Definitions containing münzer, thomas

We've found 250 definitions:

Dylan Thomas

Dylan Thomas

Dylan Marlais Thomas was a Welsh poet and writer whose works include the poems "Do not go gentle into that good night" and "And death shall have no dominion", the "play for voices", Under Milk Wood, and stories and radio broadcasts such as A Child's Christmas in Wales and Portrait of the Artist as a Young Dog. He became popular in his lifetime, and remained so after his death, partly because of his larger than life character and his reputation for drinking to excess. Thomas was born in Swansea, Wales in 1914. An undistinguished student, he left school at 16, becoming a journalist for a short time. Although many of his works appeared in print while he was still a teenager, it was the publication of "Light breaks where no sun shines", in 1934, that caught the attention of the literary world. While living in London, Thomas met Caitlin Macnamara, whom he married in 1937. Their relationship was defined by alcoholism and was mutually destructive. In the early part of his marriage, Thomas and his family lived hand-to-mouth, settling in the Welsh fishing village of Laugharne. Although Thomas was appreciated as a popular poet in his lifetime, he found earning a living as a writer difficult, which resulted in him augmenting his income with reading tours and broadcasts. His radio recordings for the BBC during the latter half of the 1940s brought him a level of celebrity. In the 1950s, Thomas travelled to America, where his readings brought him a level of fame, though his erratic behaviour and drinking worsened. His time in America cemented Thomas' legend, where he recorded to vinyl works such as A Child's Christmas in Wales. During his fourth trip to New York in 1953, Thomas became gravely ill and fell into a coma from which he did not recover. Thomas died on 9 November 1953 and his body was returned to Wales where he was buried at the village churchyard in Laugharne.

— Freebase

Rowleian

Rowleian

Of or pertaining to the work of (fictional) poet Thomas Rowley, a pseudonym of Thomas Chatterton (1752-1770), English poet.

— Wiktionary

Thomas à Kempis

Thomas à Kempis

Thomas à Kempis, C.R.S.A. was a canon regular of the late medieval period and the most probable author of The Imitation of Christ, which is one of the best known Christian books on devotion. His name means "Thomas of Kempen", his hometown, and in German he is known as Thomas von Kempen. He also is known by various spellings of his family name: Thomas Haemerkken; Thomas Hammerlein; Thomas Hemerken and Thomas Hämerken.

— Freebase

Will Thomas

Will Thomas

Will Thomas, born 1958 in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, is a novelist who writes a Victorian mystery series featuring Cyrus Barker, a Scottish detective or "private enquiry agent," and his Welsh assistant, Thomas Llewelyn. The Barker/Llewelyn novels are set in the 1880s and often feature historical events, people, and movements. Martial combat is a recurring theme throughout this hardboiled series. In interviews, Thomas has said that Barker is based on men such as Richard Francis Burton and Edward William Barton-Wright, founder of Bartitsu. Prior to writing novels, Will Thomas wrote essays for Sherlock Holmes society publications and lectured on crime fiction of the Victorian era. Will Thomas' first novel was nominated for a Barry Award and a Shamus Award, and won the 2005 Oklahoma Book Award. He has been employed as a librarian with the Tulsa City-County Library System, and featured on the cover of Library Journal. "The Black Hand" was nominated for a 2009 Shamus Award. Will Thomas is a great fan of Rex Stout, author of the Nero Wolfe mysteries. Thomas studies Victorian martial arts such as Bartitsu and Hung Gar, which he uses in his novels.

— Freebase

Tinhorn

Tinhorn

Tinhorn, formed in 2005, is a Los Angeles based heavy metal group formed by guitarist Harrison Thomas and drummer Johnathan Thomas, sons of Canadian comedian Dave Thomas of SCTV fame. Within two years, the lineup was solidified by the joining of Danny Ball and Pascual Romero, bassist of the metalcore band In This Moment. Tinhorn has made appearances on Tom Green Live and compose music for television shows including G4's Code Monkeys and the internet-based comedy created by comedian Jordan Black entitled The Black Version. They are currently working an album with industrial metal drummer Raymond Herrera of Fear Factory to be released in 2008. Current members: ⁕Pascual Romero, Bass ⁕Johnathan Thomas, Drums ⁕Harrison Thomas, Guitar ⁕Daniel Ball, Vocals

— Freebase

Babs

Babs

Babs was the land speed record car built and driven by John Parry-Thomas. It was powered by a 27-litre Liberty aero-engine. Babs began as 'Chitty 4', one of Count Louis Zborowski's series of aero-engined cars named 'Chitty Bang Bang'. As it was built at Zborowski's estate of Higham Park near Canterbury, it was also known as the Higham Special. Using a 450 hp V12 Liberty aero engine of 27 litres capacity, with a gearbox and chain-drive from a pre-war Blitzen Benz, it was the largest capacity racing car ever to run at Brooklands. Still not fully developed by the time of Zborowski's death in 1924, it was purchased from his estate by J.G. Parry-Thomas for the sum of £125. Parry-Thomas rechristened the car "Babs" and rebuilt it with four Zenith carburettors and his own design of pistons. In April 1926, Parry-Thomas used the car to break the land speed record at 171.02 mph. Babs used exposed chains to connect the gearbox to the drive wheels. It has been said that the high engine cover required Parry-Thomas to drive with his head tilted to one side. This story is of course nonsense: photographs show that the bonnet was not that high and the driver can see straight ahead.

— Freebase

Thomas theorem

Thomas theorem

The Thomas theorem is a theory of sociology which was formulated in 1928 by W. I. Thomas and D. S. Thomas: In other words, the interpretation of a situation causes the action. This interpretation is not objective. Actions are affected by subjective perceptions of situations. Whether there even is an objectively correct interpretation is not important for the purposes of helping guide individuals' behavior. In 1923, Thomas stated more precisely that any definition of a situation will influence the present. Not only that, but—after a series of definitions in which an individual is involved—such a definition also "gradually [influences] a whole life-policy and the personality of the individual himself." Consequently, Thomas stressed societal problems such as intimacy, family, or education as fundamental to the role of the situation when detecting a social world "in which subjective impressions can be projected on to life and thereby become real to projectors."

— Freebase

A

A

ä, a dialectic corruption of he or she, as in quotha, (Shak.) 'A babbled of green fields.'—A, usually written a', Scotch for all; A, a form of the L. prep. ab, from, of, used before consonants, as in Thomas à Kempis, Thomas à Becket, &c.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

THOMAS

THOMAS

THOMAS is the database of United States Congress legislative information. It is operated by the Library of Congress and was launched in January 1995 at the inception of the 104th Congress. It is a comprehensive, Internet-accessible source of information on the activities of Congress, including: ⁕Bills & resolutions ⁕The texts of bills and resolutions ⁕Summaries and status ⁕Voting results, including how individual members voted ⁕Congressional Record, including the daily digest ⁕Presidential nominations ⁕Treaties The database is named after Thomas Jefferson, who was the third President of the United States. It seems there is no reason its name is in all upper-case letters. According to some sources, 'THOMAS' is an acronym for "The House [of Representatives] Open Multimedia Access System", but as of November 2006 this text is not apparent anywhere in the THOMAS Web site. This explanation may be a backronym. The website allows users to share legislative information via several social networking sites, and there have been proposals for an application programming interface.

— Freebase

Thomas Aquinas

Thomas Aquinas

Thomas Aquinas, O.P., also Thomas of Aquin or Aquino, was an Italian Dominican priest, and an immensely influential philosopher and theologian in the tradition of scholasticism, within which he is also known as the "Doctor Angelicus", "Doctor Communis", and "Doctor Universalis". He is frequently referred to as Tomas because "Aquinas" is the demonym of Aquino, his home town, rather than a surname. He was the foremost classical proponent of natural theology, and the father of Thomism. His influence on Western thought is considerable, and much of modern philosophy was conceived in development or refutation of his ideas, particularly in the areas of ethics, natural law, metaphysics, and political theory. The works for which he is best known are the Summa Theologica and the Summa contra Gentiles. Thomas is held in the Catholic Church to be the model teacher for those studying for the priesthood, and indeed the highest expression of both natural reason and speculative theology. The study of his works, according to papal and magisterial documents, is a core of the required program of study for those seeking ordination as priests or deacons, as well as for those in religious formation and for other students of the sacred disciplines. One of the 35 Doctors of the Church, he is considered the Church's greatest theologian and philosopher. Pope Benedict XV declared: "This Order ... acquired new luster when the Church declared the teaching of Thomas to be her own and that Doctor, honored with the special praises of the Pontiffs, the master and patron of Catholic schools."

— Freebase

Thomas the Rhymer

Thomas the Rhymer

Thomas Learmonth, better known as Thomas the Rhymer or True Thomas, was a 13th-century Scottish laird and reputed prophet from Earlston. He is the protagonist of the ballad "Thomas the Rhymer". He is also the probable source of the legend of Tam Lin.

— Freebase

Tugs

Tugs

Tugs is a British children's television series first broadcast in 1988. It was created by the producers of Thomas the Tank Engine & Friends, Robert D. Cardona and David Mitton. The series dealt with the adventures of two anthropomorphized tugboat fleets, the Star Fleet and the Z-Stacks, who compete against each other in the fictional Bigg City Port. The series was set in the Roaring Twenties, and was produced by Tugs Ltd., for TVS and Clearwater Features Ltd. Music was composed by Junior Campbell and Mike O'Donnell, who also wrote the music for Thomas the Tank Engine and Friends. Following the initial airing of the series throughout 1988, television rights were sold to an unknown party, while all models and sets from the series sold to Britt Allcroft. Modified set props and tugboat models were used in Thomas the Tank Engine and Friends from 1991 onwards, with footage from the original program being heavily dubbed and edited for use in American children's series Salty's Lighthouse. Mitton returned to working with Thomas & Friends in 1991, while Cardona would go on to direct Theodore Tugboat, a similarly natured animated series set in Canada. All thirteen episodes of the show were released on VHS between 1988 and 1993.

— Freebase

dylan thomas

dylan thomas

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sir thomas wyatt

sir thomas wyatt

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thomas carew

thomas carew

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thomas carlyle

thomas carlyle

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thomas dekker

thomas dekker

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thomas gray

thomas gray

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thomas hardy

thomas hardy

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thomas moore

thomas moore

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dylan thomas

dylan thomas

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john thomas

john thomas

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lowell thomas

lowell thomas

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norman thomas

norman thomas

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saint thomas aquinas

saint thomas aquinas

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sir thomas malory

sir thomas malory

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sir thomas more

sir thomas more

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thomas a kempis

thomas a kempis

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thomas alva edison

thomas alva edison

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thomas aquinas

thomas aquinas

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thomas babington macaulay

thomas babington macaulay

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thomas carlyle

thomas carlyle

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thomas de quincey

thomas de quincey

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thomas dekker

thomas dekker

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thomas edison

thomas edison

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thomas gray

thomas gray

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thomas hardy

thomas hardy

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thomas henry huxley

thomas henry huxley

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thomas higginson

thomas higginson

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thomas hobbes

thomas hobbes

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thomas huxley

thomas huxley

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thomas jackson

thomas jackson

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thomas jefferson

thomas jefferson

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thomas mann

thomas mann

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thomas merton

thomas merton

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thomas moore

thomas moore

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thomas more

thomas more

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thomas paine

thomas paine

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thomas pynchon

thomas pynchon

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thomas reid

thomas reid

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thomas wolfe

thomas wolfe

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dieter thomas kuhn

dieter thomas kuhn

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john thomas

john thomas

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thomas

thomas

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thomas anders

thomas anders

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thomas jefferson

thomas jefferson

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thomas young

thomas young

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Bayes Theorem

Bayes Theorem

A theorem in probability theory named for Thomas Bayes (1702-1761). In epidemiology, it is used to obtain the probability of disease in a group of people with some characteristic on the basis of the overall rate of that disease and of the likelihoods of that characteristic in healthy and diseased individuals. The most familiar application is in clinical decision analysis where it is used for estimating the probability of a particular diagnosis given the appearance of some symptoms or test result.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Virgin Islands of the United States

Virgin Islands of the United States

A group of islands in the Lesser Antilles in the West Indies, the three main islands being St. Croix, St. Thomas, and St. John. The capital is Charlotte Amalie. The Virgin Islands were discovered by Columbus in 1493. Before 1917 the U.S. Virgin Islands were held by the Danish and called the Danish West Indies but the name was changed when the United States acquired them by purchase. Virgin refers to the fact that Columbus made his discovery on St. Ursula's day - virgins being her legendary companions - or to the resemblance of the chain of islands to a procession of nuns or virgins. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1305 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p577)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Addition

Addition

a title annexed to a man's name, to identify him more precisely; as, John Doe, Esq.; Richard Roe, Gent.; Robert Dale, Mason; Thomas Way, of New York; a mark of distinction; a title

— Webster Dictionary

Bodleian

Bodleian

of or pertaining to Sir Thomas Bodley, or to the celebrated library at Oxford, founded by him in the sixteenth century

— Webster Dictionary

Canonize

Canonize

to declare (a deceased person) a saint; to put in the catalogue of saints; as, Thomas a Becket was canonized

— Webster Dictionary

Canterbury

Canterbury

a city in England, giving its name various articles. It is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury (primate of all England), and contains the shrine of Thomas a Becket, to which pilgrimages were formerly made

— Webster Dictionary

Coincidence

Coincidence

the condition or fact of happening at the same time; as, the coincidence of the deaths of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson

— Webster Dictionary

Erastian

Erastian

one of the followers of Thomas Erastus, a German physician and theologian of the 16th century. He held that the punishment of all offenses should be referred to the civil power, and that holy communion was open to all. In the present day, an Erastian is one who would see the church placed entirely under the control of the State

— Webster Dictionary

Hobbism

Hobbism

the philosophical system of Thomas Hobbes, an English materialist (1588-1679); esp., his political theory that the most perfect form of civil government is an absolute monarchy with despotic control over everything relating to law, morals, and religion

— Webster Dictionary

Hobbist

Hobbist

one who accepts the doctrines of Thomas Hobbes

— Webster Dictionary

Jeffersonian

Jeffersonian

pertaining to, or characteristic of, Thomas Jefferson or his policy or political doctrines

— Webster Dictionary

Scotist

Scotist

a follower of (Joannes) Duns Scotus, the Franciscan scholastic (d. 1308), who maintained certain doctrines in philosophy and theology, in opposition to the Thomists, or followers of Thomas Aquinas, the Dominican scholastic

— Webster Dictionary

Suggestion

Suggestion

the act or power of originating or recalling ideas or relations, distinguished as original and relative; -- a term much used by Scottish metaphysicians from Hutcherson to Thomas Brown

— Webster Dictionary

Thomean

Thomean

a member of the ancient church of Christians established on the Malabar coast of India, which some suppose to have been originally founded by the Apostle Thomas

— Webster Dictionary

Thomaism

Thomaism

the doctrine of Thomas Aquinas, esp. with respect to predestination and grace

— Webster Dictionary

Thomist

Thomist

a follower of Thomas Aquinas. See Scotist

— Webster Dictionary

Tipper

Tipper

a kind of ale brewed with brackish water obtained from a particular well; -- so called from the first brewer of it, one Thomas Tipper

— Webster Dictionary

Utopia

Utopia

an imaginary island, represented by Sir Thomas More, in a work called Utopia, as enjoying the greatest perfection in politics, laws, and the like. See Utopia, in the Dictionary of Noted Names in Fiction

— Webster Dictionary

accidentalism

accidentalism

The belief that outward appearance often contrasts with substance or essence (after Thomas Aquinas).

— Wiktionary

crapper

crapper

A water closet containing a flushable toilet, especially a toilet fixture identified "T. Crapper", a well known Victorian-era English engineer and plumbing installer, Thomas Crapper.

— Wiktionary

tipper

tipper

A kind of ale brewed with brackish water obtained from a particular well; -- so called from the first brewer of it, one Thomas Tipper.

— Wiktionary

babblery

babblery

Babble. Sir Thomas More.

— Wiktionary

Book of Common Prayer

Book of Common Prayer

The book containing the liturgy of the Church of England; compiled by Thomas Cranmer in 1549 following the Act of Uniformity.

— Wiktionary

Malthus

Malthus

Specifically, Thomas Malthus, English demographer and political economist, who proposed the view that population growth always exceeds the growth of the necessary food supply.

— Wiktionary

Hardy

Hardy

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), English novelist and poet.

— Wiktionary

Jeffersonian

Jeffersonian

A follower of Thomas Jefferson, or an advocate of his political theories.

— Wiktionary

Jeffersonian

Jeffersonian

Of, or relating to Thomas Jefferson, or his political theories.

— Wiktionary

Thomism

Thomism

The philosophy and theology of Thomas Aquinas.

— Wiktionary

seven deadly sins

seven deadly sins

The cardinal sins enumerated by Thomas Aquinas in the 13th century - pride/vanity, envy, gluttony, greed/avarice, lust, sloth, wrath/anger.

— Wiktionary

Thomu00E6an

Thomu00E6an

a member of an early Christian church supposedly founded by the Apostle Thomas on the Malabar coast of India

— Wiktionary

Jefferson

Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826); the third President of the United States, principal author of the US Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential founders of the United States.

— Wiktionary

Carlyle

Carlyle

derived from Carlisle; the most famous to bear it was Thomas Carlyle.

— Wiktionary

ptilochronology

ptilochronology

literally, 'the study of feather time'. It was coined by Thomas C. Grubb, Jr to describe the study of feather growth rates as an index of nutritional condition in birds.

— Wiktionary

mimeograph

mimeograph

An invention of Thomas A. Edison, a machine for making printed copies, using typed stencil, ubiquitous until the 1990s when photocopying became competitive (if not cheaper), and considerably easier to use.

— Wiktionary

Edison

Edison

Thomas Edison, American inventor and businessman.

— Wiktionary

Huxley

Huxley

Thomas Henry Huxley, English biologist.

— Wiktionary

Tomkins

Tomkins

from the pet form of Thomas.

— Wiktionary

Kuhnian

Kuhnian

Of or pertaining to the philosophy of Thomas Kuhn, most often to the theories he put forth in his book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.

— Wiktionary

cosmological argument

cosmological argument

A type of argument for the existence of God, advanced by a number of philosophers, including Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas, which maintains that, since every thing and event has a cause, there must be a first cause (God) which is itself uncaused and which causes everything else.

— Wiktionary

teleological argument

teleological argument

A type of argument for the existence of God, advanced by a number of philosophers, including Thomas Aquinas and George Berkeley, which maintains that the design of the world reveals that objects have purposes or ends and that such an organized design must be the creation of a supreme designer (God). Also called the argument from design.

— Wiktionary

first cause

first cause

That which causes everything else; the ultimate creative force or being behind the universe, identified with God by such Christian thinkers as Thomas Aquinas.

— Wiktionary

Pynchonesque

Pynchonesque

Of, pertaining to, or in the style of Thomas Pynchon

— Wiktionary

Munro

Munro

Any Scottish mountain having a height of more than 3,000 feet; named after Sir Hugh Thomas Munro, Scottish mountaineer

— Wiktionary

Mumping Day

Mumping Day

December 21st, St. Thomas's Day, a day for begging before Christmas.

— Wiktionary

Crapper

Crapper

Thomas Crapper, English plumber who developed and popularised the water closet.

— Wiktionary

Utopia

Utopia

The satirical treatise on government by Sir Thomas More, from which the term utopia was coined.

— Wiktionary

Bayesian

Bayesian

Of or pertaining to Thomas Bayes, English mathematician.

— Wiktionary

Thomasina

Thomasina

, a feminine form of Thomas.

— Wiktionary

Hardyan

Hardyan

Of or pertaining to Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) or his writings, of which the best known are tragic novels.

— Wiktionary

Peacockian

Peacockian

Of or pertaining to Thomas Love Peacock (1785-1866), English satirist and author, or his works, specifically a set of novels whose characters are placed in social contexts, especially the dining table, to discuss and criticise the philosophical opinions of the day.

— Wiktionary

Eliotian

Eliotian

Of or pertaining to Thomas Stearns Eliot (1888u20131965), American-born poet, playwright, and literary critic.

— Wiktionary

Bodleian

Bodleian

Of or pertaining to Sir Thomas Bodley (1545u20131613), English diplomat and scholar and founder of the Bodleian Library.

— Wiktionary

Nagelian

Nagelian

Of or pertaining to Thomas Nagel (born 1937), American philosopher.

— Wiktionary

Hardyesque

Hardyesque

Reminiscent of the writings of Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), of which the best known are tragic novels.

— Wiktionary

Tommo

Tommo

A nickname for Tom or Thomas

— Wiktionary

Thomases

Thomases

Plural form of Thomas.

— Wiktionary

doubting Thomases

doubting Thomases

Plural form of doubting Thomas.

— Wiktionary

abu ali al-husain ibn abdallah ibn sina

Avicenna, ibn-Sina, Abu Ali al-Husain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina

Arabian physician and influential Islamic philosopher; his interpretation of Aristotle influenced St. Thomas Aquinas; writings on medicine were important for almost 500 years (980-1037)

— Princeton's WordNet

aldous huxley

Huxley, Aldous Huxley, Aldous Leonard Huxley

English writer; grandson of Thomas Huxley who is remembered mainly for his depiction of a scientifically controlled utopia (1894-1963)

— Princeton's WordNet

aldous leonard huxley

Huxley, Aldous Huxley, Aldous Leonard Huxley

English writer; grandson of Thomas Huxley who is remembered mainly for his depiction of a scientifically controlled utopia (1894-1963)

— Princeton's WordNet

avicenna

Avicenna, ibn-Sina, Abu Ali al-Husain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina

Arabian physician and influential Islamic philosopher; his interpretation of Aristotle influenced St. Thomas Aquinas; writings on medicine were important for almost 500 years (980-1037)

— Princeton's WordNet

battle of chattanooga

Chattanooga, battle of Chattanooga

in the American Civil War (1863) the Union armies of Hooker, Thomas, and Sherman under the command of Ulysses S. Grant won a decisive victory over the Confederate Army under Braxton Bragg

— Princeton's WordNet

berkeley

Berkeley, Bishop Berkeley, George Berkeley

Irish philosopher and Anglican bishop who opposed the materialism of Thomas Hobbes (1685-1753)

— Princeton's WordNet

bishop berkeley

Berkeley, Bishop Berkeley, George Berkeley

Irish philosopher and Anglican bishop who opposed the materialism of Thomas Hobbes (1685-1753)

— Princeton's WordNet

byrd

Byrd, William Byrd

English organist and composer of church music; master of 16th century polyphony; was granted a monopoly in music printing with Thomas Tallis (1543-1623)

— Princeton's WordNet

canterbury

Canterbury

a town in Kent in southeastern England; site of the cathedral where Thomas a Becket was martyred in 1170; seat of the archbishop and primate of the Anglican Church

— Princeton's WordNet

carrere

Carrere, John Merven Carrere

United States architect who with his partner Thomas Hastings designed many important public buildings (1858-1911)

— Princeton's WordNet

chattanooga

Chattanooga, battle of Chattanooga

in the American Civil War (1863) the Union armies of Hooker, Thomas, and Sherman under the command of Ulysses S. Grant won a decisive victory over the Confederate Army under Braxton Bragg

— Princeton's WordNet

chippendale

Chippendale

of or relating to an 18th-century style of furniture made by Thomas Chippendale; graceful outlines and Greek motifs and massive rococo carvings

— Princeton's WordNet

donkey

donkey

the symbol of the Democratic Party; introduced in cartoons by Thomas Nast in 1874

— Princeton's WordNet

drosophila

drosophila, Drosophila melanogaster

small fruit fly used by Thomas Hunt Morgan in studying basic mechanisms of inheritance

— Princeton's WordNet

drosophila melanogaster

drosophila, Drosophila melanogaster

small fruit fly used by Thomas Hunt Morgan in studying basic mechanisms of inheritance

— Princeton's WordNet

dugald stewart

Stewart, Dugald Stewart

Scottish philosopher and follower of Thomas Reid (1753-1828)

— Princeton's WordNet

elephant

elephant

the symbol of the Republican Party; introduced in cartoons by Thomas Nast in 1874

— Princeton's WordNet

elihu thomson

Thomson, Elihu Thomson

United States electrical engineer (born in England) who in 1892 formed a company with Thomas Edison (1853-1937)

— Princeton's WordNet

george berkeley

Berkeley, Bishop Berkeley, George Berkeley

Irish philosopher and Anglican bishop who opposed the materialism of Thomas Hobbes (1685-1753)

— Princeton's WordNet

gresham's law

Gresham's Law

(economics) the principle that when two kinds of money having the same denominational value are in circulation the intrinsically more valuable money will be hoarded and the money of lower intrinsic value will circulate more freely until the intrinsically more valuable money is driven out of circulation; bad money drives out good; credited to Sir Thomas Gresham

— Princeton's WordNet

huxleian

Huxleyan, Huxleian

of or relating to Thomas Huxley

— Princeton's WordNet

huxleyan

Huxleyan, Huxleian

of or relating to Thomas Huxley

— Princeton's WordNet

huxley

Huxley, Aldous Huxley, Aldous Leonard Huxley

English writer; grandson of Thomas Huxley who is remembered mainly for his depiction of a scientifically controlled utopia (1894-1963)

— Princeton's WordNet

ibn-sina

Avicenna, ibn-Sina, Abu Ali al-Husain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina

Arabian physician and influential Islamic philosopher; his interpretation of Aristotle influenced St. Thomas Aquinas; writings on medicine were important for almost 500 years (980-1037)

— Princeton's WordNet

jeffersonian

Jeffersonian

a follower of Thomas Jefferson or his ideas and principles

— Princeton's WordNet

jeffersonian

Jeffersonian

relating to or characteristic of Thomas Jefferson or his principles or theories

— Princeton's WordNet

john merven carrere

Carrere, John Merven Carrere

United States architect who with his partner Thomas Hastings designed many important public buildings (1858-1911)

— Princeton's WordNet

lewis and clark expedition

Lewis and Clark Expedition

an expedition sent by Thomas Jefferson to explore the northwestern territories of the United States; led by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark; traveled from St. Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River from 1803 to 1806

— Princeton's WordNet

malthusian

Malthusian

of or relating to Thomas Malthus or to Malthusianism

— Princeton's WordNet

scopes trial

Scopes trial

a highly publicized trial in 1925 when John Thomas Scopes violated a Tennessee state law by teaching evolution in high school; Scopes was prosecuted by William Jennings Bryan and defended by Clarence Darrow; Scopes was convicted but the verdict was later reversed

— Princeton's WordNet

stewart

Stewart, Dugald Stewart

Scottish philosopher and follower of Thomas Reid (1753-1828)

— Princeton's WordNet

thomism

Thomism

the comprehensive theological doctrine created by Saint Thomas Aquinas in the 13th century and still taught by the Dominicans

— Princeton's WordNet

thomson

Thomson, Elihu Thomson

United States electrical engineer (born in England) who in 1892 formed a company with Thomas Edison (1853-1937)

— Princeton's WordNet

utopia

Utopia

a book written by Sir Thomas More (1516) describing the perfect society on an imaginary island

— Princeton's WordNet

william byrd

Byrd, William Byrd

English organist and composer of church music; master of 16th century polyphony; was granted a monopoly in music printing with Thomas Tallis (1543-1623)

— Princeton's WordNet

Patriot

Patriot

Patriots were the colonists of the British Thirteen United Colonies who violently rebelled against British control during the American Revolution and in July 1776 declared the United States of America an independent nation. Their rebellion was based on the political philosophy of republicanism, as expressed by pamphleteers, such as Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, and Thomas Paine. As a group, Patriots represented a wide array of social, economic, ethnic and racial backgrounds. They included lawyers like John Adams and Alexander Hamilton; planters like Thomas Jefferson and George Mason; merchants like Alexander McDougall and ordinary farmers like Daniel Shays and Joseph Plumb Martin.

— Freebase

Thomism

Thomism

Thomism is the philosophical school that arose as a legacy of the work and thought of Saint Thomas Aquinas, philosopher, theologian, and Doctor of the Church. In philosophy, his commentaries on Aristotle are his most lasting contribution. In theology, his Summa Theologica was one of the most influential documents in medieval theology and continues to be studied today in theology and philosophy classes. In the encyclical Doctoris Angelici Pope Pius X cautioned that the teachings of the Church cannot be understood without the basic philosophical underpinnings of Thomas' major theses: The Second Vatican Council described Thomas's system as the "Perennial Philosophy".

— Freebase

Charlotte Amalie

Charlotte Amalie

Charlotte Amalie, located on St. Thomas, is the capital and largest city of the U.S. Virgin Islands, founded in 1666 as Taphus. In 1691, the town was renamed to Amalienborg after Charlotte Amalie of Hesse-Kassel, queen consort to King Christian V of Denmark. It contains a deep-water harbor that was once a haven for pirates and is now one of the busiest port of call for cruise ships in the Caribbean, with about 1.5 million cruise ship passengers landing there in 2004. Protected by Hassel Island, the harbor has docking and fueling facilities, machine shops, and shipyards and was a U.S. submarine base until 1966. The town has been inhabited for centuries. When Christopher Columbus came here in 1493, the area was inhabited by both Carib- and Arawak Indians. It is located on the southern shore at the head of Saint Thomas Harbor. In 2010 the city had a population of 18,481, which makes it the largest city in the Virgin Islands Archipelago. Hundreds of ferries and yachts pass through town each week, and at times the population more than doubles. The city is known for its Danish colonial architecture, building structure and history, and a dozen streets and places throughout the city have Danish names. Charlotte Amalie has buildings of historical importance including St. Thomas Synagogue, the second-oldest synagogue in the Western Hemisphere, and the oldest Lutheran church in the Western Hemisphere, the Frederick Lutheran Church. The town has a long history of pirates, especially stories of Bluebeard and Blackbeard. In the 17th-century, the Danes built both Blackbeard's Castle and Bluebeard's Castle attributed to the pirates. Blackbeard's Castle is a U.S. National Historic Landmark and one of the most visited attractions in town. Another tourist attraction is Fort Christian, the oldest standing structure in the Virgin Islands Archipelago. A copy of the Liberty Bell is located in Emancipation Park, which is a tourist attraction.

— Freebase

Smooth

Smooth

"Smooth" is a collaboration between Latin rock band Santana and Rob Thomas of the rock group Matchbox Twenty. The song was written by Thomas and Itaal Shur, sung by Thomas, produced by Matt Serletic and won three Grammy Awards, including Record of the Year, Song of the Year, and Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals.

— Freebase

British Archaeological Association

British Archaeological Association

The British Archaeological Association was founded in 1843 and aims to inspire, support and disseminate high quality research in the fields of Western archaeology, art and architecture, primarily of the medieval period, through lectures, conferences, study days and publications. The BAA was founded in December 1843 by Charles Roach Smith, Thomas Wright and Thomas Joseph Pettigrew, to encourage the recording, preservation, and publication of archaeological discoveries, and to lobby for government assistance for the collection of British antiquities. All three men were Fellows of the Society of Antiquaries of London but felt the older body was too aristocratic, too London-focused and lacked the campaigning vigour required. The naming of the new body was symbolic: British referred to the campaign for a museum of British Antiquities, Archaeological differentiated their field from older antiquarian methods and Association had reformist, even revolutionary, overtones. Smith became its first secretary and arranged the first six annual congresses. Although he remained one of the secretaries until 1851, he had effectively resigned the post in 1849. One of the aims of the Association was to promote dialogue between self-identified experts and local archaeologists, to be achieved through the organization of an annual congress, along the model of the French Congres Archaeologique or the annual meetings of the British Association for the Advancement of Science. The first meeting was held in Canterbury in 1844. The site, with its magnificent cathedral, had obvious appeal and was close to the seat of the Association’s first President, Lord Albert Conyngham. The Canterbury Congress occasioned the dispute which led to a split and the formation of the Archaeological Institute. The public reason for the feud was the publication by Thomas Wright of The Archaeological Album, or, Museum of National Antiquities, a commercial publication from which Wright drew profit. This infuriated Oxford publisher John Henry Parker, who was to have been the publisher of the official proceedings. Behind the scenes, however, the dispute had other dimensions, both social and religious.

— Freebase

Ringside

Ringside

Ringside is an indie rock band from Hollywood, California, originally formed in Los Angeles. They specialize in fusing indie rock with electronic beats. The band consists of Scott Thomas, Kirk Hellie, Sandy Chila, Max Allyn, and actor Balthazar Getty, who doubles as a beatmaker and producer. Scott Thomas, a former clothing designer, eventually tired of witnessing others' successes and decided to put out his own music. He had to sell all his possessions to dedicate himself to writing songs. His inspiration came from artists like The Stooges, The Clash, T. Rex, and Depeche Mode. Thomas eventually collaborated with Getty, who was already into making beats for underground hip-hop groups. Their debut album Ringside was released on April 19, 2005 under Fred Durst's label Flawless Records and Geffen Records, with the single "Tired of Being Sorry" achieving moderate success. The song was later covered by singer/songwriter Enrique Iglesias on his eighth album Insomniac and was released as a single in Europe. Also the same song, "Tired of Being Sorry" was featured on the movie Her Minor Thing. The song "Struggle" from their self-titled album was featured on a Pontiac Torrent commercial, the movie Doom and on the TV series Six Feet Under. The track also appeared briefly on the ambient play list of the Schecter Guitars website, as Schecter promotes artists that use their guitars.

— Freebase

Sir Thomas More

Sir Thomas More

Sir Thomas More is a collaborative Elizabethan play by Anthony Munday and others depicting the life and death of Thomas More. It survives only in a single manuscript, now owned by the British Library. The manuscript is notable because three pages of it are considered to be in the hand of William Shakespeare and for the light it sheds on the collaborative nature of Elizabethan drama and the theatrical censorship of the era. In 1871, Richard Simpson proposed that some additions to the play had been written by Shakespeare, and a year later James Spedding, editor of the works of Sir Francis Bacon, while rejecting some of Simpson's suggestions, supported the attribution to Shakespeare of the passage credited to Hand D. In 1916, the paleographer Sir Edward Maunde Thompson published a minute analysis of the handwriting of the addition and judged it to be Shakespeare's. The case was strengthened with the publication of Shakespeare's Hand in the Play of Sir Thomas More by five noted scholars who analysed the play from multiple perspectives, all of which led to the same affirmative conclusion. Although some dissenters remain, the attribution has been generally accepted since the mid-20th century and most authoritative editions of Shakespeare's works, including The Oxford Shakespeare and the Arden Shakespeare, include the play. It was performed with Shakespeare's name included amongst the authors by the Royal Shakespeare Company in 2005.

— Freebase

Fish family

Fish family

The Fish family is a family of American politicians. The family is of English origin and is descended from Jonathan Fish, who was born in East Farndon, Northamptonshire, England and settled in the Province of New York. ⁕Hamilton Fish, candidate for New York Assemblyman 1834, U.S. Representative from New York 1843–1845, candidate for Lieutenant Governor of New York 1846, Lieutenant Governor of New York 1848, Governor of New York 1849–1851, U.S. Senator from New York 1851–1857, U.S. Secretary of State 1869–1877. Father of Nicholas Fish II and Hamilton Fish II. ⁕Nicholas Fish II, U.S. Chargé d'Affaires to Switzerland 1877–1881, U.S. Minister to Belgium 1882–1885. Son of Hamilton Fish. ⁕Hamilton Fish II, New York Assemblyman 1874, 1876–1879, 1889–1891, 1893–1896, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1884, U.S. Representative from New York 1909–1911. Son of Hamilton Fish. ⁕D. Maitland Armstrong, U.S. Consul in Rome, Italy 1869–1871; U.S. Chargé d'Affaires to the Papal States 1869; U.S. Consul General in Rome, Italy 1871-1873. Nephew by marriage of Hamilton Fish. ⁕Alfred C. Chapin, New York Assemblyman 1882–1883, New York Comptroller 1884–1887, Mayor of Brooklyn, New York 1888–1891; U.S. Representative from New York 1891–1892. Father-in-law of Hamilton Fish III.Hamilton F. Kean, New Jersey Republican Committeeman 1905–1919, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1916, Republican National Committeeman 1919–1928, candidate for U.S. Senate from New Jersey 1924, U.S. Senator from New Jersey 1929–1935. Grandnephew of Hamilton Fish.Hamilton Fish Armstrong, U.S. diplomat; editor Foreign Affairs 1928–1972. Son of D. Maitland Armstrong.Hamilton Fish III, New York Assemblyman 1914–1916, U.S. Representative from New York 1920–1945, New York Republican Committeeman 1936. Son of Hamilton Fish II.Robert W. Kean, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1936, U.S. Representative from New Jersey 1939–1959, candidate for U.S. Senate from New Jersey 1958. Son of Hamilton F. Kean.Hamilton Fish IV, U.S. Representative from New York 1969–1995, delegate to the Republican National Convention 1984. Son of Hamilton Fish III.Thomas H. Kean, New Jersey Assemblyman 1968–1977, Governor of New Jersey 1982–1990. Son of Robert W. Kean.Hamilton Fish V, candidate for U.S. Representative from New York 1988, 1994. Son of Hamilton Fish IV.Thomas Kean, Jr., New Jersey state senator, son of Thomas H. Kean.

— Freebase

In Between

In Between

In Between is an EP by American singer-songwriter Rosie Thomas, released in 2001. Pitched by her record company, Sub Pop, as "a 5-song introduction to Rosie Thomas", the EP was only available at Thomas's shows and via mail order from Sub Pop.

— Freebase

Native Son

Native Son

Native Son is a novel by American author Richard Wright. The novel tells the story of 20-year-old Bigger Thomas, a black American youth living in utter poverty. Bigger lived in a poor area on Chicago's South Side in the 1930s. The novel's treatment of Bigger and his motivations conforms to the conventions of literary naturalism. While not apologizing for Bigger's crimes, Wright is sympathetic to the systemic inevitability behind them. As Bigger's lawyer points out, there is no escape from this destiny for his client or any other black American, since they are the necessary product of the society that formed them and told them since birth who exactly they were supposed to be. "No American Negro exists," James Baldwin once wrote, "who does not have his private Bigger Thomas living in his skull." Frantz Fanon discusses this feeling in his 1952 essay L'Experience Vecue du Noir, or "The Fact of Blackness". "In the end," writes Fanon, "Bigger Thomas acts. To put an end to his tension, he acts, he responds to the world's anticipation."

— Freebase

Gunpowder Plot

Gunpowder Plot

The Gunpowder Plot of 1605, in earlier centuries often called the Gunpowder Treason Plot or the Jesuit Treason, was a failed assassination attempt against King James I of England and VI of Scotland by a group of provincial English Catholics led by Robert Catesby. The plan was to blow up the House of Lords during the State Opening of England's Parliament on 5 November 1605, as the prelude to a popular revolt in the Midlands during which James's nine-year-old daughter, Princess Elizabeth, was to be installed as the Catholic head of state. Catesby may have embarked on the scheme after hopes of securing greater religious tolerance under King James had faded, leaving many English Catholics disappointed. His fellow plotters were John Wright, Thomas Wintour, Thomas Percy, Guy Fawkes, Robert Keyes, Thomas Bates, Robert Wintour, Christopher Wright, John Grant, Ambrose Rookwood, Sir Everard Digby and Francis Tresham. Fawkes, who had 10 years of military experience fighting in the Spanish Netherlands in suppression of the Dutch Revolt, was given charge of the explosives. The plot was revealed to the authorities in an anonymous letter sent to William Parker, 4th Baron Monteagle, on 26 October 1605. During a search of the House of Lords at about midnight on 4 November 1605, Fawkes was discovered guarding 36 barrels of gunpowder—enough to reduce the House of Lords to rubble—and arrested. Most of the conspirators fled from London as they learnt of the plot's discovery, trying to enlist support along the way. Several made a stand against the pursuing Sheriff of Worcester and his men at Holbeche House; in the ensuing battle Catesby was one of those shot and killed. At their trial on 27 January 1606, eight of the survivors, including Fawkes, were convicted and sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered.

— Freebase

Meeting of Minds

Meeting of Minds

Meeting of Minds is a television series, created by Steve Allen, which aired on PBS from 1977 to 1981. The show featured guests who played significant roles in world history. Guests would interact with each other and host Steve Allen, discussing philosophy, religion, history, science, and many other topics. It was conceptually quite similar to the Canadian television series Witness to Yesterday, created by Arthur Voronka, which preceded Meeting Of Minds to the air by three years. Steve Allen actually appeared on a 1976 episode of Witness to Yesterday as George Gershwin, one year before Meeting Of Minds premiered. As nearly as was possible, the actual words of the historical figures were used. The show was fully scripted, yet the scripts were carefully crafted to give the appearance of spontaneous discussion among historic figures. Guests included: Plato, Socrates, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther, Cleopatra, Marie Antoinette, Florence Nightingale, Thomas Paine, Francis Bacon, Thomas Jefferson, Voltaire, Karl Marx and Charles Darwin. Typically, each episode would be split into two parts, broadcast separately, with most or all of the guests introduced over the course of the first part, and the discussions continuing into the second part. A total of 24 episodes were produced.

— Freebase

Thomas Kyd

Thomas Kyd

Thomas Kyd was an English dramatist, the author of The Spanish Tragedy, and one of the most important figures in the development of Elizabethan drama. Although well known in his own time, Kyd fell into obscurity until 1773 when Thomas Hawkins discovered that Kyd was named as its author by Thomas Heywood in his Apologie for Actors. A hundred years later, scholars in Germany and England began to shed light on his life and work, including the controversial finding that he may have been the author of a Hamlet play pre-dating Shakespeare's.

— Freebase

Winning Streak

Winning Streak

Winning Streak is a weekly Irish game show in which five contestants play a number of games to win cars, holidays, and cash prizes up to €500,000. Broadcast on Saturday nights between September and June on RTÉ One, the game show is among the channel's most popular programmes, often ranking among the top five in the ratings. However, there was a significant drop in viewership in the 2008/2009 series. The game show began on 21 September 1990, and has been hosted by popular television personalities Mike Murphy and Derek Mooney. Prize money for the show is funded by the Irish National Lottery, with entry to the game based on National Lottery scratchcards. Mooney stepped down as the show's host at the end of the 2007–08 season. The 2008–09 season was rebranded Winning Streak: Dream Ticket and was co-hosted by Kathryn Thomas and Aidan Power. They were the first duo to host the programme and Thomas was the show's first permanent female presenter. Aidan Power stood down, after the 2008/09 season ended on 6 June 2009, because of his commitments to the RTÉ Young Peoples Programme The Cafe, as well as presenting on The All Ireland Talent Show in early 2010. Marty Whelan stepped into Aidan's shoes, co-hosting the 2009/10 series with Kathryn, which aired from 12 September 2009 until 29 May 2010. The current series, now in its twenty-first season, commenced on 4 September 2010, again with Kathryn Thomas and Marty Whelan at the helm. Kathryn was then replaced with Geri Maye.

— Freebase

Anti Scrunti Faction

Anti Scrunti Faction

Anti-Scrunti Faction were a queercore punk trio from Boulder, Colorado. The band made their first appearance in 1984 on the Restless Records compilation LP entitled FlipSide Vinyl Fanzine Volume 1, assembled by the fanzine Flipside, with the song "Big Women". In 1985, Anti-Scrunti Faction released A Sure Fuck, a single on Unclean Records. Appearing on the extended single are Leslie Mah, bass and vocals, Tracie Thomas, guitar and vocals, Sarah Bibb on drums for two songs and Eric Van Leuven on drums for the remaining four. Later that same year the album Damsels In Distress came out on Flipside Records. The artists' names are intentionally obscured on the album: the guitarist is listed as T. Thomas and the drummer is only named as "E". As on the single, these musicians are Tracie Thomas on guitar and Eric Van Leuven on drums. Credited as L. Mah, Leslie Mah again plays bass and sings. After Anti-Scrunti Faction broke up, Leslie Mah moved to San Francisco and joined Tribe 8, regarded as one of the seminal queercore bands. However, Anti-Scrunti Faction continues to be popular among fans of old-school punk and fans of Tribe 8. The song "Slave to my Estrogen" is a stand-out favorite for radio airplay. In 1998, Tribe 8 recast "Slave To My Estrogen" as "Estrofemme" for their Role Models For AmeriKKKa album on Alternative Tentacles.

— Freebase

Victrola

Victrola

The name later assigned to the improved 'phonograph' contrived by Thomas Alva Edison while residing in Washington, DC;

— Editors Contribution

26260

26260

26260 is the US ZIP code of Davis, Thomas - West Virginia

— ZIP Codes

26292

26292

26292 is the US ZIP code of Thomas - West Virginia

— ZIP Codes

41071

41071

41071 is the US ZIP code of Newport, Southgate, Bellevue, Fort Thomas, Wilder, Woodlawn - Kentucky

— ZIP Codes

41074

41074

41074 is the US ZIP code of Dayton, Fort Thomas - Kentucky

— ZIP Codes

41075

41075

41075 is the US ZIP code of Fort Thomas, Highland Heights, Dayton, Newport, Southgate - Kentucky

— ZIP Codes

41076

41076

41076 is the US ZIP code of Melbourne, Silver Grove, Southgate, Alexandria, Cold Spring, Crestview, Fort Thomas, Highland Heights, Wilder - Kentucky

— ZIP Codes

58276

58276

58276 is the US ZIP code of St. Thomas - North Dakota

— ZIP Codes

65058

65058

65058 is the US ZIP code of Meta, St. Thomas - Missouri

— ZIP Codes

65076

65076

65076 is the US ZIP code of St. Thomas - Missouri

— ZIP Codes

73669

73669

73669 is the US ZIP code of Thomas - Oklahoma

— ZIP Codes

85536

85536

85536 is the US ZIP code of Fort Thomas - Arizona

— ZIP Codes

CPU Wars

CPU Wars

A 1979 large-format comic by Chas Andres chronicling the attempts of the brainwashed androids of IPM (Impossible to Program Machines) to conquer and destroy the peaceful denizens of HEC (Human Engineered Computers). This rather transparent allegory featured many references to ADVENT and the immortal line “Eat flaming death, minicomputer mongrels!” (uttered, of course, by an IPM stormtrooper). The whole shebang is now available on the Web.It is alleged that the author subsequently received a letter of appreciation on IBM company stationery from the head of IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Laboratories (at that time one of the few islands of true hackerdom in the IBM archipelago). The lower loop of the B in the IBM logo, it is said, had been carefully whited out. See eat flaming death.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Apocrypha

Apocrypha

a-pok′rif-a, n. as applied to religious writings = (1) those suitable for the initiated only; (2) those of unknown date and origin; (3) those which are spurious—the term generally means the fourteen books or parts of books known as the Apocrypha of the Old Testament—found in the Septuagint but not the Hebrew or Palestinian canon:—(1) First, or Third, Esdras; (2) Second, or Fourth, Esdras; (3) Tobit; (4) Judith; (5) the parts of Esther not found in Hebrew or Chaldee; (6) The Wisdom of Solomon; (7) The Wisdom of Jesus, the son of Sirach, or Ecclesiasticus; (8) Baruch; (9) The Song of the Three Holy Children; (10) The History of Susannah; (11) Bel and the Dragon; (12) The Prayer of Manasses, king of Judah; (13) First Maccabees; (14) Second Maccabees. The Apocryphal books of the New Testament, as the Protevangelium of James, the Gospel of Thomas, the Gesta Pilati, &c., stand on quite a different footing, never having been accepted by any as canonical, or in any way authoritative: hidden or secret things.—adj. Apoc′ryphal, of doubtful authority. [Gr., 'things hidden'—apo, from, krypt-ein, to hide.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Carlylese

Carlylese

kar-līl′ēz, n. the vigorous, irregular, hypermetaphorical literary style and phraseology peculiar to Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881).—adjs. Carlyl′esque, Carlyl′ēan.—n. Carlyl′ism.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Christadelphian

Christadelphian

kris-ta-del′fi-an, n. a member of a small religious body holding conditional immortality, denying a personal devil, &c.—sometimes called Thomasites from Dr John Thomas of Brooklyn (1805-71). [Lit. 'Brethren of Christ,' Gr. Christos, Christ, and adelphos, brother.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Dover's powder

Dover's powder

dō′verz pow′der, n. a valuable sudorific medicine, compounded of ipecacuanha root, powdered opium, and sulphate of potash. [From Dr Thomas Dover, 1660-1742.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Erastian

Erastian

e-rast′yan, n. a follower of Thomas Erastus (1524-83), a Swiss physician, who denied the church the right to inflict excommunication and disciplinary penalties: one who minimises the spiritual independence of the church, subordinating her jurisdiction to the state—a position not held by Erastus at all.—adj. relating to the Erastians or their doctrines.—n. Erast′ianism, control of church by state.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Gradgrind

Gradgrind

gräd′grīnd, n. one who regulates all human things by rule and compass and the mechanical application of statistics, allowing nothing for sentiment, emotion, and individuality. [From Thomas Gradgrind in Dickens's Hard Times.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Grundy

Grundy

grund′i, Mrs, the invisible censor morum who is frequently appealed to in the phrase, 'But what will Mrs Grundy say?' in Thomas Morton's play, Speed the Plough (1800).

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Hobbism

Hobbism

hob′izm, n. the doctrine of Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), that morality is an institution of society.—n. Hobb′ist, a follower of Hobbes.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Jeffersonite

Jeffersonite

jef′er-son-īt, n. a greenish-black variety of pyroxene. [Thomas Jefferson, 1743-1826.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

John

John

jon, n. a proper name, one of whose diminutives, John′ny, is sometimes used in slang for a simpleton or a fellow generally.—ns. John′-a-dreams′ (Shak.), a dreamy fellow; John′ian, a member of St John's College, Cambridge; John′ny-cake, a cake of Indian meal toasted; John′ny-raw, a beginner.—John Bull, a generic name for an Englishman from Arbuthnott's History of John Bull, 1712; John Bullism, the typical English character, or any act or word expressive of it; John Chinaman, a Chinaman, the Chinese collectively; John Company, an old colloquial name for the Honourable East India Company; John Dory (see Dory); John Thomas, a generic name for a flunkey.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Malthusian

Malthusian

mal-thū′zhan, adj. relating to Malthus or to the principles he taught regarding the necessity of preventing population from increasing faster than the means of living.—n. a disciple of Thomas Robert Malthus (1766-1834).

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Mump

Mump

mump, v.t. and v.i. to mumble, mutter, or move the lips with the mouth almost closed: to nibble: to cheat: to play the beggar.—ns. Mump′er, one who mumps: an old cant term for a beggar; Mump′ing-day, St Thomas's Day, 21st Dec.—adj. Mump′ish, having mumps: dull: sullen.—adv. Mump′ishly.—n. Mump′ishness.—n. Mumps, a contagious non-suppurative inflammation of the parotid and sometimes of the other salivary glands: gloomy silence. [Form of mum.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Rev.

Rev.

an abridgment of Reverend, in addressing clergymen, as 'Rev. Thomas Davidson;' deans are styled 'Very Reverend,' also principals of universities in Scotland, if clergymen, and the moderator of the General Assembly for the time being; bishops are styled 'Right Reverend,' and archbishops, 'Most Reverend.'

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Rhyme

Rhyme

Rime, rīm, n. the recurrence of similar sounds at certain intervals: (orig.) words arranged in numbers or verse: poetry: metre: a short poem.—v.i. to correspond in sound: to harmonise: to chime: to make rhymes or verses.—v.t. to put into rhyme.—adj. Rhyme′less, without rhyme or reason: without sound or sense: neither pleasant to the mind nor to the ear.—ns. Rhyme′-lett′er, the repeated letters in alliteration (q.v.); Rhy′mer, Rhy′mist, Rī′mist, an inferior poet: a minstrel; Rhyme′-roy′al (so called from its use by King James I. of Scotland in the King's Quair), a seven-line stanza borrowed by Chaucer from the French—its formula, a b a b b c c; Rhyme′ster, a poetaster: a would-be poet.—adjs. Rhy′mic, Rī′mic.—Feminine rhyme (see Feminine); Male, or Masculine, rhyme, a rhyme in which the accent and rhyme fall on the final syllable only.—Neither rhyme nor reason, without either sound or sense.—The Rhymer, Thomas the Rhymer, the earliest poet of Scotland (flor. 1286). [Properly rime (the hy being due to the influence of Rhythm)—A.S. rim, number, cog. with Old High Ger. rīm (Ger. reim).]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sayornis

Sayornis

sā-or′nis, n. the pewit fly-catchers. [Thomas Say, an American ornithologist.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Smectymnuus

Smectymnuus

smek-tim′nū-us, n. a name compounded of the initials of the five Puritan divines—Stephen Marshall, Edmund Calamy, Thomas Young, Matthew Newcomen, and William Spurstow, joint authors of An Answer (1641) to Bishop Hall's Humble Remonstrance to the High Court of Parliament (1641) in defence of the liturgy and episcopal government.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tantum Ergo

Tantum Ergo

tan′tum er′gō, n. the fifth stanza of the hymn 'Pange, lingua, gloriosi corporis mysterium,' written for the office of the Festival of Corpus Christi, which St Thomas of Aquino drew up in 1263. [From its opening words.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Thomism

Thomism

tō′mizm, n. the doctrines of the followers of the prince of scholastic theologians, Thomas Aquinas (1226-74), esp. as these are set forth in his Summa Theologiæ, which still represent, with few exceptions, the general teaching of the R.C. Church.—n. Thō′mist, a follower of Aquinas.—adjs. Thomist′ic, -al.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tipper

Tipper

tip′ėr, n. a kind of ale—from Thomas Tipper, who brewed it in Sussex.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Tom

Tom

tom, n. a dim. of Thomas—used generically for man in 'tomfool,' &c.: a male, esp. a male cat: (prov.) a close-stool.—ns. Tom′-and-Jer′ry, a drink of hot rum and eggs, spiced and sweetened; Tom′-trot, a toffee made with treacle, sugar, and butter.—Tom, Dick, and Harry, any persons taken at random.—Long Tom, a long gun, as distinguished from a carronade, a gun carried amidships on a swivel-carriage.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Cochrane

Cochrane

the name of several English naval officers of the Dundonald family; Sir Alexander Forrester Inglis (1758-1832); Sir Thomas John, his son (1798-1872); and Thomas, Lord. See Dundonald.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

John of Salisbusy

John of Salisbusy

bishop of Chartres, born at Salisbury, of Saxon lineage; was a pupil of Abelard; was secretary first to Theobald and then to Thomas á Becket, archbishop of Canterbury; was present at the assassination of the latter; afterwards he retired to France and was made bishop; wrote the Lives of St. Thomas and St. Anselm, and other works of importance in connection with the scholasticism of the time (1120-1180).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Liturgy

Liturgy

is sometimes used as including any form of public worship, but more strictly it denotes the form for the observance of the Eucharist. As development from the simple form of their institution in the primitive Church liturgies assumed various forms, and only by degrees certain marked types began to prevail: viz., the Roman, ascribed to St. Peter, in Latin, and prevailing in the Roman Catholic Church all over the world; the Ephesian, ascribed to St. John, in corrupt Latin, included the old Scottish and Irish forms, heard now only in a few places in Spain; the Jerusalem, ascribed to St. James, in Greek, the form of the Greek Church and in translation of the Armenians; the Babylonian, ascribed to St. Thomas, in Syriac, used still by the Nestorians and Christians of St. Thomas; and the Alexandrian, ascribed to St. Mark, in a Græco-Coptic jargon, in use among the Copts; these all contain certain common elements, but differ in order and in subsidiary parts; the Anglican liturgy is adapted from the Roman; other Protestant liturgies or forms of service are mostly of modern date and compiled from Scripture sources.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Parr, Catherine

Parr, Catherine

sixth wife of Henry VIII., daughter of Sir Thomas Parr of Kendal, was a woman of learning and great discretion, acquired great power over the king, persuaded him to consent to the succession of his daughters, and surviving him, married her former suitor Sir Thomas Seymour, and died from the effects of childbirth the year after (1512-1548).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Rhymer, Thomas the

Rhymer, Thomas the

or True Thomas, Thomas of Ercildoune, or Earlston, a Berwickshire notability of the 13th century, famous for his rhyming prophecies, who was said, in return for his prophetic gift, to have sold himself to the fairies.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

St. Thomas

St. Thomas

1, an unhealthy volcanic island (20) in the Gulf of Guinea, belonging to Portugal; produces coffee, cocoa, and some spices; chief town, St. Thomas (3), a port on the NE. 2, One of the Virgin Islands (14), 37 m. E. of Porto Rico; belongs to Denmark; since the abolition of slavery its prosperous sugar trade has entirely departed; capital, St. Thomas (12), is now a coaling-station for steamers.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Tichborne

Tichborne

a village and property of Hampshire, which became notorious in the "seventies" through a butcher, from Wagga Wagga, in Australia, named Thomas Castro, otherwise Thomas Orton, laying claim to it in 1866 on the death of Sir Alfred Joseph Tichborne; the "Claimant" represented himself as an elder brother of the deceased baronet, supposed (and rightly) to have perished at sea; the imposture was exposed after a lengthy trial, and a subsequent trial for perjury resulted in a sentence of 14 years' penal servitude. Orton, after his release, confessed his imposture in 1895.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Anesthesia Medical Group

Anesthesia Medical Group

Anesthesia Medical Group, PC (AMG) is a 64 physician, 170 certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) anesthesia practice serving the greater Nashville community. AMG provides anesthesia services on the Baptist, Centennial, St. Thomas, Summit, and Williamson medical center campuses. In addition, they serve a number of ambulatory surgery centers on those campuses and elsewhere.

— CrunchBase

Chefs Feed

Chefs Feed

Chefs Feed enables a rapidly growing roster of highly acclaimed professional chefs to share food discoveries from outside their own kitchens. Want to know where Mario Batali gets his carnitas taco fix? Where Wolfgang Puck goes for sushi or where Thomas Keller goes for pasta? Chefs Feed has the answers. With thousands of high-end to hole-in-the-wall restaurant recommendations straight from the mouths of the country's best chefs, you'll learn where to go, and most importantly, what to order.Chefs Feed's flagship mobile app features ongoing dish recommendations from top chefs delivered to a social user community. The app provides a positive and social food experience to both chefs and consumers. For chefs, the platform is a powerful tool providing increased engagement with a highly targeted audience. For consumers, Chefs Feed delivers strong value with insightful guidance from the most knowledgeable palates; the chefs themselves. The commentary includes an amazing range of discoveries from food trucks, to fine dining and everything in between.

— CrunchBase

CyberHeart

CyberHeart

CyberHeart Incorporated is developing the first non-invasive robotic ablation treatment for cardiac arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia. The CyberHeart system is designed to address these conditions by dynamically detecting, tracking and compensating for movement of the heart and patient, to ensure accuracy in the delivery of radiation.CyberHeart is creating proprietary cardiac technology utilizing the most accurate robotic radiosurgical system commercially available worldwide, the CyberKnife® Robotic Radiosurgery System. With an exclusive intellectual property license agreement, CyberHeart will leverage the existing experience and knowledge base to develop this innovative electrophysiology application for the heart.The CyberHeart System is being developed specifically for use by radiation oncologists, medical physicists, electrophysiologists, and cardiac surgeons, to non-invasively treat cardiac arrhythmias.CyberHeart is an early stage, venture capital-backed medical device company founded by Dr. Thomas Fogarty and Roderick Young. The company began operations in 2006 and has been conducting pre-clinical studies that validate the feasibility of the technology. CyberHeart secured $9 million in Series A financing in November 2007.

— CrunchBase

FindMySong

FindMySong

FindMySong brings musicians from all over the world closer together. Guided by the belief that musicians deserve better technology to help them achieve success, FindMySong focuses on clarity, simplicity, and quality to provide the best online collaborative platform for music in the world. FindMySong is hand-crafted by musicians in Los Angeles to help musicians network, collaborate on projects, work safely with simple contracts, share files, and reach success in the music business. It's a strong, supportive community online built by musicians, for musicians.Created by Vincent Fong & Thomas Honeyman in Los Angeles.

— CrunchBase

GateGuru

GateGuru

GateGuru is a mobile application that provides a seamless platform to travelers to revolutionize how they experience their “day-of” travel. Web-based businesses have largely democratized the planning and booking experiences around travel, but the actual “day-of” travel is a very large, untapped market - GateGuru is leading this charge. GateGuru currently works on iOS and Android devices. The Company which is led by former venture capitalist Dan Gellert, closed their initial round of financing in May 2011. Investors in the round included Chamath Palihapitiya, Allen Morgan, Brad Harrison (BH Ventures), Tom Glocer, Matt Daimler (SeatGuru Founder), Thomas Lehrman and several other prominent angel investors.

— CrunchBase

General Electric

General Electric

The General Electric Company, or GE, is an American multinational conglomerate corporation incorporated in the State of New York. In 2009, Forbes ranked GE as the world’s largest company. The company has 304,000 employees around the world.GE is a diversified infrastructure, finance and media company taking on the world’s toughest challenges. From aircraft engines and power generation to financial services, medical imaging, and television programming, GE operates in more than 100 countries and employs about 300,000 people worldwide.GE has a strong set of global businesses in infrastructure, finance and media aligned to meet today’s needs, including the demand for global infrastructure; growing and changing demographics that need access to healthcare, finance, and information and entertainment; and environmental technologies.In 2009, GE delivered solid results despite the tough economic climate with earnings of $11.2 billion. Industrial cash flow from operating activities for the year remained strong at over $16.6 billion.GE traces its beginnings to Thomas A. Edison, who established Edison Electric Light Company in 1878. In 1892, a merger of Edison General Electric Company and Thomson-Houston Electric Company created General Electric Company. GE is the only company listed in the Dow Jones Industrial Index today that was also included in the original index in 1896.

— CrunchBase

Nimsoft

Nimsoft

Nimsoft provides Unified Monitoring from the datacenter to the cloud. Today™s business applications are running on SaaS, cloud, and managed environments, as well as in virtualized environments and the legacy datacenter. The Nimsoft Monitoring Solution (NMS) delivers the visibility needed to monitor and manage performance across all these environments"making it the one solution that can address all of today™s monitoring needs, and those arising in the future. With its combination of comprehensive coverage, ease of use, and scalability, NMS enables organizations to leverage existing and emerging technologies and services, with unprecedented agility and ROI. Nimsoft has over 1,000 customers in 36 countries. Customers include mid-market and global organizations, such as Barclays Capital, Amway Corporation, Bay Area Rapid Transit, TriNet, TRW Automotive, BrainLAB, Credit Agricole Deveurope, Health Dialog, Infospace, and SMART Technologies plus hundreds of leading managed service providers such as CDW Berbee, Easynet, Rackspace Managed Hosting, 1&1 " the world™s largest Web hosting provider, Atrion, GlassHouse Technologies, ISC IT Solutions, IT Authorities, Midwave, Securex, and Thomas Duryea. For more information, visit www.nimsoft.com.

— CrunchBase

PowerMag

PowerMag

Robert Albertson, a well-known inventor with over 200 patents and 38 successful commercial product development cycles to date, has been active in continuing the work of Dr. Nikola Tesla. Tesla's inventions, including patents for the commercial use of alternating current (AC) electricity, rivaled Albert Einstein and Thomas Edison for their accomplishments in the electrical field.

— CrunchBase

Satiety

Satiety

Satiety, Inc. is a medical device company focused on the development of less invasive devices for the treatment of obesity. Obesity is a global health problem, affecting 70 million people in the U.S. and 300 million worldwide, and growth of which is causing increases in obesity-related diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. Obesity surgery has been shown to be the only long-term effective means of weight loss for morbidly obese patients.Satiety, Inc. was founded in 2000 through a collaboration of medical device incubators Thomas Fogarty Engineering and The Foundry, and is headquartered in Palo Alto, California.

— CrunchBase

Seven Seas Water

Seven Seas Water

Seven Seas Water provides complete water and wastewater treatment services for municipal, industrial, and private clients throughout the Greater Caribbean and the Americas with a compliment of technologies for desalination, water re-use, and high purity water treatment. The Strength of Experience The company is led and managed by a team of professionals with over 350 years of combined experience in the water treatment industry. Seven Seas Water offers customized water supply and management services; typically under the client focused build own operate (BOO) arrangement. Under the BOO model Seven Seas Water provides the for the equipment capital costs, takes on all the liabilities associated with the design, construction and operation of the water facilities. Our clients enjoy a guaranteed, dependable supply of water at a fixed rate water rate.Solid Financial Backing Seven Seas Water is solidly funded by clean-tech financial investors such as Advent Morrow, Element Partners, Texas Pacific Group and Virgin Green Fund. Because Seven Seas Water does not need to seek project financing, which can cause delays, we can expedite timelines quickly and offer our services at the lowest possible cost. Leveraging our centralized management and workforce, bulk purchasing power, unrivaled experience and the most efficient and reliable designs available, Seven Seas Water is able to realize considerable savings which are then passed on to our clients.Experts in Caribbean PPP The ability of Seven Seas™ experienced & diverse team to execute and deliver reliable, affordable and environmentally sustainable solutions has resulted in the formation of several successful Private-Public-Partnerships (PPP) in the Caribbean, including the Water and Sewerage Authority of Trinidad & Tobago (WASA), the Water and Power Authority of the US Virgin Islands (WAPA) and Dutch St. Maarten™s Water and Electricity Department (GEBE). Seven Seas Water™s ability to provide cost effective solutions that meet clients needs have made Seven Seas one of the fastest growing privately owned water companies in our market.Quick Deployment Capabilities For emergency or temporary situations, Seven Seas maintains a fleet of high efficiency, containerized mobile reverse osmosis units that can be rapidly deployed for construction, maintenance, catastrophic weather events, and golf course irrigation.Seven Seas Water is headquartered in Tampa, Florida with offices and operations in Anguilla, The Bahamas, The British Virgin Islands, Mexico, Netherlands Antilles, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks and Caico™s Islands and the US Virgin Islands. For more information please visit our website at www.sevenseaswater.com or contact Lauren Thomas at T: + 1 813 855 8636 ext 1200, E: lthomas@7seaswater.com.

— CrunchBase

ShareMagnet

ShareMagnet

ShareMagnet, rewards customers for recommending and referring products and services to their friends and family across social networks. Co-founded in 2010 by Thomas Larkin and Benjamin Stewart, the Company is focused on harnessing the social media power of companies' best advertisers - their customers.Our guiding axiom is that word of mouth is the most trusted and effective form of all advertising. We believe that actual customers are the best marketers and, therefore, companies should hire them. Retailers recognize this fact, however, the significant pain in the market has been how to effectively harness the power of word of mouth, track its ROI, and create a repeatable engagement structure. ShareMagnet's application Social Rebate incentivizes customers to share products and brands on social networks after a purchase is made. This allows for effective tracking of word of mouth efforts and clearly shows the ROI.Through a simple back-end integration, requiring no up-front fees and limited time commitment for most Ecommerce sites, customers are given the opportunity to rebate their purchase by sharing and promoting what they just bought with their online friends. The application is fully integrated into all major social networks, including, Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest, and allows customers to login and post to their preferred social media site. Each click of the link made by friends and family in the network rebates a portion of the original purchase back to the original customer. The technology has a butterfly effect; secondary and tertiary purchasers can post a rebate link, too, which allows the client retailer to promote to a larger network and rebate additional customers.To date, SocialRebate has impressively shown over a 15% conversion rate for rebates posted to social media sites for participating brands. This revenue is incremental to existing marketing and customer acquisition efforts, and only costs a client (defined as a retailer who has integrated SocialRebate onto its ecommerce platform) when a purchase has been made. SocialRebate is currently installed with 100 clients, has processed over 20,000 transactions, has a 15% participation rate on referrals, and has currently developed software to integrate with the top ecommerce software platforms. The retention rate for integrated clients is over 90% and on the customer side each new rebate claimed is a new registered user waiting to be re-targeted to or syndicated. Additionally, an estimated 20% of revenue generated has been from pre-purchases of Share Magnets, including brands such as MySpace, Care.com, National Positions, Okabashi and Gazelle.com.

— CrunchBase

SIPP International Industries

SIPP International Industries

SIPP International Industries, Inc. is the holding company for “au” Le Cadeau Natural Mountain Spring Water, La BonneTable Gourmet Dinner Entrees, the Z-CAC Controlled Atmosphere Container, La Bonne Table Productions (“So You Wanna Be A Chef”), SIPP affiliated medical products, and Newport Creek Hospitality. Chef Homer Lee Thomas

— CrunchBase

SpinalMotion

SpinalMotion

SpinalMotion is dedicated to preserving motion in the spine for patients with degenerative disc disease. By developing innovative artificial discs and instrumentation, we seek to combine the kinematics of a mobile bearing design with materials designed for low wear and improved longevity. Building upon our international clinical experience since 2002, SpinalMotion obtained FDA approval to conduct lumbar and cervical artificial disc clinical trials in the United States in 2005.SpinalMotion is a private company founded in 2004 by Southern Medical, a spinal implant company in South Africa, and Thomas Weisel Healthcare partners. Three Arch Partners became an investor in 2005, and in 2006 Skyline Ventures and MedVenture Associates joined the company’s investor group.

— CrunchBase

Univision

Univision

Univision is a Spanish-language television network in the United States and Puerto Rico. It has the largest Latin American audience, largely due to repurposed telenovelas and other Mexican programs produced by Grupo Televisa. Joe Uva is the CEO of Univision Communications, Inc.Univision is headquartered now in New York City, after years of being in Los Angeles, and its major production facilities/operations are in Miami. It is available on cable in most of the country, with local stations in over 50 markets with sizeable Latino populations. Most of these stations air full local news and programming in addition to network shows. Univision’s major programming is closed-captioned in Spanish, but unlike main competitor Telemundo, it almost never provides English subtitles.The network was sold on March 12, 2006, to a consortium led by Haim Saban (who had previously owned the entity Saban Entertainment), TPG Capital, L.P., Providence Equity Partners, Madison Dearborn Partners, and Thomas H. Lee Partners for $13.7 billion or $36.25 per share plus $1.4 billion in acquired debt. The buyout left the company with a debt level of twelve times its annual cash flow, which was twice the norm in buyouts done over the previous two years.

— CrunchBase

Zooomr

Zooomr

Kristopher Tate, a 17 year old at the time, originally started Zooomr as a place for him to share photos with his friends in Japan. The site was made so it could be viewed in both English and Japanese. In April of 2006 Zooomer was relaunched and the following month digital media enthusiast Thomas Hawk was hired on as Zooomr’s CEO.Zooomr has continued to grow since then and now supports 18 localizations. For non English speakers, Zooomr may be the most compelling photo sharing option.

— CrunchBase

John Thomas

John Thomas

John C. Thomas is an American screenwriter based in California. With his brother Jim Thomas, he wrote and/or was substantially involved with the screenplays of numerous films - including Predator, The Rescue, Predator 2, Executive Decision, Wild Wild West, Mission to Mars and Behind Enemy Lines - and the short-lived TV series Hard Time on Planet Earth.

— Freebase

Hiddenite

Hiddenite

Hiddenite is an unincorporated community in east-central Alexander County, North Carolina. It is part of the Hickory–Lenoir–Morganton Metropolitan Statistical Area. The town of Hiddenite was incorporated in 1913, but its charter was repealed in 1919. Hiddenite was named for William Earl Hidden, a mineralogist sent to North Carolina by Thomas Edison to look for platinum. Hidden discovered the gem that came to be known as "hiddenite" in 1879 in mines nearby. Hiddenite is a variety of spodumene and is the only precious gemstone that cannot be synthesized. Until recently it was found only in Alexander County, North Carolina, but in recent decades it has been subsequently found in Madagascar and Brazil. The area around Hiddenite also yields emeralds, sapphires, and many other precious stones. Sluicing and digging for precious gems is a popular recreational activity that draws many visitors to the area. Prior to the arrival of W.E. Hidden, the community was known as White Plains; this is how the area appears on a map of 1871. Hiddenite was once noted as a health resort because of its sulfur springs. Hiddenite's altitude is 1,140 feet above sea level. The community is also a poultry producer. Native and lifelong resident Raeford A. Thomas is generally considered to be the unofficial "mayor" of Hiddenite.

— Freebase

Welcome Wagon

Welcome Wagon

Welcome Wagon is a business in the United States that contacts new homeowners after relocation, providing them with coupons and advertisements from local businesses. The company's full name is Welcome Wagon International, Inc. The company was founded in 1928, by Thomas Briggs in Memphis, Tennessee. Briggs later established the Thomas W. Briggs Foundation in 1957. When the company was founded, Welcome Wagon "hostesses" would visit new homeowners with a gift basket containing samples, coupons, and advertising from contributing businesses. These home visits continued for over 50 years until 1998, when then-owner Cendant laid off the "hostesses", saying that changing demographics meant few homeowners would be at home when representatives called. Welcome Wagon Canada, a separate company, continues to offer home visits. It also operates events for people planning a wedding or expecting a baby. Welcome Wagon in Canada was founded in 1930 and was run for many years by Pauline Hill, who first became a Hostess in 1953 and advanced to be head of the company as CEO. Welcome Wagon Ltd. became a wholly Canadian-owned entity in 1979 when a group of Canadian managers purchased it outright from the US owners. Currently, Welcome Wagon Ltd. is being led by its CEO, Pat Neuman and its head office is situated in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Hostesses are now known as representatives.

— Freebase

Nag Hammadi library

Nag Hammadi library

The Nag Hammadi library is a collection of Gnostic texts discovered near the Upper Egyptian town of Nag Hammadi in 1945. Twelve leather-bound papyrus codices buried in a sealed jar were found by a local peasant named Mohammed Ali Samman. The writings in these codices comprised fifty-two mostly Gnostic treatises, but they also include three works belonging to the Corpus Hermeticum and a partial translation/alteration of Plato's Republic. In his "Introduction" to The Nag Hammadi Library in English, James Robinson suggests that these codices may have belonged to a nearby Pachomian monastery, and were buried after Bishop Athanasius condemned the use of non-canonical books in his Festal Letter of 367 AD. The contents of the codices were written in the Coptic language, though the works were probably all translations from Greek. The best-known of these works is probably the Gospel of Thomas, of which the Nag Hammadi codices contain the only complete text. After the discovery, scholars recognized that fragments of these sayings attributed to Jesus appeared in manuscripts discovered at Oxyrhynchus in 1898, and matching quotations were recognized in other early Christian sources. Subsequently, a 1st or 2nd century date of composition circa 80 AD has been proposed for the lost Greek originals of the Gospel of Thomas. The buried manuscripts date from the third and fourth centuries.

— Freebase

Automatic

Automatic

Automatic is the third album by Scottish alternative rock band The Jesus and Mary Chain. The Mary Chain on this record is basically the core duo of brothers William and Jim Reid, with a drum machine providing percussion, and even a synthesizer filling in on bass guitar. The only other credited musician was Richard Thomas, who joined the touring version of the Mary Chain as a drummer. Thomas drummed on "Gimme Hell", and was a former member of Dif Juz. He also made appearances on Cocteau Twins' 1986 Victorialand LP and This Mortal Coil's 1986 Filigree & Shadow.

— Freebase

Zyzzyva

Zyzzyva

Zyzzyva is a genus of tropical American weevil often found in association with palms. It is a snouted beetle. "Zyzzyva" is the last word in many English-language dictionaries. The yellowish weevil is no longer than an ant. It was first discovered in 1922 in Brazil, and named by an Irishman Thomas Lincoln Casey, Jr. An entomologist at New York's Museum of Natural History thought that, because there was not a Latin name or Brazilian name associated with this weevil, it was probably named Zyzzyva as a practical joke to place it in a prominent ending position in many guides and manuals. Thomas Casey describes Zyzzyva ochreotecta in his book Memoirs on the Coleoptera, Volume 10: He collected only one specimen.

— Freebase

Thomas Hobbes

Thomas Hobbes

Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury, in some older texts Thomas Hobbs of Malmsbury, was an English philosopher, best known today for his work on political philosophy. His 1651 book Leviathan established the foundation for most of Western political philosophy from the perspective of social contract theory. Hobbes was a champion of absolutism for the sovereign, but he also developed some of the fundamentals of European liberal thought: the right of the individual; the natural equality of all men; the artificial character of the political order; the view that all legitimate political power must be "representative" and based on the consent of the people; and a liberal interpretation of law which leaves people free to do whatever the law does not explicitly forbid. He was one of the founders of modern political philosophy. His understanding of humans as being matter and motion, obeying the same physical laws as other matter and motion, remains influential; and his account of human nature as self-interested cooperation, and of political communities as being based upon a "social contract" remains one of the major topics of political philosophy.

— Freebase

Secularism

Secularism

Secularism is the principle of separation of government institutions, and the persons mandated to represent the State, from religious institutions and religious dignitaries. In one sense, secularism may assert the right to be free from religious rule and teachings, and the right to freedom from governmental imposition of religion upon the people within a state that is neutral on matters of belief. In another sense, it refers to the view that human activities and decisions, especially political ones, should be unbiased by religious influence. Some scholars are now arguing that the very idea of secularism will change. Secularism draws its intellectual roots from Greek and Roman philosophers such as Marcus Aurelius and Epicurus; medieval Muslim polymaths such as Ibn Rushd; Enlightenment thinkers such as Denis Diderot, Voltaire, Baruch Spinoza, John Locke, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, and Thomas Paine; and more recent freethinkers, agnostics, and atheists such as Robert Ingersoll and Bertrand Russell. The purposes and arguments in support of secularism vary widely. In European laicism, it has been argued that secularism is a movement toward modernization, and away from traditional religious values. This type of secularism, on a social or philosophical level, has often occurred while maintaining an official state church or other state support of religion. In the United States, some argue that state secularism has served to a greater extent to protect religion and the religious from governmental interference, while secularism on a social level is less prevalent. Within countries as well, differing political movements support secularism for varying reasons.

— Freebase

Anne Boleyn

Anne Boleyn

Anne Boleyn; was Queen of England from 1533 to 1536 as the second wife of King Henry VIII and Marquess of Pembroke in her own right. Henry's marriage to Anne, and her subsequent execution, made her a key figure in the political and religious upheaval that was the start of the English Reformation. Anne was the daughter of Thomas Boleyn, 1st Earl of Wiltshire, and his wife, Lady Elizabeth Howard, and was educated in the Netherlands and France, largely as a maid of honour to Claude of France. She returned to England in early 1522, in order to marry her Irish cousin James Butler, 9th Earl of Ormond; however, the marriage plans ended in failure and she secured a post at court as maid of honour to Henry VIII's wife, Catherine of Aragon. Early in 1523 there was a secret betrothal between Anne and Henry Percy, son of the 5th Earl of Northumberland. However, in January of 1524, Cardinal Thomas Wolsey broke the betrothal, Anne was sent back home to Hever Castle, and Percy was married to Lady Mary Talbot, to whom he had been betrothed since adolescence. In February/March 1526, Henry VIII began his pursuit of Anne. She resisted his attempts to seduce her, refusing to become his mistress as her sister Mary had. It soon became the one absorbing object of Henry's desires to annul his marriage to Queen Catherine so he would be free to marry Anne. When it became clear that Pope Clement VII would not annul the marriage, the breaking of the power of the Catholic Church in England began. In 1532, Henry granted her the Marquesate of Pembroke.

— Freebase

Bored!

Bored!

Bored! were an Australian punk rock band which formed in Geelong in 1987. The original line-up was Grant Gardner on bass guitar, Adrian Hann on keyboards, Justin Munday on drums, John Nolan on guitar and Dave Thomas on guitar and vocals. In 1989 Gardner was replaced by Tim Hemensley. Both Hemensley and Nolan left in 1991 to form Powder Monkeys. Bored! released four studio albums by 1993 and disbanded later that year. Thomas briefly joined Magic Dirt and subsequently has enlisted various line-ups for reformed versions of Bored! in 1998, 1999 and 2000.

— Freebase

Virgin Islands National Park

Virgin Islands National Park

The Virgin Islands National Park is a United States National Park, covering approximately 60% of the island of Saint John in the United States Virgin Islands, plus nearly all of Hassel Island, just off the Charlotte Amalie, Saint Thomas harbor. The park is famous for scuba diving and snorkeling and has miles of hiking trails through the tropical rainforest. Ferries from Red Hook and Charlotte Amalie on Saint Thomas make regular stops at Cruz Bay, Saint John, near the park, which averages about 500,000 visitors per year.

— Freebase

Doubting Thomas

Doubting Thomas

A doubting Thomas is a skeptic who refuses to believe without direct personal experience—a reference to the Apostle Thomas, who refused to believe that the resurrected Jesus had appeared to the eleven other apostles, until he could see and feel the wounds received by Jesus on the cross. In art the episode has been frequently depicted since at least the 5th century, with its depiction reflecting a range of theological interpretations.

— Freebase

United States Virgin Islands

United States Virgin Islands

The Virgin Islands of the United States are a group of islands in the Caribbean that are an insular area of the United States. The islands are geographically part of the Virgin Islands archipelago and are located in the Leeward Islands of the Lesser Antilles. The U.S. Virgin Islands consist of the main islands of Saint Croix, Saint John, and Saint Thomas, along with the much smaller but historically distinct Water Island, and many other surrounding minor islands. The total land area of the territory is 133.73 square miles. The territory's capital is Charlotte Amalie on the island of Saint Thomas. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, the population was 106,405, mostly composed by those of Afro-Caribbean descent. Tourism is the primary economic activity, although there is a significant rum manufacturing sector. Formerly the Danish West Indies, they were sold to the United States by Denmark in the Treaty of the Danish West Indies of 1916. They are classified by the UN as a Non-Self-Governing Territory, and are currently an organized, unincorporated United States territory. The U.S. Virgin Islands are organized under the 1954 Revised Organic Act of the Virgin Islands and have since held five constitutional conventions. The last and only proposed Constitution, adopted by the Fifth Constitutional Convention in 2009, was rejected by the U.S. Congress in 2010, which urged the convention to reconvene to address the concerns Congress and the Obama administration had with the proposed document. The convention reconvened in October 2012 to address these concerns, but was unable to produce a revised Constitution before its October 31 deadline.

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Hygeia

Hygeia

Hygeia was a proposed utopian community on the bank of the Ohio River on the site of present-day Ludlow, Kentucky. The land was granted to Gen. Thomas Sandford by the U.S. military in 1790. Sandford traded the land to Thomas D. Carneal, who had Elmwood Hall built in 1818 on the riverfront, then sold the land to William Bullock, a British showman, entrepreneur and traveller, owner of the Egyptian Hall in Piccadilly. Bullock proposed a planned community named Hygeia designed in Egyptian style by John Buonarotti Papworth. The speculation was not a success, although some people, including Frances Trollope, took part; Bullock sold the land to Israel L. Ludlow in 1846.

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Saint Thomas

Saint Thomas

The Brandenburg colony of St. Thomas consisted of a leased part of the Danish island of St. Thomas

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Telltale

Telltale

Telltale were a group of six musicians who regularly appeared on the first series of the British TV series Rainbow in 1972. Telltale began with Tim Thomas and Hugh Portnow who were working with the Freehold Theatre Company. In 1970, Tim concentrated on forming a group of musicians and actors, and Hugh joined him a year later. Hugh Fraser, Chris Ashley and Fluff Joinson joined later, with the final member Ted Richards joining the group in the summer of 1972. The three members of Portnow, Fraser and Thomas also wrote the theme tune to Rainbow. The group recorded a total of 14 songs for the show, including "Shapes", and "Walk in the country". The band feature on a vinyl LP album released by MFP in 1973 called Rainbow, which occasionally surfaces on sites such as eBay. After series two of the show, Telltale were replaced with singing trio Charmian, Karl and Julian in 1974. And that trio were then replaced with Rod, Jane and Matthew, the precursors to Rod, Jane and Roger and the more familiar Rod, Jane and Freddy.

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Craigenputtock

Craigenputtock

Craigenputtock is the craig/whinstone hill of the puttocks. It is the 800-acre upland farming estate in the civil parish of Dunscore in Dumfriesshire, within the District Council Region of Dumfries and Galloway. It comprises the principal residence - a two storey, 4 bedroomed Georgian Country House, 2 cottages and a farmstead, 315 acres of moorland hill rising to 1,000 ft above sea level, 350 acres of inbye ground of which 40 acres is arable/ploughable and 135 acres of woodland/forestry. It was once the residence of the well-known writer Thomas Carlyle, who wrote many famous works there. It was the property for generations of the family Welsh, and eventually that of their heiress, Jane Baillie Welsh Carlyle, which the Carlyles made their dwelling-house in 1828, where they remained for seven years, and where "Sartor Resartus" was written. The property was bequeathed by Thomas Carlyle to the Edinburgh University on his death in 1881. It is now home to the Carter-Campbell family, and managed by the C.C.C..

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Thomas Bowdler

Thomas Bowdler

Thomas Bowdler was an English physician and philanthropist, best known for publishing The Family Shakspeare, an expurgated edition of William Shakespeare's work, edited by his sister Henrietta Maria Bowdler, intended to be more appropriate for 19th century women and children than the original. Although early editions of the work were published with the spelling "Shakspeare", after Bowdler's death, later editions adopted the spelling "Shakespeare", reflecting changes in the standard spelling of Shakespeare's name. The verb bowdlerise has associated his name with the censorship not only of literature but also of motion pictures and television programmes. After several other publications, some reflecting his interest in and knowledge of continental Europe, Bowdler's last work was an expurgated version of Edward Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, published posthumously in 1826 under the supervision of his nephew and biographer, Thomas Bowdler the Younger.

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Athenaeum

Athenaeum

The Athenaeum was a literary magazine published in London from 1828 to 1921. It had a reputation for publishing the very best writers of the age. Launched in 1828 by James Silk Buckingham, it was sold within a few weeks to Frederick Maurice and John Sterling, who failed to make it profitable. In 1829, Charles Wentworth Dilke became part proprietor and editor; he greatly extended the influence of the magazine. In 1846, he resigned the editorship and assumed that of the Daily News but contributed a series of notable articles to Athenaeum. In 1846, Thomas Kibble Hervey, poet and critic, became editor until his resignation due to ill health in 1853. George Darley was a staff critic in the early years, and Gerald Massey contributed many literary reviews - mainly on poetry - during the period 1858-1868. Theodore Watts-Dunton contributed regularly as the principal critic of poetry from 1875 until 1898. Frederic George Stephens was art editor from 1851 until 1901, when he was replaced by Roger Fry because of his unfashionable hatred of Impressionism. Arthur Symons joined the staff in 1891. In the 19th century, it received contributions from Lord Kelvin. In the early 20th century, its contributors included Max Beerbohm, Edmund Blunden, T. S. Eliot, Robert Graves, Thomas Hardy, Aldous Huxley, Edith Sitwell, Julian Huxley, Katherine Mansfield, and Virginia Woolf.

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Petrichor

Petrichor

Petrichor is the scent of rain on dry earth. The word is constructed from Greek, petra, meaning stone + ichor, the fluid that flows in the veins of the gods in Greek mythology. It is defined as "the distinctive scent which accompanies the first rain after a long warm dry spell". The term was coined in 1964 by two Australian researchers, Bear and Thomas, for an article in the journal Nature. In the article, the authors describe how the smell derives from an oil exuded by certain plants during dry periods, whereupon it is absorbed by clay-based soils and rocks. During rain, the oil is released into the air along with another compound, geosmin, a metabolic by-product of bacteria, which is emitted by wet soil, producing the distinctive scent; ozone may also be present if there is lightning. In a follow-up paper, Bear and Thomas showed that the oil retards seed germination and early plant growth. This would indicate that the plants exude the oil in order to safeguard the seeds from germination under duress.

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Thomas More

Thomas More

Sir Thomas More, known to Roman Catholics as Saint Thomas More since 1935, was an English lawyer, social philosopher, author, statesman, and noted Renaissance humanist. He was an important councillor to Henry VIII of England and was Lord Chancellor from October 1529 to 16 May 1532. He was canonized by Pope Pius XI in 1935 as one of the early martyrs of the schism that separated the Church of England from Rome in the 16th century. In 2000, Pope John Paul II declared him "the heavenly Patron of Statesmen and Politicians". More was an opponent of the Protestant Reformation, in particular of Martin Luther and William Tyndale. However, since 1980, he is also commemorated by the Church of England as a reformation martyr. More coined the word "utopia" – a name he gave to the ideal and imaginary island nation, the political system of which he described in Utopia, published in 1516. He opposed the King's separation from the Roman Catholic Church and refused to accept him as Supreme Head of the Church of England, a title which had been given by parliament through the Act of Supremacy of 1534. He was imprisoned in 1534 for his refusal to take the oath required by the First Succession Act, because the act disparaged Papal Authority and Henry’s marriage to Catherine of Aragon. In 1535, he was tried for treason, convicted on perjured testimony, and beheaded.

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Train of thought

Train of thought

The train of thought, stream of thought', chain of thought or trail of thought refers to the interconnection in the sequence of ideas expressed during a connected discourse or thought, as well as the sequence itself, especially in discussion how this sequence leads from one idea to another. When a reader or listener "loses the train of thought", comprehension is lost of the expressed or unexpressed thought. The term "train of thoughts" was introduced and elaborated as early as in 1651 by Thomas Hobbes in his Leviathan, though with a somewhat different meaning: By Consequence, or train of thoughts, I understand that succession of one thought to another which is called, to distinguish it from discourse in words, mental discourse. When a man thinketh on anything whatsoever, his next thought after is not altogether so casual as it seems to be. Not every thought to every thought succeeds indifferently. — Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan, The First Part: Of Man, Chapter III: Of the Consequence or Train of Imagination

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Mignon

Mignon

Mignon is an opéra comique in three acts by Ambroise Thomas. The original French libretto was by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré, based on Goethe's novel Wilhelm Meisters Lehrjahre. The Italian version was translated by Giuseppe Zaffira. The opera is mentioned in James Joyce's "The Dead" and Willa Cather's The Professor's House. Thomas's goddaughter Mignon Nevada was named after the main character.

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Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy

Thomas Hardy, OM was an English novelist and poet. A Victorian realist, in the tradition of George Eliot, he was also influenced both in his novels and poetry by Romanticism, especially by William Wordsworth. Charles Dickens is another important influence on Thomas Hardy. Like Dickens, he was also highly critical of much in Victorian society, though Hardy focused more on a declining rural society. While Hardy wrote poetry throughout his life, and regarded himself primarily as a poet, his first collection was not published until 1898. Initially therefore he gained fame as the author of such novels as Far from the Madding Crowd, The Mayor of Casterbridge, Tess of the d'Urbervilles, and Jude the Obscure. However, since the 1950s Hardy has been recognized as a major poet, and had a significant influence on The Movement poets of the 1950s and 1960s, including Phillip Larkin. The bulk of his fictional works, initially published as serials in magazines, were set in the semi-fictional region of Wessex and explored tragic characters struggling against their passions and social circumstances. Hardy's Wessex is based on the medieval Anglo-Saxon kingdom and eventually came to include the counties of Dorset, Wiltshire, Somerset, Devon, Hampshire and much of Berkshire, in south west England.

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Map Room

Map Room

The Map Room is a room on the ground floor of the White House, the official home of the President of the United States. The Map Room takes its name from its use during World War II, when Franklin Roosevelt used it as a situation room where maps were consulted to track the war's progress. The room was originally finished as part of the extensive renovation of the White House designed by the architectural firm of McKim, Mead, and White in the administration of Theodore Roosevelt; the former basement billiard room was made into a formal space. In the Truman reconstruction of the White House, the room was paneled in the late Georgian style with wood sawn from the 1816 load-bearing timbers of the house. In the Kennedy administration the room was used by the newly created Curator of the White House as an office, used to catalog donations of furniture and objects. Under the leadership of First Lady Pat Nixon, working with Curator Clement Conger, the room underwent a major redecoration in 1970, transforming it from an office to the parlor which remains today. The room was redecorated again in 1994. The Map Room is furnished in the style of English cabinetmaker Thomas Chippendale and includes two stuffed-back armchairs that may have been built by Philadelphia cabinetmaker Thomas Affleck. Today the room is used for television interviews, small teas, and social gatherings.

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Nesbit, Northumberland

Nesbit, Northumberland

Nesbit township in Doddington parish, Northumberland, England was once the site of a medieval village. In maps published during the 17th to 19th centuries, the name of the settlement was variously spelled Nesbet, Nesbitt or Nesbit. Nesbit is near the confluence of the Glen and Till rivers and the hypothesized location of one of King Arthur's battles against invading Anglo-Saxons. Latin documentation dating to 1242 lists "Dodington cum Nesebit membro suo" as among the holdings of Baron William de Vesci. In 1346, Edward III granted land at Nesbit to Thomas Grey of Heaton after the rebellion of the previous holder, John de Trollope. Documents note the existence in 1415 of a defensive tower at Nesbit belonging to Sir Thomas Grey. However, in a 1541 survey it was observed that: During the 19th century, the township was productive farmland supporting a small community of workers. An 1855 survey of Northumberland reports as follows. Today, Nesbit is the site of a sheep farm with no visible trace of the medieval tower or village.

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Dies Irae

Dies Irae

"Dies Irae" is a thirteenth-century Latin hymn attributed to either Thomas of Celano of the Franciscan Order or to Latino Malabranca Orsini, lector at the Dominican studium at Santa Sabina, the forerunner of the Pontifical University of Saint Thomas Aquinas, Angelicum in Rome. It is a medieval Latin poem characterized by its accentual stress and its rhymed lines. The metre is trochaic. The poem describes the day of judgment, the last trumpet summoning souls before the throne of God, where the saved will be delivered and the unsaved cast into eternal flames. The hymn is best known from its use as a sequence in the Roman Catholic Requiem mass. An English version is found in various Anglican Communion missals.

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Speedwell

Speedwell

The Speedwell was a 60-ton ship, along with the Mayflower, she transported the pilgrim fathers and was the smaller of the two ships. A vessel of the same name and size traveled to the New World seventeen years prior as the flagship of the first expedition of Martin Pring. The Speedwell was built in 1577, under the name Swiftsure, as part of English preparations for war against Spain. She participated in the fight against the Spanish Armada, and during the Earl of Essex' 1596 Azores expedition she served as the ship of his second in command, Sir Gilly Merick. After hostilities with Spain ended, she was decommissioned in 1605, and renamed the Speedwell. The Leiden Separatists bought or leased the ship Speedwell in Holland, and are said to have boarded it on 1 August at Delfshaven under the command of Captain John Thomas Chappell. They then sailed to Southampton, England to meet the sister ship, Mayflower, which had been chartered by the merchant investors. In Southampton they joined with other Separatists and the additional colonists hired by the investors. The two ships began the voyage on August 5, 1620, but the Speedwell was found to be taking on water, and the two ships put into Dartmouth for repairs. On the second attempt, Mayflower and Speedwell sailed about 100 leagues beyond Land's End in Cornwall, but the Speedwell was again found to be taking on water. Both vessels returned to Plymouth. The Separatists decided to go on to America on the Mayflower. It is not known if the Speedwell returned to Holland or was sold in England. At least two of its passengers, Thomas Blossom and a son, returned to Leiden.

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Thomas Mann

Thomas Mann

Thomas Mann was a German novelist, short story writer, social critic, philanthropist, essayist, and 1929 Nobel laureate, known for his series of highly symbolic and ironic epic novels and novellas, noted for their insight into the psychology of the artist and the intellectual. His analysis and critique of the European and German soul used modernized German and Biblical stories, as well as the ideas of Goethe, Nietzsche, and Schopenhauer. Mann was a member of the Hanseatic Mann family, and portrayed his own family and social class in the novel Buddenbrooks. His older brother was the radical writer Heinrich Mann, and three of his six children, Erika Mann, Klaus Mann and Golo Mann, also became important German writers. When Hitler came to power in 1933, Mann fled to Switzerland. When World War II broke out in 1939, he emigrated to the United States, whence he returned to Switzerland in 1952. Thomas Mann is one of the best-known exponents of the so-called Exilliteratur.

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Bessemer process

Bessemer process

The Bessemer process was the first inexpensive industrial process for the mass-production of steel from molten pig iron prior to the open hearth furnace. The process is named after its inventor, Henry Bessemer, who took out a patent on the process in 1855. The process was independently discovered in 1851 by William Kelly. The process had also been used outside of Europe for hundreds of years, but not on an industrial scale. The key principle is removal of impurities from the iron by oxidation with air being blown through the molten iron. The oxidation also raises the temperature of the iron mass and keeps it molten. The process using a basic refractory lining is known as the basic Bessemer process or Gilchrist-Thomas process after the discoverer Sidney Gilchrist Thomas.

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Thieves

Thieves

Thieves is a play by Herb Gardner. Its focus is on Martin and Sally Cramer, whose twelve-year marriage slowly is disintegrating. He has become the stuffy headmaster of a fashionable Manhattan private school, while she clings to her dedication to the underprivileged and continues to teach in a ghetto public school. For him, their new high-rise apartment is a sign of their steady upward mobility; she is so unhappy with his need to earn and spend she moves all the antique furniture he has purchased to their first apartment on the Lower East Side. The growing chasm between them isn't helped by individual one-night stands, an unwanted pregnancy and consequent contemplation of abortion, an attempted mugging, and her racist cab driver father Joe Kaminsky. After twelve previews, the Broadway production, directed by Charles Grodin, opened on April 7, 1974 at the Broadhurst Theatre and later transferred to the Longacre to complete its 313-performance run. The cast included Richard Mulligan as Martin, Marlo Thomas as Sally, and Irwin Corey as Joe, with William Hickey and Dick Van Patten in supporting roles. In 1977, Gardner adapted his play for a feature film directed by John Berry. Thomas and Corey reprised their stage roles for the Paramount Pictures release, with Charles Grodin as Martin and Hector Elizondo, Mercedes McCambridge, John McMartin, Gary Merrill, and Bob Fosse in supporting roles.

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