Definitions containing münzer, thomas

We've found 250 definitions:

Rowleian

Rowleian

Of or pertaining to the work of (fictional) poet Thomas Rowley, a pseudonym of Thomas Chatterton (1752-1770), English poet.

— Wiktionary

Thomist

Thomist

a follower of Thomas Aquinas. See Scotist

— Webster Dictionary

Thomases

Thomases

Plural form of Thomas.

— Wiktionary

babblery

babblery

Babble. Sir Thomas More.

— Wiktionary

Thomasina

Thomasina

, a feminine form of Thomas.

— Wiktionary

doubting Thomases

doubting Thomases

Plural form of doubting Thomas.

— Wiktionary

Tommo

Tommo

A nickname for Tom or Thomas

— Wiktionary

Huxley

Huxley

Thomas Henry Huxley, English biologist.

— Wiktionary

Hobbist

Hobbist

one who accepts the doctrines of Thomas Hobbes

— Webster Dictionary

Tomkins

Tomkins

from the pet form of Thomas.

— Wiktionary

Edison

Edison

Thomas Edison, American inventor and businessman.

— Wiktionary

Thomism

Thomism

The philosophy and theology of Thomas Aquinas.

— Wiktionary

Bayesian

Bayesian

Of or pertaining to Thomas Bayes, English mathematician.

— Wiktionary

Hardy

Hardy

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), English novelist and poet.

— Wiktionary

Thomaism

Thomaism

the doctrine of Thomas Aquinas, esp. with respect to predestination and grace

— Webster Dictionary

Nagelian

Nagelian

Of or pertaining to Thomas Nagel (born 1937), American philosopher.

— Wiktionary

huxleyan

Huxleyan, Huxleian

of or relating to Thomas Huxley

— Princeton's WordNet

huxleian

Huxleyan, Huxleian

of or relating to Thomas Huxley

— Princeton's WordNet

Crapper

Crapper

Thomas Crapper, English plumber who developed and popularised the water closet.

— Wiktionary

Carlyle

Carlyle

derived from Carlisle; the most famous to bear it was Thomas Carlyle.

— Wiktionary

dugald stewart

Stewart, Dugald Stewart

Scottish philosopher and follower of Thomas Reid (1753-1828)

— Princeton's WordNet

jeffersonian

Jeffersonian

a follower of Thomas Jefferson or his ideas and principles

— Princeton's WordNet

stewart

Stewart, Dugald Stewart

Scottish philosopher and follower of Thomas Reid (1753-1828)

— Princeton's WordNet

accidentalism

accidentalism

The belief that outward appearance often contrasts with substance or essence (after Thomas Aquinas).

— Wiktionary

Eliotian

Eliotian

Of or pertaining to Thomas Stearns Eliot (1888u20131965), American-born poet, playwright, and literary critic.

— Wiktionary

Thomas à Kempis

Thomas à Kempis

Thomas à Kempis, C.R.S.A. was a canon regular of the late medieval period and the most probable author of The Imitation of Christ, which is one of the best known Christian books on devotion. His name means "Thomas of Kempen", his hometown, and in German he is known as Thomas von Kempen. He also is known by various spellings of his family name: Thomas Haemerkken; Thomas Hammerlein; Thomas Hemerken and Thomas Hämerken.

— Freebase

Jeffersonian

Jeffersonian

Of, or relating to Thomas Jefferson, or his political theories.

— Wiktionary

Pynchonesque

Pynchonesque

Of, pertaining to, or in the style of Thomas Pynchon

— Wiktionary

Mumping Day

Mumping Day

December 21st, St. Thomas's Day, a day for begging before Christmas.

— Wiktionary

Jeffersonian

Jeffersonian

A follower of Thomas Jefferson, or an advocate of his political theories.

— Wiktionary

Canonize

Canonize

to declare (a deceased person) a saint; to put in the catalogue of saints; as, Thomas a Becket was canonized

— Webster Dictionary

Jeffersonian

Jeffersonian

pertaining to, or characteristic of, Thomas Jefferson or his policy or political doctrines

— Webster Dictionary

berkeley

Berkeley, Bishop Berkeley, George Berkeley

Irish philosopher and Anglican bishop who opposed the materialism of Thomas Hobbes (1685-1753)

— Princeton's WordNet

george berkeley

Berkeley, Bishop Berkeley, George Berkeley

Irish philosopher and Anglican bishop who opposed the materialism of Thomas Hobbes (1685-1753)

— Princeton's WordNet

drosophila melanogaster

drosophila, Drosophila melanogaster

small fruit fly used by Thomas Hunt Morgan in studying basic mechanisms of inheritance

— Princeton's WordNet

drosophila

drosophila, Drosophila melanogaster

small fruit fly used by Thomas Hunt Morgan in studying basic mechanisms of inheritance

— Princeton's WordNet

bishop berkeley

Berkeley, Bishop Berkeley, George Berkeley

Irish philosopher and Anglican bishop who opposed the materialism of Thomas Hobbes (1685-1753)

— Princeton's WordNet

Utopia

Utopia

The satirical treatise on government by Sir Thomas More, from which the term utopia was coined.

— Wiktionary

utopia

Utopia

a book written by Sir Thomas More (1516) describing the perfect society on an imaginary island

— Princeton's WordNet

carrere

Carrere, John Merven Carrere

United States architect who with his partner Thomas Hastings designed many important public buildings (1858-1911)

— Princeton's WordNet

john merven carrere

Carrere, John Merven Carrere

United States architect who with his partner Thomas Hastings designed many important public buildings (1858-1911)

— Princeton's WordNet

Munro

Munro

Any Scottish mountain having a height of more than 3,000 feet; named after Sir Hugh Thomas Munro, Scottish mountaineer

— Wiktionary

Thomas the Rhymer

Thomas the Rhymer

Thomas Learmonth, better known as Thomas the Rhymer or True Thomas, was a 13th-century Scottish laird and reputed prophet from Earlston. He is the protagonist of the ballad "Thomas the Rhymer". He is also the probable source of the legend of Tam Lin.

— Freebase

seven deadly sins

seven deadly sins

The cardinal sins enumerated by Thomas Aquinas in the 13th century - pride/vanity, envy, gluttony, greed/avarice, lust, sloth, wrath/anger.

— Wiktionary

Tipper

Tipper

a kind of ale brewed with brackish water obtained from a particular well; -- so called from the first brewer of it, one Thomas Tipper

— Webster Dictionary

Bodleian

Bodleian

Of or pertaining to Sir Thomas Bodley (1545u20131613), English diplomat and scholar and founder of the Bodleian Library.

— Wiktionary

Thomu00E6an

Thomu00E6an

a member of an early Christian church supposedly founded by the Apostle Thomas on the Malabar coast of India

— Wiktionary

elihu thomson

Thomson, Elihu Thomson

United States electrical engineer (born in England) who in 1892 formed a company with Thomas Edison (1853-1937)

— Princeton's WordNet

thomson

Thomson, Elihu Thomson

United States electrical engineer (born in England) who in 1892 formed a company with Thomas Edison (1853-1937)

— Princeton's WordNet

Hardyan

Hardyan

Of or pertaining to Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) or his writings, of which the best known are tragic novels.

— Wiktionary

jeffersonian

Jeffersonian

relating to or characteristic of Thomas Jefferson or his principles or theories

— Princeton's WordNet

first cause

first cause

That which causes everything else; the ultimate creative force or being behind the universe, identified with God by such Christian thinkers as Thomas Aquinas.

— Wiktionary

crapper

crapper

A water closet containing a flushable toilet, especially a toilet fixture identified "T. Crapper", a well known Victorian-era English engineer and plumbing installer, Thomas Crapper.

— Wiktionary

Hardyesque

Hardyesque

Reminiscent of the writings of Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), of which the best known are tragic novels.

— Wiktionary

huxley

Huxley, Aldous Huxley, Aldous Leonard Huxley

English writer; grandson of Thomas Huxley who is remembered mainly for his depiction of a scientifically controlled utopia (1894-1963)

— Princeton's WordNet

aldous huxley

Huxley, Aldous Huxley, Aldous Leonard Huxley

English writer; grandson of Thomas Huxley who is remembered mainly for his depiction of a scientifically controlled utopia (1894-1963)

— Princeton's WordNet

aldous leonard huxley

Huxley, Aldous Huxley, Aldous Leonard Huxley

English writer; grandson of Thomas Huxley who is remembered mainly for his depiction of a scientifically controlled utopia (1894-1963)

— Princeton's WordNet

Suggestion

Suggestion

the act or power of originating or recalling ideas or relations, distinguished as original and relative; -- a term much used by Scottish metaphysicians from Hutcherson to Thomas Brown

— Webster Dictionary

tipper

tipper

A kind of ale brewed with brackish water obtained from a particular well; -- so called from the first brewer of it, one Thomas Tipper.

— Wiktionary

Bodleian

Bodleian

of or pertaining to Sir Thomas Bodley, or to the celebrated library at Oxford, founded by him in the sixteenth century

— Webster Dictionary

donkey

donkey

the symbol of the Democratic Party; introduced in cartoons by Thomas Nast in 1874

— Princeton's WordNet

elephant

elephant

the symbol of the Republican Party; introduced in cartoons by Thomas Nast in 1874

— Princeton's WordNet

mimeograph

mimeograph

An invention of Thomas A. Edison, a machine for making printed copies, using typed stencil, ubiquitous until the 1990s when photocopying became competitive (if not cheaper), and considerably easier to use.

— Wiktionary

Coincidence

Coincidence

the condition or fact of happening at the same time; as, the coincidence of the deaths of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson

— Webster Dictionary

Thomean

Thomean

a member of the ancient church of Christians established on the Malabar coast of India, which some suppose to have been originally founded by the Apostle Thomas

— Webster Dictionary

ibn-sina

Avicenna, ibn-Sina, Abu Ali al-Husain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina

Arabian physician and influential Islamic philosopher; his interpretation of Aristotle influenced St. Thomas Aquinas; writings on medicine were important for almost 500 years (980-1037)

— Princeton's WordNet

abu ali al-husain ibn abdallah ibn sina

Avicenna, ibn-Sina, Abu Ali al-Husain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina

Arabian physician and influential Islamic philosopher; his interpretation of Aristotle influenced St. Thomas Aquinas; writings on medicine were important for almost 500 years (980-1037)

— Princeton's WordNet

avicenna

Avicenna, ibn-Sina, Abu Ali al-Husain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina

Arabian physician and influential Islamic philosopher; his interpretation of Aristotle influenced St. Thomas Aquinas; writings on medicine were important for almost 500 years (980-1037)

— Princeton's WordNet

Malthus

Malthus

Specifically, Thomas Malthus, English demographer and political economist, who proposed the view that population growth always exceeds the growth of the necessary food supply.

— Wiktionary

malthusian

Malthusian

of or relating to Thomas Malthus or to Malthusianism

— Princeton's WordNet

Book of Common Prayer

Book of Common Prayer

The book containing the liturgy of the Church of England; compiled by Thomas Cranmer in 1549 following the Act of Uniformity.

— Wiktionary

Addition

Addition

a title annexed to a man's name, to identify him more precisely; as, John Doe, Esq.; Richard Roe, Gent.; Robert Dale, Mason; Thomas Way, of New York; a mark of distinction; a title

— Webster Dictionary

thomism

Thomism

the comprehensive theological doctrine created by Saint Thomas Aquinas in the 13th century and still taught by the Dominicans

— Princeton's WordNet

Seth Thomas

Seth Thomas

Seth Thomas was an American clockmaker and a pioneer of mass production at his Seth Thomas Clock Company.

— Freebase

byrd

Byrd, William Byrd

English organist and composer of church music; master of 16th century polyphony; was granted a monopoly in music printing with Thomas Tallis (1543-1623)

— Princeton's WordNet

william byrd

Byrd, William Byrd

English organist and composer of church music; master of 16th century polyphony; was granted a monopoly in music printing with Thomas Tallis (1543-1623)

— Princeton's WordNet

chippendale

Chippendale

of or relating to an 18th-century style of furniture made by Thomas Chippendale; graceful outlines and Greek motifs and massive rococo carvings

— Princeton's WordNet

In Between

In Between

In Between is an EP by American singer-songwriter Rosie Thomas, released in 2001. Pitched by her record company, Sub Pop, as "a 5-song introduction to Rosie Thomas", the EP was only available at Thomas's shows and via mail order from Sub Pop.

— Freebase

Kuhnian

Kuhnian

Of or pertaining to the philosophy of Thomas Kuhn, most often to the theories he put forth in his book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.

— Wiktionary

Scotist

Scotist

a follower of (Joannes) Duns Scotus, the Franciscan scholastic (d. 1308), who maintained certain doctrines in philosophy and theology, in opposition to the Thomists, or followers of Thomas Aquinas, the Dominican scholastic

— Webster Dictionary

Utopia

Utopia

an imaginary island, represented by Sir Thomas More, in a work called Utopia, as enjoying the greatest perfection in politics, laws, and the like. See Utopia, in the Dictionary of Noted Names in Fiction

— Webster Dictionary

Canterbury

Canterbury

a city in England, giving its name various articles. It is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury (primate of all England), and contains the shrine of Thomas a Becket, to which pilgrimages were formerly made

— Webster Dictionary

ptilochronology

ptilochronology

literally, 'the study of feather time'. It was coined by Thomas C. Grubb, Jr to describe the study of feather growth rates as an index of nutritional condition in birds.

— Wiktionary

Hobbism

Hobbism

the philosophical system of Thomas Hobbes, an English materialist (1588-1679); esp., his political theory that the most perfect form of civil government is an absolute monarchy with despotic control over everything relating to law, morals, and religion

— Webster Dictionary

chattanooga

Chattanooga, battle of Chattanooga

in the American Civil War (1863) the Union armies of Hooker, Thomas, and Sherman under the command of Ulysses S. Grant won a decisive victory over the Confederate Army under Braxton Bragg

— Princeton's WordNet

battle of chattanooga

Chattanooga, battle of Chattanooga

in the American Civil War (1863) the Union armies of Hooker, Thomas, and Sherman under the command of Ulysses S. Grant won a decisive victory over the Confederate Army under Braxton Bragg

— Princeton's WordNet

canterbury

Canterbury

a town in Kent in southeastern England; site of the cathedral where Thomas a Becket was martyred in 1170; seat of the archbishop and primate of the Anglican Church

— Princeton's WordNet

Cochrane

Cochrane

the name of several English naval officers of the Dundonald family; Sir Alexander Forrester Inglis (1758-1832); Sir Thomas John, his son (1798-1872); and Thomas, Lord. See Dundonald.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Jefferson

Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826); the third President of the United States, principal author of the US Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential founders of the United States.

— Wiktionary

Smooth

Smooth

"Smooth" is a collaboration between Latin rock band Santana and Rob Thomas of the rock group Matchbox Twenty. The song was written by Thomas and Itaal Shur, sung by Thomas, produced by Matt Serletic and won three Grammy Awards, including Record of the Year, Song of the Year, and Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals.

— Freebase

Peacockian

Peacockian

Of or pertaining to Thomas Love Peacock (1785-1866), English satirist and author, or his works, specifically a set of novels whose characters are placed in social contexts, especially the dining table, to discuss and criticise the philosophical opinions of the day.

— Wiktionary

Thomas theorem

Thomas theorem

The Thomas theorem is a theory of sociology which was formulated in 1928 by W. I. Thomas and D. S. Thomas: In other words, the interpretation of a situation causes the action. This interpretation is not objective. Actions are affected by subjective perceptions of situations. Whether there even is an objectively correct interpretation is not important for the purposes of helping guide individuals' behavior. In 1923, Thomas stated more precisely that any definition of a situation will influence the present. Not only that, but—after a series of definitions in which an individual is involved—such a definition also "gradually [influences] a whole life-policy and the personality of the individual himself." Consequently, Thomas stressed societal problems such as intimacy, family, or education as fundamental to the role of the situation when detecting a social world "in which subjective impressions can be projected on to life and thereby become real to projectors."

— Freebase

cosmological argument

cosmological argument

A type of argument for the existence of God, advanced by a number of philosophers, including Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas, which maintains that, since every thing and event has a cause, there must be a first cause (God) which is itself uncaused and which causes everything else.

— Wiktionary

Saint Thomas

Saint Thomas

The Brandenburg colony of St. Thomas consisted of a leased part of the Danish island of St. Thomas

— Freebase

Rhymer, Thomas the

Rhymer, Thomas the

or True Thomas, Thomas of Ercildoune, or Earlston, a Berwickshire notability of the 13th century, famous for his rhyming prophecies, who was said, in return for his prophetic gift, to have sold himself to the fairies.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

lewis and clark expedition

Lewis and Clark Expedition

an expedition sent by Thomas Jefferson to explore the northwestern territories of the United States; led by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark; traveled from St. Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River from 1803 to 1806

— Princeton's WordNet

scopes trial

Scopes trial

a highly publicized trial in 1925 when John Thomas Scopes violated a Tennessee state law by teaching evolution in high school; Scopes was prosecuted by William Jennings Bryan and defended by Clarence Darrow; Scopes was convicted but the verdict was later reversed

— Princeton's WordNet

Tinhorn

Tinhorn

Tinhorn, formed in 2005, is a Los Angeles based heavy metal group formed by guitarist Harrison Thomas and drummer Johnathan Thomas, sons of Canadian comedian Dave Thomas of SCTV fame. Within two years, the lineup was solidified by the joining of Danny Ball and Pascual Romero, bassist of the metalcore band In This Moment. Tinhorn has made appearances on Tom Green Live and compose music for television shows including G4's Code Monkeys and the internet-based comedy created by comedian Jordan Black entitled The Black Version. They are currently working an album with industrial metal drummer Raymond Herrera of Fear Factory to be released in 2008. Current members: ⁕Pascual Romero, Bass ⁕Johnathan Thomas, Drums ⁕Harrison Thomas, Guitar ⁕Daniel Ball, Vocals

— Freebase

Erastian

Erastian

one of the followers of Thomas Erastus, a German physician and theologian of the 16th century. He held that the punishment of all offenses should be referred to the civil power, and that holy communion was open to all. In the present day, an Erastian is one who would see the church placed entirely under the control of the State

— Webster Dictionary

teleological argument

teleological argument

A type of argument for the existence of God, advanced by a number of philosophers, including Thomas Aquinas and George Berkeley, which maintains that the design of the world reveals that objects have purposes or ends and that such an organized design must be the creation of a supreme designer (God). Also called the argument from design.

— Wiktionary

Lowell Thomas

Lowell Thomas

Lowell Jackson Thomas was an American writer, broadcaster, and traveler, best known as the man who made Lawrence of Arabia famous. So varied were Thomas's activities that when it came time for the Library of Congress to catalog his memoirs they were forced to put them in "CT" in their classification.

— Freebase

Angelic Doctor

Angelic Doctor

Thomas Aquinas.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Thomas Kyd

Thomas Kyd

Thomas Kyd was an English dramatist, the author of The Spanish Tragedy, and one of the most important figures in the development of Elizabethan drama. Although well known in his own time, Kyd fell into obscurity until 1773 when Thomas Hawkins discovered that Kyd was named as its author by Thomas Heywood in his Apologie for Actors. A hundred years later, scholars in Germany and England began to shed light on his life and work, including the controversial finding that he may have been the author of a Hamlet play pre-dating Shakespeare's.

— Freebase

Parr, Catherine

Parr, Catherine

sixth wife of Henry VIII., daughter of Sir Thomas Parr of Kendal, was a woman of learning and great discretion, acquired great power over the king, persuaded him to consent to the succession of his daughters, and surviving him, married her former suitor Sir Thomas Seymour, and died from the effects of childbirth the year after (1512-1548).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

St. Thomas

St. Thomas

1, an unhealthy volcanic island (20) in the Gulf of Guinea, belonging to Portugal; produces coffee, cocoa, and some spices; chief town, St. Thomas (3), a port on the NE. 2, One of the Virgin Islands (14), 37 m. E. of Porto Rico; belongs to Denmark; since the abolition of slavery its prosperous sugar trade has entirely departed; capital, St. Thomas (12), is now a coaling-station for steamers.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Thomas the Rhymer

Thomas the Rhymer

. See Rhymer, Thomas the.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Will Thomas

Will Thomas

Will Thomas, born 1958 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, is a novelist who writes a Victorian mystery series featuring Cyrus Barker, a Scottish detective or "private enquiry agent," and his Welsh assistant, Thomas Llewelyn. The Barker/Llewelyn novels are set in the 1880s and often feature historical events, people, and movements. Martial combat is a recurring theme throughout this hardboiled series. In interviews, Thomas has said that Barker is based on men such as Richard Francis Burton and Edward William Barton-Wright, founder of Bartitsu. Prior to writing novels, Will Thomas wrote essays for Sherlock Holmes society publications and lectured on crime fiction of the Victorian era. Will Thomas' first novel was nominated for a Barry Award and a Shamus Award, and won the 2005 Oklahoma Book Award. He has been employed as a librarian with the Tulsa City-County Library System, and featured on the cover of Library Journal. "The Black Hand" was nominated for a 2009 Shamus Award. Will Thomas is a great fan of Rex Stout, author of the Nero Wolfe mysteries. Thomas studies Victorian martial arts such as Bartitsu and Hung Gar, which he uses in his novels.

— Freebase

John Thomas

John Thomas

John C. Thomas is an American screenwriter based in California. With his brother Jim Thomas, he wrote and/or was substantially involved with the screenplays of numerous films - including Predator, The Rescue, Predator 2, Executive Decision, Wild Wild West, Mission to Mars and Behind Enemy Lines - and the short-lived TV series Hard Time on Planet Earth.

— Freebase

Please Turn Over

Please Turn Over

Please Turn Over is a 1959 British comedy film written by Norman Hudis and directed by Gerald Thomas. It featured Ted Ray, Julia Lockwood, Jean Kent, Joan Sims, Leslie Phillips, Charles Hawtrey, Lionel Jeffries and Victor Maddern. An English village is thrown into chaos when the daughter of one of the residents publishes a book detailing the supposed secrets of the inhabitants. It was based on the play Book of the Month by Basil Thomas.

— Freebase

Albert Rothstein

Albert Rothstein

Albert Rothstein is a fictional character, a comic book superhero in the DC Comics universe. Atom Smasher is known for his power of growth and super strength. Created by Roy Thomas and Jerry Ordway, he first appeared in All-Star Squadron #25. Thomas chose his name as a tribute to his friend and fellow comic book fan Alan Rothstein.

— Freebase

Thomism

Thomism

Thomism is the philosophical school that arose as a legacy of the work and thought of Saint Thomas Aquinas, philosopher, theologian, and Doctor of the Church. In philosophy, his commentaries on Aristotle are his most lasting contribution. In theology, his Summa Theologica was one of the most influential documents in medieval theology and continues to be studied today in theology and philosophy classes. In the encyclical Doctoris Angelici Pope Pius X cautioned that the teachings of the Church cannot be understood without the basic philosophical underpinnings of Thomas' major theses: The Second Vatican Council described Thomas's system as the "Perennial Philosophy".

— Freebase

Patriot

Patriot

Patriots were the colonists of the British Thirteen United Colonies who violently rebelled against British control during the American Revolution and in July 1776 declared the United States of America an independent nation. Their rebellion was based on the political philosophy of republicanism, as expressed by pamphleteers, such as Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and Thomas Paine. As a group, Patriots represented a wide array of social, economic, ethnic and racial backgrounds. They included lawyers like John Adams and Alexander Hamilton; planters like Thomas Jefferson and George Mason; merchants like Alexander McDougall and ordinary farmers like Daniel Shays and Joseph Plumb Martin.

— Freebase

gresham's law

Gresham's Law

(economics) the principle that when two kinds of money having the same denominational value are in circulation the intrinsically more valuable money will be hoarded and the money of lower intrinsic value will circulate more freely until the intrinsically more valuable money is driven out of circulation; bad money drives out good; credited to Sir Thomas Gresham

— Princeton's WordNet

Dieter Thomas Kuhn

Dieter Thomas Kuhn

Dieter Thomas Kuhn is a musician.

— Freebase

Fudge Family, The

Fudge Family, The

a satiric piece by Thomas Moore, published in 1818.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Bayes Theorem

Bayes Theorem

A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihoods of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

John of Salisbusy

John of Salisbusy

bishop of Chartres, born at Salisbury, of Saxon lineage; was a pupil of Abelard; was secretary first to Theobald and then to Thomas á Becket, archbishop of Canterbury; was present at the assassination of the latter; afterwards he retired to France and was made bishop; wrote the Lives of St. Thomas and St. Anselm, and other works of importance in connection with the scholasticism of the time (1120-1180).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Joseph Butler

Joseph Butler

Joseph Butler was an English bishop, theologian, apologist, and philosopher. He was born in Wantage in the English county of Berkshire. He is known, among other things, for his critique of Thomas Hobbes's egoism and John Locke's theory of personal identity. During his life and after his death, Butler influenced many philosophers, including David Hume, Thomas Reid, and Adam Smith.

— Freebase

Mignon

Mignon

Mignon is an opéra comique in three acts by Ambroise Thomas. The original French libretto was by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré, based on Goethe's novel Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre. The Italian version was translated by Giuseppe Zaffira. The opera is mentioned in James Joyce's "The Dead" and Willa Cather's The Professor's House. Thomas's goddaughter Mignon Nevada was named after the main character.

— Freebase

Hämerkin

Hämerkin

or Hämmerlein, the paternal name of Thomas à Kempis (q. v.).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Doubting Thomas

Doubting Thomas

A doubting Thomas is a skeptic who refuses to believe without direct personal experience—a reference to the Apostle Thomas, who refused to believe that the resurrected Jesus had appeared to the eleven other apostles, until he could see and feel the wounds received by Jesus on the cross. In art the episode has been frequently depicted since at least the 5th century, with its depiction reflecting a range of theological interpretations.

— Freebase

Thomas Crawford

Thomas Crawford

Thomas Gibson Crawford was an American sculptor.

— Freebase

Thomism

Thomism

the doctrine of Thomas Aquinas (q. v.), particularly in reference to predestination and grace.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Anchovies

Anchovies

Anchovies is a 3-track EP by English folk musician David Thomas Broughton.

— Freebase

Slammed

Slammed

Slammed is a 2001 film directed by Brian Thomas Jones.

— Freebase

Thomas Sully

Thomas Sully

Thomas Sully was an American painter, mostly of portraits.

— Freebase

Tasimeter

Tasimeter

The tasimeter is a device designed by Thomas Edison to measure infrared radiation.

— Freebase

Thomas Hodgkin

Thomas Hodgkin

Thomas Hodgkin was an English physician, considered one of the most prominent pathologists of his time and a pioneer in preventive medicine. He is now best known for the first account of Hodgkin's disease, a form of lymphoma and blood disease, in 1832. Hodgkin's work marked the beginning of times when a pathologist was actively involved in the clinical process. He was a contemporary of Thomas Addison and Richard Bright at Guy's Hospital.

— Freebase

James Thomas Fields

James Thomas Fields

James Thomas Fields was an American publisher, editor, and poet.

— Freebase

Kelly Green

Kelly Green

Thomas Beaudry is a member of the musical group, Frijid Pink.

— Freebase

Jim Byrnes

Jim Byrnes

James Thomas Kevin "Jim" Byrnes is a blues musician, guitarist, and actor.

— Freebase

SIPP International Industries

SIPP International Industries

SIPP International Industries, Inc. is the holding company for “au” Le Cadeau Natural Mountain Spring Water, La BonneTable Gourmet Dinner Entrees, the Z-CAC Controlled Atmosphere Container, La Bonne Table Productions (“So You Wanna Be A Chef”), SIPP affiliated medical products, and Newport Creek Hospitality. Chef Homer Lee Thomas

— CrunchBase

Inherent Vice

Inherent Vice

Inherent Vice is a novel by Thomas Pynchon, originally published in August 2009.

— Freebase

Anesthesia Medical Group

Anesthesia Medical Group

Anesthesia Medical Group, PC (AMG) is a 64 physician, 170 certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) anesthesia practice serving the greater Nashville community. AMG provides anesthesia services on the Baptist, Centennial, St. Thomas, Summit, and Williamson medical center campuses. In addition, they serve a number of ambulatory surgery centers on those campuses and elsewhere.

— CrunchBase

THOMAS

THOMAS

THOMAS is the database of United States Congress legislative information. It is operated by the Library of Congress and was launched in January 1995 at the inception of the 104th Congress. It is a comprehensive, Internet-accessible source of information on the activities of Congress, including: ⁕Bills & resolutions ⁕The texts of bills and resolutions ⁕Summaries and status ⁕Voting results, including how individual members voted ⁕Congressional Record, including the daily digest ⁕Presidential nominations ⁕Treaties The database is named after Thomas Jefferson, who was the third President of the United States. It seems there is no reason its name is in all upper-case letters. According to some sources, 'THOMAS' is an acronym for "The House [of Representatives] Open Multimedia Access System", but as of November 2006 this text is not apparent anywhere in the THOMAS Web site. This explanation may be a backronym. The website allows users to share legislative information via several social networking sites, and there have been proposals for an application programming interface.

— Freebase

Mintons

Mintons

Minton's Ltd, was a major ceramics manufacturing company, originated with Thomas Minton the founder of "Thomas Minton and Sons", who established his pottery factory in Stoke-upon-Trent, Staffordshire, England, in 1793, producing earthenware. He formed a partnership, Minton & Poulson, c.1796, with Joseph Poulson who made bone china from c.1798 in his new near-by china pottery. When Poulson died in 1808, Minton carried on alone,using Poulson's pottery for china until 1816. He built a new china pottery in 1824. The products are more often referred to as "Minton", as in Minton china.

— Freebase

Thomas Carew

Thomas Carew

Thomas Carew was an English poet, among the 'Cavalier' group of Caroline poets.

— Freebase

Fats Waller

Fats Waller

Thomas Wright "Fats" Waller was a jazz pianist, organist, composer, singer, and comedic entertainer.

— Freebase

Paper Aeroplane

Paper Aeroplane

Paper Airplane is an EP by American singer-songwriter Rosie Thomas, released in 2002.

— Freebase

PowerMag

PowerMag

Robert Albertson, a well-known inventor with over 200 patents and 38 successful commercial product development cycles to date, has been active in continuing the work of Dr. Nikola Tesla. Tesla's inventions, including patents for the commercial use of alternating current (AC) electricity, rivaled Albert Einstein and Thomas Edison for their accomplishments in the electrical field.

— CrunchBase

Bashy

Bashy

Ashley Thomas, also known by his stage name Bashy, is an English musician and actor.

— Freebase

Imitation of Christ

Imitation of Christ

a book of pious reflections, unique in its kind, and much esteemed by piously thoughtful people; ascribed to Thomas à Kempis (q. v.).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Inside Dope

Inside Dope

Inside Dope is a 1995 Ned Kelly Award winning novel by the New Zealand author Paul Thomas.

— Freebase

Tichborne

Tichborne

a village and property of Hampshire, which became notorious in the "seventies" through a butcher, from Wagga Wagga, in Australia, named Thomas Castro, otherwise Thomas Orton, laying claim to it in 1866 on the death of Sir Alfred Joseph Tichborne; the "Claimant" represented himself as an elder brother of the deceased baronet, supposed (and rightly) to have perished at sea; the imposture was exposed after a lengthy trial, and a subsequent trial for perjury resulted in a sentence of 14 years' penal servitude. Orton, after his release, confessed his imposture in 1895.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

City of the Sun

City of the Sun

Baalbek (q. v.); and a work by Campanella, describing an ideal republic, after the manner of Plato and Sir Thomas More.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Albumazar

Albumazar

Albumazar is a Jacobean era play, a comedy written by Thomas Tomkis that was performed and published in 1615.

— Freebase

Thomas Sydenham

Thomas Sydenham

Thomas Sydenham was an English physician. He was born at Wynford Eagle in Dorset, where his father was a gentleman of property. His brother was Colonel William Sydenham. Thomas fought for the Parliament throughout the English Civil War, and, at its end, resumed his medical studies at Oxford. He became the undisputed master of the English medical world and was known as 'The English Hippocrates’. Among his many achievements was the discovery of a disease, Sydenham's Chorea, also known as St Vitus Dance.

— Freebase

Thomas Hastings

Thomas Hastings

Thomas Hastings was an American architect, a partner in the firm of Carrère and Hastings.

— Freebase

Dylan Thomas

Dylan Thomas

Dylan Marlais Thomas was a Welsh poet and writer whose works include the poems "Do not go gentle into that good night" and "And death shall have no dominion", the "play for voices", Under Milk Wood, and stories and radio broadcasts such as A Child's Christmas in Wales and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Dog. He became popular in his lifetime, and remained so after his death, partly because of his larger than life character and his reputation for drinking to excess. Thomas was born in Swansea, Wales in 1914. An undistinguished student, he left school at 16, becoming a journalist for a short time. Although many of his works appeared in print while he was still a teenager, it was the publication of "Light breaks where no sun shines", in 1934, that caught the attention of the literary world. While living in London, Thomas met Caitlin Macnamara, whom he married in 1937. Their relationship was defined by alcoholism and was mutually destructive. In the early part of his marriage, Thomas and his family lived hand-to-mouth, settling in the Welsh fishing village of Laugharne. Although Thomas was appreciated as a popular poet in his lifetime, he found earning a living as a writer difficult, which resulted in him augmenting his income with reading tours and broadcasts. His radio recordings for the BBC during the latter half of the 1940s brought him a level of celebrity. In the 1950s, Thomas travelled to America, where his readings brought him a level of fame, though his erratic behaviour and drinking worsened. His time in America cemented Thomas' legend, where he recorded to vinyl works such as A Child's Christmas in Wales. During his fourth trip to New York in 1953, Thomas became gravely ill and fell into a coma from which he did not recover. Thomas died on 9 November 1953 and his body was returned to Wales where he was buried at the village churchyard in Laugharne.

— Freebase

Switches

Switches

Switches were an English indie rock band, consisting of members Matt Bishop, Ollie Thomas, Thom Kirkpatrick and Steve Godfrey.

— Freebase

Virgin Islands of the United States

Virgin Islands of the United States

A group of islands in the Lesser Antilles in the West Indies, the three main islands being St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St. John. The capital is Charlotte Amalie. The Virgin Islands were discovered by Columbus in 1493. Before 1917 the U.S. Virgin Islands were held by the Danish and called the Danish West Indies but the name was changed when the United States acquired them by purchase. Virgin refers to the fact that Columbus made his discovery on St. Ursula's day - virgins being her legendary companions - or to the resemblance of the chain of islands to a procession of nuns or virgins. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1305 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p577)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Bombastes Furioso

Bombastes Furioso

an opera by Thomas Rhodes in ridicule of the bombastic style of certain tragedies in vogue.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Babs

Babs

Babs was the land speed record car built and driven by John Parry-Thomas. It was powered by a 27-litre Liberty aero-engine. Babs began as 'Chitty 4', one of Count Louis Zborowski's series of aero-engined cars named 'Chitty Bang Bang'. As it was built at Zborowski's estate of Higham Park near Canterbury, it was also known as the Higham Special. Using a 450 hp V12 Liberty aero engine of 27 litres capacity, with a gearbox and chain-drive from a pre-war Blitzen Benz, it was the largest capacity racing car ever to run at Brooklands. Still not fully developed by the time of Zborowski's death in 1924, it was purchased from his estate by J.G. Parry-Thomas for the sum of £125. Parry-Thomas rechristened the car "Babs" and rebuilt it with four Zenith carburettors and his own design of pistons. In April 1926, Parry-Thomas used the car to break the land speed record at 171.02 mph. Babs used exposed chains to connect the gearbox to the drive wheels. It has been said that the high engine cover required Parry-Thomas to drive with his head tilted to one side. This story is of course nonsense: photographs show that the bonnet was not that high and the driver can see straight ahead.

— Freebase

Joe

Joe

Joe Lewis Thomas, usually credited simply as Joe, is an American R&B singer-songwriter and record producer.

— Freebase

Thomas Malory

Thomas Malory

Sir Thomas Malory was an English writer, the author or compiler of Le Morte d'Arthur. Since the late nineteenth century he has generally been identified as Sir Thomas Malory of Newbold Revel in Warwickshire, a knight, land-owner and Member of Parliament. Previously, it was suggested by antiquary John Leland as well as John Bale that he was Welsh. Occasionally, other candidates are put forward for authorship of Le Morte d'Arthur, but the supporting evidence for their claim has been described as 'no more than circumstantial'.

— Freebase

Kempen

Kempen

a Prussian town, 27 m. NW. of Düsseldorf; manufactures textile fabrics in silk, cotton, linen, &c.; was the birthplace of Thomas à Kempis.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Unikont

Unikont

Unikonts are members of the Unikonta, a taxonomic group proposed by Thomas Cavalier-Smith. It includes amoebozoa, opisthokonts, and possibly Apusozoa.

— Freebase

Automatic

Automatic

Automatic is the third album by Scottish alternative rock band The Jesus and Mary Chain. The Mary Chain on this record is basically the core duo of brothers William and Jim Reid, with a drum machine providing percussion, and even a synthesizer filling in on bass guitar. The only other credited musician was Richard Thomas, who joined the touring version of the Mary Chain as a drummer. Thomas drummed on "Gimme Hell", and was a former member of Dif Juz. He also made appearances on Cocteau Twins' 1986 Victorialand LP and This Mortal Coil's 1986 Filigree & Shadow.

— Freebase

Didymus

Didymus

a surname of St. Thomas; also the name of a grammarian of Alexandria, a contemporary of Cicero, and who wrote commentaries on Homer.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Virgin Islands National Park

Virgin Islands National Park

The Virgin Islands National Park is a United States National Park, covering approximately 60% of the island of Saint John in the United States Virgin Islands, plus nearly all of Hassel Island, just off the Charlotte Amalie, Saint Thomas harbor. The park is famous for scuba diving and snorkeling and has miles of hiking trails through the tropical rainforest. Ferries from Red Hook and Charlotte Amalie on Saint Thomas make regular stops at Cruz Bay, Saint John, near the park, which averages about 500,000 visitors per year.

— Freebase

334

334

334 is a science fiction novel by American author Thomas M. Disch, written in 1972. It is a dystopian look at everyday life in New York City around the year 2025.

— Freebase

Dumb Ox

Dumb Ox

Thomas Aquinas (q. v.), so called from his taciturnity before he opened his mouth and began, as predicted, to fill the world with his lowing.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Bored!

Bored!

Bored! were an Australian punk rock band which formed in Geelong in 1987. The original line-up was Grant Gardner on bass guitar, Adrian Hann on keyboards, Justin Munday on drums, John Nolan on guitar and Dave Thomas on guitar and vocals. In 1989 Gardner was replaced by Tim Hemensley. Both Hemensley and Nolan left in 1991 to form Powder Monkeys. Bored! released four studio albums by 1993 and disbanded later that year. Thomas briefly joined Magic Dirt and subsequently has enlisted various line-ups for reformed versions of Bored! in 1998, 1999 and 2000.

— Freebase

Anstruther, East and West

Anstruther, East and West

two contiguous royal burghs on the Fife coast, the former the birthplace of Tennant the poet, Thomas Chalmers, and John Goodsir the anatomist.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Ashburton, William Bingham Baring

Ashburton, William Bingham Baring

son of the preceding, "a very worthy man," an admirer, and his wife, Lady Harriet, still more, of Thomas Carlyle (1797-1844).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Jeffery

Jeffery

The Jeffery brand of automobiles were manufactured by the Thomas B. Jeffery Company in Kenosha, Wisconsin.

— Freebase

Rexford

Rexford

Rexford is a city in Thomas County, Kansas, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 232.

— Freebase

Lynda

Lynda

Lynda was the first album of the Mexican singer Lynda Thomas.

— Freebase

Tugs

Tugs

Tugs is a British children's television series first broadcast in 1988. It was created by the producers of Thomas the Tank Engine & Friends, Robert D. Cardona and David Mitton. The series dealt with the adventures of two anthropomorphized tugboat fleets, the Star Fleet and the Z-Stacks, who compete against each other in the fictional Bigg City Port. The series was set in the Roaring Twenties, and was produced by Tugs Ltd., for TVS and Clearwater Features Ltd. Music was composed by Junior Campbell and Mike O'Donnell, who also wrote the music for Thomas the Tank Engine and Friends. Following the initial airing of the series throughout 1988, television rights were sold to an unknown party, while all models and sets from the series sold to Britt Allcroft. Modified set props and tugboat models were used in Thomas the Tank Engine and Friends from 1991 onwards, with footage from the original program being heavily dubbed and edited for use in American children's series Salty's Lighthouse. Mitton returned to working with Thomas & Friends in 1991, while Cardona would go on to direct Theodore Tugboat, a similarly natured animated series set in Canada. All thirteen episodes of the show were released on VHS between 1988 and 1993.

— Freebase

Naga

Naga

Naga is a fictional character and Marvel Comics supervillain. Created by writer Roy Thomas and artist Marie Severin, he first appeared in Sub-Mariner #9.

— Freebase

Strained tendon

Strained tendon

Strained tendon is a German band whose music and artwork is experimental. It was founded in 1995 in the town of Winterberg, Germany. The members are: Tobias Basedow Thomas Hetzler

— Freebase

Gem

Gem

Gem is a city in Thomas County, Kansas, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 88.

— Freebase

Bryan Donkin

Bryan Donkin

Bryan Donkin FRS was an English engineer and industrialist. Of his six sons, John, Bryan, and Thomas also became engineers.

— Freebase

Thomas Willis

Thomas Willis

Thomas Willis was an English doctor who played an important part in the history of anatomy, neurology and psychiatry. He was a founding member of the Royal Society.

— Freebase

Buller, Charles

Buller, Charles

a politician, born in Calcutta, pupil of Thomas Carlyle; entered Parliament at 24, a Liberal in politics; held distinguished State appointments; died in his prime, universally beloved and respected (1806-1848).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Norman Thomas

Norman Thomas

Norman Mattoon Thomas was an American Presbyterian minister who achieved fame as a socialist, pacifist, and six-time presidential candidate for the Socialist Party of America.

— Freebase

Brakes

Brakes

Brakes is a four member band from Brighton, England. The group formed in 2003. It consists of Eamon Hamilton, Thomas White, Marc Beatty, and Alex White.

— Freebase

Religio Medici

Religio Medici

a celebrated work of Sir Thomas Browne's, characterised as a "confession of intelligent, orthodox, and logical supernaturalism couched in some of the most exquisite English ever written."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Zooomr

Zooomr

Kristopher Tate, a 17 year old at the time, originally started Zooomr as a place for him to share photos with his friends in Japan. The site was made so it could be viewed in both English and Japanese. In April of 2006 Zooomer was relaunched and the following month digital media enthusiast Thomas Hawk was hired on as Zooomr’s CEO.Zooomr has continued to grow since then and now supports 18 localizations. For non English speakers, Zooomr may be the most compelling photo sharing option.

— CrunchBase

Exserts

Exserts

The Exserts were an Australian punk rock band, based in Sydney, who played from 1981 until 1986. The band was started in 1979 by four school chums, Andrew Thomas, Steve Dempsey, Greg Suptut and Charles Sammut. Their first show was in late 1981, playing punk covers and a few originals, at the Sussex Hotel, Sydney. Members then being Andrew Thomas Steve Dempsey and Charles Sammut. Simon Holmes joined in 1981 for a time. They recorded one LP, Exserts, on Aberrant Records in 1986, but broke up soon after. They also appeared on the Aberrant 1984 Sydney punk compilation Not So Humdrum.

— Freebase

Meigs

Meigs

Meigs is a city in Mitchell and Thomas counties in the U.S. state of Georgia. The population was 1,090 at the 2000 census.

— Freebase

Hygeia

Hygeia

Hygeia was a proposed utopian community on the bank of the Ohio River on the site of present-day Ludlow, Kentucky. The land was granted to Gen. Thomas Sandford by the U.S. military in 1790. Sandford traded the land to Thomas D. Carneal, who had Elmwood Hall built in 1818 on the riverfront, then sold the land to William Bullock, a British showman, entrepreneur and traveller, owner of the Egyptian Hall in Piccadilly. Bullock proposed a planned community named Hygeia designed in Egyptian style by John Buonarotti Papworth. The speculation was not a success, although some people, including Frances Trollope, took part; Bullock sold the land to Israel L. Ludlow in 1846.

— Freebase

Drummond Light

Drummond Light

an intensely-brilliant and pure white light produced by the play of an oxyhydrogen flame upon a ball of lime, so called from the inventor, Captain Thomas Drummond.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Pange Lingua

Pange Lingua

a hymn in the Roman Breviary, service of Corpus Christi, part of which is incorporated in every Eucharistic service; was written in rhymed Latin by Thomas Aquinas.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Grocyn, William

Grocyn, William

classical scholar, born at Bristol; was the first to teach Greek at Oxford, and the tutor in that department of Sir Thomas More and Erasmus (1442-1519).

Grodno

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Dies Natalis

Dies Natalis

Dies Natalis, Op. 8, is a five-movement work by Gerald Finzi, setting texts by Thomas Traherne, for solo soprano or tenor and string orchestra. It was written in 1939.

— Freebase

Dies Irae

Dies Irae

"Dies Irae" is a thirteenth-century Latin hymn attributed to either Thomas of Celano of the Franciscan Order or to Latino Malabranca Orsini, lector at the Dominican studium at Santa Sabina, the forerunner of the Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas, Angelicum in Rome. It is a medieval Latin poem characterized by its accentual stress and its rhymed lines. The metre is trochaic. The poem describes the day of judgment, the last trumpet summoning souls before the throne of God, where the saved will be delivered and the unsaved cast into eternal flames. The hymn is best known from its use as a sequence in the Roman Catholic Requiem mass. An English version is found in various Anglican Communion missals.

— Freebase

Sweet Memories

Sweet Memories

Sweet Memories is a 1911 silent short romantic drama film, written and directed by Thomas H. Ince, released by the Independent Moving Pictures Company on March 27, 1911.

— Freebase

Ruffneck

Ruffneck

Ruffneck is an American house music group from New Jersey, United States, consisting of record producers Dwayne Richardson, Derek Jenkins and Shaheer Williams. They placed three singles on the U.S. Hot Dance Club Play chart, including "Everybody Be Somebody," which was based on a sample from "Bostich" by the Swiss synth-pop band Yello, and spent three weeks at #1 in 1995. Their first two hits were released on Masters At Work's MAW label. Their biggest success in the UK Singles Chart occurred in 1995, when "Everybody Be Somebody" peaked at #13. The featured vocalist on all their chart entries was Joanne "Yavahn" Thomas. Their tracks are officially credited to Ruffneck featuring Yavahn. Thomas was one of the original members of the house music trio, Jomanda. She died of colon cancer in October 2003.

— Freebase

Thomas Gray

Thomas Gray

Thomas Gray was an English poet, letter-writer, classical scholar and professor at Cambridge University. He is widely known for his Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard, published in 1751.

— Freebase

Zwolle

Zwolle

a manufacturing town in the Dutch province of Oberyssel, 50 m. NE. of Amsterdam; close to it is Agnetenberg, famous as the seat of the monastery where Thomas à Kempis lived and died.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Thomas Anders

Thomas Anders

Thomas Anders is a German singer, composer, and record producer. Anders was the lead singer of Germany's popular pop-duo Modern Talking in 1984–1987 and in 1998–2003.

— Freebase

Native Son

Native Son

Native Son is a novel by American author Richard Wright. The novel tells the story of 20-year-old Bigger Thomas, a black American youth living in utter poverty. Bigger lived in a poor area on Chicago's South Side in the 1930s. The novel's treatment of Bigger and his motivations conforms to the conventions of literary naturalism. While not apologizing for Bigger's crimes, Wright is sympathetic to the systemic inevitability behind them. As Bigger's lawyer points out, there is no escape from this destiny for his client or any other black American, since they are the necessary product of the society that formed them and told them since birth who exactly they were supposed to be. "No American Negro exists," James Baldwin once wrote, "who does not have his private Bigger Thomas living in his skull." Frantz Fanon discusses this feeling in his 1952 essay L'Experience Vecue du Noir, or "The Fact of Blackness". "In the end," writes Fanon, "Bigger Thomas acts. To put an end to his tension, he acts, he responds to the world's anticipation."

— Freebase

Circle of Willis

Circle of Willis

The Circle of Willis is a circulatory anastomosis that supplies blood to the brain and surrounding structures. It is named after Thomas Willis, an English physician.

— Freebase

CPU Wars

CPU Wars

A 1979 large-format comic by Chas Andres chronicling the attempts of the brainwashed androids of IPM (Impossible to Program Machines) to conquer and destroy the peaceful denizens of HEC (Human Engineered Computers). This rather transparent allegory featured many references to ADVENT and the immortal line “Eat flaming death, minicomputer mongrels!” (uttered, of course, by an IPM stormtrooper). The whole shebang is now available on the Web.It is alleged that the author subsequently received a letter of appreciation on IBM company stationery from the head of IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Laboratories (at that time one of the few islands of true hackerdom in the IBM archipelago). The lower loop of the B in the IBM logo, it is said, had been carefully whited out. See eat flaming death.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Brownmillerite

Brownmillerite

Brownmillerite is a rare oxide mineral with chemical formula is Ca2(Al,Fe)2O5. It is named for Lorrin Thomas Brownmiller, chief chemist of the Alpha Portland Cement Company, Easton, Pennsylvania.

— Freebase

Thomas Dekker

Thomas Dekker

Thomas Dekker was an English Elizabethan dramatist and pamphleteer, a versatile and prolific writer whose career spanned several decades and brought him into contact with many of the period's most famous dramatists.

— Freebase

Jenny

Jenny

Jenny is a 1970 film starring Marlo Thomas and Alan Alda, released by ABC Pictures. The film was rated "M" for "Mature Audiences." Singer-songwriter Harry Nilsson provided Jenny 's theme song, "Waiting".

— Freebase

Bodleian Library

Bodleian Library

the university library of Oxford, founded, or rather restored, by Sir Thomas Bodley in 1593; enlarged from time to time by bequests, often munificent. It possesses 400,000 printed volumes and 30,000 MSS.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Zyzzyva

Zyzzyva

Zyzzyva is a genus of tropical American weevil often found in association with palms. It is a snouted beetle. "Zyzzyva" is the last word in many English-language dictionaries. The yellowish weevil is no longer than an ant. It was first discovered in 1922 in Brazil, and named by an Irishman Thomas Lincoln Casey, Jr. An entomologist at New York's Museum of Natural History thought that, because there was not a Latin name or Brazilian name associated with this weevil, it was probably named Zyzzyva as a practical joke to place it in a prominent ending position in many guides and manuals. Thomas Casey describes Zyzzyva ochreotecta in his book Memoirs on the Coleoptera, Volume 10: He collected only one specimen.

— Freebase

Thomas Aquinas

Thomas Aquinas

Thomas Aquinas, O.P., also Thomas of Aquin or Aquino, was an Italian Dominican priest, and an immensely influential philosopher and theologian in the tradition of scholasticism, within which he is also known as the "Doctor Angelicus", "Doctor Communis", and "Doctor Universalis". He is frequently referred to as Tomas because "Aquinas" is the demonym of Aquino, his home town, rather than a surname. He was the foremost classical proponent of natural theology, and the father of Thomism. His influence on Western thought is considerable, and much of modern philosophy was conceived in development or refutation of his ideas, particularly in the areas of ethics, natural law, metaphysics, and political theory. The works for which he is best known are the Summa Theologica and the Summa contra Gentiles. Thomas is held in the Catholic Church to be the model teacher for those studying for the priesthood, and indeed the highest expression of both natural reason and speculative theology. The study of his works, according to papal and magisterial documents, is a core of the required program of study for those seeking ordination as priests or deacons, as well as for those in religious formation and for other students of the sacred disciplines. One of the 35 Doctors of the Church, he is considered the Church's greatest theologian and philosopher. Pope Benedict XV declared: "This Order ... acquired new luster when the Church declared the teaching of Thomas to be her own and that Doctor, honored with the special praises of the Pontiffs, the master and patron of Catholic schools."

— Freebase

Monastrol

Monastrol

Monastrol is a cell-permeable small molecule inhibitor discovered by Thomas U. Mayer in the lab of Tim Mitchison. Monastrol was shown to inhibit the kinesin Eg5, a motor protein important for spindle bipolarity.

— Freebase

Thomas Nelson Page

Thomas Nelson Page

Thomas Nelson Page was a lawyer and American writer. He also served as the U.S. ambassador to Italy during the administration of President Woodrow Wilson, including the important period of World War I.

— Freebase

Barham, Richard Harris

Barham, Richard Harris

his literary name Thomas Ingoldsby, born at Canterbury, minor canon of St. Paul's; friend of Sidney Smith; author of "Ingoldsby Legends," published originally as a series of papers in Bentley's Miscellany (1788-1879).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Thomas Jackson

Thomas Jackson

Thomas Marshall Jackson was an American track and field athlete who competed in the 1908 Summer Olympics. In 1908 he finished twelfth in the pole vault competition.

— Freebase

John Draper

John Draper

John Thomas Draper, also known as Captain Crunch, Crunch or Crunchman, is an American computer programmer and former phone phreak. He is a legendary figure within the computer programming world.

— Freebase

Thomas Higginson

Thomas Higginson

Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Higginson the son of John Higginson and Eliza Sheriff, was an Irish emigrant from County Antrim, Ireland who left for Canada in 1819 and settled in Vankleek Hill in 1829. In 1831, he married Margery Browne.

— Freebase

Avranches`

Avranches`

a town in dep. of Manche, Normandy; the place, the spot marked by a stone, where Henry II. received absolution for the murder of Thomas à Becket; lace-making the staple industry, and trade in agricultural products.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Satiety

Satiety

Satiety, Inc. is a medical device company focused on the development of less invasive devices for the treatment of obesity. Obesity is a global health problem, affecting 70 million people in the U.S. and 300 million worldwide, and growth of which is causing increases in obesity-related diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. Obesity surgery has been shown to be the only long-term effective means of weight loss for morbidly obese patients.Satiety, Inc. was founded in 2000 through a collaboration of medical device incubators Thomas Fogarty Engineering and The Foundry, and is headquartered in Palo Alto, California.

— CrunchBase

FindMySong

FindMySong

FindMySong brings musicians from all over the world closer together. Guided by the belief that musicians deserve better technology to help them achieve success, FindMySong focuses on clarity, simplicity, and quality to provide the best online collaborative platform for music in the world. FindMySong is hand-crafted by musicians in Los Angeles to help musicians network, collaborate on projects, work safely with simple contracts, share files, and reach success in the music business. It's a strong, supportive community online built by musicians, for musicians.Created by Vincent Fong & Thomas Honeyman in Los Angeles.

— CrunchBase

Anti Scrunti Faction

Anti Scrunti Faction

Anti-Scrunti Faction were a queercore punk trio from Boulder, Colorado. The band made their first appearance in 1984 on the Restless Records compilation LP entitled FlipSide Vinyl Fanzine Volume 1, assembled by the fanzine Flipside, with the song "Big Women". In 1985, Anti-Scrunti Faction released A Sure Fuck, a single on Unclean Records. Appearing on the extended single are Leslie Mah, bass and vocals, Tracie Thomas, guitar and vocals, Sarah Bibb on drums for two songs and Eric Van Leuven on drums for the remaining four. Later that same year the album Damsels In Distress came out on Flipside Records. The artists' names are intentionally obscured on the album: the guitarist is listed as T. Thomas and the drummer is only named as "E". As on the single, these musicians are Tracie Thomas on guitar and Eric Van Leuven on drums. Credited as L. Mah, Leslie Mah again plays bass and sings. After Anti-Scrunti Faction broke up, Leslie Mah moved to San Francisco and joined Tribe 8, regarded as one of the seminal queercore bands. However, Anti-Scrunti Faction continues to be popular among fans of old-school punk and fans of Tribe 8. The song "Slave to my Estrogen" is a stand-out favorite for radio airplay. In 1998, Tribe 8 recast "Slave To My Estrogen" as "Estrofemme" for their Role Models For AmeriKKKa album on Alternative Tentacles.

— Freebase

Ecclefechan

Ecclefechan

a market-town of Dumfriesshire, consisting for the most part of the High Street, 5 m. S. of Lockerbie, on the main road to Carlisle, 16 m. to the S.; noted as the birth and burial place of Thomas Carlyle.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Colby

Colby

Colby is a city in and the county seat of Thomas County, Kansas, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 5,387.

— Freebase

Bessemer process

Bessemer process

The Bessemer process was the first inexpensive industrial process for the mass-production of steel from molten pig iron prior to the open hearth furnace. The process is named after its inventor, Henry Bessemer, who took out a patent on the process in 1855. The process was independently discovered in 1851 by William Kelly. The process had also been used outside of Europe for hundreds of years, but not on an industrial scale. The key principle is removal of impurities from the iron by oxidation with air being blown through the molten iron. The oxidation also raises the temperature of the iron mass and keeps it molten. The process using a basic refractory lining is known as the basic Bessemer process or Gilchrist-Thomas process after the discoverer Sidney Gilchrist Thomas.

— Freebase

William Henry

William Henry

William Henry was an English chemist. He was the son of Thomas Henry and was born in Manchester England. He developed what is known today as Henry's Law.

— Freebase

Classical liberalism

Classical liberalism

Classical liberalism is a political philosophy and ideology belonging to liberalism in which primary emphasis is placed on securing the freedom of the individual by limiting the power of the government. The philosophy emerged as a response to the Industrial Revolution and urbanization in the 19th century in Europe and the United States. It advocates civil liberties with a limited government under the rule of law, private property, and belief in laissez-faire economic policy. Classical liberalism is built on ideas that had already arisen by the end of the 18th century, such as selected ideas of Adam Smith, John Locke, Jean-Baptiste Say, Thomas Malthus, and David Ricardo. It drew on a psychological understanding of individual liberty, the contradictory theories of natural law and utilitarianism, and a belief in progress. Classical liberals were more suspicious than conservatives of all but the most minimal government and, adopting Thomas Hobbes's theory of government, they believed government had been created by individuals to protect themselves from one another.

— Freebase

São Tomé

São Tomé

São Tomé is the capital city of São Tomé and Príncipe and is by far that nation's largest town. Its name is Portuguese for "Saint Thomas".

— Freebase

Alexander III.

Alexander III.

pope, successor to Adrian IV., an able man, whose election Barbarossa at first opposed, but finally assented to; took the part of Thomas à Becket against Henry II. and canonised him, as also St. Bernard. Pope from 1159 to 1181.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Netpulse

Netpulse

Netpulse, LLC is an American broadband fitness entertainment company which is dedicated to "the evolution of fitness equipment". Its products include the N3i Broadband Entertainment System, N3t LCD Entertainment Station, and ClubWatch, the first online network for monitoring exercise equipment. The company is led by Intuit, Inc. co-founder Thomas Proulx. It introduced its first products in 1994. The company is headquartered in San Francisco, California. Netpulse was originally founded in 1994 as Transcape by Michael Cohen, Kevin Martin, and Jeff Cahn. Transcape provided entertainment content on CDs. Eventually Netpulse became an internet company and grew quickly during the dot-com era. and subsequently went bankrupt in 2000. The assets of Netpulse were purchased by Thomas Proulx, who was previously the CEO of the company. Netpules, LLC is an assignee of United States Patent 7022047, Interface for controlling and accessing information on an exercise device, which was patented on April 4, 2006.

— Freebase

Francisco Suárez

Francisco Suárez

Francisco Suárez was a Spanish Jesuit priest, philosopher and theologian, one of the leading figures of the School of Salamanca movement, and generally regarded among the greatest scholastics after Thomas Aquinas.

— Freebase

Grundy, Mrs.

Grundy, Mrs.

an old lady referred to in Thomas Morgan's comedy of "Speed the Plough," personifying the often affected extreme offence taken by people of the old school at what they consider violations of propriety.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Enoch Arden

Enoch Arden

"Enoch Arden" is a narrative poem published in 1864 by Alfred, Lord Tennyson, during his tenure as England's Poet Laureate. The story on which it was based was provided to Tennyson by Thomas Woolner.

— Freebase

The Like

The Like

The Like was an alternative rock band from Los Angeles, California. Its final lineup consisted of Z Berg, Tennessee Thomas, Laena Geronimo, and Annie Monroe. The band released three extended plays and two studio albums.

— Freebase

Lingle

Lingle

Lingle is a town in Goshen County, Wyoming, United States. The population was 468 at the 2010 census. Former Wyoming Supreme Court Justice Richard V. Thomas was reared in Lingle.

— Freebase

Sainte-Claire Deville, Henri étienne

Sainte-Claire Deville, Henri étienne

a noted French chemist, born in St. Thomas, West Indies; occupied for many years the chair of Chemistry in the Sorbonne, Paris; his important contributions to chemical knowledge include a process for simplifying the extraction of aluminium and platinum (1818-1881).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Chelsea

Chelsea

a western suburb of London, on the N. of the Thames; famous for its hospital for old and disabled soldiers, and the place of residence of sundry literary celebrities, among others Sir Thomas More, Swift, Steele, and Carlyle.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Earlston

Earlston

or Ercildoune, a village in Berwickshire, with manufactures of ginghams and other textiles. In its vicinity stand the ruins of the "Rhymer's Tower," alleged to have been the residence of Thomas the Rhymer.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Sir Thomas More

Sir Thomas More

Sir Thomas More is a collaborative Elizabethan play by Anthony Munday and others depicting the life and death of Thomas More. It survives only in a single manuscript, now owned by the British Library. The manuscript is notable because three pages of it are considered to be in the hand of William Shakespeare and for the light it sheds on the collaborative nature of Elizabethan drama and the theatrical censorship of the era. In 1871, Richard Simpson proposed that some additions to the play had been written by Shakespeare, and a year later James Spedding, editor of the works of Sir Francis Bacon, while rejecting some of Simpson's suggestions, supported the attribution to Shakespeare of the passage credited to Hand D. In 1916, the paleographer Sir Edward Maunde Thompson published a minute analysis of the handwriting of the addition and judged it to be Shakespeare's. The case was strengthened with the publication of Shakespeare's Hand in the Play of Sir Thomas More by five noted scholars who analysed the play from multiple perspectives, all of which led to the same affirmative conclusion. Although some dissenters remain, the attribution has been generally accepted since the mid-20th century and most authoritative editions of Shakespeare's works, including The Oxford Shakespeare and the Arden Shakespeare, include the play. It was performed with Shakespeare's name included amongst the authors by the Royal Shakespeare Company in 2005.

— Freebase

Dover's powder

Dover's powder

Dover's powder was a traditional medicine against cold and fever developed by Thomas Dover. It is no longer in use in modern medicine, but may have been in use at least through the 1960s. A 1958 source describes Dover's Powder as follows: "Powder of Ipecacuanha and Opium. Pulv. Ipecac. et Opii; Ipecac and Opium Powder; Dover's Powder; Compound Ipecacuanha Powder. Prepared ipecacuanha, 10 g., powdered opium 10 g., lactose 80 g. It contains 1% of anhydrous morphine. Dose: 320 to 640 mg.. Many foreign pharmacies include a similar powder, sometimes with potassium sulphate or with equal parts of potassium nitrate and potassium sulphate in place of lactose; max. single dose 1 to 1.5 g. and max. in 24 hours 4 to 6 g." Named from Doctor Thomas Dover, an English physician of the eighteenth century who first prepared it, the powder was an old preparation of powder of ipecacuanha, opium in powder, and potassium sulfate. The powder was largely used in domestic practice to induce sweating, to defeat the advance of a "cold" and at the beginning of any attack of fever. It was also known by the name pulvis ipecacuanhae et opii.

— Freebase

De Vere, Thomas Aubrey

De Vere, Thomas Aubrey

poet and prose writer, born in co. Limerick, Ireland; educated at Trinity College, Dublin; wrote poetical dramas of "Alexander the Great" and "St. Thomas of Canterbury"; his first poem "The Waldenses"; also critical essays; b. 1814.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Meeting of Minds

Meeting of Minds

Meeting of Minds is a television series, created by Steve Allen, which aired on PBS from 1977 to 1981. The show featured guests who played significant roles in world history. Guests would interact with each other and host Steve Allen, discussing philosophy, religion, history, science, and many other topics. It was conceptually quite similar to the Canadian television series Witness to Yesterday, created by Arthur Voronka, which preceded Meeting Of Minds to the air by three years. Steve Allen actually appeared on a 1976 episode of Witness to Yesterday as George Gershwin, one year before Meeting Of Minds premiered. As nearly as was possible, the actual words of the historical figures were used. The show was fully scripted, yet the scripts were carefully crafted to give the appearance of spontaneous discussion among historic figures. Guests included: Plato, Socrates, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther, Cleopatra, Marie Antoinette, Florence Nightingale, Thomas Paine, Francis Bacon, Thomas Jefferson, Voltaire, Karl Marx and Charles Darwin. Typically, each episode would be split into two parts, broadcast separately, with most or all of the guests introduced over the course of the first part, and the discussions continuing into the second part. A total of 24 episodes were produced.

— Freebase

Bramhall, John

Bramhall, John

archbishop of Armagh, born in Yorkshire, a high-handed Churchman and imitator of Laud; was foolhardy enough once to engage, nowise to his credit, in public debate with such a dialectician as Thomas Hobbes on the questions of necessity and free-will (1594-1663).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Roulé

Roulé

Roulé is a French record label that was founded in 1995 by Thomas Bangalter of Daft Punk fame. There exists a sister label called Scratché, which has had only one release to date by the Buffalo Bunch who now release on the Crydamoure and We Rock Music labels.

— Freebase

Hohenlinden

Hohenlinden

Hohenlinden is a community in the Upper Bavarian district of Ebersberg. The city of Lynden, Washington is named after it. Hohenlinden is also the subject of an eponymous poem by Thomas Campbell.

— Freebase

Dev`enter

Dev`enter

a town in Holland, in the province of Overyssel, 55 m. SE. of Amsterdam; has carpet manufactures; is celebrated for its gingerbread; was the locality of the Brotherhood of Common Life, with which the life and work of Thomas à Kempis are associated.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Thomas Hooker

Thomas Hooker

Thomas Hooker was a prominent Puritan colonial leader, who founded the Colony of Connecticut after dissenting with Puritan leaders in Massachusetts. He was known as an outstanding speaker and a leader of universal Christian suffrage. Called today “the Father of Connecticut,” Thomas Hooker was a towering figure in the early development of colonial New England. He was one of the great preachers of his time, an erudite writer on Christian subjects, the first minister of Cambridge, Massachusetts, one of the first settlers and founders of both the city of Hartford and the state of Connecticut, and cited by many as the inspiration for the "Fundamental Orders of Connecticut," cited by some as the world's first written democratic constitution that established a representative government. Most likely coming out of the county of Leicestershire, in the East Midlands region, the Hooker family was prominent at least as far back as the reign of Henry VIII. There is known to have been a great Hooker family in Devon, well known throughout Southern England. The Devon branch produced the great theologian and clergyman, the Rev.

— Freebase

Klepto

Klepto

Klepto is a 2003 straight-to-DVD independent thriller film starring Meredith Bishop and Jsu Garcia. It is the debut film of director Thomas Trail and premiered at the 2003 CineVegas Film Festival.

— Freebase

Lambeth

Lambeth

part of the SW. quarter of London, and a parliamentary borough in Surrey returning four members; abounds in manufactories, contains St. Thomas's Hospital and Lambeth Palace, the official residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury, with a magnificent library and important historic portrait-gallery.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Phoenix Park

Phoenix Park

a magnificent public park of 2000 acres in Dublin; is much used for military reviews; it was rendered notorious in 1882 through the murder by the "Invincibles" of Lord Frederick Cavendish, who had just been appointed Irish Secretary, and his subordinate, Thomas Burke.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Alber`tus Magnus

Alber`tus Magnus

one of the greatest of the scholastic philosophers and theologians of the Middle Ages, teacher of Thomas Aquinas, supreme in knowledge of the arts and sciences of the time, and regarded by his contemporaries in consequence as a sorcerer (1190-1280).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Polen

Polen

Polen was the fourth studio album of Lynda Thomas, and was released in 2001. ⁕"Mala leche" ⁕"Estoy viva" ⁕"Lo mejor de mí" ⁕"Amar así" ⁕"Perdedor" ⁕"Ay, ay, ay" ⁕"Para tí" ⁕"De pie" ⁕"En el andén" ⁕"Abrazame" ⁕"Polen"

— Freebase

Traveller's Joy

Traveller's Joy

Traveller's Joy is a 1949 British comedy film directed by Ralph Thomas and starring Googie Withers, John McCallum and Maurice Denham. Based on a play by Arthur MacRae, it was the last film released by the original Gainsborough Pictures.

— Freebase

Thomas Bowdler

Thomas Bowdler

Thomas Bowdler was an English physician and philanthropist, best known for publishing The Family Shakspeare, an expurgated edition of William Shakespeare's work, edited by his sister Henrietta Maria Bowdler, intended to be more appropriate for 19th century women and children than the original. Although early editions of the work were published with the spelling "Shakspeare", after Bowdler's death, later editions adopted the spelling "Shakespeare", reflecting changes in the standard spelling of Shakespeare's name. The verb bowdlerise has associated his name with the censorship not only of literature but also of motion pictures and television programmes. After several other publications, some reflecting his interest in and knowledge of continental Europe, Bowdler's last work was an expurgated version of Edward Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, published posthumously in 1826 under the supervision of his nephew and biographer, Thomas Bowdler the Younger.

— Freebase

GateGuru

GateGuru

GateGuru is a mobile application that provides a seamless platform to travelers to revolutionize how they experience their “day-of” travel. Web-based businesses have largely democratized the planning and booking experiences around travel, but the actual “day-of” travel is a very large, untapped market - GateGuru is leading this charge. GateGuru currently works on iOS and Android devices. The Company which is led by former venture capitalist Dan Gellert, closed their initial round of financing in May 2011. Investors in the round included Chamath Palihapitiya, Allen Morgan, Brad Harrison (BH Ventures), Tom Glocer, Matt Daimler (SeatGuru Founder), Thomas Lehrman and several other prominent angel investors.

— CrunchBase

Beck's Brewery

Beck's Brewery

Beck's Brewery, also known as Brauerei Beck & Co., is a German brewery in the northern German city of Bremen. Beck's is the world's best selling German beer, sold in nearly 90 countries. Owned by local families until February 2002, the Beck's brewery was then sold to Interbrew for 1.8 billion euros. The brewery was formed under the name Kaiserbrauerei Beck & May o.H.G. in 1873 by Lüder Rutenberg, Heinrich Beck and Thomas May. In 1875, Thomas May left the brewery which then became known as Kaiserbrauerei Beck & Co. The largest markets for Beck's outside Germany are the United Kingdom, the USA, Italy, Australia, Ukraine, Romania and Russia. Beck's ranks fifth among Germany's best selling breweries. Beck's in Bremen is the logistic German Headquarters of InBev. All advertising and logistics for the companies owned by InBev Germany is steered from there for this market.

— Freebase

Gresham College

Gresham College

college founded by Sir Thomas Gresham in 1575, and managed by the Mercer's Company, London, where lectures are delivered, twelve each year, by successive lecturers on physics, rhetoric, astronomy, law, geometry, music, and divinity, to form part of the teaching of University College.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Sackville, Thomas, Earl of Dorset

Sackville, Thomas, Earl of Dorset

poet and statesman, born at Buckhurst; bred for the bar; entered Parliament in 1558; wrote with Thomas Norton a tragedy called "Gorboduc," contributed to a collection of British legends called the "Mirror of Magistrates" two pieces in noble verse (1536-1608).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Long Day

Long Day

"Long Day" is the first single and second track from Matchbox Twenty's debut album Yourself or Someone Like You. The video clip, like most of the band's material centers around Matchbox Twenty, but is punctuated by black and white shots from an old movie. Thomas has shorter hair than in the subsequent clips and is dressed in a suit and sunglasses. The song begins acoustic but then goes to electric guitar. In a stop is acoustic but is mostly in electric. The song first begin with Rob Thomas voice. The cover of the single features a parody of a Diamond Matches box. The song was not as successful on mainstream pop radio as the other singles from the album, however it had a significant presence on mainstream rock radio, reaching the top ten of the Mainstream Rock Tracks and in the top ten for 6 weeks.

— Freebase

Irons in the Fire

Irons in the Fire

Irons in the Fire is the third album by Teena Marie, released in 1980 on Motown. Her first self produced effort, it was dedicated to her father, Thomas Leslie Brockert. It received positive reviews on its release.

— Freebase

SpinalMotion

SpinalMotion

SpinalMotion is dedicated to preserving motion in the spine for patients with degenerative disc disease. By developing innovative artificial discs and instrumentation, we seek to combine the kinematics of a mobile bearing design with materials designed for low wear and improved longevity. Building upon our international clinical experience since 2002, SpinalMotion obtained FDA approval to conduct lumbar and cervical artificial disc clinical trials in the United States in 2005.SpinalMotion is a private company founded in 2004 by Southern Medical, a spinal implant company in South Africa, and Thomas Weisel Healthcare partners. Three Arch Partners became an investor in 2005, and in 2006 Skyline Ventures and MedVenture Associates joined the company’s investor group.

— CrunchBase


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