning to the shortened Spa-Francorchamps. Zolder has also been used for cycling events including the UCI Road World Championships twice in; 1969 and 2002 and the UCI Cyclo-cross World Championships in 1970 and 2002. In the beginning of 2006, the track underwent safety adaptations. In 2007, the track hosted a Champ Car World Series Grand Prix, and a round of the FIA GT Championship. The track was venue of a round of the World Series by Renault championship from 2003 to 2006, and replaced Zandvoort as site for the Masters of Formula 3 in 2007 and 2008. Zolder was featured on the car program Top Gear in 2008. In the episode, the show's British hosts competed against their German counterparts from D MOTOR. Zolder currently hosts the FIA WTCC Race of Belgium and the GT Belcar championship, including the 24 Hours of Zolder.

— Freebase

Antoine Court

Antoine Court

Antoine Court was a French reformer called the "Restorer of Protestantism in France." He was born at Villeneuve-de-Berg, in Languedoc, March 27, 1696. His parents were peasants, adherents of the Reformed church, which was then undergoing persecution. When but 17 years old, Court began to speak at the secret meetings of the Protestants, held literally "in dens and caves of the earth," and often in darkness, with no pastor present to teach or counsel. In 1685, Louis XIV revoked the Edict of Nantes, referred to as the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, aka the Edict of Fontainebleau. This caused mass exodus of Protestants. There were those who stayed and continued to secretly practice Protestantism; called “The Church of the Desert”, or "Christians of the Desert". His followers were always hounded, persecuted, and put to death.

— Freebase

Villeneuve

Villeneuve

Villeneuve was a federal electoral district in Quebec, Canada, that was represented in the Canadian House of Commons from 1949 to 1979. This riding was created in 1947 from parts of Pontiac riding. It consisted initially of: ⁕the southwestern part of the county of Abitibi; and ⁕parts of the county of Témiscamingue including the towns of Mercier, Noranda and Rouyn. In 1952, it was redefined to consist of: ⁕parts of the county of Abitibi including the towns of Bourlamarque, Cadillac, Duparquet, Malartic and Val-d'Or; ⁕the northern parts of the county of Témiscamingue including the cities of Noranda and Rouyn. In 1966, it was redefined to consist of: ⁕the Towns of Barville, Bourlamaque, Cadillac, Chapais, Chibougamau, Lebel-sur-Quévillon, Malartic, Senneterre and Val-d'Or; ⁕parts of the County of Abitibi; and ⁕parts of the County of Témiscamingue. The electoral district was abolished in 1976 when it was redistributed into Abitibi and Témiscamingue ridings.

— Freebase

Bonaparte

Bonaparte

name of a celebrated family of Italian origin settled in Corsica; the principal members of it were: Charles Marie, born at Ajaccio, 1744; died at Montpellier, 1785; married, 1767. Marie-Lætitia Ramolino, born at Ajaccio, 1750; died at Rome, 1836; of this union were born eight children: Joseph, became king of Naples, 1806; king of Spain from 1808 to 1813; retired to United States after Waterloo; returned to Europe, and died at Florence, 1844. Napoleon I. (q. v.). Lucien, b. 1775; became president of the Council of the Five Hundred, and prince of Canino; died in Viterbo, 1840. Marie-Anne-Eliza, b. 1777; married Felix Bacciochi, who became prince of Lucca; died at Trieste, 1826. Louis, b. 1778; married Hortense de Beauharnais; father of Napoleon III.; king of Holland (from 1806 to 1810); died at Leghorn, 1846. Marie Pauline, b. 1780; married General Leclerc, 1801; afterwards, in 1803, Prince Camille Borghese; became Duchess of Guastalla; died at Florence, 1825. Caroline-Marie, b. 1782; married Marat in 1800; became Grand-duchess of Berg and Clèves, then queen of Naples; died at Florence, 1839. Jerome, b. 1784, king of Westphalia (from 1807 to 1813); marshal of France in 1850; married, by second marriage, Princess Catherine of Würtemburg; died in 1860; his daughter, the Princess Mathilde, b. 1820, and his son, Prince Napoleon, called Jerome, b. 1822, married Princess Clothilde, daughter of Victor Emmanuel, of which marriage was born Prince Victor Napoleon in 1862.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Nelson, Horatio, Lord

Nelson, Horatio, Lord

great English admiral, born at Burnham Thorpe, Norfolk; entered the navy as a midshipman in 1770, and after voyages to the West Indies, the Arctic regions, and the East Indies, was promoted to a lieutenancy in 1777; three years later he headed the expedition against San Juan, was invalided home, and in 1781 acted under Lord Hood in American waters; in command of the Boreas on the Leeward Islands station, here he involved himself in trouble through his severe and arbitrary enforcement of the Navigation Act against American traders, and there also he met and married in 1787 the widow of Dr. Nesbit; returning home he lived for five years in retirement, but on the eve of the French Revolutionary war he was again summoned to active service, and in command of the Agamemnon, advanced his reputation by gallant conduct in the Mediterranean operations of Lord Hood, losing his right eye during the storming of Calvi, in Corsica; conspicuous bravery at the engagement with the Spaniards off Cape St. Vincent (1797) brought him promotion to the rank of rear-admiral; in the same year he lost his right arm at Santa Cruz, and in the following year, with an inferior force, annihilated the French fleet in the Bay of Aboukir, for which he was raised to the peerage as Baron Nelson, and created Duke of Bronte by the King of Naples; at this time began his lifelong liaison with Lady Hamilton (q. v.); involving himself in Neapolitan affairs, he went beyond his commission in suppressing the rebel Jacobins, and especially in executing their leader Caracciolo; in 1800 he returned home, his never robust strength considerably impaired; as vice-admiral nominally under Sir Hugh Parker, he in 1801 sailed for the Baltic and inflicted a signal defeat on the Danish fleet off Copenhagen; for this he was made Viscount and commander-in-chief; during the scare of a Napoleonic invasion he kept a vigilant watch in the Channel, and on the resumption of war he on October 21, 1805, crowned his great career by a memorable victory off Trafalgar over the French fleet commanded by Villeneuve, but was himself mortally wounded at the very height of the battle (1758-1805).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Allegro Diagnostics

Allegro Diagnostics

Allegro Diagnostics was founded in 2006 by Jerome Brody, M.D., and Avrum Spira, M.D., MSc, faculty at the Boston University School of Medicine and thought leaders in the field of pulmonology. The company is currently headquartered in Maynard, Massachusetts.

— CrunchBase

SmartRecruiters

SmartRecruiters

SmartRecruiters the hiring platform. Leveraging the latest cloud technologies along with intuitive design, the SmartRecruiters platform gives social enterprises everything they need to source, engage and hire top talent. The mission of SmartRecruiters is to eradicate unemployment by removing friction in the labor market. Its 50,000+ customers have created 250,000+ jobs. SmartRecruiters, based in San Francisco CA, was founded in 2010 by Jerome Ternynck, a recognized recruiting thought leader and pioneer of the recruiting software industry, and is backed by Rembrandt Venture Partners and the Mayfield Fund.

— CrunchBase

troff

troff

[Unix] The gray eminence of Unix text processing; a formatting and phototypesetting program, written originally in PDP-11 assembler and then in barely-structured early C by the late Joseph Ossanna, modeled after the earlier ROFF which was in turn modeled after the Multics and CTSS program RUNOFF by Jerome Saltzer (that name came from the expression “to run off a copy”). A companion program, nroff, formats output for terminals and line printers.In 1979, Brian Kernighan modified troff so that it could drive phototypesetters other than the Graphic Systems CAT. His paper describing that work (“A Typesetter-independent troff,” AT&T CSTR #97) explains troff's durability. After discussing the program's “obvious deficiencies — a rebarbative input syntax, mysterious and undocumented properties in some areas, and a voracious appetite for computer resources” and noting the ugliness and extreme hairiness of the code and internals, Kernighan concludes:None of these remarks should be taken as denigrating Ossanna's accomplishment with TROFF. It has proven a remarkably robust tool, taking unbelievable abuse from a variety of preprocessors and being forced into uses that were never conceived of in the original design, all with considerable grace under fire.The success of TeX and desktop publishing systems have reduced troff's relative importance, but this tribute perfectly captures the strengths that secured troff a place in hacker folklore; indeed, it could be taken more generally as an indication of those qualities of good programs that, in the long run, hackers most admire.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Mel Blanc

Mel Blanc

Melvin Jerome "Mel" Blanc was an American voice actor and comedian. Although he began his nearly six-decade-long career performing in radio commercials, Blanc is best remembered for his work with Warner Bros. as the voices of Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, Tweety Bird, Sylvester the Cat, Yosemite Sam, Foghorn Leghorn, Marvin the Martian, Pepé Le Pew, Speedy Gonzales, the Tasmanian Devil and many of the other characters from the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies theatrical cartoons, during the "Golden age of American animation". He later worked for Hanna-Barbera's television cartoons, most notably as the voices of Barney Rubble in The Flintstones and Mr. Spacely in The Jetsons. Blanc was also a regular performer on The Jack Benny Program, in both its radio and television formats. Having earned the nickname "The Man of a Thousand Voices", Blanc is regarded as one of the most influential people in the voice-acting industry. Blanc has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 6385 Hollywood Boulevard.

— Freebase

Vulgate

Vulgate

The Vulgate is a late 4th-century Latin translation of the Bible. It was largely the work of St. Jerome, who was commissioned by Pope Damasus I in 382 to make a revision of the Vetus Latina. Its widespread adoption eventually led to their eclipse. By the 13th century this revision had come to be called the versio vulgata, that is, the "commonly used translation". In the 16th century it became the definitive and officially promulgated Latin version of the Bible in the Roman Catholic Church.

— Freebase

Carte Blanche

Carte Blanche

Carte Blanche is a compilation album by Algerian raï artist Rachid Taha, consisting of songs he recorded with Mohammed Amini, Mokthar Amini and Jérôme Savy when they formed a band called Carte de Séjour, along with songs from his more recent solo albums. It was released in 1997 by Barclay, and produced by Steve Hillage.

— Freebase

Mortal

Mortal

Mortal was a Christian industrial/dance band fronted by Jerome Fontamillas and Jyro Xhan. Both members went on to found the alternative rock group Fold Zandura, and for a time were members of both bands simultaneously. The band is known for its lyrical intelligence, incorporating advanced theology with what has been billed as "Industrial Praise and Worship." According to CCM Magazine "Mortal has had a much greater influence... on industrial music than its modest output would suggest."

— Freebase

huH

huH

huH was a popular music magazine in the United States during the 1990s. It was published by Ray Gun Publishing, Inc. based in Santa Monica, California and owned by Time Warner. It was launched in 1994 as a new business venture concept in a mixed music sample marketing/publishing format. "huH" was edited by Ray Gun Publishing Editorial Director Mark Blackwell and was designed by Vaughan Oliver and Jerome Curchod. The magazine's editorial staff also included writer Dean Kuipers. Initially, the magazine came packaged in a prototype sent by mail that included the square-ish magazine and a VHS tape with videos by artists mentioned in the magazine, all boxed up in styrofoam and sealed in plastic wrap. After marketing stabilization and a format change, the magazine included sampler CDs released on a monthly basis by genre while reviews were contained within the magazine. The format then changed to a numbered sequence with all sample songs on one CD per month. The magazine also included a letters section with a mostly youth audience, news briefs, and cartoons. Its large, almost square design distinguished it among other publications. huH stopped circulating in the late 1990s.

— Freebase

Book of Malachi

Book of Malachi

Malachi is a book of the Hebrew Bible, the last of the twelve minor prophets and the final book of the Neviim. In the Christian ordering, the grouping of the Prophetic Books is the last section of the Old Testament, making Malachi the last book before the New Testament. The book is commonly attributed to a prophet by the name of Malachi. Although the appellation Malachi has frequently been understood as a proper name, its Hebrew meaning is simply "My [i.e., God's] messenger" and may not be the author's name at all. The sobriquet occurs in the superscription at 1:1 and in 3:1, although it is highly unlikely that the word refers to the same character in both of these references. Thus, there is substantial debate regarding the identity of the book's author. One of the Targums identifies Ezra as the author of Malachi. St. Jerome suggests this may be because Ezra is seen as an intermediary between the prophets and the 'great synagogue'. There is, however, no historical evidence yet to support this claim. Some scholars note affinities between Zechariah 9-14 and the book of Malachi. Zechariah 9, Zechariah 12, and Malachi 1 are all introduced as The word of Elohim. Many scholars argue that this collection originally consisted of three independent and anonymous prophecies, two of which were subsequently appended to the book of Zechariah with the third becoming the book of Malachi. As a result, most scholars consider the book of Malachi to be the work of a single author who may or may not have been identified by the title Malachi. The present division of the oracles results in a total of twelve books of minor prophets—a number parallelling the sons of Jacob who became the heads of the twelve tribes of Israel. The Catholic Encyclopedia asserts that "We are no doubt in presence of an abbreviation of the name Mál'akhîyah, that is Messenger of Elohim.

— Freebase

TYPSET and RUNOFF

TYPSET and RUNOFF

RUNOFF was the first computer text formatting program to see significant use. It was written in 1964 for the CTSS operating system by Jerome H. Saltzer in MAD assembler. It actually consisted of a pair of programs, TYPSET, and RUNOFF. RUNOFF had support for pagination and headers, as well as text justification. RUNOFF is a direct predecessor of the runoff document formatting program of Multics, which in turn was the ancestor of the roff and nroff document formatting programs of Unix, and their descendants. It was also the ancestor of FORMAT for the IBM System/360, and of course indirectly for every computerized word processing system. Likewise, RUNOFF for CTSS was the predecessor of the various RUNOFFs for DEC's operating systems, via the RUNOFF developed by the University of California, Berkeley's Project Genie for the SDS 940 system. The name is alleged to have come from the phrase at the time, I'll run off a copy.

— Freebase

Erech

Erech

Erech according to the Book of Genesis, was an ancient city in the land of Shinar, the second city built by king Nimrod. While earlier scholars such as Jerome had identified Erech with the Syrian city of Edessa, the modern consensus is that it refers to the Sumerian city-state of Uruk, in south Mesopotamia.

— Freebase

Remus

Remus

Remus is the inner and smaller moon of the main-belt asteroid 87 Sylvia. It follows an almost-circular close-to-equatorial orbit around the parent asteroid. In this respect it is similar to the other moon Romulus. Remus was discovered several years after Romulus on images taken starting on August 9, 2004, and announced on August 10, 2005. It was discovered by Franck Marchis of UC Berkeley, and Pascal Descamps, Daniel Hestroffer, and Jérôme Berthier of the Observatoire de Paris, France, using the Yepun telescope of the European Southern Observatory in Chile. Marchis, the project leader, was waiting for the completion of the image acquisition programme before starting to process the data. Just as he was set to go on vacation in March 2005, Descamps sent him a brief note entitled "87 Sylvia est triple ?" pointing out that he could see two moonlets on several images of Sylvia. The entire team then focused quickly on analysis of the data, wrote a paper, submitted an abstract to the August meeting in Rio de Janeiro and submitted a naming proposal to the IAU. Its full designation is Sylvia II Remus; before receiving its name, it was known as S/2004 1. The moon is named after Remus, twin of the mythological founder of Rome, one of the children of Rhea Silvia raised by a wolf.

— Freebase

Lucretius

Lucretius

Titus Lucretius Carus was a Roman poet and philosopher. His only known work is the epic philosophical poem De rerum natura about the beliefs of Epicureanism, and which is translated into English as On the Nature of Things or "On the Nature of the Universe". Virtually nothing is known about the life of Lucretius. Jerome tells how he was driven mad by a love potion and wrote his poetry between fits of insanity, eventually committing suicide in middle age; but modern scholarship suggests this account was likely an invention. The De rerum natura was a considerable influence on the Augustan poets, particularly Virgil and Horace. It virtually disappeared during the Middle Ages, but was rediscovered in a monastery in Germany in 1417, by Poggio Bracciolini, and played an important role both in the development of atomism and the efforts of various figures of the Enlightenment era to construct a new Christian humanism.

— Freebase

X-gal

X-gal

X-gal is an organic compound consisting of galactose linked to a substituted indole. The compound was synthesized by Jerome Horwitz and collaborators in Detroit, MI, in 1964. The formal chemical name is often shortened to less accurate but also less cumbersome phrases such as bromochloroindoxyl galactoside. The X from indoxyl may well be the source of the X in the X-gal contraction. X-gal is much used in molecular biology to test for the presence of an enzyme, β-galactosidase. It is also used to detect activity of this enzyme in histochemistry and bacteriology. X-gal is one of many indoxyl glycosides and esters that yield insoluble blue compounds similar to indigo as a result of enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis.

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Bethel

Bethel

Bethel Ugaritic: bt il, meaning "House of El" or "House of God", Hebrew: בֵּית אֵל, also transliterated Beth El, Beth-El, or Beit El; Greek: Βαιθηλ; Latin: Bethel was a border city described in the Hebrew Bible as being located between Benjamin and Ephraim. Eusebius of Caesarea and Jerome describe it in their time as a small village that lay 12 Roman miles north of Jerusalem, to the right or east of the road leading to Neapolis. Edward Robinson identified the village of Beitin in Palestine with ancient Bethel in Biblical Researches in Palestine, 1838–52. He based this assessment on its fitting the location described in earlier texts, and on the philological similarities between the modern and ancient name, arguing that the replacement of the Hebrew el with the Arabic in was not unusual. Ten years after the Six Day War, the biblical name was applied to an Israeli settlement Beit El constructed adjacent to Beitin. In several countries - particularly in the US - the name was given to various locations. A second biblical Bethel, in the southern Judah, is mentioned in the Book of Joshua, and seems to be the same as Bethul or Bethuel, a city of the tribe of Simeon.

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Worldview

Worldview

Worldview is Chicago Public Media's daily international-affairs radio show, hosted by Jerome McDonnell. It features conversations about international issues as well as their local connections. It airs a series every Thursday called "Global Activism," in which Midwesterners involved in international advocacy and suggested by listeners are interviewed. It airs at noon, CT, and is re-broadcast at 09:00 p.m. It is also aired daily on XMPR, channel 133 at 01:00 a.m. ET, 10:00 p.m. PT. The program is distributed by both National Public Radio and Public Radio International.

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Psychopedagogy

Psychopedagogy

Psychopedagogy is a combination of two main branches of study, Pedagogy and Psychology. Some of the most influential authors in this field are Jean Piaget, Ausubel, Jerome Bruner and Lev Vygotsky. Important contributions have also been made by Mary Warnock in the field of special education and authors such as John D. Krumboltz in the academic and professional orientation. In Spain we can highlight the works of Rafael Bisquerra, Manuel Álvarez y Jesús Alonso Tapia amongst various others. The Psychopedagogy Degree provides students with the tools needed to take part in the different stages and all the areas of the teaching/learning process. These professionals can act on the people who take part in this teaching/learning process directly, or indirectly by designing the support material needed to make this process easier. This degree’s main objective is to enable students to elaborate and develop counselling activities and programmes to help the education community to both improve and renew educational processes and create the right conditions to carry them out. To achieve this, the Psychopedagogy Degree aims at developing academic, personal and labour skills to make educational psychologists’ tasks easier. These skills enable professionals to know, inform and take part in the educational process and to solve conflicts which may arise during its development.

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Rhabdomancy

Rhabdomancy

Rhabdomancy is a type of divination by means of any rod, wand, staff, stick, arrow, or the like. One method of rhabdomancy was setting a number of staffs on end and observing where they fall, to divine the direction one should travel, or to find answers to certain questions. It has also been used for divination by arrows - otherwise known as belomancy. Less commonly it has been assigned to the I Ching, which uses small wooden rods, and also dowsing, which often uses a wooden stick. Rhabdomancy has been used in reference to a number of Biblical verses. St Jerome connected Hosea 4.12, which reads "My people ask counsel at their stocks, and their staff declareth unto them", to Ancient Greek rhabdomantic practices. Thomas Browne, in his Pseudodoxia Epidemica, notes that Ezekiel 21.21 describes the divination by arrows of Nebuchadnezzar II as rhabdomancy, though this can also be termed belomancy. Numbers 17 has also been attributed to rhabdomancy. W.F. Kirby, an English translator of the Kalevala, notes that in Runo 49, Väinämöinen uses rhabdomancy, or divination by rods, to learn where the sun and moon are hidden, but this interpretation is rejected by Aili Kolehmainen Johnson.

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Immature

Immature

Immature is an American R&B group, managed by record producer Chris Stokes. Its members include Marques "Batman" Houston, Jerome "Romeo" Jones, and Kelton "LDB" Kessee, all natives of Los Angeles, California, where the group was formed. The group released four albums under the Immature moniker including On Our Worst Behavior in 1992 which included former member Don "Half Pint" Santos, later replaced by Kessee, Playtyme Is Over in 1994, then We Got It in 1995 and finally in 1997 released the album, The Journey. In 1999, the group changed their name to IMx marking 10 years of being a group and released two studio albums Introducing IMx and IMx, and then released a Greatest Hits album in 2001. The group also branched out into film and television before disbanding in 2002. In 2010, Houston announced on 106 & Park that the group were planning to record another group album together for 2011.

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Quantum cascade laser

Quantum cascade laser

Quantum cascade lasers are semiconductor lasers that emit in the mid- to far-infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum and were first demonstrated by Jerome Faist, Federico Capasso, Deborah Sivco, Carlo Sirtori, Albert Hutchinson, and Alfred Cho at Bell Laboratories in 1994. Unlike typical interband semiconductor lasers that emit electromagnetic radiation through the recombination of electron–hole pairs across the material band gap, QCLs are unipolar and laser emission is achieved through the use of intersubband transitions in a repeated stack of semiconductor multiple quantum well heterostructures, an idea first proposed in the paper "Possibility of amplification of electromagnetic waves in a semiconductor with a superlattice" by R.F. Kazarinov and R.A. Suris in 1971.

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Saint Barbara

Saint Barbara

Saint Barbara, Feast Day December 4, known in the Eastern Orthodox Church as the Great Martyr Barbara, was an early Christian saint and martyr. Accounts place her in the 3rd century in Nicodemia, present-site Turkey or in Heliopolis in Egypt. There is no reference to her in the authentic early Christian writings, nor in the original recension of Saint Jerome's martyrology. Her name can be traced to the 7th century, and veneration of her was common, especially in the East, from the 9th century. Because of doubts about the historicity of her legend, she was removed from the liturgical calendar of the Roman rite in 1969 in Pope Paul VI's motu proprio Mysterii Paschalis. Saint Barbara is often portrayed with miniature chains and a tower. As one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers, Barbara continues to be a popular saint in modern times, perhaps best known as the patron saint of artillerymen, military engineers, miners and others who work with explosives because of her old legend's association with lightning, and also of mathematicians. Many of the thirteen miracles in a 15th-century French version of her story turn on the security she offered that her devotees would not die without making confession and receiving extreme unction.

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Fred Astaire

Fred Astaire

Fred Astaire was an American film and Broadway stage dancer, choreographer, singer, musician and actor. His stage and subsequent film and television careers spanned a total of 76 years, during which he made 31 musical films, several award winning television specials, and issued numerous recordings. He was named the fifth Greatest Male Star of All Time by the American Film Institute. He is particularly associated with Ginger Rogers, with whom he made ten films. Gene Kelly, another major innovator in filmed dance, said that "the history of dance on film begins with Astaire". Beyond film and television, many classical dancers and choreographers, Rudolf Nureyev, Sammy Davis, Jr., Michael Jackson, Gregory Hines, Mikhail Baryshnikov, George Balanchine and Jerome Robbins among them, also acknowledged his importance and influence.

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Winston Churchill

Winston Churchill

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, DL, FRS, Hon. RA was a British politician who was the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 1945 and again from 1951 to 1955. Widely regarded as one of the greatest wartime leaders of the 20th century, Churchill was also an officer in the British Army, a historian, a writer, and an artist. He is the only British Prime Minister in history to have received the Nobel Prize in Literature, and was also the first person to be made an Honorary Citizen of the United States. Churchill was born into an aristocratic family as the grandson of the 7th Duke of Marlborough. His father, Lord Randolph Churchill, was a charismatic politician who served as Chancellor of the Exchequer; his mother, Jennie Jerome, was an American socialite. As a young army officer, he saw action in British India, The Sudan, and the Second Boer War. He gained fame as a war correspondent and wrote books about his campaigns. At the forefront of politics for fifty years, he held many political and cabinet positions. Before the First World War, he served as President of the Board of Trade, Home Secretary, and First Lord of the Admiralty as part of the Asquith Liberal government. During the war, he continued as First Lord of the Admiralty until the disastrous Gallipoli Campaign caused his departure from government. He then briefly resumed active army service on the Western Front as commander of the 6th Battalion of the Royal Scots Fusiliers. He returned to government as Minister of Munitions, Secretary of State for War, and Secretary of State for Air. After the War, Churchill served as Chancellor of the Exchequer in the Conservative government of 1924–29, controversially returning the pound sterling in 1925 to the gold standard at its pre-war parity, a move widely seen as creating deflationary pressure on the UK economy. Also controversial was his opposition to increased home rule for India and his resistance to the 1936 abdication of Edward VIII.

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Jabberwock

Jabberwock

Jabberwock is a 1972 play by American playwrights Jerome Lawrence and Robert Edwin Lee, a semi-biographical account of the childhood of author/cartoonist/playwright James Thurber. It focuses on his early life and his eccentric family as they live through World War I.

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Bromine

Bromine

Bromine is a chemical element with the symbol Br, and atomic number of 35. It is in the halogen group. The element was isolated independently by two chemists, Carl Jacob Löwig and Antoine Jerome Balard, in 1825–1826. Elemental bromine is a fuming red-brown liquid at room temperature, corrosive and toxic, with properties between those of chlorine and iodine. Free bromine does not occur in nature, but occurs as colorless soluble crystalline mineral halide salts, analogous to table salt. Bromine is rarer than about three-quarters of elements in the Earth's crust; however, the high solubility of bromide ion has caused its accumulation in the oceans, and commercially the element is easily extracted from brine pools, mostly in the United States, Israel and China. About 556,000 tonnes were produced in 2007, an amount similar to the far more abundant element magnesium. At high temperatures, organobromine compounds readily convert to free bromine atoms, a process which has the effect of stopping free radical chemical chain reactions. This effect makes organobromine compounds useful as fire retardants; more than half the bromine produced industrially worldwide each year is put to this use. Unfortunately, the same property causes sunlight to convert volatile organobromine compounds to free bromine atoms in the atmosphere, and an unwanted side effect of this process is ozone depletion. As a result, many organobromide compounds that were formerly in common use—such as the pesticide methyl bromide—have been abandoned. Bromine compounds are still used for certain purposes, however, including in well-drilling fluids, in film photography, and as an intermediate in the manufacture of organic chemicals.–

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Ray Gun

Ray Gun

Ray Gun was an American alternative rock-and-roll magazine, first published in 1992 in Santa Monica, California. Led by founding art director David Carson, Ray Gun explored experimental magazine typographic design. The result was a chaotic, abstract style, not always readable, but distinctive in appearance. That tradition for compelling visuals continued even after Carson left the magazine after three years; he was followed by a series of art directors, including Robert Hales, Chris Ashworth, Scott Denton-Cardew, and Jerome Curchod. In terms of content, Ray Gun was also notable for its choices of subject matter. The cutting-edge advertising, musical artists and pop culture icons spotlighted were typically ahead of the curve, putting such artists as Radiohead, Björk, Beck, Flaming Lips, PJ Harvey and Eminem on its cover long before its better-known competitors. Those choices were guided by Executive Editor Randy Bookasta and an editorial staff that included Dean Kuipers, Nina Malkin, Mark Blackwell, Joe Donnelly, Grant Alden, Mark Woodlief, and Eric Gladstone. Ray Gun produced over 70 issues from 1992 through 2000. Owner-founder-publisher Marvin Scott Jarrett also created the magazines Bikini, Stick and huH. Jarret is currently editor-in-chief of Nylon, a New York–based fashion magazine. The most notable common thread among all of Jarrett's magazines has been an attraction to dynamic next-generation graphic design.

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Fenestella

Fenestella

Fenestella, Roman historian and encyclopaedic writer, flourished in the reign of Tiberius. If the notice in Jerome is correct, he lived from 52 BC to AD 19. Taking Varro for his model, Fenestella was one of the chief representatives of the new style of historical writing which, in the place of the brilliant descriptive pictures of Livy, discussed curious and out-of-the-way incidents and customs of political and social life, including literary history. He was the author of an Annales, probably from the earliest times down to his own days. The fragments indicate the great variety of subjects discussed: the origin of the appeal to the people; the use of elephants in the circus games; the wearing of gold rings; the introduction of the olive tree; the material for making the toga; the cultivation of the soil; certain details as to the lives of Cicero and Terence. The work was very much used by Pliny the Elder, Asconius Pedianus, Nonius, and the philologists. A work published under the name of L. Fenestella is really by A. D. Fiocchi, canon and papal secretary, and was subsequently published as by him, edited by Aegidius Witsius.

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Roberta

Roberta

Roberta is a musical from 1933 with music by Jerome Kern, and lyrics and book by Otto Harbach. The musical is based on the novel Gowns by Roberta by Alice Duer Miller. The play features the famous songs "Yesterdays", "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes", "Let's Begin", "You're Devastating", "Something Had To Happen" and "The Touch of Your Hand".

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Simon the Zealot

Simon the Zealot

The apostle called Simon Zelotes, Simon the Zealot, in Luke 6:15 and Acts 1:13; and Simon Kananaios or Simon Cananeus, was one of the most obscure among the apostles of Jesus. Little is recorded of him aside from his name. A few pseudepigraphical writings were connected to him, and Jerome does not include him in De viris illustribus.

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Achor

Achor

Achor is the name of a valley in the vicinity of Jericho. Eusebius and Jerome implied that they thought it was a valley north of Jericho. In the nineteenth century some writers identified the valley with the wadi al-Qelt, a deep ravine located to Jericho's south. In the twentieth century the Hyrcania valley west and south of Qumran, and Wadi en-Nu'eima have also been suggested. One difficulty is that the narrative of Joshua 7 appears to place the valley of Achor to the north of Jericho, between Jericho and Ai; but Joshua 15:7 makes the valley part of the boundary between the tribe of Judah and the tribe of Benjamin, to the south of Jericho, but not as far south as El-Buqei'a. The Book of Joshua, chapter seven, relates the story from which the valley's name comes. After the problems the Israelites had as a result of Achan's immoral theft of items commanded to be destroyed, the Israelite community stoned Achan and his household. Liberal scholars and archaeologists regard the narrative about Achan as an aetiological myth, and instead suspect that it gained this name for another reason. Due to the horrific nature of this narrative, the phrase valley of trouble became eminently proverbial and occurs elsewhere in the Hebrew bible. The Book of Isaiah and Book of Hosea use the term - the valley of trouble, a place for herds to lie down in, the valley of trouble for a door of hope as a way of describing the redemption promised by God.

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Quentin Tarantino

Quentin Tarantino

Quentin Jerome Tarantino is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, and actor. His films have been characterized by nonlinear storylines, satirical subject matter, and an aestheticization of violence that often results in the exhibition of neo-noir characteristics. Tarantino has been dubbed a "director DJ," comparing his stylistic use of mix-and-match genre and music infusion to the use of sampling in DJ exhibits, morphing a variety of old works to create a new one. Tarantino grew up an avid film fan and worked in a video rental store while training to act. His career began in the late 1980s, when he wrote and directed My Best Friend's Birthday, the screenplay of which formed the basis for True Romance. In the early 1990s, he began his career as an independent filmmaker with the release of Reservoir Dogs in 1992; regarded as a classic and cult hit, it was called the "Greatest Independent Film of All Time" by Empire magazine. Its popularity was boosted by the release of his second film, 1994's Pulp Fiction, a neo-noir crime film that became a major critical and commercial success, widely regarded as one of the greatest films of all time. Paying homage to 1970s blaxploitation films, Tarantino released Jackie Brown in 1997, an adaptation of the novel Rum Punch.

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Augustine of Hippo

Augustine of Hippo

Augustine of Hippo, also known as St Augustine, St Austin, or St Augoustinos, was an early Christian theologian whose writings are considered very influential in the development of Western Christianity and Western philosophy. He was bishop of Hippo Regius located in the Roman province of Africa. Writing during the Patristic Era, he is viewed as one of the most important Church Fathers. Among his most important works are City of God and Confessions, which continue to be read widely today. According to his contemporary, Jerome, Augustine "established anew the ancient Faith." In his early years, he was heavily influenced by Manichaeism and afterward by the Neo-Platonism of Plotinus. After his conversion to Christianity and his baptism in 387, Augustine developed his own approach to philosophy and theology, accommodating a variety of methods and different perspectives. He believed that the grace of Christ was indispensable to human freedom and he framed the concepts of original sin and just war. When the Western Roman Empire began to disintegrate, Augustine developed the concept of the Catholic Church as a spiritual City of God, distinct from the material Earthly City. His thoughts profoundly influenced the medieval worldview. Augustine's City of God was closely identified with the segment of the Church that adhered to the concept of the Trinity as defined by the Council of Nicaea and the Council of Constantinople.

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KART

KART

KART is a radio station broadcasting a Classic Country format. Licensed to Jerome, Idaho, USA, the station serves the Twin Falls area. The station is currently owned by Kart Broadcasting Co, and features programing from ABC Radio.

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Polycarp

Polycarp

Polycarp was a 2nd-century Christian bishop of Smyrna. According to the Martyrdom of Polycarp he died a martyr, bound and burned at the stake, then stabbed when the fire failed to touch him. Polycarp is regarded as a saint in the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, and Lutheran churches. It is recorded by Irenaeus, who heard him speak in his youth, and by Tertullian, that he had been a disciple of John the Apostle. Saint Jerome wrote that Polycarp was a disciple of John and that John had ordained him bishop of Smyrna. The early tradition that expanded upon the Martyrdom to link Polycarp in competition and contrast with John the Apostle who, though many people had tried to kill him, was not martyred but died of old age after being exiled to the island of Patmos, is embodied in the Coptic language fragmentary papyri dating to the 3rd to 6th centuries. Frederick Weidmann, their editor, interprets the "Harris fragments" as Smyrnan hagiography addressing Smyrna-Ephesus church rivalries, which "develops the association of Polycarp and John to a degree unwitnessed, so far as we know, either before or since". The fragments echo the Martyrology, and diverge from it.

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Naarath

Naarath

Naarath is a place named in Joshua 16:7 as one of the landmarks on the southern boundary of the Tribe of Ephraim and Benjamin. It appears to have been situated between Ataroth and Jericho. During the 4th-century, Eusebius and Jerome speak of "Naorath", as a "small village of Jews fives miles from Jericho."

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Twin Falls

Twin Falls

Twin Falls is the county seat and largest city of Twin Falls County, Idaho, United States. The city had a population of 44,125 as of the 2010 census. Twin Falls is the largest city of Idaho's Magic Valley region. As the largest city in a 100-mile radius, Twin Falls serves as a regional commercial center for both south-central Idaho and northeastern Nevada. Twin Falls is the principal city of the Twin Falls, ID Micropolitan Statistical Area, which officially includes Jerome and Twin Falls Counties. The resort community of Jackpot, Nevada, in Elko County is unofficially considered part of the greater Twin Falls area.

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Down syndrome

Down syndrome

Down syndrome or Down's syndrome, also known as trisomy 21, is a genetic disorder caused by the presence of all or part of a third copy of chromosome 21. Down syndrome is the most common chromosome abnormality in humans. It is typically associated with a delay in cognitive ability and physical growth, and a particular set of facial characteristics. The average IQ of young adults with Down syndrome is around 50, whereas young adults without the condition typically have an IQ of 100. A large proportion of individuals with Down syndrome have a severe degree of intellectual disability. Down syndrome is named after John Langdon Down, the British physician who described the syndrome in 1866. The condition was clinically described earlier by Jean Etienne Dominique Esquirol in 1838 and Edouard Seguin in 1844. Down syndrome was identified as a chromosome 21 trisomy by Dr. Jérôme Lejeune in 1959. Down syndrome can be identified in a newborn by direct observation or in a fetus by prenatal screening. Pregnancies with this diagnosis are often terminated. The CDC estimates that about one of every 691 babies born in the United States each year is born with Down syndrome.

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Locked-in syndrome

Locked-in syndrome

Locked-in syndrome, or LIS for short, is a condition in which a patient is aware and awake but cannot move or communicate verbally due to complete paralysis of nearly all voluntary muscles in the body except for the eyes. Total locked-in syndrome is a version of locked-in syndrome where the eyes are paralyzed, as well. The term for this disorder was coined by Fred Plum and Jerome Posner in 1966. Locked-in syndrome is also known as cerebromedullospinal disconnection, de-efferented state, pseudocoma, and ventral pontine syndrome.

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Inachus

Inachus

In Greek mythology, Inachus was the first king of Argos after whom a river was called Inachus River, the modern Panitsa that drains the western margin of the Argive plain. The historian Pausanias describes him as the eldest king of Argos who named the river after himself and sacrificed to Hera. He also notes that some said he was not a mortal, but a river. He states that Inachus, Cephissus and Asterion were mediators in a land dispute between Poseidon and Hera; when they judged for Hera, Poseidon took away their water. He mentions Dinomenes and Mycene as daughters of Inachus. Though Jerome and Eusebius, and as even late as 1812 John Lemprière euhemeristically asserted that he was the first king of Argos, and Robert Graves that he was a descendant of Iapetus, most modern mythologists understand Inachus as one of the river gods, all sons of Oceanus and Tethys and thus to the Greeks part of the pre-Olympian or "Pelasgian" mythic landscape; in Greek iconography, Walter Burkert notes, the rivers are represented in the form of a bull with a human head or face. In the Danaan founding myth, Poseidon had dried up the springs of the Argolid out of anger at Inachus for testifying that the land belonged to the ancient goddess, Hera; to counter this drought, Danaus sent his daughters to draw water. One of them, Amymone, in her search lay with Poseidon, and he revealed to her the springs at Lerna.

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Jerome of Prague

Jerome of Prague

Jerome of Prague was a Czech church reformer and one of the chief followers of Jan Hus who was burned for heresy at the Council of Constance.

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Diodorus Siculus

Diodorus Siculus

Diodorus Siculus was a Greek historian, who wrote works of history between 60 and 30 BC. He is known for the monumental universal history Bibliotheca historica. According to Diodorus' own work, he was born at Agyrium in Sicily. With one exception, antiquity affords no further information about Diodorus' life and doings beyond what is to be found in his own work. Only Jerome, in his Chronicon under the "year of Abraham 1968", writes, "Diodorus of Sicily, a writer of Greek history, became illustrious". His English translator, Charles Henry Oldfather, remarks on the "striking coincidence" that one of only two known Greek inscriptions from Agyrium is the tombstone of one "Diodorus, the son of Apollonius".

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Steam Heat

Steam Heat

"Steam Heat" is a show tune from the 1954 Broadway musical The Pajama Game, written by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross. "Steam Heat" was one of four songs which Adler and Ross wrote and submitted to George Abbott in hopes of being hired to score the stage musical Abbott was developing, which would become The Pajama Game. Rather than complementing the musical's storyline of a labor dispute at a garment factory, "Steam Heat" manifests as an overt staged number being a song-and-dance number featured as the "entertainment portion" of a union rally with the factory boss' s secretary Gladys as lead performer. Carol Haney originated the role of Gladys and she sang and danced the "Steam Heat" number in the original production of The Pajama Game with the accompaniment of Peter Gennaro and Buzz Miller. The "Steam Heat" number in The Pajama Game would make stage musical history by introducing the signature style of choreographer Bob Fosse. George Abbott had asked Fosse to stage "Steam Heat" in a manner appropriate to the amateur entertainment it was supposed to be, with Abbott specifically stating: "Do something small". When the "Steam Heat" number, featuring Fosse's minimalist but riveting dance moves, prefigured its Broadway reception by stopping the show during The Pajama Game's out-of-town tryout in New Haven, Abbott - discomfited by the disruption to the play's flow - moved to cut the number: however Abbott's partner Jerome Robbins successfully lobbied for its retention.

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Long Ago (and Far Away)

Long Ago (and Far Away)

"Long Ago (and Far Away)" is a popular song from the 1944 Technicolor film musical Cover Girl starring Rita Hayworth and Gene Kelly and released by Columbia Pictures. The music was written by Jerome Kern, and the lyrics were written by Ira Gershwin. The song was published in 1944 and sold over 600,000 copies in sheet music in a year. In the film it is sung by Rita Hayworth to Gene Kelly, and later briefly reprised by Jinx Falkenburg. Charting versions were recorded almost simultaneously by Dick Haymes and Helen Forrest, Bing Crosby, Jo Stafford, and Perry Como. The Dick Haymes-Helen Forrest recording was released by Decca Records as catalog number 23317. The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on April 27, 1944 and lasted 11 weeks on the chart, peaking at #2. The Jo Stafford recording was released by Capitol Records as catalog number 153. The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on May 4, 1944 and lasted 12 weeks on the chart, peaking at #6. The Perry Como recording was released by RCA Victor Records as catalog number 20-1569. The record first reached the Billboard magazine charts on May 11, 1944 and lasted three weeks on the chart, peaking at #8.

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Aelius Donatus

Aelius Donatus

Aelius Donatus was a Roman grammarian and teacher of rhetoric. The only fact known regarding his life is that he was the tutor of St. Jerome. He was the author of a number of professional works, of which several are extant: ⁕A partly incomplete commentary on the playwright Terence compiled from other commentaries, but probably not in its original form; ⁕His Life of Virgil is thought to be based on a lost Vita by Suetonius, together with the preface and introduction of his commentary on Virgil's works. A greatly expanded version of Servius' commentary exists, however, which is supplemented with frequent and extensive extracts from what is thought to be Donatus' commentary on Virgil. ⁕His Ars grammatica, especially the section on the eight parts of speech, though possessing little claim to originality, and evidently based on the same authorities which were used by the grammarians Charisius and Diomedes, attained such popularity as a schoolbook that, in the Middle Ages, he became the eponym for a rudimentary treatise of any sort, called a donet. When books came to be printed in the 15th century, editions of the little book were multiplied to an enormous extent. It is also the only purely textual work to be printed in blockbook form. It is in the form of an Ars Minor, which only treats of the parts of speech, and an Ars Major, which deals with grammar in general at greater length.

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Ira Gershwin

Ira Gershwin

Ira Gershwin was an American lyricist who collaborated with his younger brother, composer George Gershwin, to create some of the most memorable songs of the 20th century. With George he wrote more than a dozen Broadway shows, featuring songs such as "I Got Rhythm," "Embraceable You," "The Man I Love" and "Someone to Watch Over Me." He was also responsible, along with DuBose Heyward, for the libretto to George's opera Porgy and Bess. The success the brothers had with their collaborative works has often overshadowed the creative role that Ira played. However, his mastery of songwriting continued after the early death of George. He wrote additional hit songs with composers Jerome Kern, Kurt Weill and Harold Arlen. His critically acclaimed book Lyrics on Several Occasions of 1959, an amalgam of autobiography and annotated anthology, is an important source for studying the art of the lyricist in the golden age of American popular song.

— Freebase

Jerome Kern

Jerome Kern

Jerome David Kern was an American composer of musical theatre and popular music. One of the most important American theatre composers of the early 20th century, he wrote more than 700 songs, used in over 100 stage works, including such classics as "Ol' Man River", "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man", "A Fine Romance", "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes", "All the Things You Are", "The Way You Look Tonight", "Long Ago" and "Who?". He collaborated with many of the leading librettists and lyricists of his era, including George Grossmith Jr., Guy Bolton, P. G. Wodehouse, Otto Harbach, Oscar Hammerstein II, Dorothy Fields, Johnny Mercer, Ira Gershwin and E. Y. Harburg. A native New Yorker, Kern created dozens of Broadway musicals and Hollywood films in a career that lasted for more than four decades. His musical innovations, such as 4/4 dance rhythms and the employment of syncopation and jazz progressions, built on, rather than rejected, earlier musical theatre tradition. He and his collaborators also employed his melodies to further the action or develop characterization to a greater extent than in the other musicals of his day, creating the model for later musicals. Although dozens of Kern's musicals and musical films were hits, only Show Boat is now regularly revived. Songs from his other shows, however, are still frequently performed and adapted. Although Kern detested jazz arrangements of his songs, many have been adopted by jazz musicians to become standard tunes.

— Freebase

Jerome Robbins

Jerome Robbins

Jerome Robbins was an American theater producer, director, and choreographer known primarily for Broadway Theater and Ballet/Dance, but who also occasionally directed films and directed/produced for television. His work ranged from classical ballet to contemporary musical theater. Among the numerous stage productions he worked on were On the Town, Peter Pan, High Button Shoes, The King And I, The Pajama Game, Bells Are Ringing, West Side Story, Gypsy: A Musical Fable, and Fiddler on the Roof. Robbins was a five time Tony Award winner and a recipient of the Kennedy Center Honors. He received two Academy Awards, including the 1961 Academy Award for Best Director with Robert Wise for West Side Story. A documentary about his life and work, Something to Dance About, featuring excerpts from his journals, archival performance and rehearsal footage, and interviews with Robbins and his colleagues, premiered on PBS in 2009.

— Freebase

Netroots

Netroots

Netroots is a term coined in 2002 by Jerome Armstrong to describe political activism organized through blogs and other online media, including wikis and social network services. The word is a portmanteau of Internet and grassroots, reflecting the technological innovations that set netroots techniques apart from other forms of political participation. In the United States, the term is used mainly in left-leaning circles. The term necessarily overlaps with the related ideas of e-democracy, open politics, and participatory democracy—all of which are somewhat more specific, better defined, and more widely accepted. Netroots outreach is a campaign-oriented activity that uses the web for complementing more traditional campaign activities, such as collaborating with grassroots activism that involves get out the vote and organizing through interconnecting local and regional efforts, such as Meetup, and the netroots-grassroots coalition that propelled the election of Howard Dean to the DNC Chair in January, 2005. At times, the term netroots is used interchangeably with the term blogosphere, though the blogosphere is considered a subset of netroots in that blogosphere describes just the online community of blogs, where netroots includes that plus a number of larger liberal on-line outposts such as MoveOn, Media Matters for America and Think Progress.

— Freebase

Enaction

Enaction

Enaction is one of the possible ways of organizing knowledge and one of the forms of interaction with the world. The first definition of enaction was introduced by psychologist Jerome Bruner in association with the other two ways of knowledge organization: Iconic and Symbolic. The second was by Francisco Varela and Humberto Maturana. Enactive knowledge is knowledge that comes through action and it is constructed on motor skills, such as manipulating objects, riding a bicycle or playing a sport. The enactive knowledges of entities are the ones acquired by doing. The aim of the research on Enaction is the construction of Enactive interfaces, that are interactive systems that allow to organize and transmit this particular type of knowledge. Multimodal interfaces are a good candidate for the creation of Enactive interfaces because of their coordinated use of haptic, sound and vision. Such research is the main objective of the ENACTIVE Network of Excellence, a European consortium of more than 20 research laboratories that are joining their research effort for the definition, development and exploitation of Enactive interfaces. Enaction has been also theorised recently by Domenico Masciotra, Wolff-Michael Roth and Denise Morel.

— Freebase

On the Town

On the Town

On the Town is a musical with music by Leonard Bernstein and book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, based on Jerome Robbins' idea for his 1944 ballet Fancy Free, which he had set to Bernstein's music. The musical introduced several popular and classic songs, among them "New York, New York", "Lonely Town", "I Can Cook, Too", and "Some Other Time". The story concerns three American sailors on a 24-hour shore leave in New York City during wartime 1944. Each of the three sailors becomes enamoured of a particular woman — and of the city itself. On the Town was first produced on Broadway in 1944 and was made into a film in 1949 - although the film replaced all but three of the original Broadway songs with Hollywood-written substitutes. The show has enjoyed a number of major revivals. The musical integrates dance into its storytelling: Robbins made a number of ballets and extended dance sequences for the show, including the "Imaginary Coney Island" ballet.

— Freebase

Orosius

Orosius

Paulus Orosius — less often Paul Orosius in English — was a Gallaecian Christian priest, historian and theologian, a student of Augustine of Hippo. It is possible that he was born in Bracara Augusta, then capital of the Roman province of Gallaecia. Although there are some questions regarding his biography, such as his exact date of birth, it is known that he was a person of some prestige from a cultural point of view, as he had contact with the greatest figures of his time such as Saint Augustine of Hippo and Saint Jerome. In order to meet with them Orosius travelled to cities on the southern coast of the Mediterranean Sea, such as Hippo Regius and Alexandria. These journeys defined his life and intellectual output. Orosius did not just discuss theological matters with Saint Augustine, in fact he also collaborated with him on the book City of God. In addition, in 415 he was chosen to travel to Palestine in order to exchange information with other intellectuals. He was also able to participate in a Church Council meeting in Jerusalem on the same trip and he was entrusted with transporting the relics of Saint Stephen. The date of his death is also unclear, although it appears to have not been earlier than 418, when he finished one of his books, or later than 423.

— Freebase

Parmigianino

Parmigianino

Girolamo Francesco Maria Mazzola was an Italian Mannerist painter and printmaker active in Florence, Rome, Bologna, and his native city of Parma. His work is characterized by elongation of form and includes Vision of Saint Jerome and the Madonna with the Long Neck.

— Freebase

Translation studies

Translation studies

Translation studies is an interdiscipline containing elements of social science and the humanities, dealing with the systematic study of the theory, the description and the application of translation, interpreting, or both. Historically, translation studies has long been normative, to the point that discussions of translation that were not normative were generally not considered to be about translation at all. When historians of translation studies have traced early thinking about translation, for example, they have most often set the beginning with Cicero's remarks on how he used translation from Greek to Latin to improve his oratorical abilities--an early description of what Jerome ended up calling sense-for-sense translation. The descriptive history of interpreters in Egypt provided by Herodotus several centuries earlier is typically not thought of as "translation studies"--presumably because it doesn't tell translators how to translate. As an interdiscipline, translation studies borrows much from the different fields of study that support translation. These include comparative literature, computer science, history, linguistics, philology, philosophy, semiotics, terminology, and so forth. Note that occasionally in English, writers will use the term translatology to refer to translation studies. However, the term translation studies has become implanted in English, whereas in French, it is la traductologie that is used.

— Freebase

Rhodo

Rhodo

Rhodo was a Christian writer who flourished in the time of the Roman emperor Commodus; he was a native of the province of Asia Minor who came to Rome where he was a pupil of Tatian. He wrote several books, two of which are mentioned by Eusebius of Caesarea, viz., a treatise on "The Six Days of Creation" and a work against the Marcionites, in which he dwelled upon the various opinions which divided them. Eusebius, upon whom we depend exclusively for our knowledge of Rhodo, quotes some passages from the latter work, in one of which an account is given of the Marcionite Apelles. Jerome's De Viris Illustribus amplifies Eusebius's account somewhat by making Rhodo the author of a work against the Cataphrygians: probably he had in mind an anonymous work quoted by Eusebius a little later.

— Freebase

Gether

Gether

According to the Table of Nations in the Book of Genesis in the Hebrew Bible Gether was the third son of Aram, son of Shem. In Arabic traditions, he became the father of Thamud, whose brother the Qur'an calls Salih. In Josephus, he is ancestor of the Bactrians, but Jerome and Isidore of Seville make him ancestor of the Acarnanians or Carians.

— Freebase

Ethnopoetics

Ethnopoetics

Ethnopoetics is a method of recording text versions of oral poetry or narrative performances that uses poetic lines, verses, and stanzas to capture the formal, poetic performance elements which would otherwise be lost in the written texts.The goal of any ethnopoetic text is to show how the techniques of unique oral performers enhance the aesthetic value of their performances within their specific cultural contexts. Major contributors to ethnopoetic theory include Jerome Rothenberg, Dennis Tedlock, and Dell Hymes. Ethnopoetics is considered a subfield of ethnology, anthropology, folkloristics, stylistics, linguistics, and literature and translation studies.

— Freebase

Paulinus of Nola

Paulinus of Nola

Paulinus of Nola was a Latin poet and letter-writer, and a convert to the Christian faith. His renunciation of wealth and a senatorial career in favour of a Christian ascetic and philanthropic life was held up as an example by many of his contemporaries, including Augustine, Jerome, Martin of Tours, and Ambrose. After his conversion he wrote to his friend and teacher, the poet Ausonius, affirming his friendship but insisting on the priorities of his new life. He and his wife settled at Nola near Naples, where he wrote poems in honor of St. Felix and corresponded with Christian leaders throughout the Roman Empire. After his wife's death he became Bishop of Nola, and was invited to help resolve the disputed election of Pope Boniface I. He was recognized as a saint in the undivided Church and is commemorated on 22 June.

— Freebase

Albrecht Dürer

Albrecht Dürer

Albrecht Dürer was a German painter, engraver, printmaker, mathematician, and theorist from Nuremberg. His high-quality woodcuts established his reputation and influence across Europe when he was still in his twenties, and he has been conventionally regarded as the greatest artist of the Northern Renaissance ever since. His vast body of work includes altarpieces and religious works, numerous portraits and self-portraits, and copper engravings. The woodcuts, such as the Apocalypse series, retain a more Gothic flavour than the rest of his work. His well-known prints include the Knight, Death, and the Devil, Saint Jerome in his Study and Melencolia I, which has been the subject of extensive analysis and interpretation. His watercolours also mark him as one of the first European landscape artists, while his ambitious woodcuts revolutionized the potential of that medium. Dürer's introduction of classical motifs into Northern art, through his knowledge of Italian artists and German humanists, has secured his reputation as one of the most important figures of the Northern Renaissance. This is reinforced by his theoretical treatises, which involve principles of mathematics, perspective and ideal proportions.

— Freebase

Peter Martins

Peter Martins

Peter Martins is a Danish danseur and choreographer. He was a principal dancer with the Royal Danish Ballet and with The New York City Ballet, where he joined George Balanchine, Jerome Robbins and John Taras as balletmaster in 1981, retired from dancing in 1983 at which time he became Co-Ballet Master-In-Chief with Robbins, and since 1990 has borne sole responsibility for artistic leadership of City Ballet.

— Freebase

Oscar Hammerstein II

Oscar Hammerstein II

Oscar Greeley Clendenning Hammerstein II was an American librettist, theatrical producer, and theatre director of musicals for almost forty years. Hammerstein won eight Tony Awards and two Academy Awards for Best Original Song. Many of his songs are standard repertoire for singers and jazz musicians. He co-wrote 850 songs. Hammerstein was the lyricist and playwright in his partnerships; his collaborators wrote the music. Hammerstein collaborated with composers Jerome Kern, Vincent Youmans, Rudolf Friml, Richard A. Whiting and Sigmund Romberg; but his most famous collaboration, by far, was with Richard Rodgers, which included The Sound of Music.

— Freebase

Seventh Avenue

Seventh Avenue

Seventh Avenue, known as Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard north of Central Park, is a thoroughfare on the West Side of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It is southbound below Central Park and a two-way street north of the park. Seventh Avenue originates in the West Village at Clarkson Street, where Varick Street becomes Seventh Avenue. It is interrupted by Central Park from 59th to 110th Street. Artisans' Gate is the 59th Street exit from Central Park to Seventh Avenue. North of Warriors' Gate at the north end of the Park, the road runs in both directions through Harlem, where it is called Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard which has the Adam Clayton Powell Jr. State Office Building. The street ends at the Macombs Dam Bridge over the Harlem River, where Jerome Avenue commences in the Bronx.

— Freebase

Metoposcopy

Metoposcopy

Metoposcopy is a form of divination in which the diviner predicts personality, character, and destiny, based on the pattern of lines on the subject's forehead. It was developed by the 16th century astrologer and physician Jerome Cardan. The 16th century astrologer Giovanni Antonio Magini also concerned himself with this subject. Metoposcopy is prominently featured in the Zohar. Criticism Metoposcopy is described as a form of divination, in which the expert obtains their information from other-worldly or supernatural sources. This alone makes it clear that the practice of Metoposcopy is not supported by science, but is pseudoscience. The regular combination of this practice with astrology and it’s comparisons to palm reading further establishes metoposcopy within the realm of pseudoscience. These techniques rely on methods that cannot be disproven and lack any scientific merit. With confirmation bias, a rare correct prediction is used as confirmation of their abilities. However, the numerous incorrect predictions are minimized through assertions that every prediction can’t be 100% accurate, or as an inability to tap into one’s gifts at that moment. This increases the believability of the expert and their predictions, since no-one is perfect. Also making it difficult, or impossible, to disconfirm or falsify these claims, as the only ‘evidence’ is confirmatory.

— Freebase

PC12 minicomputer

PC12 minicomputer

PC12 by Artronix was a minicomputer built with TTL7400 technology and ferrite core memory. Computers were manufactured at the Artronix facility in suburban St. Louis, Missouri. An oral history transcript from Prof. Jerome Cox is at. The instruction set architecture was adapted from the LINC, the only significant change was to expand addressable memory to 4K, which required addition of an origin register. It was an accumulator machine with 12-bit addresses to manipulate 12-bit data. Later versions included "origin registers" that were used to extend the addressability of memory. Arithmetic was one's complement. For mass storage it had a LINCtape dual unit. It also used a Tektronix screen with tube memory and an ADC/DAC to capture and display images. There was an optional plotter to draw the results. To speed up the calculations it had a separate floating point unit that interfaced like any other peripheral. It ran an operating system LAP6-PC with support for assembly language and Fortran programming and usually came with end user software for Radiation Treatment Planning, for use by a radiation therapist or radiation oncologist, and Hospital Patient Records. With extended hardware it became a multiuser system running MUMPS. Latter additions included an 8" floppy disk and hard disk of larger capacity. The PC12 initially controlled the Artronix brain scanner, but this was for prototyping. The PC12 was also the core of an ultrasound system and a gamma camera system.

— Freebase

Books of Chronicles

Books of Chronicles

The two Books of Chronicles are the final books of the Hebrew Bible in the order followed by modern Judaism; in that generally followed in Christianity, they follow the two Books of Kings and precede Ezra and Nehemiah, thus concluding the history-oriented books of the Old Testament. The English title comes from the 5th century scholar Jerome, who referred to the book as a chronikon; in Hebrew it is called Divrei Hayyamim, and in Greek, Paralipomenon, ""things left on one side". The history told in Chronicles begins with Adam, and the story is then carried forward, almost entirely by genealogical lists, down to the founding of the Israelite monarchy. The bulk of remainder of 1 Chronicles, after a brief account of Saul, is concerned with the reign of David. The next long section concerns David's son Solomon, and the final part is concerned with the kingdom of Judah with occasional references to the kingdom of Israel. In the last chapter Judah is destroyed and the people taken into exile in Babylon, and in the final verses the Persian king Cyrus conquers Babylon, and authorises the restoration of the Temple of Solomon, and, apparently, the return of the exiles.

— Freebase

J. D. Salinger

J. D. Salinger

Jerome David "J. D." Salinger was an American writer. Living reclusively after much-noticed publications early in his career, he last published an original work in 1965, and gave his last interview in 1980. Raised in Manhattan, Salinger began writing short stories while in secondary school, and published several in Story magazine in the early 1940s before serving in World War II. In 1948, his critically acclaimed story "A Perfect Day for Bananafish" appeared in The New Yorker magazine, which became home to much of his later work. In 1951, his novel The Catcher in the Rye was an immediate popular success. His depiction of adolescent alienation and loss of innocence in the protagonist Holden Caulfield was influential, especially among adolescent readers. The novel remains widely read and controversial, selling around 250,000 copies a year. The success of The Catcher in the Rye led to public attention and scrutiny: Salinger became reclusive, publishing new work less frequently. He followed Catcher with a short story collection, Nine Stories, a volume containing a novella and a short story, Franny and Zooey, and a volume containing two novellas, Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction. His last published work, a novella entitled "Hapworth 16, 1924", appeared in The New Yorker on June 19, 1965.

— Freebase

James J. Hill

James J. Hill

James Jerome Hill, was a Canadian-American railroad executive. He was the chief executive officer of a family of lines headed by the Great Northern Railway, which served a substantial area of the Upper Midwest, the northern Great Plains, and Pacific Northwest. Because of the size of this region and the economic dominance exerted by the Hill lines, Hill became known during his lifetime as The Empire Builder.

— Freebase

Jerome Hines

Jerome Hines

Jerome A. Hines was an American operatic bass who performed at the Metropolitan Opera from 1946 to 1987. Standing 6 ft 6 in, his stage presence and stentorian voice made him ideal for such roles as Sarastro in The Magic Flute, Mephistopheles in Faust, Ramfis in Aida, the Grand Inquisitor in Don Carlos, the title role of Boris Godunov and King Mark in Tristan und Isolde.

— Freebase

Jerome Isaac Friedman

Jerome Isaac Friedman

Dr. Jerome Isaac Friedman, Ph.D is an American physicist.

— Freebase

Jerome Karle

Jerome Karle

Jerome Karle was an American physical chemist. Jointly with Herbert A. Hauptman, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1985, for the direct analysis of crystal structures using X-ray scattering techniques.

— Freebase

Jerome Weidman

Jerome Weidman

Jerome Weidman was an American playwright and novelist. He collaborated with George Abbott on the book for the musical Fiorello! with music by Jerry Bock, and lyrics by Sheldon Harnick. All received the 1960 Pulitzer Prize for Drama for the work.

— Freebase

Jerry Garcia

Jerry Garcia

Jerome John "Jerry" Garcia was an American musician who was best known for his lead guitar work, singing and songwriting with the band the Grateful Dead. Though he disavowed the role, Garcia was viewed by many as the leader or "spokesman" of the group. One of its founders, Garcia performed with the Grateful Dead for their entire thirty-year career. Garcia also founded and participated in a variety of side projects, including the Saunders-Garcia Band, Jerry Garcia Band, Old and in the Way, the Garcia/Grisman acoustic duo, Legion of Mary, and the New Riders of the Purple Sage. He also released several solo albums, and contributed to a number of albums by other artists over the years as a session musician. He was well known by many for his distinctive guitar playing and was ranked 13th in Rolling Stone's "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" cover story. Later in life, Garcia was sometimes ill because of his unstable weight, and in 1986 went into a diabetic coma that nearly cost him his life. Although his overall health improved somewhat after that, he also struggled with heroin and cocaine addictions, and was staying in a California drug rehabilitation facility when he died of a heart attack in August 1995.

— Freebase

The Bronx

The Bronx

The Bronx is the northernmost of the five boroughs of New York City. Coextensive with Bronx County, it was the last of the 62 counties of New York State to be incorporated. Located north of Manhattan and Queens, and south of Westchester County, the Bronx is the only borough that is located primarily on the mainland. The Bronx's population is 1,385,108 according to the 2010 United States Census. The borough has a land area of 42 square miles, making it the fourth-largest in land area of the five boroughs, the fourth most populated, and the third-highest in population density. The Bronx is divided by the Bronx River into a hillier section in the west, closer to Manhattan, and the flatter eastern section, closer to Long Island. Technically, the West Bronx is divided from the East Bronx by Jerome Avenue—the continuation of Manhattan's Fifth Avenue—making the West Bronx roughly one-eighth the size of the East Bronx. The West Bronx was annexed to New York City in 1874, and the areas east of the Bronx River were annexed in 1895. The Bronx first assumed a distinct legal identity when it became a borough of Greater New York in 1898. Bronx County, with the same boundaries as the borough, was separated from New York County as of January 1, 1914.

— Freebase

High, Wide, and Handsome

High, Wide, and Handsome

High, Wide, and Handsome is a 1937 American musical film starring Irene Dunne, Randolph Scott, Alan Hale, Sr., Charles Bickford, and Dorothy Lamour. The 110-minute movie was directed by Rouben Mamoulian, and written by Oscar Hammerstein II and George O'Neil, with lyrics by Hammerstein and music by Jerome Kern. It was released by Paramount Pictures. The film is set in rural western Titusville, Pennsylvania. In 1859, railroad tycoon Walt Brennan wants to take over the land of several oil-drilling farmers, led by Peter Cortlandt. Brennan wants to use the land to build a railroad. The townspeople block the plan, assisted by a herd of circus elephants, and instead construct their own oil pipeline. In a deliberate nod to Kern and Hammerstein's classic musical Show Boat, which had been filmed with Irene Dunne the year before, Dunne's lovable father Raymond Walburn is the owner of a traveling musical medicine show, and Dunne is its star; in addition, Dorothy Lamour sings a torch song, much as Helen Morgan did in Show Boat. The movie includes the classic Kern-Hammerstein song "Can I Forget You?", as well as "The Folks Who Live On the Hill". Director Mamoulian saw to it that most of the songs were firmly integrated into the plot of the film and advanced the storyline.

— Freebase

Hillsdale

Hillsdale

Hillsdale is a city in the state of Michigan. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 8,305. It is the county seat of Hillsdale County, and is run as a council-manager government. The city is the home of Hillsdale College, a private liberal arts college noted for its academics and its influence in politics and education. The city is situated mostly within Hillsdale Township, but is a municipality governed independently of the township. Nearby communities include: Allen, Bankers, Cambria, Camden, Frontier, Jerome, Jonesville, Litchfield, Montgomery, Moscow, Mosherville, North Adams, Osseo, Pittsford, Prattville, Ransom, Reading, and Waldron.

— Freebase

Encores!

Encores!

Encores! Great American Musicals in Concert is a program that has been presented by New York City Center since 1994. Encores! is dedicated to performing the full score of musicals that rarely are heard in New York City. Scores by Stephen Sondheim, Rodgers & Hammerstein, Rodgers & Hart, Cole Porter, Irving Berlin, Kurt Weill, George and Ira Gershwin, Jerome Kern, Jerry Bock, Sheldon Harnick, Kander and Ebb, Jule Styne, and Comden and Green have been heard at Encores! productions. The Encores! series was awarded the Jujamcyn Theater Award in 1997, the Association for Independent Music Indie Award in 1998, Tony Honors for Excellence in Theatre in 2000, several Lucille Lortel Awards, and an Outer Critics Circle Award. Cast recordings of the Encores! productions of Call Me Madam, Out Of This World, Pal Joey, Chicago, The Boys From Syracuse, St. Louis Woman, Babes In Arms, Do Re Mi, Tenderloin, Face the Music, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Merrily We Roll Along and Pipe Dream have been released. Accredited scholars can view videotapes of many Encores! productions at the Billy Rose Theater Collection of the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

— Freebase

Atem

Atem

Atem is an album by the German electronic music group Tangerine Dream. The music on Atem ranges from slow atmospheric pieces to more aggressive percussion and vocal experiments with dynamic Mellotron orchestrations. The release of the album in 1973 marked the end of the band's seminal "Pink Years" period, with future albums adopting a more structured sound. The baby pictured on the cover is Jerome Froese, the son of Edgar Froese, who would eventually become a member of Tangerine Dream. He was two years four months old at the time this album was released. It was largely through DJ John Peel's enthusiastic championing of this album, that Tangerine Dream first came to the attention of British music listeners in a big way, ordering copies of the group's albums through mail order companies. According to legend, it was this mail order activity that caused Richard Branson to take notice.

— Freebase

Jazer

Jazer

Jazer was a city east of the Jordan River, in or near Gilead, and inhabited by the Amorites. It was taken by a special expedition sent by Moses to conquer it. From the Septuagint, it appears that Jazer was on the border of Ammon. As an important city it gave its name to the whole of the surrounding territory. Even a "sea of Jazer" is mentioned in Jer. xlviii. 32. Jazer is stated to have been a fertile land fit for the raising of cattle and a place having many vineyards. It was occupied by the children of Gad, by which tribe it was allotted to the Merarite Levites. In the time of David it seems to have been occupied by the Hebronites, who were descendants of Kohath. It was chosen as one of the stations by David's officers who were sent to number the children of Israel. According to Josephus, Jazer was captured and burned by Judas Maccabeus. The site of Jazer was defined by Eusebius and Jerome as being 8 or 10 Roman miles west of Philadelphia, and 15 miles north of Heshbon, and as the source of a large river falling into the Jordan. It is identified by some scholars with the modern Khurbat Ṣar on the road from `Iraq al Amir to Al-Salt; but this identification has been rejected by Cheyne.

— Freebase

Sponsus

Sponsus

Sponsus or The Bridegroom is a medieval Latin and Occitan dramatic treatment of Jesus' parable of the ten virgins. A liturgical play designed for Easter Vigil, it was composed probably in Gascony or western Languedoc in the mid-eleventh century. Its scriptural basis is found in the Gospel of Matthew, but it also draws on the Song of Songs and the Patristics, perhaps Jerome's Adversus Jovinianum. In certain respects—the portrayal of the merchants, the spilling of the oil, the implicit questioning of accepted theodicy—it is original and dramatically powerful. "Sponsus" is the Latin word for groom/husband and is a cognate of the English "spouse". The feminine form is "sponsa".

— Freebase

Freeloaders

Freeloaders

The Freeloaders were formed in 2004 by Kevin O'Toole and Dale Longworth, two of the founder members of N-Trance. Under this alias they released a UK Top 10 single, "So Much Love to Give", which sampled The Real Thing; and an album Freshly Squeezed. Other musicians involved with the Freeloaders were Jerome Stokes and Vinny Burns.

— Freebase

The Cardinal

The Cardinal

The Cardinal is a 1963 American drama film which was produced independently and directed by Otto Preminger, and distributed by Columbia Pictures. The screenplay was written by Robert Dozier, based on the novel of the same name by Henry Morton Robinson. Its cast featured Tom Tryon, Romy Schneider and John Huston, and it was nominated for six Academy Awards. The film was shot on location in Boston, in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and in Rome and Vienna. The music score was written by Jerome Moross. The Cardinal featured the final appearance by veteran film star Dorothy Gish as well as the last big-screen performance of Maggie McNamara. Robinson's novel was based on the life of Cardinal Francis Spellman, who was then Archbishop of New York. The Vatican's liaison officer for the film was Joseph Ratzinger, later to become Pope Benedict XVI.

— Freebase

Nocturns

Nocturns

Nocturns are divisions of Matins, the night office of the Christian Liturgy of the Hours. A nocturn consists of psalms with antiphons followed by three lessons, which are taken either from scripture or from the writings of the Church Fathers. The office of Matins is composed of one to three nocturns. The term nocturn has been used since the Middle Ages. In 1970, following the Second Vatican Council, a revision of the Roman Breviary discontinued the use of nocturns when the office of Matins was reformed as the Office of Readings. Tertullian speaks of nocturnal gatherings; St. Cyprian, of the nocturnal hours, "nulla sint horis nocturnis precum damna, nulla orationum pigra et ignava dispendia". In the life of Melania the Younger is found the expression "nocturnæ horæ", "nocturna tempora". In these passages the term signifies night prayer in general and seems synonymous with the word vigiliæ. It is not accurate, then, to assume that the division of Matins into three Nocturns represents three distinct Offices recited during the night in the early ages of the Church. Durandus of Mende and others who follow him assert that the early Christians rose thrice in the night to pray; hence the present division into three Nocturns. Some early Christian writers speak of three vigils in the night, as Methodius or St. Jerome; but the first was evening prayer, or prayer at nightfall, corresponding practically to our Vespers or Complines; the second, midnight prayer, specifically called Vigils; the third, a prayer at dawn, corresponding to the Office of Lauds. As a matter of fact the Office of the Vigils, and consequently of the Nocturns, was a single Office, recited without interruption at midnight. All the old texts alluding to this Office testify to this. Moreover, it does not seem practical to assume that anyone, considering the length of the Office in those days, could have risen to pray at three different times during the night, besides joining in the two Offices of eventide and dawn.

— Freebase

First Impressions

First Impressions

First Impressions is a Broadway musical with music and lyrics by George Weiss, Bo Goldman, and Glenn Paxton, and book by Abe Burrows, who also directed the musical. It is based on Helen Jerome's 1935 stage adaptation of Jane Austen's novel Pride and Prejudice.

— Freebase

Numéro

Numéro

Numéro# is an electro-pop Canadian duo from Montreal formed by French Jérôme Rocipon and Québécois Pierre Crube.

— Freebase

Agapetae

Agapetae

In the first century of the Christian era, the Agapetae were virgins who consecrated themselves to God with a vow of chastity and associated with laymen. This association later resulted in abuses and scandals, so that councils of the fourth century forbade it. The Council of Ancyra, in 314, forbade virgins consecrated to God to live thus with men as sisters. This did not correct the practice entirely, for St. Jerome arraigns Syrian monks for living in cities with Christian virgins. The Agapetae are sometimes confounded with the subintroductae, or woman who lived with clerics without marriage, a class against which the third canon of the First Council of Nicaea was directed. The Agapetae were also a branch of the Gnostics in the late 4th century, who held that sexual relations were only improper if the mind was impure.

— Freebase

In Memory Of ...

In Memory Of ...

In Memory of ... is a ballet made by New York City Ballet balletmaster Jerome Robbins to Berg's Violin Concerto of 1935, based on themes from Mahler, a Carpathian folk song and Bach's O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort, BWV 20. The premiere took place on June 13, 1985, at the New York State Theater, Lincoln Center with scenery by David Mitchell, costumes by Dain Marcus and lighting by Jennifer Tipton.

— Freebase

Annales

Annales

The Annals by Roman historian and senator Tacitus is a history of the Roman Empire from the reign of Tiberius to that of Nero, the years AD 14-68. The Annals are an important source to modern understanding of the history of the Roman Empire during the first century. The Annals is Tacitus' final work, and modern historians generally consider it his greatest writing. Historian Ronald Mellor considers it "Tacitus's crowning achievement" which represents the "pinnacle of Roman historical writing". Tacitus' Histories and Annals together amounted to thirty books; although some scholars disagree about which work to assign some books to, traditionally fourteen are assigned to Histories and sixteen to Annals. Of the 30 books referred to by Jerome about half have survived. Modern scholars believe that as a Roman senator, Tacitus had access to Acta Senatus—the Roman senate's records—thus providing a solid basis for his work. Although Tacitus refers to part of his work as "my annals", the title of the work Annals used today was not assigned by Tacitus himself, but derives from its year-by-year structure.

— Freebase

Laurentides

Laurentides

The Laurentides is a region of Quebec. While it is often called the Laurentians in English, the region includes only part of the Laurentian mountains. It has a total land area of 20,744.29 km² and a 2011 census population of 555,614 inhabitants. The area was inhabited by the Montagnais First Nations tribe, until the French settled it in the first half of the 19th century, establishing an agricultural presence throughout the valleys. During the 20th century, the area also became a popular tourist destination, based on a cottage and lake culture in the summer, and a downhill and cross-country ski culture in the winter. Ski resorts include Saint-Sauveur and Mont Tremblant. The Laurentides still offer a weekend escape for Montrealers and tourists from New England to Ontario, though with the building of a major highway through the area in the 1970s, the area has experienced a lot of growth. Its largest city is Saint-Jérôme, in its extreme southeast, with a 2011 census population of 68,456 inhabitants.

— Freebase

Bethlehem

Bethlehem

a village 6 m. S. of Jerusalem, the birthplace of Jesus Christ and King David, with a convent containing the Church of the Nativity; near it is the grotto where St. Jerome translated the Bible into Latin.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Bible, The

Bible, The

a collection of sacred writings divided into two parts, the Old Testament and the New; the Old, written in Hebrew, comprehending three groups of books, the Pentateuch, the Prophets, and the Hagiographa, bearing on the religion, the history, the institutions, and the manners of the Jews; and the New, written in Greek, comprehending the Four Gospels, the Acts of the Apostles, and the Epistles. The Old Testament was translated into Greek at Alexandria by 72 Jews, 280 B.C., and is known as the Septuagint; and the whole book, Old and New, was translated into Latin in a grotto near Bethlehem by St. Jerome, A.D. 385-404, and is known as the Vulgate, after which the two came to be regarded by the Church as of equal divine authority and as sections of one book. It may be permitted to note that the Bible is written throughout, not in a speculative or a scientific, but a spiritual interest, and that its final aim is to guide men in the way of life. The spirit in which it is composed is the spirit of conviction; its essence, both in the root of it and the fruit of it, is faith, and that primarily in a moral power above, and ultimately a moral principle within, both equally divine. The one principle of the book is that loyalty to the divine commands is the one foundation of all well-being, individual and social.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Caracci

Caracci

or Carracci, a family of painters, born at Bologna: Ludovico, the founder of a new school of painting, the principle of which was eclecticism, in consequence of which it is known as the Eclectic School, or imitation of the styles of the best masters (1555-1619); Annibale, cousin and pupil, did "St. Roche distributing Alms," and his chief, "Three Marys weeping over Christ"; went to Rome and painted the celebrated Farnese gallery, a work which occupied him four years (1560-1609); Agostino, brother of above, assisted him in the frescoes of the gallery, the "Communion of St. Jerome" his greatest work (1557-1602).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Constance

Constance

a city of the Grand-Duchy of Baden, on the S. bank of the Rhine, at its exit from the lake; famous for the seat of the council (1414-1418) which condemned John Huss and Jerome of Prague to death; long famous for its linen manufacture.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Damasus, St.

Damasus, St.

Pope from 366 to 384, a Spaniard; a zealous opponent of the Arians and a friend of St. Jerome, who, under his sanction, executed his translation of the Bible into the Vulgate; there was a Damasus II., Pope in 1048.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Domenichi`no

Domenichi`no

a celebrated Italian painter, born at Bologna; studied under Calvaert and Caracci; was of the Bolognese school, and reckoned one of the first of them; his principal works are his "Communion of St. Jerome," now in the Vatican, and the "Martyrdom of St. Agnes," at Bologna, the former being regarded as his masterpiece; he was the victim of persecution at the hands of rivals; died at Naples, not without suspicion of having been poisoned (1581-1641).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Donatus

Donatus

a Latin grammarian and rhetorician of the 4th century, the teacher of St. Jerome; the author of treatises in grammar known as Donats, and, along with the sacred Scriptures, the earliest examples of printing by means of letters cut on wooden blocks, and so appreciated as elementary treatises that they gave name to treatises of the kind on any subject; he wrote also scholia to the plays of Terence.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Grimm, Jacob Ludwig

Grimm, Jacob Ludwig

German philologist, born at Hanau; held office as librarian to Jerome Bonaparte, king of Westphalia, and afterwards to Göttingen University, as well as a professorship there, devoting himself the while chiefly to studies in early German lore, and afterwards with his brother settled in Berlin; his principal works were, "Deutsche Grammatik," "Deutsche Mythologie," "Geschichte der Deutschen Sprache," and the "Kinder-und-Haus-Märchen" in collaboration with his brother (1785-1863).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Hieronymus

Hieronymus

. See Jerome.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Italic Version, The

Italic Version, The

a version of the Scriptures into Latin on the basis of the Septuagint, executed in N. Italy under episcopal authority from other versions in circulation; being of mixed quality and far from satisfactory, Jerome (q. v.) undertook its revision with the view of a new translation into Latin known as the Vulgate direct from the Hebrew and Greek originals.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Vulgate

Vulgate

a version of the Bible in Latin executed by St. Jerome (q. v.), and was in two centuries after its execution universally adopted in the Western Christian Church as authoritative for both faith and practice, and from the circumstance of its general reception it became known as the Vulgate (i. e. the commonly-accepted Bible of the Church), and it is the version accepted as authentic to-day by the Roman Catholic Church, under sanction of the Council of Trent. "With the publication of it," says Ruskin, "the great deed of fixing, in their ever since undisturbed harmony and majesty, the canon of Mosaic and Apostolic Scripture, was virtually accomplished, and the series of historic and didactic books which form our present Bible (including the Apocrypha) were established in and above the nascent thought of the noblest races of men living on the terrestrial globe, as a direct message to them from its Maker, containing whatever it was necessary for them to learn of His purposes towards them, and commanding, or advising, with divine authority and infallible wisdom, all that it was best for them to do and happiest to desire. Thus, partly as a scholar's exercise and partly as an old man's recreation, the severity of the Latin language was softened, like Venetian crystal, by the variable fire of Hebrew thought, and the 'Book of Books' took the abiding form of which all the future art of the Western nations was to be an hourly expanding interpretation."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Westphalia

Westphalia

a German duchy, now a Prussian province; made with other territories in 1807 into a kingdom by Napoleon for his brother Jerome, and designed to be the centre of the Confederation of the Rhine; was assigned to Prussia in 1813 according to the Treaty of Vienna.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Ziska, Johann

Ziska, Johann

Hussite leader, born in Bohemia of a noble family; began life as a page at the court of King Wenceslas, but threw up a courtier's life in disgust for a career in arms; fought and distinguished himself by his valour against the Teutonic knights at Tannenberg in 1410, to their utter defeat; signalised himself afterwards against the Turks, and in 1413 fought on the English side at Agincourt; failing to rouse Wenceslas to avenge the death of Huss (q. v.) and of Jerome of Prague (q. v.), he joined the Hussites, organised their forces, assumed the chief command, and in 1420 gained, with a force of 4000 men, a victory over the Emperor Sigismund with an army of 40,000 mustered to crush him; captured next year the castle of Prague, erected fortresses over the country, one in particular called Tabor, whence the name Taborites given to his party; blind of one eye from his childhood, lost the other at the siege of Ratz, fought on blind notwithstanding, gaining victory after victory, but was seized with the plague and carried off by it at Czaslav, where his remains were buried and his big mace or battle-club, mostly iron, hung honourably on the wall close by; that his skin was tanned and made into the cover of a drum is a fable; he was a tough soldier, and is called once and again in Carlyle's "Frederick" "Rhinoceros Ziska" (1360-1424).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia


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