Definitions containing père*

We've found 22 definitions:

Péré, Charente-Maritime

Péré, Charente-Maritime

Péré is a commune in the Charente-Maritime department in southwestern France.

— Freebase

Name of the Father

Name of the Father

The Name-of-the-Father is a concept that Jacques Lacan developed from his seminar The Psychoses to cover the role of the father in the Symbolic Order. Lacan plays with the similar sound of le nom du père, le non du père, and les non-dupes errent to, in the former case, emphasize the legislative and prohibitive function of the father and, in the latter case, emphasize that "those who do not let themselves be caught in the symbolic deception/fiction and continue to believe their eyes are the ones who err most." Alan Sheridan, his early translator, wrote that 'In terms of Lacan's three orders, it refers not to the real father, nor to the imaginary father, but to the symbolic father'.

— Freebase

person eligible to receive effects

person eligible to receive effects

The person authorized by law to receive the personal effects of a deceased military member. Receipt of personal effects does not constitute ownership. Also called PERE. See also mortuary affairs; personal effects.

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

Bourse

Bourse

Bourse is a station on Paris Métro Line 3. It opened on 19 October 1904 as part of the first section of the line opened between Père Lachaise and Villiers. It is named after the nearby Bourse de Paris.

— Freebase

Aramis

Aramis

René d'Herblay, alias Aramis is a fictional character in the novels The Three Musketeers, Twenty Years After and The Vicomte de Bragelonne by Alexandre Dumas, père. He and the other two musketeers Athos and Porthos are friends of the novels' protagonist, d'Artagnan. The fictional Aramis is loosely based on the historical musketeer Henri d'Aramitz.

— Freebase

Jacques Marquette

Jacques Marquette

Father Jacques Marquette S.J., sometimes known as Père Marquette or James Marquette, was a French Jesuit missionary who founded Michigan's first European settlement, Sault Ste. Marie, and later founded St. Ignace, Michigan. In 1673 Father Marquette and Louis Jolliet were the first Europeans to explore and map the northern portion of the Mississippi River.

— Freebase

Georges

Georges

Georges is a short novel by Alexandre Dumas, père set on the island of Mauritius, from 1810 to 1824. This novel is of particular interest to scholars because Dumas reused many of the ideas and plot devices later in The Count of Monte Cristo, and because race and racism are at the center of this novel, and this was a topic on which Dumas, despite his part-African ancestry, rarely wrote. Georges was first published in 1843. It has been republished in English as George; or, the Planter of the Isle of France. A new translation by Tina Kover, edited by Werner Sollors and with an introduction by Jamaica Kincaid, was published by Random House, Inc./Modern Library in May 2007.

— Freebase

Sentier

Sentier

Sentier is a station on Paris Métro Line 3 in the 2nd arrondissement. It opened on 20 November 1904 as part of the first section of the line between Père Lachaise and Villiers, which opened a month earlier. The station is named after a path leading to the city's fortifications, now called the Rue du Sentier. The station is one of the few to have its entrance incorporated into the front of a building. A secondary entrance is located 87 rue Réaumur, it contains railings designed by Hector Guimard and is listed as a "monument historique".

— Freebase

Georges Clémenceau

Georges Clémenceau

Georges Benjamin Clemenceau was a French statesman who led the nation to victory in the First World War. A leader of the Radical Party, he played a central role in politics after 1870. Clemenceau served as the Prime Minister of France from 1906 to 1909, and again from 1917 to 1920. He was one of the principal architects of the Treaty of Versailles at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919. Nicknamed "Père la Victoire" (Father Victory) or "Le Tigre" (The Tiger), he took a very harsh position against defeated Germany and won agreement on Germany's payment of large sums for reparations.

— Freebase

Workbook

Workbook

Workbook is the title of Bob Mould's first solo album after leaving Hüsker Dü. The album is primarily acoustic and has a strong folk influence - very different from much of his group's heavier music. The single "See a Little Light" was a hit on the US Modern Rock chart. Drummer Anton Fier and bassist Tony Maimone, of Pere Ubu fame, served as Mould's rhythm section. In the liner notes of the Hüsker Dü live album titled The Living End, critic David Fricke noted that Mould had an embryonic version of "Compositions for the Young and Old" in the waning days of that band.

— Freebase

Patife Band

Patife Band

Patife Band is a Brazilian post-punk band formed in São Paulo in 1983 by Paulo Barnabé, initially under the name Paulo Patife Band. Characterized by its heavily experimental and almost non-descript musical style, that uses dodecaphonism and atonalism as main principles of composition and flirts with many different genres such as jazz, punk rock, traditional Brazilian music and popular music, it was favorably compared to American band Pere Ubu, and one critic at some point called their sound "a crossing between King Crimson and Fear". The band was disestablished in 1990, but reformed briefly in 2003 with a new line-up and releasing a live album. In 2005, it was reformed again with yet another line-up, and since then they make sporadic shows around São Paulo.

— Freebase

Grand Central Station

Grand Central Station

Grand Central Station was a passenger railroad terminal in downtown Chicago, Illinois, from 1890 to 1969. It was located at 201 W. Harrison Street in the south-western part of the Chicago Loop, the block bounded by Harrison Street, Wells Street, Polk Street and the Chicago River. Grand Central Station was designed by architect Solon Spencer Beman for the Wisconsin Central Railroad, and was completed by the Chicago and Northern Pacific Railroad. Grand Central Station was eventually purchased by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, which used the station as the Chicago terminus for its passenger rail service, including its glamorous Capitol Limited to Washington, D.C. Major tenant railroads included the Soo Line Railroad, successor to the Wisconsin Central, the Chicago Great Western Railway, and the Pere Marquette Railway. The station opened December 8, 1890, closed on November 8, 1969, and torn down in 1971.

— Freebase

Marsh Tit

Marsh Tit

The Marsh Tit Poecile palustris is a passerine bird in the tit family Paridae and genus Poecile, closely related to the Willow, Père David's and Songar Tits. It is small with a black crown and nape, pale cheeks, brown back and greyish-brown wings and tail. Between 8 and 11 subspecies are recognised. This bird's close resemblance to the Willow Tit can cause identification problems, especially in the United Kingdom where the local subspecies of the two are very similar. Globally, the Marsh Tit is classified as Least Concern, although there is evidence of a decline in numbers. It can be found throughout temperate Europe and northern Asia and, despite its name, it occurs in a range of habitats including dry woodland. The Marsh Tit is omnivorous; its food includes caterpillars, spiders and seeds. It nests in tree holes, choosing existing hollows to enlarge, rather than excavating its own. A clutch of 5-9 eggs is laid.

— Freebase

Agnew

Agnew

Agnew, Michigan is a tiny unincorporated hamlet located at 42°57′54″N 86°10′36″W / 42.965°N 86.17667°W at the intersection of US 31 and M-45 in Grand Haven Charter Township of Ottawa County in the U.S. state of Michigan. Agnew was first known as "Johnsville" after John Behm, who was one of the early settlers in the area in the 1860s. A post office named Johnsville operated there from 1870 to 1875. It reopened in 1878 and was renamed "Agnew" on December 23, 1887. It was platted with the name "Village of Agnew" on May 16, 1889, by Edward E. Stites. The settlement was named for JKV Agnew, a superintendent of the Chicago and West Michigan Railway, which had a station by that name there. The successor railroad, Pere Marquette Railway, closed the station and in 1952, the Michigan Department of Transportation determined it was easier to move the 12 remaining buildings to allow construction of US Highway 31.

— Freebase

Bovine malignant catarrhal fever

Bovine malignant catarrhal fever

Bovine malignant catarrhal fever is a fatal lymphoproliferative disease caused by a group of ruminant gamma herpes viruses including Alcelaphine Herpes Virus 1 and Ovine Herpes Virus 2 These viruses cause inapparent infection in their reservoir hosts, but are usually fatal in cattle and other ungulates such as deer, antelope, and buffalo. BMCF is an important disease where reservoir and susceptible animals mix. There is a particular problem with Bali cattle in Indonesia, bison in the USA and in pastoralist herds in Eastern and Southern Africa. Disease outbreaks in cattle are usually sporadic although infection of up to 40% of a herd has been reported. The reasons for this are unknown. Some species appear to be particularly susceptible, for example Pére Davids deer, Bali cattle and bison, with many deer dying within 48 hours of the appearance of the first symptoms and bison within three days. In contrast, post infection cattle will usually survive a week or more.

— Freebase

Lutin

Lutin

A lutin is a type of hobgoblin in French folklore and fairy tales. Female lutins are called lutines. A lutin plays a similar role in the folklore of Normandy to house-spirits in England, Germany and Scandinavia. Lutin is generally translated into English as: brownie, elf, fairy, gnome, goblin, hobgoblin, imp, leprechaun, pixie, puck, or sprite. It sometimes takes the form of a horse saddled ready to ride, and in this shape is called Le Cheval Bayard. Lutins sometimes tangle people's or horses' hair into elf-locks. A French fairy tale, "Le Prince Lutin", written in 1697 by Marie Catherine d'Aulnoy has a description of the "air, water and terrestrial lutin": "You are invisible when you like it; you cross in one moment the vast space of the universe; you rise without having wings; you go through the ground without dying; you penetrate the abysses of the sea without drowning; you enter everywhere, though the windows and the doors are closed; and, when you decide to, you can let yourself be seen in your natural form." In this story a red hat with two feathers makes the lutin invisible. Lutins also assist Père Noël in Lapland.

— Freebase

Lenition

Lenition

In linguistics, lenition is a kind of sound change that alters consonants, making them more sonorous. The word lenition itself means "softening" or "weakening". Lenition can happen both synchronically and diachronically. Lenition can involve such changes as making a consonant more sonorous, causing a consonant to lose its place of articulation, or even causing a consonant to disappear entirely. An example of synchronic lenition in English is found in flapping in some dialects: the of a word like wait becomes the more sonorous in the related form waiting. Some dialects of Spanish show debuccalization of to at the end of a syllable, so that a word like estamos "we are" is pronounced. An example of diachronic lenition can be found in the Romance languages, where the of Latin patrem becomes in Italian padre and in Spanish padre, while in French père and Portuguese pai it has disappeared completely. Along with assimilation, lenition is one of the primary sources of phonological change of languages.

— Freebase

Kean

Kean

Kean is a musical with a book by Peter Stone and music and lyrics by Robert Wright and George Forrest. Using material by Jean-Paul Sartre and Alexandre Dumas, père as its source, it centers on the adventures of Edmund Kean, considered the greatest Shakespearean actor of the early 19th century, focusing primarily mainly on his wild behavior offstage. Trouble ensues as Kean desperately tries to juggle the two women in his life - the Danish Ambassador's wife, Elena, and a young aspiring actress, Anna. After one preview, the Broadway production, directed and choreographed by Jack Cole, opened on November 2, 1961 at the Broadway Theatre, where it ran for 92 performances. The cast included Roderick Cook, Alfred Drake, Larry Fuller, Christopher Hewett, Joan Weldon, and Lee Venora. Drake was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical, and the show was nominated for Best Conductor and Musical Director. An original cast recording was released by Columbia Records. This album is one of the most valuable original cast albums because of its scarcity.

— Freebase

Sheng

Sheng

The Chinese sheng is a mouth-blown free reed instrument consisting of vertical pipes. It is one of the oldest Chinese instruments, with images depicting its kind dating back to 1100 BC, and there are actual instruments from the Han era that have been preserved today. Traditionally, the sheng has been used as an accompaniment instrument for solo suona or dizi performances. It is one of the main instruments in kunqu and some other forms of Chinese opera. Traditional small ensembles also make use of the sheng, such as the wind and percussion ensembles in northern China. In the modern large Chinese orchestra, it is used for both melody and accompaniment The sheng has been used in the works of a few non-Chinese composers, including Lou Harrison, Tim Risher, Daníel Bjarnason, Brad Catler, and Christopher Adler. Some believe that Johann Wilde and Pere Amiot traveled to China and brought the first shengs to Europe in 1740 and 1777 respectively, although there is evidence that free reed musical instruments similar to shengs were known in Europe a century earlier.

— Freebase

Mass grave

Mass grave

A mass grave is a grave containing multiple number of human corpses, which may or may not be identified prior to burial. There is no strict definition of the minimum number of bodies required to constitute a mass grave, although the United Nations defines a mass grave as a burial site which contains three or more victims of execution. Mass graves are an infamous variation on common burial, still occasionally practiced today under normal circumstances. Mass or communal burial was a common practice before the development of a dependable crematory chamber by an Italian named Brunetti in 1873. In Paris, the practice of mass burial, and in particular, the condition of the infamous Cimetière des Innocents, led Louis XVI to eliminate Parisian cemeteries. The remains were removed and placed in the Paris underground forming the early Catacombs. La Cimetière des Innocents alone had 6,000,000 dead to remove. Burial commenced outside of the city limits in what is now Père Lachaise Cemetery. Mass graves are usually created after a large number of people die or are killed, and there is a desire to bury the corpses quickly for sanitation concerns. In disasters, mass graves are used for infection and disease control.

— Freebase

Holy Hour

Holy Hour

Holy Hour is the Roman Catholic devotional tradition of spending an hour in Eucharistic adoration in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament. The official Raccolta book provides indulgences for this practice. In 1673 Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque stated that she had a vision of Jesus in which she was instructed to spend an hour every Thursday night to meditate on the sufferings of Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane. This practice later became widespread among Catholics. The inspiration for the Holy Hour is Matthew 26:40. In the Gospel of Matthew, during the agony in the Garden of Gethsemane the night before his crucifixion, Jesus spoke to his disciples, saying "My soul is sorrowful even to death. Remain here and keep watch with me." Returning to the disciples after prayer, he found them asleep and in Matthew 26:40 he asked Peter: In 1829, the Archconfraternity of the Holy Hour was established by Père Robert Debrosse at Paray-le-Monial, Bourgogne, France. In 1911 it received the right of aggregation for the entire world. A similar society called "The Holy Perpetual Hour of Gethsemani" was formed in Toulouse in 1885 and was canonically erected in 1907. In 1909 it received indulgences from Pope Pius X.

— Freebase

Steiner

Steiner

Steiner was a small farming settlement in what is now Frenchtown Charter Township, Monroe County in the U.S. state of Michigan. It was situated at the intersection of the Norfolk Southern Railway and Steiner Road at 41°59′20″N 83°23′15″W / 41.98889°N 83.3875°W. It was a station on the Pere Marquette Railroad founded by and named for William Steiner in 1873. A post office opened on September 7, 1886 with John Kohler as the first postmaster. The office closed on July 31, 1925. At one time the town had a railroad stop, saw-mill, basket factory, saloon, and general store. The town had a post-master, probably the proprietor of the general store. The general store and other structures, located between Laduke Roads and the railroad tracks were destroyed in a fire in early 1960s. An elderly lady and her perished in the fire. There was a significant delay in the arrival of rescuers, as the closest fire department was located six miles south, in Monroe. Local anger among area residents after the "Steiner Fire" led to the formation of the Frenchtown Township Volunteer Fire Department. The sawmill still stands in the same location today. It and a basket factory were operated by the Edgar Calkins family. Few obvious signs remain today of this town except a cluster of several pre-1900 houses, the saw-mill adjoining the railroad tracks, and the road name. Steiner is now one of the lost cities, towns, and counties of Michigan

— Freebase


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