Definitions containing müller, johannes von

We've found 250 definitions:

Mullerian

Mullerian

of, pertaining to, or discovered by, Johannes Muller

— Webster Dictionary

Johann Muller

Johann Muller

Gysbert Johannes Muller, more commonly known as Johann Muller, is a South African Rugby Union player. He played lock for the Natal Sharks, Sharks in and the Springboks, before a move to Northern Ireland to play with Ulster in 2010, where he is currently team captain.

— Freebase

Regiomontanus

Regiomontanus

Johannes Müller von Königsberg, today best known by the Latin epithet Regiomontanus, was a German mathematician, astronomer, astrologer, translator, instrument maker and Catholic bishop. He was born in the Franconian village of Unfinden — not in the more famous East-Prussian Königsberg. He was also known as Johannes der Königsberger. His writings were published under the name of Joannes de Monte Regio, a Latinized version of his name. Both names mean "John of King's Mountain". The name "Regiomontanus" was first coined by Phillip Melanchthon in 1534, fifty-eight years after Regiomontanus' death.

— Freebase

Johannes Peter Müller

Johannes Peter Müller

Johannes Peter Müller, was a German physiologist, comparative anatomist, ichthyologist, and herpetologist, known not only for his discoveries but also for his ability to synthesize knowledge.

— Freebase

Joe

Joe

see Johannes

— Webster Dictionary

Hyalite

Hyalite

Hyalite is a form of opal with a glassy and clear appearance which exhibits an internal play of colors and has natural inclusions. It is also called Muller's glass, water opal and jalite. Its Mohs hardness is 5.5 to 6 and it has a specific gravity of 2.1. It is an amorphous form of silica. Its has a conchoidal fracture, a vitreous luster and a white streak. It is sometimes mistaken for resin opal, since they both look like little globs. It glows bright green under blacklight. The name Müller's glass derived from the name of its discoverer, Franz-Joseph Müller von Reichenstein

— Freebase

Ku00E1rmu00E1n vortex street

Ku00E1rmu00E1n vortex street

A Von Ku00E1rmu00E1n vortex street.

— Wiktionary

johanneses

johanneses

Plural form of johannes.

— Wiktionary

Rydberg

Rydberg

Johannes Rydberg, Swedish physicist.

— Wiktionary

Rhinoptera

Rhinoptera

Rhinoptera is a genus of eagle rays, family Myliobatidae, commonly known as the cownose rays It contains the following species: ⁕Rhinoptera adspersa J. P. Müller & Henle, 1841 ⁕Rhinoptera bonasus ⁕Rhinoptera brasiliensis J. P. Müller, 1836 ⁕Rhinoptera javanica J. P. Müller & Henle, 1841 ⁕Rhinoptera jayakari Boulenger, 1895 ⁕Rhinoptera marginata ⁕Rhinoptera neglecta J. D. Ogilby, 1912 ⁕Rhinoptera steindachneri Evermann & O. P. Jenkins, 1891

— Freebase

01

01

Released in 2001,´01 is the seventh solo album by the Slovak singer Richard Müller. Müller wrote most of the lyrics and, due to the death of his favourite composer Jaro Filip, Müller also composed half of the music. The album was critically well received, and placed at number 9 in the Czech musicserver.cz's list of the 25 best Czech and Slovak albums of the decade.

— Freebase

Joh

Joh

A diminutive form of the male given name Johannes.

— Wiktionary

Hyalite

Hyalite

a pellucid variety of opal in globules looking like colorless gum or resin; -- called also Muller's glass

— Webster Dictionary

Keplerian

Keplerian

Of or pertaining to Johannes Kepler, German astronomer and mathematician.

— Wiktionary

kepler's law

Kepler's law, Kepler's law of planetary motion

(astronomy) one of three empirical laws of planetary motion stated by Johannes Kepler

— Princeton's WordNet

kepler's law of planetary motion

Kepler's law, Kepler's law of planetary motion

(astronomy) one of three empirical laws of planetary motion stated by Johannes Kepler

— Princeton's WordNet

The Mission

The Mission

The Mission: Memory of a Revolution, also known as The Task, is a postmodern drama by the German playwright Heiner Müller. The play was written and first published in 1979. Müller and his wife Ginka Cholakova co-directed its first theatrical production in 1980, at the intimate 'Theatre im 3.Stock' studio space of the Volksbühne in Berlin. Müller also directed a full-house production in 1982 at the Bochum Theatre in West Germany.

— Freebase

Clausewitzian

Clausewitzian

Adhering to or described by the military theory of Carl von Clausewitz.

— Wiktionary

Misesian

Misesian

A person who substantially agrees with the economic analyses of Ludwig von Mises.

— Wiktionary

Müller

Müller

Unternehmensgruppe Theo Müller is a multinational producer of dairy products, with a headquarters in Fischach in the German state of Bavaria. Müller made a net turnover of €2.1 billion in 2006 and has 5,400 employees.

— Freebase

Henotheism

Henotheism

Henotheism is the belief and worship of a single god while accepting the existence or possible existence of other deities that may also be worshipped. The term was originally coined by Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling to depict early stages of monotheism, however Max Müller, a German philologist and orientalist, brought the term into common usage. Müller made the term central to his criticism of Western theological and religious exceptionalism, focusing on a cultural dogma which held "monotheism" to be both fundamentally well-defined and inherently superior to differing conceptions of God.

— Freebase

Linnean

Linnean

of, or relating to Carl von Linnu00E9, Swedish nobleman, born as Carolus Linnaeus: "the Linnean Society".

— Wiktionary

von Willebrand Disease, Type 1

von Willebrand Disease, Type 1

A subtype of von Willebrand disease that results from a partial deficiency of VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

copper captain

copper captain

A Brummagem captain; a person with an artificial title of captain; a General von Poffenburgh.

— Wiktionary

Schwenkfeldian

Schwenkfeldian

a member of a religious sect founded by Kaspar von Schwenkfeld, a Silesian reformer who disagreed with Luther, especially on the deification of the body of Christ

— Webster Dictionary

Christianopolis

Christianopolis

A proposed utopian society proposed by Johannes Valentinus Andreae in the 17th century.

— Wiktionary

von Willebrand Disease, Type 3

von Willebrand Disease, Type 3

A subtype of von Willebrand disease that results from a total or near total deficiency of VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Bismarck

Bismarck

Otto von Bismarck, one of the prominent German statesmen of the nineteenth century.

— Wiktionary

Gutenbergian

Gutenbergian

Of or pertaining to Johannes Gutenberg (c. 1398u20131468), inventor of the European technology of printing with movable type.

— Wiktionary

Culcita

Culcita

Culcita is a genus of cushion stars. They are found in tropical waters. Some are kept in home aquaruims. The genus contains three species: ⁕Culcita coriacea Müller & Troschel, 1842 ⁕Culcita novaeguineae Müller & Troschel, 1842 ⁕Culcita schmideliana

— Freebase

Gutenberg

Gutenberg

Johannes Gutenberg, a German printer who independently invented movable type (though it had previously been invented in East Asia centuries earlier).

— Wiktionary

von Willebrand Disease, Type 2

von Willebrand Disease, Type 2

A subtype of von Willebrand disease that results from qualitative deficiencies of VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR. The subtype is divided into several variants with each variant having a distinctive pattern of PLATELET-interaction.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Purkinjean

Purkinjean

Of or pertaining to Jan Evangelista Purkynu011B (Johannes Evangelists Purkinje, 1787-1869), Czech anatomist and physiologist, or to his discoveries.

— Wiktionary

Max Müller

Max Müller

Friedrich Max Müller, generally known as Max Müller, was a German-born philologist and Orientalist, who lived and studied in Britain for most of his life. He was one of the founders of the western academic field of Indian studies and the discipline of comparative religion. Müller wrote both scholarly and popular works on the subject of Indology and the Sacred Books of the East, a 50-volume set of English translations, was prepared under his direction. He also put forward and promoted the idea of a Turanian family of languages and Turanian people.

— Freebase

Kathenotheism

Kathenotheism

Kathenotheism is a term coined by the philologist Max Müller to mean the worship of one god at a time. It is closely related to henotheism. Müller coined the term in reference to the Vedas; where he explained each deity is treated as supreme in turn.

— Freebase

Felix Weingartner

Felix Weingartner

Paul Felix von Weingartner, Edler von Münzberg was an Austrian conductor, composer and pianist.

— Freebase

bismarckian

Bismarckian

of or relating to Prince Otto von Bismarck or his accomplishments

— Princeton's WordNet

Rothschild, Meyer Amschel

Rothschild, Meyer Amschel

the founder of the celebrated banking business, born at Frankfort-on-the-Main, a Jew by birth; began his career as a money-lender and made a large fortune (1743-1812); left five sons, who were all made barons of the Austrian empire—Amselm von R., eldest, head of the house at Frankfort (1773-1855); Solomon von R., the second, head of the Vienna house (1774-1855); Nathan von R., the third, head of the London house (1777-1836); Karl von R., the fourth, head of the house at Naples (1755-1855); and Jacob von R., the fifth, head of the Paris house (1792-1868).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

von Willebrand Factor

von Willebrand Factor

A high-molecular-weight plasma protein, produced by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, that is part of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex. The von Willebrand factor has receptors for collagen, platelets, and ristocetin activity as well as the immunologically distinct antigenic determinants. It functions in adhesion of platelets to collagen and hemostatic plug formation. The prolonged bleeding time in VON WILLEBRAND DISEASES is due to the deficiency of this factor.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Hermann Joseph Muller

Hermann Joseph Muller

Hermann Joseph Muller was an American geneticist, educator, and Nobel laureate best known for his work on the physiological and genetic effects of radiation as well as his outspoken political beliefs. Muller frequently warned of the long-term dangers of radioactive fallout from nuclear war and nuclear testing, helping to raise public awareness in this area.

— Freebase

sir charles william siemens

Siemens, Karl Wilhelm Siemens, Sir Charles William Siemens

engineer who was a brother of Ernst Werner von Siemens and who moved to England (1823-1883)

— Princeton's WordNet

siemens

Siemens, Karl Wilhelm Siemens, Sir Charles William Siemens

engineer who was a brother of Ernst Werner von Siemens and who moved to England (1823-1883)

— Princeton's WordNet

karl wilhelm siemens

Siemens, Karl Wilhelm Siemens, Sir Charles William Siemens

engineer who was a brother of Ernst Werner von Siemens and who moved to England (1823-1883)

— Princeton's WordNet

richard strauss

Strauss, Richard Strauss

German composer of many operas; collaborated with librettist Hugo von Hoffmannsthal to produce several operas (1864-1949)

— Princeton's WordNet

strauss

Strauss, Richard Strauss

German composer of many operas; collaborated with librettist Hugo von Hoffmannsthal to produce several operas (1864-1949)

— Princeton's WordNet

dietrich

Dietrich, Marlene Dietrich, Maria Magdalene von Losch

United States film actress (born in Germany) who made many films with Josef von Sternberg and later was a successful cabaret star (1901-1992)

— Princeton's WordNet

marlene dietrich

Dietrich, Marlene Dietrich, Maria Magdalene von Losch

United States film actress (born in Germany) who made many films with Josef von Sternberg and later was a successful cabaret star (1901-1992)

— Princeton's WordNet

maria magdalene von losch

Dietrich, Marlene Dietrich, Maria Magdalene von Losch

United States film actress (born in Germany) who made many films with Josef von Sternberg and later was a successful cabaret star (1901-1992)

— Princeton's WordNet

Jan Davidsz. de Heem

Jan Davidsz. de Heem

Jan Davidsz. de Heem or in-full Jan Davidszoon de Heem, also called Johannes de Heem or Johannes van Antwerpen, was a still life painter who was active in Utrecht and Antwerp. He is a major representative of that genre in both Dutch and Flemish Baroque painting.

— Freebase

Geiger counter

Geiger counter

A Geiger–Müller counter, also called a Geiger counter, is a type of particle detector that measures ionizing radiation. It detects the emission of nuclear radiation — alpha particles, beta particles, or gamma rays — by the ionization produced in a low-pressure gas in a Geiger–Müller tube, which gives its name to the instrument. In wide and prominent use as a hand-held radiation survey instrument, it is perhaps society's best-known radiation instrument. The original operating principle was discovered in 1908 in early radiation research. Since the subsequent development of the Geiger-Müller tube in 1928 the Geiger-Müller counter has been a popular instrument for use in radiation dosimetry, health physics, experimental physics, the nuclear industry, geological exploration and other fields, due to its robust sensing element and relatively low cost. However there are limitations in measuring high radiation rates and in measuring the energy of incident radiation.

— Freebase

Affentheater

Affentheater

Affentheater is a musical album by Marius Müller-Westernhagen.

— Freebase

von neumann machine

von Neumann machine

any digital computer incorporating the ideas of stored programs and serial counters that were proposed in 1946 by von Neumann and his colleagues

— Princeton's WordNet

Nahaufnahme

Nahaufnahme

Nahaufnahme is a 2005 studio album by Marius Müller-Westernhagen.

— Freebase

Hans Geiger

Hans Geiger

Johannes "Hans" Wilhelm Geiger was a German physicist. He is perhaps best known as the co-inventor of the Geiger counter and for the Geiger-Marsden experiment which discovered the Atomic nucleus. Geiger was born at Neustadt-an-der-Haardt, Germany. He was one of five children born to the Indologist Wilhelm Ludwig Geiger, who was professor at the University of Erlangen. In 1902, Geiger started studying physics and mathematics in University of Erlangen and was awarded a doctorate in 1906. In 1907 he began work with Ernest Rutherford at the University of Manchester and in 1909, along with Ernest Marsden, conducted the famous Geiger-Marsden experiment called the "gold foil experiment". Together they created the Geiger counter. In 1911 Geiger and John Mitchell Nuttall discovered the Geiger-Nuttall law and performed experiments that led to Rutherford's atomic model. In 1928 Geiger and his student Walther Müller created an improved version of the Geiger counter, the Geiger-Müller counter. Geiger also worked with James Chadwick. In 1912 he became leader of the Physical-Technical Reichsanstalt in Berlin, 1925 professor in Kiel, 1929 in Tübingen, and from 1936 in Berlin.

— Freebase

battle of the bulge

Battle of the Ardennes Bulge, Battle of the Bulge, Ardennes counteroffensive

a battle during World War II; in December 1944 von Rundstedt launched a powerful counteroffensive in the forest at Ardennes and caught the Allies by surprise

— Princeton's WordNet

battle of the ardennes bulge

Battle of the Ardennes Bulge, Battle of the Bulge, Ardennes counteroffensive

a battle during World War II; in December 1944 von Rundstedt launched a powerful counteroffensive in the forest at Ardennes and caught the Allies by surprise

— Princeton's WordNet

ardennes counteroffensive

Battle of the Ardennes Bulge, Battle of the Bulge, Ardennes counteroffensive

a battle during World War II; in December 1944 von Rundstedt launched a powerful counteroffensive in the forest at Ardennes and caught the Allies by surprise

— Princeton's WordNet

Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher

Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher

Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher, Fürst von Wahlstatt, Graf, later elevated to Fürst von Wahlstatt, was a Prussian Generalfeldmarschall who led his army against Napoleon I at the Battle of the Nations at Leipzig in 1813 and at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815 with the Duke of Wellington. The honorary citizen of Berlin, Hamburg and Rostock bore the nickname "Marschall Vorwärts" because of his approach to warfare.

— Freebase

Linnaeus

Linnaeus

Carl (or the latinized Carolus) Linnaeus, also known as Carl von Linnu00E9, Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. He is known as the "father of modern taxonomy."

— Wiktionary

Von Neumann entropy

Von Neumann entropy

In quantum statistical mechanics, von Neumann entropy, named after John von Neumann, is the extension of classical entropy concepts to the field of quantum mechanics. For a quantum-mechanical system described by a density matrix ρ, the von Neumann entropy is where tr denotes the trace. If ρ is written in terms of its eigenvectors |1〉, |2〉, |3〉, ... as then the von Neumann entropy is In this form, S can be seen to be related to the Shannon entropy.

— Freebase

vascular hemophilia

von Willebrand's disease, angiohemophilia, vascular hemophilia

a form of hemophilia discovered by Erik von Willebrand; a genetic disorder that is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait; characterized by a deficiency of the coagulation factor and by mucosal bleeding

— Princeton's WordNet

angiohemophilia

von Willebrand's disease, angiohemophilia, vascular hemophilia

a form of hemophilia discovered by Erik von Willebrand; a genetic disorder that is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait; characterized by a deficiency of the coagulation factor and by mucosal bleeding

— Princeton's WordNet

von willebrand's disease

von Willebrand's disease, angiohemophilia, vascular hemophilia

a form of hemophilia discovered by Erik von Willebrand; a genetic disorder that is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait; characterized by a deficiency of the coagulation factor and by mucosal bleeding

— Princeton's WordNet

German Catholics

German Catholics

The German Catholics were a schismatic sect formed in December 1844 by German dissidents from the Roman Catholic Church, under the leadership of Johannes Ronge. The movement originated in Breslau. They were joined for a time by somewhat more conservative dissidents under the leadership of Johannes Czerski. This latter movement took the name of Christian Catholics and originated in Schneidemühl.

— Freebase

Cancridae

Cancridae

Cancridae is a family of crabs. It comprises six extant genera, and eleven exclusively fossil genera, in two subfamilies: Cancrinae Latreille, 1802 ⁕Anatolikos Schweitzer & Feldmann, 2000 ⁕†Anisospinos Schweitzer & Feldmann, 2000 ⁕Cancer Linnaeus, 1758 ⁕†Ceronnectes De Angeli & Beschin, 1998 ⁕†Cyclocancer Beurlen, 1958 ⁕Glebocarcinus Nations, 1975 ⁕Metacarcinus A. Milne-Edwards, 1862 ⁕†Microdium Reuss, 1867 ⁕†Notocarcinus Schweitzer & Feldmann, 2000 ⁕Platepistoma Rathbun, 1906 ⁕Romaleon Gistel, 1848 ⁕†Santeecarcinus Blow & Manning, 1996 ⁕†Sarahcarcinus Blow & Manning, 1996 †Lobocarcininae Beurlen, 1930 ⁕†Lobocarcinus Reuss, 1857 ⁕†Miocyclus Müller, 1978 ⁕†Tasadia Müller in Janssen & Müller, 1984 Before 2000, the extant species were all placed in a single genus, but in that year Carrie Schweitzer and Rodney Feldmann elevated the existing subgenera to the rank of genus, and described three additional genera. Most of the family's current diversity is found in temperate waters of the Northern Hemisphere.

— Freebase

Sickingen, Franz von

Sickingen, Franz von

a German free-lance, a man of a knightly spirit and great prowess; had often a large following, Götz von Berlichingen of the number, and joined the cause of the Reformation; lost his life by a musket-shot when besieged in the castle of Landstuhl; he was a warm friend of Ulrich von Hutten (1481-1523).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Odic force

Odic force

The Odic force is the name given in the mid-19th century to a hypothetical vital energy or life force by Baron Carl von Reichenbach. Von Reichenbach coined the name from that of the Norse god Odin in 1845.

— Freebase

Leo von Klenze

Leo von Klenze

Leo von Klenze was a German neoclassicist architect, painter and writer. Court architect of Bavarian King Ludwig I, Leo von Klenze was one of the most prominent representatives of Greek revival style.

— Freebase

Weibel-Palade Bodies

Weibel-Palade Bodies

Rod-shaped storage granules for VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR specific to endothelial cells.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Illuminate

Illuminate

Illuminate is a successful German Gothic music band from Karlsruhe formed in 1993 by Johannes Berthold.

— Freebase

Dishonored

Dishonored

Dishonored is a 1931 romantic spy film made by Paramount Pictures. It was co-written, directed and edited by Josef von Sternberg. The costume design was by Travis Banton. The film stars Marlene Dietrich, Victor McLaglen, Gustav von Seyffertitz and Warner Oland.

— Freebase

Iron Hand

Iron Hand

Goetz von Berlichingen (q. v.).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

von

von

In German, von is a preposition which approximately means of or from. When it is used as a part of a German family name, it is usually a nobiliary particle, like the French, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese de. At certain times and places, it has been illegal for anyone who was not a member of the nobility to use von before the family name. However, in Northern Germany and Switzerland the von particle is still a common part of surnames and is widely used also by commoners, whereas in the Middle Ages this was common practice in all German-speaking areas; thus, "Hans von Duisburg" meant Hans from [the city of] Duisburg. The Dutch van, which is a cognate of von but does not indicate nobility, can be said to have preserved this meaning.

— Freebase

Eleven

Eleven

Eleven was a hard rock band from Los Angeles, California, formed in 1990 by Alain Johannes, Natasha Shneider, and Jack Irons.

— Freebase

Erik Adolf von Willebrand

Erik Adolf von Willebrand

Erik Adolf von Willebrand was an internist from Finland. The son of a district engineer in Vaasa, von Willebrand got his medical degree in the University of Helsinki. He graduated in 1896, and did his doctoral thesis on the changes that occurred in blood following significant blood loss. For the remainder of his professional career, the properties of blood and its coagulation continued to be the focus of his interest. Von Willebrand was the first to describe the blood coagulation disorder later named for him, von Willebrand disease. The condition first aroused his interest in the case of a 5-year-old girl from Åland with an extensive history of bleeding in her family. Mapping her family history, von Willebrand found 23 of the girl's 66 family members were affected, and that the disease was more common in women. In his personal life, von Willebrand was described as a very modest man. He also published two papers concerning the use of hot air as a form of medical treatment.

— Freebase

Winterreise

Winterreise

Winterreise is a song cycle for voice and piano by Franz Schubert, a setting of 24 poems by Wilhelm Müller. It is the second of Schubert's two great song cycles on Müller's poems, the earlier being Die schöne Müllerin. Both were originally written for tenor voice but are frequently transposed to suit other vocal ranges - the precedent being established by Schubert himself. These two works have posed interpretative demands on listeners and performers due to their scale and structural coherence. Although Ludwig van Beethoven's cycle An die ferne Geliebte had been published earlier, in 1816, Schubert's two cycles hold the foremost place in the history of the genre.

— Freebase

Vaesite

Vaesite

Vaesite is a mineral found together with cattierite in the Democratic Republic of Congo. It is named after Johannes F. Vaes, a Belgian mineralologist.

— Freebase

Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein

Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Protein

A ubiquitin-protein ligase that mediates OXYGEN-dependent polyubiquitination of HYPOXIA-INDUCIBLE FACTOR 1, ALPHA SUBUNIT. It is inactivated in VON HIPPEL-LINDAU SYNDROME.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Steve von Till

Steve von Till

Steve von Till is best known as singer and guitarist for the atmospheric metal band Neurosis, replacing Chad Salter in 1989. He is also in Tribes of Neurot and Culper Ring, and records solo work under both his given name and the moniker Harvestman. His solo albums are composed of original songs and traditional folk arrangements, using minimalistic acoustic guitar and vocal styles. Outside his semi-professional role as a musician, he works as an elementary school teacher. His father, Steven von Till, Sr, is a civil attorney in the San Francisco Bay Area. His mother, Beth von Till, is a communications professor at San Jose State University. He resides with his wife Niela and his kids in Idaho.

— Freebase

Imigrante

Imigrante

Imigrante is a city in Rio Grande do Sul, located in south Brazil, situated in the state's Taquari Valley region. It was established by German and Italian immigrants. Imigrante calls itself, Terra do Cactos, or Land of the Cactus. The city is 100 m above sea level. Its climate is subtropical. Imigrante's economy centers on the metallurgy industry. The mayor is Paulo Gilberto Altmann, of the PP party. ⁕ Rosenthal Cascade. ⁕ Dr. Ito Snell Main Street, Arroio da Seca Neighbourhood. ⁕ Johannes Fells, 539m. ⁕ Johannes Fells, 539m. ⁕ Daltro Filho Neighbourhood, and the Boa Vista 37 Mountain. ⁕ Arroio da Seca Valley.

— Freebase

Browallia

Browallia

Browallia is a genus of Solanaceae family. It is named after Johannes Browallius, also known as Johan Browall, a Swedish botanist, physician and bishop.

— Freebase

Lunik

Lunik

Lunik is a band from Switzerland. There are currently three members. Lunik started in 1997 with Adi Amstutz, Luk Zimmermann, Mats Marti, Walo Müller and Anton Höglhammer. Singer Jaël joined the band in 1998 and Anton Höglhammer left the line-up. 1999 saw the release of their debut album Rumour, recorded largely in an atmospheric trip hop style. Bassist Walo Müller left the band after the accompanying tour, and the second album Ahead saw the band steering towards a pop sound. Oli Müller supported the band as bassist in the live performances, and Adi Amstutz left the band. The third album Weather was a huge success in Switzerland, with an acoustic approach from Jaël, Luk, and Mats replacing the electronica of the earlier albums. Cédric Monnier and Jacob Suske joined the band as supporting players on the acoustic tour for Weather. A live album, Life is On Our Side, appeared in 2004. Cédric Monnier and Jacob Suske joined the official line-up in 2005, and Mats Marti departed at the same time. In the beginning of 2006, Chrigel Bosshard joined Lunik as the new drummer, but left the band at the end of 2011. Jacob Suske left the band again in September 2008.

— Freebase

Chorology

Chorology

Chorology can mean ⁕the study of the causal relations between geographical phenomena occurring within a particular region ⁕the study of the spatial distribution of organisms. In geography, the term was first used by Strabo. In the twentieth century, Richard Hartshorne worked on that notion again. The term was popularized by Ferdinand von Richthofen, uncle of Manfred von Richthofen.

— Freebase

Pandectists

Pandectists

Pandectists were German university legal scholars in the early 19th century who studied and taught Roman law as a model of what they called Konstruktionsjurisprudenz as codified in the Pandects of Justinian. Beginning in the mid-19th century, the Pandectists were attacked in arguments by noted jurists Julius Hermann von Kirchmann and Rudolf von Jhering who favored a modern approach of law as a practical means to an end. In the United States, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. and other legal realists pushed for laws based on what judges and the courts actually did, rather than the historical and conceptual or academic law of Friedrich Carl von Savigny and the Pandectists.

— Freebase

Peter von Cornelius

Peter von Cornelius

Peter von Cornelius was a German painter.

— Freebase

Von Hippel-Lindau disease

Von Hippel-Lindau disease

Von Hippel–Lindau disease is a rare, autosomal dominant genetic condition that predisposes individuals to benign and malignant tumours. The most common tumours found in VHL are central nervous system and retinal hemangioblastomas, clear cell renal carcinomas, pheochromocytomas, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, pancreatic cysts, endolymphatic sac tumors and epididymal papillary cystadenomas. VHL results from a mutation in the von Hippel–Lindau tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 3p25.3.

— Freebase

Fenris

Fenris

Fenris are two fictional characters from the Marvel Comics universe, namely German twins Andrea and Andreas von Strucker. They are the children of supervillain Baron Wolfgang von Strucker of HYDRA and the half-brother of Werner von Strucker. Andrea is female, Andreas is male. They first appeared in Uncanny X-Men #194 as Andrea and Andreas and were first called Fenris in Uncanny X-Men #200. They were created by Chris Claremont and John Romita, Jr. Fenris is also the name of the terrorist organization the two are head of, which is made up of armored soldiers based on technology developed by HYDRA.

— Freebase

Receptors, Vitronectin

Receptors, Vitronectin

Receptors such as INTEGRIN ALPHAVBETA3 that bind VITRONECTIN with high affinity and play a role in cell migration. They also bind FIBRINOGEN; VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR; osteopontin; and THROMBOSPONDINS.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Nicht Von Schlechten Eltern

Nicht Von Schlechten Eltern

Nicht von schlechten Eltern is a German television series.

— Freebase

Joseph Joachim

Joseph Joachim

Joseph Joachim was a Hungarian violinist, conductor, composer and teacher. A close collaborator of Johannes Brahms, he is widely regarded as one of the most significant violinists of the 19th century.

— Freebase

Smoke Stack

Smoke Stack

Smoke Stack is a studio album by jazz pianist Andrew Hill, recorded in 1963 and released in 1966 on the Blue Note Records label. It was his second recording as leader on the record label. "Ode to Von" is dedicated to saxophonist Von Freeman, whilst "Verne" is dedicated to Hill's first wife, Laverne Gillette. The album is notable for its use of two basses playing contemporaneously.

— Freebase

Haym, Rudolf

Haym, Rudolf

professor of Philosophy at Halle; wrote biographies of Hegel, W. von Humboldt, and Schopenhauer; b. 1821.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Field emission microscopy

Field emission microscopy

Field emission microscopy is an analytical technique used in materials science to investigate molecular surface structures and their electronic properties. Invented by Erwin Wilhelm Müller in 1936, the FEM was one of the first surface analysis instruments that approached near-atomic resolution.

— Freebase

Franz von Lenbach

Franz von Lenbach

Franz von Lenbach was a German painter of Realist style.

— Freebase

netiquette

netiquette

[Coined by Chuq von Rospach c.1983] [portmanteau, network + etiquette] The conventions of politeness recognized on Usenet, such as avoidance of cross-posting to inappropriate groups and refraining from commercial pluggery outside the biz groups.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Iduna

Iduna

Iduna was an important literary association founded in May 1891 by a circle of writers around Fritz Lemmermayer. Lemmermayer acted as a sort of "middle man" between an older generation of authors and a group of younger writers and thinkers. The society had the descriptive subtitle of "Free German Society for Literature". The name Iduna was provided by Guido von List himself and is that of a North Germanic goddess of eternal youth and renewal. Richard von Kralik and Joseph Kalasanz Poestion, authors with specifically neo-Germanic leanings, where also involved in the circle. The circle dissolved in 1893 when the 'Literarische Donaugesellschaft' grew out of its ashes and was founded by Guido von List and Fanny Wschiansky.

— Freebase

Furin

Furin

A proprotein convertase with specificity for the proproteins of PROALBUMIN; COMPLEMENT 3C; and VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR. It has specificity for cleavage near paired ARGININE residues that are separated by two amino acids.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Sextans

Sextans

Sextans is a minor equatorial constellation which was introduced in 1687 by Johannes Hevelius. Its name is Latin for the astronomical sextant, an instrument that Hevelius made frequent use of in his observations.

— Freebase

Von Neumann architecture

Von Neumann architecture

The term Von Neumann architecture, also known as the Von Neumann model or the Princeton architecture, derives from a 1945 computer architecture description by the mathematician and early computer scientist John von Neumann and others, First Draft of a Report on the EDVAC. This describes a design architecture for an electronic digital computer with subdivisions of a processing unit consisting of an arithmetic logic unit and processor registers, a control unit containing an instruction register and program counter, a memory to store both data and instructions, external mass storage, and input and output mechanisms. The meaning of the term has evolved to mean a stored-program computer in which an instruction fetch and a data operation cannot occur at the same time because they share a common bus. This is referred to as the Von Neumann bottleneck and often limits the performance of the system. The design of a Von Neumann architecture is simpler than the more modern Harvard architecture which is also a stored-program system but has one dedicated set of address and data buses for reading data from and writing data to memory, and another set of address and data buses for fetching instructions.

— Freebase

Albrecht von Haller

Albrecht von Haller

Albrecht von Haller was a Swiss anatomist, physiologist, naturalist and poet.

— Freebase

Integrin alpha2

Integrin alpha2

An integrin alpha subunit that primarily combines with INTEGRIN BETA1 to form the INTEGRIN ALPHA2BETA1 heterodimer. It contains a domain which has homology to collagen-binding domains found in von Willebrand factor.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

app2you

app2you

app2you provides a web service that enables anyone to create their own custom, hosted, interactive web applications simply by outlining the pages of the application.app2you’s licensed, patent-pending technology originated in UCSD’s web and databases lab and won the UCSD von Liebig Technology Commercialization award in May 2006.

— CrunchBase

Von Restorff effect

Von Restorff effect

The Von Restorff effect, also called the isolation effect, predicts that an item that "stands out like a sore thumb" is more likely to be remembered than other items. A bias in favour of remembering the unusual. Modern theory of the isolation effect emphasizes perceptual salience and accompanying differential attention to the isolated item as necessary for enhanced memory. In fact, von Restorff, whose paper is not available in English, presented evidence that perceptual salience is not necessary for the isolation effect. She further argued that the difference between the isolated and surrounding items is not sufficient to produce isolation effects but must be considered in the context of similarity. Von Restorff worked as a postdoctoral assistant to Wolfgang Köhler at the Psychological Institute of the University of Berlin up to the time that Köhler resigned in protest against Nazi interference with the Institute. During her time in Köhler’s laboratory, von Restorff published two papers, the second of which she co-authored with Köhler. Von Restorff proposed the isolation effect in a paper she wrote in 1933 on the topic of spontaneous reminding which included a prescient discussion of the role of intentionality in the memory test.

— Freebase

Gottfried von Strassburg

Gottfried von Strassburg

Gottfried von Strassburg is the author of the Middle High German courtly romance Tristan, an adaptation of the 12th-century Tristan and Iseult legend. Gottfried's work is regarded, alongside Wolfram von Eschenbach's Parzival and the Nibelungenlied, as one of the great narrative masterpieces of the German Middle Ages. He is probably also the composer of a small number of surviving lyrics. His work became a source of inspiration for Richard Wagner's opera Tristan und Isolde.

— Freebase

Alexander von Humboldt

Alexander von Humboldt

Friedrich Wilhelm Heinrich Alexander von Humboldt was a Prussian geographer, naturalist and explorer, and the younger brother of the Prussian minister, philosopher and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt. Humboldt's quantitative work on botanical geography laid the foundation for the field of biogeography. Between 1799 and 1804, Humboldt travelled extensively in Latin America, exploring and describing it for the first time in a manner generally considered to be a modern scientific point of view. His description of the journey was written up and published in an enormous set of volumes over 21 years. He was one of the first to propose that the lands bordering the Atlantic Ocean were once joined. Later, his five-volume work, Kosmos, attempted to unify the various branches of scientific knowledge. Humboldt supported and worked with other scientists, including Joseph-Louis Gay-Lussac, Justus von Liebig, Louis Agassiz, Matthew Fontaine Maury and Georg von Neumayer, most notably, Aimé Bonpland, with whom he conducted much of his scientific exploration.

— Freebase

Wedding Guests

Wedding Guests

Wedding Guests is a 1990 short film written and directed by Niko von Glasow.

— Freebase

Alexander von Kluck

Alexander von Kluck

Alexander Heinrich Rudolph von Kluck was a German general during World War I.

— Freebase

Lili Von Shtupp

Lili Von Shtupp

Lili Von Shtupp is a fictional character from the 1974 film Blazing Saddles.

— Freebase

Encephalitis lethargica

Encephalitis lethargica

Encephalitis lethargica or von Economo disease is an atypical form of encephalitis. Also known as "sleepy sickness", it was first described by the neurologist Constantin von Economo in 1917. The disease attacks the brain, leaving some victims in a statue-like condition, speechless and motionless. Between 1915 and 1926, an epidemic of encephalitis lethargica spread around the world; no recurrence of the epidemic has since been reported, though isolated cases continue to occur.

— Freebase

Johannes Rau

Johannes Rau

Johannes Rau was a German politician of the SPD. He was President of Germany from 1 July 1999 until 30 June 2004, and Minister-President of North Rhine-Westphalia from 1978 to 1998.

— Freebase

Ewald, Georg Heinrich August von

Ewald, Georg Heinrich August von

a distinguished Orientalist and biblical scholar, born at Göttingen, and professor both there and at Tübingen; his works were numerous, and the principal were "The Poetic Books of the Old Testament," "The Prophets," and "The History of the People of Israel"; he was a student and interpreter of the concrete, and belonged to no party (1803-1875).

Ewald, Johannes

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Paul Hermann Müller

Paul Hermann Müller

Paul Hermann Müller also known as Pauly Mueller was a Swiss chemist who received the 1948 Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine for his 1939 discovery of insecticidal qualities and use of DDT in the control of vector diseases such as malaria and yellow fever.

— Freebase

Von Willebrand factor

Von Willebrand factor

Von Willebrand factor is a blood glycoprotein involved in hemostasis. It is deficient or defective in von Willebrand disease and is involved in a large number of other diseases, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, Heyde's syndrome, and possibly hemolytic-uremic syndrome. Increased plasma levels in a large number of cardiovascular, neoplastic, and connective tissue diseases are presumed to arise from adverse changes to the endothelium, and may contribute to an increased risk of thrombosis.

— Freebase

Universal Turing machine

Universal Turing machine

In computer science, a universal Turing machine is a Turing machine that can simulate an arbitrary Turing machine on arbitrary input. The universal machine essentially achieves this by reading both the description of the machine to be simulated as well as the input thereof from its own tape. Alan Turing introduced this machine in 1936–1937. This model is considered by some to be the origin of the stored program computer—used by John von Neumann for the "Electronic Computing Instrument" that now bears von Neumann's name: the von Neumann architecture. It is also known as universal computing machine, universal machine, machine U, U. In terms of computational complexity, a multi-tape universal Turing machine need only be slower by logarithmic factor compared to the machines it simulates.

— Freebase

Proportional counter

Proportional counter

The proportional counter is a type of gaseous ionization detector device used to count particles of ionizing radiation. A key feature is its ability to measure the energy of incident radiation, and it is widely used where discrimination between radiation types is required, such as between alpha and beta particles. A proportional counter uses a combination of the mechanisms of a Geiger-Muller tube and an ionisation chamber, and operates in an intermediate voltage region between these. Considering a gas-filled chamber with a wire anode, if the field strength everywhere in the volume is below a critical value, Townsend avalanches do not occur at all, and the detector operates as an ionization chamber. If the applied voltage is too high, complete ionisation of the fill gas occurs with almost each ion pair and the detector operates as a Geiger-Müller counter, with the consequent loss of incident particle energy information. The accompanying plot shows the proportional operating region for a co-axial cylinder arrangement.

— Freebase

Alban Berg

Alban Berg

Alban Maria Johannes Berg was an Austrian composer. He was a member of the Second Viennese School with Arnold Schoenberg and Anton Webern, and produced compositions that combined Mahlerian Romanticism with a personal adaptation of Schoenberg's twelve-tone technique.

— Freebase

Hugo von Hofmannsthal

Hugo von Hofmannsthal

Hugo Laurenz August Hofmann von Hofmannsthal, was an Austrian novelist, librettist, poet, dramatist, narrator, and essayist.

— Freebase

Von Kármán

Von Kármán

Von Kármán is a lunar crater that is located in the southern hemisphere on the far side of the Moon. The northern third of this formation is overlain by the rim and outer rampart of the walled plain Leibnitz, forming a deep indentation in the formation. The remainder of the outer wall is roughly circular in shape, although it is irregular and heavily worn by subsequent impacts. The interior of Von Kármán has been subjected to flooding by lava flows after the original crater formed, leaving the southern portion of the floor nearly flat. This surface has a lower albedo than the surrounding terrain, and is nearly as dark as the interior of Leibnitz. There is a central peak at the location where the midpoint of the original Von Kármán was formed, which joins with the rougher surface in the northern part of the crater. In addition to Leibnitz to the north, the crater Oresme is located to the west-northwest, and Finsen lies to the northeast on the edge of Leibnitz's rim. Nearly attached to the southeast rim is the unusual figure-eight-shaped Von Kármán L formation. Directly to the east of this is the crater Alder.

— Freebase

Brentano, Clemens

Brentano, Clemens

poet of the romanticist school, born at Frankfort-on-the-Main, brother of Goethe's Bettina von Arnim; was a roving genius (1778-1849).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Heilbronn

Heilbronn

Heilbronn is a city in northern Baden-Württemberg, Germany. It is surrounded by Heilbronn County and, with approximately 123,000 residents, it is the sixth-largest city in the state. The city on the Neckar is a former Imperial Free City and is the seat of Heilbronn County. Heilbronn is also the economic center of the Heilbronn-Franken region that includes most of northeast Baden-Württemberg. Heilbronn is known for its wine industry and is nicknamed Käthchenstadt, after Heinrich von Kleist's Das Käthchen von Heilbronn.

— Freebase

Destructionism

Destructionism

Destructionism is a term used by Ludwig Von Mises, a classical liberal economist, to refer to policies that consume capital but do not accumulate it. It is the title of Part V of his seminal work Socialism. Since accumulation of capital is the basis for economic progress, Von Mises warned that pursuing socialist and etatist policies will eventually lead to the consumption and reliance on old capital, borrowed capital, or printed "capital" as these policies cannot create any new capital, instead only consuming the old.

— Freebase

Lipocalin 1

Lipocalin 1

A lipocalin that was orignally characterized from human TEARS. It is expressed primarily in the LACRIMAL GLAND and the VON EBNER GLANDS. Lipocalin 1 may play a role in olfactory transduction by concentrating and delivering odorants to the ODORANT RECEPTORS.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Johann Eck

Johann Eck

Dr. Johann Maier von Eck was a German Scholastic theologian and defender of Catholicism during the Protestant Reformation.

— Freebase

Le Clerc, John

Le Clerc, John

otherwise Johannes Clericus, liberal Swiss theologian and controversialist, born at Geneva; studied philosophy and theology there, and at Paris and London; became professor in the Remonstrant Seminary in Amsterdam in 1684, but lost his speech in 1728; his voluminous writings include commentaries on the whole Bible, which contained opinions on the authorship and composition of the Pentateuch, and the inspiration of the wisdom books, then startling but since much in favour (1657-1736).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Av`ola

Av`ola

a seaport on the E. coast of Sicily, ruined by an earthquake in 1693, rebuilt since; place of export of the Hybla honey.

A`von

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Thrombotic Microangiopathies

Thrombotic Microangiopathies

Diseases that result in THROMBOSIS in MICROVASCULATURE. The two most prominent diseases are PURPURA, THROMBOTIC THROMBOCYTOPENIC; and HEMOLYTIC-UREMIC SYNDROME. Multiple etiological factors include VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL CELL damage due to SHIGA TOXIN; FACTOR H deficiency; and aberrant VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR formation.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Deamino Arginine Vasopressin

Deamino Arginine Vasopressin

A synthetic analog of the pituitary hormone, ARGININE VASOPRESSIN. Its action is mediated by the VASOPRESSIN receptor V2. It has prolonged antidiuretic activity, but little pressor effects. It also modulates levels of circulating FACTOR VIII and VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Hermann Müller

Hermann Müller

Hermann Müller, born in Mannheim, was a German Social Democratic politician who served as Foreign Minister, and twice as Chancellor of Germany under the Weimar Republic. In his capacity as Foreign Minister, he was one of the German signatories of the Treaty of Versailles in 1919.

— Freebase

Novalis

Novalis

the nom de plume of Friedrich von Hardenberg, a German author, born at Wiederstädt, near Mansfeld, one of the most prominent representatives of the Romantic school of poets, author of two unfinished romances entitled "Heinrich von Ofterdingen" and "Lehrlinge zu Sais," together with "Geistliche Lieder" and "Hymnen an die Nacht"; was an ardent student of Jacob Boehme (q. v.), and wrote in a mystical vein, and was at heart a mystic of deep true feeling; pronounced by Carlyle "an anti-mechanist—a deep man, the most perfect of modern spirit seers"; regarded, he says, "religion as a social thing, and as impossible without a church" (1772-1801). See Carlyle's "Miscellanies."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Walther von der Vogelweide

Walther von der Vogelweide

Walther von der Vogelweide is the most celebrated of the Middle High German lyric poets.

— Freebase

Hauerite

Hauerite

Hauerite is a manganese sulfide mineral with the chemical formula MnS2. It forms reddish brown or black octahedral crystals and it is usually found associated with the sulfides of other transition metals such as rambergite. It occurs in low temperature, sulfur rich environments associated with solfataras and salt deposits in association with native sulfur, realgar, gypsum and calcite. It was discovered in Austro-Hungarian Monarchy near Banska Bystrica in what is now Slovakia in 1846 and named after the Austrian geologists, Joseph Ritter von Hauer and Franz Ritter von Hauer.

— Freebase

Heldenbuch

Heldenbuch

Heldenbücher is the conventional title under which a group of manuscripts and prints of the 15th and 16th centuries has come down to us. Each Heldenbuch contains a collection of primarily German epic poetry, typically including material from the Theodoric cycle, and the cycle of Hugdietrich, Wolfdietrich and Ortnit. The Heldenbuch texts are thus based on medieval German literature, but adapted to the tastes of the Renaissance, remodelled in rough Knittelvers or doggerel. The Heldenbücher group was edited in 19th-century German scholarship, by Friedrich Heinrich von der Hagen, Müllenhoff, Simrock and A. von Keller.

— Freebase

C-Block

C-Block

C-Block were a German platinum-selling hip-hop group, founded in 1995 by music producers Frank Müller, Ulrich Buchmann and Jörg Wagner. The group is fronted by Anthony "Red Dogg" Joseph and James "Mr.P" White. C-Block were a well-known hip hop act in Europe in the 1990s, who along with Down Low and Nana, signified the rise of the American-influenced rap music in Europe.

— Freebase

Novalis

Novalis

Novalis was the pseudonym of Georg Philipp Friedrich Freiherr von Hardenberg, a poet, an author and philosopher of early German Romanticism.

— Freebase

Alexander von Zemlinsky

Alexander von Zemlinsky

Alexander Zemlinsky or Alexander von Zemlinsky was an Austrian composer, conductor, and teacher.

— Freebase

Nosema

Nosema

Nosema is a genus of microsporidian parasites. The genus, circumscribed by Swiss botanist Karl Wilhelm von Nägeli in 1857, contains 81 species.

— Freebase

Ritter

Ritter

Ritter is a designation used as a title of nobility in German-speaking areas. Traditionally it denotes the second lowest rank within the nobility, standing above "Edler" and below "Freiherr". For its historical association with warfare and the landed gentry in the Middle Ages, it can be considered roughly equal to the titles of "Knight" or "Baronet". As with most titles and designations within the nobility in German-speaking areas, the rank was normally hereditary and would generally be used together with the nobiliary particle of von or zu before a family name. In the Austrian Empire the title of "Ritter von" would be bestowed upon citizens who deserved more than the plain "von" but were not considered deserving enough as to be given a barony as "Freiherr". In addition to the described system, some states like Württemberg and Bavaria introduced orders of merit beginning in the late 18th century which also conferred nobility as "Ritter von" but kept the title limited to the recipient's lifetime. In heraldry, from the late 18th century a Ritter would often be indicated by the use of a coronet with five points, although not everyone who was a Ritter and displayed arms actually made use of such a coronet.

— Freebase

Buch, Leopold von

Buch, Leopold von

a German geologist, a pupil of Werner and fellow-student of Alexander von Humboldt, who esteemed him highly; adopted the volcanic theory of the earth; wrote no end of scientific memoirs (1774-1853).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Tellurium

Tellurium

Tellurium is a chemical element with symbol Te and atomic number 52. A brittle, mildly toxic, rare, silver-white metalloid which looks similar to tin, tellurium is chemically related to selenium and sulfur. It is occasionally found in native form, as elemental crystals. Tellurium is far more common in the universe as a whole than it is on Earth. Its extreme rarity in the Earth's crust, comparable to that of platinum, is partly due to its high atomic number, but also due to its formation of a volatile hydride which caused the element to be lost to space as a gas during the hot nebular formation of the planet. Tellurium was discovered in Transylvania in 1782 by Franz-Joseph Müller von Reichenstein in a mineral containing tellurium and gold. Martin Heinrich Klaproth named the new element in 1798 after the Latin word for "earth", tellus. Gold telluride minerals are the most notable natural gold compounds. However, they are not a commercially significant source of tellurium itself, which is normally extracted as a by-product of copper and lead production. Commercially, the primary use of tellurium is in alloys, foremost in steel and copper to improve machinability. Applications in solar panels and as a semiconductor material also consume a considerable fraction of tellurium production.

— Freebase

Polyvore

Polyvore

Polyvore is the leading community site for online style where users are empowered to discover their style and set trends around the world. The company collaborates with prominent brands such as Calvin Klein, Diane Von Furstenberg, Lancôme, Net-a-Porter, Gap and Coach to drive product engagement; and its user-generated fashion campaigns have been judged by Lady Gaga and Katy Perry. Headquartered in Silicon Valley, Polyvore is funded by Benchmark Capital and Matrix Partners.In September 2013, Polyvore launched a section dedicated to home decor.

— CrunchBase

Verl

Verl

Verl is a town in the district of Gütersloh in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is located approximately 15 km south of Bielefeld and 10 km east of Gütersloh. In the 19th century two citizens of Verl, Johannes Otto and Ferdinand Bredeik, founded two towns in Ohio, USA: Delphos and Ottoville. Since the 1990s Verl has been an official sister city of both towns.

— Freebase

Almira

Almira

Almira, Königin von Castilien is George Frideric Handel's first opera. It was first performed in Hamburg in January 1705.

— Freebase

Johannes Vilhelm Jensen

Johannes Vilhelm Jensen

Johannes Vilhelm Jensen was a Danish author, often considered the first great Danish writer of the 20th century. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1944. One of his sisters, Thit Jensen, was also a well-known writer and a very vocal, and occasionally controversial, early feminist.

— Freebase

Receptors, Cytoadhesin

Receptors, Cytoadhesin

A group of INTEGRINS that includes the platelet outer membrane glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa (PLATELET GLYCOPROTEIN GPIIB-IIIA COMPLEX) and the vitronectin receptor (RECEPTORS, VITRONECTIN). They play a major role in cell adhesion and serve as receptors for fibronectin, von Willebrand factor, and vitronectin.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Robert Fludd

Robert Fludd

Robert Fludd, also known as Robertus de Fluctibus was a prominent English Paracelsian physician. He is remembered as an astrologer, mathematician, cosmologist, Qabalist, and Rosicrucian apologist. Fludd is best known for his compilations in occult philosophy. He had a celebrated exchange of views with Johannes Kepler concerning the scientific and hermetic approaches to knowledge.

— Freebase

Monsun

Monsun

Monsun was a bay Thoroughbred racehorse and stallion bred in Germany by Gestut Isarland and owned by Baron Georg von Ullmann.

— Freebase

Electroretinography

Electroretinography

Electroretinography measures the electrical responses of various cell types in the retina, including the photoreceptors, inner retinal cells, and the ganglion cells. Electrodes are usually placed on the cornea and the skin near the eye, although it is possible to record the ERG from skin electrodes. During a recording, the patient's eyes are exposed to standardized stimuli and the resulting signal is displayed showing the time course of the signal's amplitude. Signals are very small, and typically are measured in microvolts or nanovolts. The ERG is composed of electrical potentials contributed by different cell types within the retina, and the stimulus conditions can elicit stronger response from certain components. If a flash ERG is performed on a dark-adapted eye, the response is primarily from the rod system. Flash ERGs performed on a light adapted eye will reflect the activity of the cone system. Sufficiently bright flashes will elicit ERGs containing an a-wave followed by a b-wave. The leading edge of the a-wave is produced by the photoreceptors, while the remainder of the wave is produced by a mixture of cells including photoreceptors, bipolar, amacrine, and Muller cells or Muller glia. The pattern ERG, evoked by an alternating checkerboard stimulus, primarily reflects activity of retinal ganglion cells.

— Freebase

John von Neumann

John von Neumann

John von Neumann was a Hungarian-born American pure and applied mathematician and polymath. He was a pioneer of the application of operator theory to quantum mechanics, in the development of functional analysis, a principal member of the Manhattan Project and the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and a key figure in the development of game theory and the concepts of cellular automata, the universal constructor, and the digital computer. Von Neumann's mathematical analysis of the structure of self-replication preceded the discovery of the structure of DNA. In a short list of facts about his life he submitted to the National Academy of Sciences, he stated "The part of my work I consider most essential is that on quantum mechanics, which developed in Göttingen in 1926, and subsequently in Berlin in 1927–1929. Also, my work on various forms of operator theory, Berlin 1930 and Princeton 1935–1939; on the ergodic theorem, Princeton, 1931–1932." Along with Teller and Stanislaw Ulam, von Neumann worked out key steps in the nuclear physics involved in thermonuclear reactions and the hydrogen bomb.

— Freebase

Canes Venatici

Canes Venatici

Canes Venatici is one of the 88 official modern constellations. It is a small northern constellation that was created by Johannes Hevelius in the 17th century. Its name is Latin for "hunting dogs", and the constellation is often depicted in illustrations as representing the dogs of Boötes the Herdsman, a neighboring constellation.

— Freebase

Danites

Danites

or Destroying Angels, a band of Mormons organised to prevent the entrance into Mormon territory of other than Mormon immigrants, but whose leader, for a massacre they perpetrated, was in 1827 convicted and shot.

Dannecker, Johann Heinrich von

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

von Willebrand Diseases

von Willebrand Diseases

Group of hemorrhagic disorders in which the VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR is either quantitatively or qualitatively abnormal. They are usually inherited as an autosomal dominant trait though rare kindreds are autosomal recessive. Symptoms vary depending on severity and disease type but may include prolonged bleeding time, deficiency of factor VIII, and impaired platelet adhesion.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Genetic load

Genetic load

In population genetics, genetic load or genetic burden is a measure of the cost of lost alleles due to selection or mutation. It is a value in the range, where 0 represents no load. The concept was first formulated in 1937 by JBS Haldane, independently formulated, named and applied to humans in 1950 by H. J. Muller, and elaborated further by Haldane in 1957.

— Freebase

Ley

Ley

Ley is a lunar impact crater that is located across the southern rim of the much larger walled plain Campbell. Intruding into the south-southwestern rim of Ley is the slightly larger crater Von Neumann. The debris from the formation of Von Neumann has produced a bulging rampart that occupies the southwest interior floor of Ley. The outer rim of Ley has undergone impact erosion, and is marked by a number of small craterlets. The inner wall is also worn, and the interior floor is pock-marked by a number of tiny craterlets. There is a small, cup-shaped crater on the floor to the northwest of the midpoint.

— Freebase

Fling

Fling

Fling, internationally titled Lie to Me, is an independent film about a couple navigating the hazards of an open relationship. It is the feature directorial debut of director John Stewart Muller and stars Brandon Routh, Steve Sandvoss, Courtney Ford, Nick Wechsler, Shoshana Bush and Ellen Hollman. It is the first feature from Santa Monica-based Steele Films and was written and produced by John Stewart Muller and his partner Laura Boersma. Fling features Brandon Routh in his first lead role since Superman Returns. It premiered to a sold out crowd at the 2008 Newport Beach Film Festival on April 26 in the Lido Theater on the Balboa Peninsula. The film received an award for "Outstanding Achievement in Filmmaking" from the festival's jury. Fling had its official Los Angeles premiere on October 18th at the Fine Arts Theatre on Wilshire Blvd. as part of the 2008 LA Femme Film Festival. Shortly thereafter, it had its completely sold out East Coast premiere on November 7 at the 2008 Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival. One week later on November 14, Fling had its Midwest premiere at the Screenland Theatre in the Crossroads District of Kansas City, Missouri which kicked off a month-long run at the theater.

— Freebase

Brainfuck

Brainfuck

The brainfuck programming language is an esoteric programming language noted for its extreme minimalism. It is a Turing tarpit, designed to challenge and amuse programmers, and was not made to be suitable for practical use. It was created in 1993 by Urban Müller. The name of the language is generally not capitalized except at the start of a sentence, although it is a proper noun.

— Freebase

Franz von Sickingen

Franz von Sickingen

Franz von Sickingen was a German knight, one of the most notable figures of the first period of the Reformation.

— Freebase

Wolfram von Eschenbach

Wolfram von Eschenbach

Wolfram von Eschenbach was a German knight and poet, regarded as one of the greatest epic poets of his time. As a Minnesinger, he also wrote lyric poetry.

— Freebase

Sachertorte

Sachertorte

Sachertorte is a specific type of chocolate cake, or torte, invented by Austrian Franz Sacher in 1832 for Prince Wenzel von Metternich in Vienna, Austria. It is one of the most famous Viennese culinary specialties 5 December is National Sachertorte Day.

— Freebase

Eschscholzia

Eschscholzia

Eschscholzia is a genus of 12 annual or perennial plants in the Papaveraceae family. The genus was named after the Baltic German botanist Johann Friedrich von Eschscholtz.

— Freebase

Helmholtz coil

Helmholtz coil

A Helmholtz coil is a device for producing a region of nearly uniform magnetic field. It is named in honor of the German physicist Hermann von Helmholtz.

— Freebase

Polygenesis

Polygenesis

In the field of linguistics, polygenesis is the view that human languages evolved as several lineages independent of one another. It is contrasted with monogenesis, which is the view that human languages all go back to a single common ancestor. Polygenesis is not to be confused with the wave theory, originally propounded by Johannes Schmidt.

— Freebase

Sphygmograph

Sphygmograph

The sphygmograph was a mechanical device used to measure blood pressure in the mid-19th century. It was developed in 1854 by German physiologist Karl von Vierordt. It is considered the first external, non-intrusive device used to estimate blood pressure. The device was a system of levers hooked to a scale-pan in which weights were placed to determine the amount of external pressure needed to stop blood flow in the radial artery. Although the instrument was cumbersome and its measurements imprecise, the basic concept of Vierordt's sphygmograph eventually led to the blood pressure cuff that's used today. In 1863, Étienne-Jules Marey, improved the device by making it portable. Also he included a specialized instrument to be placed above the radial artery that was able to magnify pulse waves and record them on paper with an attached pen. In 1880 Samuel von Basch invented the sphygmomanometer. The sphygmomanometer was then improved by Scipione Riva-Rocci in the 1890s. In 1901 Harvey Williams Cushing improved it further, and Heinrich von Recklinghausen used a wider cuff, and so it became the first accurate and practical instrument for measuring blood pressure.

— Freebase

Erich von Stroheim

Erich von Stroheim

Erich von Stroheim was an Austrian director, actor and producer, most notable as being a film star of the silent era, subsequently noted as an auteur for his directorial work.

— Freebase

Capnomor

Capnomor

Capnomor is a colorless and limpid oil with a peculiar odor, extracted by distillation from beechwood tar. It was discovered in the 1830s by the German chemist Baron Karl von Reichenbach.

— Freebase

Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex

Platelet Glycoprotein GPIIb-IIIa Complex

Platelet membrane glycoprotein complex important for platelet adhesion and aggregation. It is an integrin complex containing INTEGRIN ALPHAIIB and INTEGRIN BETA3 which recognizes the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) sequence present on several adhesive proteins. As such, it is a receptor for FIBRINOGEN; VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR; FIBRONECTIN; VITRONECTIN; and THROMBOSPONDINS. A deficiency of GPIIb-IIIa results in GLANZMANN THROMBASTHENIA.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Heinrich von Kleist

Heinrich von Kleist

Bernd Heinrich Wilhelm von Kleist was a German poet, dramatist, novelist and short story writer. The Kleist Prize, a prestigious prize for German literature, is named after him.

— Freebase

Waldmeister

Waldmeister

Waldmeister is an operetta written by Johann Strauss II. It was first performed on 4 December 1895 at the Theater an der Wien. Although not as popular as some of Strauss' other operettas, such as Der Zigeunerbaron and Die Fledermaus, it was given eighty-eight performances, and was much admired by Johannes Brahms, a friend of the composer.

— Freebase

James Van Allen

James Van Allen

James Alfred Van Allen was an American space scientist at the University of Iowa. He was instrumental in establishing the field of magnetospheric research in space. The Van Allen radiation belts were named after him, following their discovery by his Geiger–Müller tube instruments on the 1958 satellites: during the International Geophysical Year. Van Allen led the scientific community for the inclusion of scientific research instruments on space satellites.

— Freebase

Keller, Gottfried

Keller, Gottfried

distinguished poet and novelist, born in Zurich; his greatest remance, and the one by which he is best known, is "Der Grüne Heinrich"; wrote also a collection of excellent tales entitled, "Die Leute von Seldwyla" (1819-1890).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Wassermann test

Wassermann test

The Wassermann test or Wassermann reaction is an antibody test for syphilis, named after the bacteriologist August Paul von Wassermann, based on complement-fixation.

— Freebase

Von Willebrand disease

Von Willebrand disease

Von Willebrand disease is the most common hereditary coagulation abnormality described in humans, although it can also be acquired as a result of other medical conditions. It arises from a qualitative or quantitative deficiency of von Willebrand factor, a multimeric protein that is required for platelet adhesion. It is known to affect humans and dogs, and rarely swine, cattle, horses, and cats. There are three forms of vWD: inherited, acquired and pseudo or platelet type. There are three types of hereditary vWD: vWD Type I, vWD Type II and vWD III. Within the three inherited types of vWD there are various subtypes. Platelet type vWD is also an inherited condition. vWD Type I is the most common type of the disorder and those that have it are typically asymptomatic or may experience mild symptoms such as nosebleeds although there may be severe symptoms in some cases. There are various factors that affect the presentation and severity of symptoms of vWD such as blood type. vWD is named after Erik Adolf von Willebrand, a Finnish pediatrician who first described the disease in 1926.

— Freebase

Ars nova

Ars nova

Ars nova refers to a musical style which flourished in France and the Burgundian Low Countries in the Late Middle Ages: more particularly, in the period between the preparation of the Roman de Fauvel and the death of the composer Guillaume de Machaut in 1377. Sometimes the term is used more generally to refer to all European polyphonic music of the 14th century, thereby including such figures as Francesco Landini, who was working in Italy. Occasionally the term "Italian ars nova" is used to denote the music of Landini and his compatriots. In ancient and medieval Latin the term ars nova does not mean "new art", but rather "new technique", and was first used in two contemporaneous manuscripts, titled Ars novae musicae by Johannes de Muris, and Ars nova notandi attributed to Philippe de Vitry. However, the term was only first used to describe an historical era by Johannes Wolf in 1904. Ars nova is generally used in conjunction with another term, ars antiqua, which refers to the music of the immediately preceding age, usually extending back to take in the period of Notre Dame polyphony. Roughly, then, the ars antiqua is the music of the thirteenth century, and the ars nova the music of the fourteenth; many music histories use the terms in this more general sense.

— Freebase

Liberism

Liberism

Liberism is a term for the economic doctrine of laissez-faire capitalism first used by the philosopher Benedetto Croce, and popularized in English by the Italian-American political scientist Giovanni Sartori. Sartori imported the term from Italian in order to distinguish between social liberalism, which is generally considered a political ideology often advocating extensive government intervention in the economy, and those liberal theories of economics which propose to virtually eliminate such intervention. In informal usage, liberism overlaps with other concepts such as free trade, neoliberalism, right-libertarianism, the American concept of libertarianism, and the French notion of laissez-faire. In Italy, liberism is often identified with the political theories of Gaetano Mosca, Luigi Einaudi and Bruno Leoni. Internationally, liberism has been advocated by the Austrian School of economic theory, for instance by Ludwig von Mises and Friedrich von Hayek.

— Freebase

Ferdinand von Zeppelin

Ferdinand von Zeppelin

Ferdinand Adolf Heinrich August Graf von Zeppelin was a German general and later aircraft manufacturer. He founded the Zeppelin Airship company. He was born in Konstanz, Grand Duchy of Baden.

— Freebase

Technological singularity

Technological singularity

The technological singularity is the theoretical emergence of superintelligence through technological means. Since the capabilities of such intelligence would be difficult for an unaided human mind to comprehend, the technological singularity is seen as an occurrence beyond which events cannot be predicted. The first use of the term "singularity" in this context was by mathematician John von Neumann. Neumann in the mid-1950s spoke of "ever accelerating progress of technology and changes in the mode of human life, which gives the appearance of approaching some essential singularity in the history of the race beyond which human affairs, as we know them, could not continue". The term was popularized by science fiction writer Vernor Vinge, who argues that artificial intelligence, human biological enhancement, or brain-computer interfaces could be possible causes of the singularity. Futurist Ray Kurzweil cited von Neumann's use of the term in a foreword to von Neumann's classic The Computer and the Brain. Proponents of the singularity typically postulate an "intelligence explosion", where superintelligences design successive generations of increasingly powerful minds, that might occur very quickly and might not stop until the agent's cognitive abilities greatly surpass that of any human.

— Freebase

Factor VIII

Factor VIII

Blood-coagulation factor VIII. Antihemophilic factor that is part of the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor complex. Factor VIII is produced in the liver and acts in the intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. It serves as a cofactor in factor X activation and this action is markedly enhanced by small amounts of thrombin.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Jewett

Jewett

Jewett is a city in Leon County, Texas, United States. The population was 1,167 at the 2010 census. Jewett is the birthplace of Fritz Von Erich and Romus Burgin.

— Freebase

Franz von Papen

Franz von Papen

Lieutenant-Colonel Franz Joseph Hermann Michael Maria von Papen zu Köningen was a German nobleman, General Staff officer and politician. He served as Chancellor of Germany in 1932 and as Vice-Chancellor under Adolf Hitler in 1933–1934. He belonged to the group of close advisers to president Paul von Hindenburg in the late Weimar Republic. It was largely Papen, believing that Hitler could be controlled once he was in the government, who persuaded Hindenburg to appoint Hitler as Chancellor in a cabinet not under Nazi Party domination. However, Papen and his allies were quickly marginalised by Hitler and he left the government after the Night of the Long Knives, during which some of his confidantes were killed by the Nazis.

— Freebase

Ristocetin

Ristocetin

Ristocetin is an antibiotic, obtained from Amycolatopsis lurida, previously used to treat staphylococcal infections. It is no longer used clinically because it caused thrombocytopenia and platelet agglutination. It is now used solely to assay those functions in vitro in the diagnosis of conditions such as von Willebrand disease and Bernard-Soulier syndrome. Platelet agglutination caused by ristocetin can occur only in the presence of von Willebrand factor multimers, so if ristocetin is added to blood lacking the factor, the platelets will not clump. In an unknown fashion, the antibiotic ristocetin causes von Willebrand factor to bind the platelet receptor glycoprotein Ib, so when ristocetin is added to normal blood, it causes agglutination. In some types of vWD, even very small amounts of ristocetin cause platelet aggregation when the patient's platelet-rich plasma is used. This paradox is explained by these types having gain-of-function mutations which cause the vWD high molecular-weight multimers to bind more tightly to their receptors on platelets. In the case of type 2B vWD, the gain-of-function mutation involves von Willebrand's factor, and in platelet-type vWD, the receptor is the object of the mutation. This increased binding causes vWD because the high-molecular weight multimers are removed from circulation in plasma since they remain attached to the patient's platelets. Thus, if the patient's platelet-poor plasma is used, the ristocetin cofactor assay will not agglutinate standardized platelets, similar to the other types of vWD.

— Freebase

Leben

Leben

Leben is the 3rd studio album by German electronic musician, composer and producer Christopher von Deylen under his Schiller alias. If features collaborations with renown vocalists such as Sarah Brightman, Maya Saban and Kim Sanders.

— Freebase

Alexej von Jawlensky

Alexej von Jawlensky

Alexej Georgewitsch von Jawlensky was a Russian expressionist painter active in Germany. He was a key member of the New Munich Artist's Association, Der Blaue Reiter group and later the Die Blaue Vier.

— Freebase

Arabella

Arabella

Arabella is a lyric comedy or opera in 3 acts by Richard Strauss to a German libretto by Hugo von Hofmannsthal, their sixth and last operatic collaboration. It was first performed on 1 July 1933, at the Dresden Sächsisches Staatstheater.

— Freebase

Heilbronn

Heilbronn

a quaint old town of Würtemberg, on the Neckar, 23 m. N. of Stuttgart; has a fine 11th-century Gothic church, and the Thief's Tower (Diebsthurm); is associated with the captivity of Goetz von Berlichingen (q. v.); it is now a busy commercial centre, and manufactures silverware, paper, beet-sugar, chemicals, &c.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Maria Louisa

Maria Louisa

empress of France, daughter of Francis I., Emperor of Austria; was married to Napoleon in 1810 after the divorce of Joséphine, and bore him a son, who was called King of Rome; after Napoleon's death she became the wife of Count von Neipperg (1791-1847).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Sorrows of Werther

Sorrows of Werther

Sorrows of Werther is a satirical poem by William Makepeace Thackeray written in response to the enormous success of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's novel The Sorrows of Young Werther.

— Freebase

Polylux

Polylux

Polylux, the self-appointed "last/worst on the first [channel]", is a weekly half-hour German television program hosted by Tita von Hardenberg. It was produced by RBB for Das Erste and was aired in the timeslot on Thursdays at 11:15 CET. The show, which was concerned with politics, culture and social trends, offers a vivid blend of documentary & satirical segments. Typically it began with a satirical 'report' by Carsten von Ryssen related to a current matter of public concern. The show's essential hipness, which was underlined by von Hardenberg's crisp announcements and the visual & thematic backdrop of the city of Berlin, infuses the subsequent documentary pieces with a certain esprit. Thematically, their scope ran from coverage of political and social movements to current trends in underground and popular culture, whereby one piece was usually biographical in nature, setting it off from the more panoramic style of the rest of the show. Less serious segments often echoed the satire of the keynote feature. Regular items included the "Berlin for Beginners" and the show's end note, in which Manfred Dumke, an elderly pensioner, shared his curious insights on current affairs with the rest of Germany from the comfort of his front room.

— Freebase

Fehling's solution

Fehling's solution

Fehling's solution is a chemical test used to differentiate between water-soluble carbohydrate and ketone functional groups, and as a test for monosaccharides. The test was developed by German chemist Hermann von Fehling in 1849.

— Freebase

Hexalogy

Hexalogy

A hexalogy is a compound literary or narrative work that is made up of six distinct works. The word apparently first appeared in English as a borrowing from German, in discussions of August Bungert's Wagnerian opera cycle entitled Homerische Welt based on the Iliad and the Odyssey. Both pentalogie and hexalogie were used by Théophile Gautier in 1859. In 1923 the word was applied by an American reviewer to Johannes V. Jensen's The Long Journey.

— Freebase

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Wernher Magnus Maximilian, Freiherr von Braun was a German rocket scientist, aerospace engineer, space architect, and one of the leading figures in the development of rocket technology in Nazi Germany during World War II and, subsequently, in the United States. He is credited as being the "Father of Rocket Science". In his 20s and early 30s, von Braun was the central figure in Germany's rocket development program, responsible for the design and realization of the V-2 combat rocket during World War II. After the war, he and some select members of his rocket team were taken to the United States as part of the then-secret Operation Paperclip. Von Braun worked on the United States Army intermediate range ballistic missile program before his group was assimilated by NASA. Under NASA, he served as director of the newly formed Marshall Space Flight Center and as the chief architect of the Saturn V launch vehicle, the superbooster that propelled the Apollo spacecraft to the Moon. According to one NASA source, he is "without doubt, the greatest rocket scientist in history". His crowning achievement was to lead the development of the Saturn V booster rocket that helped land the first men on the Moon in July 1969. In 1975 he received the National Medal of Science.

— Freebase

Bandog

Bandog

The term Bandog originated around 1250-1300 in Middle England, referring to a mastiff type dog that was bound by a chain during the daytime and was released at night to guard against intruders. In 1570 Johannes Caius published a book in Latin which in 1576 was translated into English by Abraham Fleming under the name Of Englishe Dogges, in which he described Bandog as a vast, stubborn, eager dog of heavy body.

— Freebase

Berlepsch's Tinamou

Berlepsch's Tinamou

The Berlepsch's Tinamou is a type of ground bird found in moist forest in northwestern Colombia and northwestern Ecuador. This bird is named after Hans von Berlepsch to commemorate him.

— Freebase

Cornflower blue

Cornflower blue

Cornflower blue, a shade of azure, is a shade of light blue with relatively little green compared to blue. This color was one of the favorites of the Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer, the other being yellow. Cornflowers are among the few "blue" flowers that are truly blue, most "blue" flowers being a darker blue-purple. The most valuable blue sapphires are those that are cornflower blue, having a medium-dark violet-blue tone.

— Freebase

Foveola

Foveola

The foveola is located within a region called the macula, a yellowish, cone photo receptor filled portion of the human retina. The foveola is approximately 0.35 mm in diameter and lies in the center of the fovea and contains only cone cells, and a cone-shaped zone of Müller cells. In this region the cone receptors are found to be longer, slimmer and more densely packed than anywhere else in the retina, thus allowing that region to have the potential to have the highest visual acuity in the eye.

— Freebase

Picamar

Picamar

Picamar is a colorless, hydrocarbon oil extracted from the creosote of beechwood tar with a peculiar odor and bitter taste. It consists of derivatives of pyrogallol. It was discovered by German chemist Karl von Reichenbach in the 1830s.

— Freebase

Petaurista

Petaurista

Petaurista is a genus of rodent in the Sciuridae family. Squirrels in this family are generally large nocturnal squirrels. It contains the following species, listed alphabetically: ⁕Petaurista alborufus Milne-Edwards, 1870 – Red And White Giant Flying Squirrel ⁕Petaurista elegans Müller, 1840 – Spotted Giant Flying Squirrel ⁕Petaurista leucogenys Temminck, 1827 – Japanese Giant Flying Squirrel ⁕Petaurista magnificus Hodgson, 1836 – Hodgson's Giant Flying Squirrel ⁕Petaurista nobilis Gray, 1842 – Bhutan Giant Flying Squirrel ⁕Petaurista petaurista Pallas, 1766 – Red Giant Flying Squirrel ⁕Petaurista philippensis Elliot, 1839 – Indian Giant Flying Squirrel ⁕Petaurista xanthotis Milne-Edwards, 1872 – Chinese Giant Flying Squirrel

— Freebase

Factor VIII

Factor VIII

Factor VIII is an essential blood-clotting protein, also known as anti-hemophilic factor. In humans, factor VIII is encoded by the F8 gene. Defects in this gene results in hemophilia A, a recessive X-linked coagulation disorder. Factor VIII is produced in liver sinusoidal cells and endothelial cells outside of the liver throughout the body. This protein circulates in the bloodstream in an inactive form, bound to another molecule called von Willebrand factor, until an injury that damages blood vessels occurs. In response to injury, coagulation factor VIII is activated and separates from von Willebrand factor. The active protein interacts with another coagulation factor called factor IX. This interaction sets off a chain of additional chemical reactions that form a blood clot. Factor VIII participates in blood coagulation; it is a cofactor for factor IXa which, in the presence of Ca+2 and phospholipids forms a complex that converts factor X to the activated form Xa. The factor VIII gene produces two alternatively spliced transcripts. Transcript variant 1 encodes a large glycoprotein, isoform a, which circulates in plasma and associates with von Willebrand factor in a noncovalent complex. This protein undergoes multiple cleavage events. Transcript variant 2 encodes a putative small protein, isoform b, which consists primarily of the phospholipid binding domain of factor VIIIc. This binding domain is essential for coagulant activity.

— Freebase

Christingle

Christingle

A Christingle is a symbolic object, related to the pomander, used in the advent services of many Christian denominations. A Christingle consists of: ⁕an orange representing the world; ⁕a red ribbon around it representing the blood of Christ; ⁕dried fruits skewered on cocktail sticks pushed into the orange, representing the fruits of the earth and the four seasons; and ⁕a lit candle pushed into the centre of the orange, representing Jesus Christ as the light of the world. The base of the candle is commonly wrapped in tinfoil. This is purely functional. The Christingle has its origins in the Moravian Church, but the representation of the four seasons was a later addition. At Christmas 1747 in Germany, Bishop Johannes de Watteville thought about how he could explain the love of Jesus and what Christmas really means to the children in the church. He decided to make a simple symbol to express the message of Christmas in a fresh and lively way. Pastor Johannes de Watteville gave each child a lighted candle wrapped in a red ribbon, with a prayer that said "Lord Jesus, kindle a flame in these dear children's hearts". In 1968, John Pensom of The Children's Society introduced Christingle services to the Church of England, where the custom spread quickly. It is celebrated sometime around Christmas. Various hymns about Christingle include: The Christingle begins with an orange, We haven't come far, It's rounded like an orange, and When the frost turns the berries red.

— Freebase

Angiomatosis

Angiomatosis

Angiomatosis is a non-neoplastic condition presenting with little knots of capillaries in various organs. It consists of many angiomas. It is also known as Von Hippel-Lindau Disease and is a rare genetic multi system disorder characterized by the abnormal growth of tumours in the body. Symptoms may include headaches, problems with balance and walking, dizziness, weakness of the limbs, vision problems and high blood pressure. Prognosis depends on the size and location of the tumour, untreated angiomatosis may lead to blindness and/ or permanent brain damage. Death may occur, with complications in the kidney or brain. These tend to be cavernous hemangiomas, which are sharply defined, sponge-like tumors composed of large, dilated, cavernous vascular spaces. They often appear in: ⁕Von Hippel-Lindau disease ⁕Bacillary angiomatosis ⁕Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome ⁕Sturge-Weber syndrome

— Freebase

ORDO

ORDO

ORDO — Jahrbuch für die Ordnung von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft is a peer-reviewed academic journal established in 1948 by the German economists Walter Eucken and Franz Böhm. The journal focuses on the economic and political institutions governing modern society.

— Freebase

Wagnerite

Wagnerite

Wagnerite is a mineral, a combined phosphate and fluoride of iron and magnesium, with the formula (MgFe)2PO4F. It occurs in pegmatite associated with other phosphate minerals. It is named after F.M. von Wagner, a German mining official.

— Freebase

Franz von Suppé

Franz von Suppé

Franz von Suppé or Francesco Suppé Demelli was an Austrian composer of light operas from the Kingdom of Dalmatia, Austro-Hungarian Empire. A composer and conductor of the Romantic period, he is notable for his four dozen operettas.

— Freebase

Scheffel, Joseph Victor von

Scheffel, Joseph Victor von

German poet, bred to law, but abandoned it for literature; his first and best work "Der Trompeter von Sakkingen," a charming tale in verse of the Thirty Years' War, succeeded by "Gaudeamus," a collection of songs and ballads familiar to the German students all over the Fatherland (1826-1886).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Parkinson Disease, Postencephalitic

Parkinson Disease, Postencephalitic

Parkinsonism following encephalitis, historically seen as a sequella of encephalitis lethargica (Von Economo Encephalitis). The early age of onset, the rapid progression of symptoms followed by stabilization, and the presence of a variety of other neurological disorders (e.g., sociopathic behavior; TICS; MUSCLE SPASMS; oculogyric crises; hyperphagia; and bizarre movements) distinguish this condition from primary PARKINSON DISEASE. Pathologic features include neuronal loss and gliosis concentrated in the MESENCEPHALON; SUBTHALAMUS; and HYPOTHALAMUS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p754)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Lacerta

Lacerta

Lacerta is one of the 88 modern constellations defined by the International Astronomical Union. Its name is Latin for lizard. A small, faint constellation, it was created in 1687 by the astronomer Johannes Hevelius. Its brightest stars form a "W" shape similar to that of Cassiopeia, and it is thus sometimes referred to as 'Little Cassiopeia'. It is located between Cygnus, Cassiopeia and Andromeda on the northern celestial sphere. The northern part lies on the Milky Way.

— Freebase

Disa

Disa

Disa is the heroine of a Swedish legendary saga, which was documented by Olaus Magnus, in 1555. It is believed to be from the Middle Ages, but includes Old Norse themes. It was elaborated by Johannes Messenius in his drama Disa, which was the first historic play in the Swedish language, and was played at the Disting of 1611. It was also presented in an exaggerated version by Olaus Rudbeck in his Atlantica

— Freebase

Praxeology

Praxeology

Praxeology is the deductive study of human action based on the action axiom. The most common use of the term is in connection with the Austrian School of Economics, as established by economist Ludwig von Mises.

— Freebase

Johannes Kepler

Johannes Kepler

Johannes Kepler was a German mathematician, astronomer and astrologer. A key figure in the 17th century scientific revolution, he is best known for his eponymous laws of planetary motion, codified by later astronomers, based on his works Astronomia nova, Harmonices Mundi, and Epitome of Copernican Astronomy. These works also provided one of the foundations for Isaac Newton's theory of universal gravitation. During his career, Kepler was a mathematics teacher at a seminary school in Graz, Austria, where he became an associate of Prince Hans Ulrich von Eggenberg. Later he became an assistant to astronomer Tycho Brahe, and eventually the imperial mathematician to Emperor Rudolf II and his two successors Matthias and Ferdinand II. He was also a mathematics teacher in Linz, Austria, and an adviser to General Wallenstein. Additionally, he did fundamental work in the field of optics, invented an improved version of the refracting telescope, and mentioned the telescopic discoveries of his contemporary Galileo Galilei. Kepler lived in an era when there was no clear distinction between astronomy and astrology, but there was a strong division between astronomy and physics. Kepler also incorporated religious arguments and reasoning into his work, motivated by the religious conviction and belief that God had created the world according to an intelligible plan that is accessible through the natural light of reason. Kepler described his new astronomy as "celestial physics", as "an excursion into Aristotle's Metaphysics", and as "a supplement to Aristotle's On the Heavens", transforming the ancient tradition of physical cosmology by treating astronomy as part of a universal mathematical physics.

— Freebase

Hurter

Hurter

The von Hurter family belonged to the Swiss nobility; in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries three of them were known for their conversions to Roman Catholicism, their ecclesiastical careers in Austria and their theological writings.

— Freebase

Hermann von Salza

Hermann von Salza

Hermann von Salza was the fourth Grand Master of the Teutonic Knights, serving from 1210 to 1239. A skilled diplomat with ties to the Holy Roman Emperor and the Pope, Hermann oversaw the expansion of the military order into Prussia.

— Freebase

Amorosa

Amorosa

Amorosa is a 1986 Swedish film starring Stina Ekblad and Erland Josephson and directed by Mai Zetterling. The story, an adaptation of the life of writer Agnes Von Krusenstjarna, details her sexually charged and often turbulent relationship with the bisexual Joseph Sprengel.

— Freebase

Astronium fraxinifolium

Astronium fraxinifolium

Astronium fraxinifolium is a timber tree, which is native to Amazon Rainforest, Atlantic Forest, Caatinga, and Cerrado vegetation in Brazil. This plant is cited in Flora Brasiliensis by Carl Friedrich Philipp von Martius. It is also used to make hardwood such as Tigerwood.

— Freebase

Paul Reuter

Paul Reuter

Paul Julius Freiherr von Reuter, a German entrepreneur, pioneer of telegraphy and news reporting was a journalist and media owner, and the founder of the Reuters news agency, since 2008 part of the Thomson Reuters conglomerate.

— Freebase

Fraunhofer lines

Fraunhofer lines

In physics and optics, the Fraunhofer lines are a set of spectral lines named after the German physicist Joseph von Fraunhofer. The lines were originally observed as dark features in the optical spectrum of the Sun.

— Freebase

Thermodynamicist

Thermodynamicist

In thermodynamics, a thermodynamicist is one who studies thermodynamic processes and phenomena, i.e. the physics that deals with mechanical action and relations of heat. Among the well-known number of famous thermodynamicists, include Sadi Carnot, Rudolf Clausius, Willard Gibbs, Hermann von Helmholtz, and Max Planck.

— Freebase

Kolchose

Kolchose

The Kolchose is a group of Hip hop artists in the southern German city of Stuttgart. The group was founded in 1993 and includes the artists Freundeskreis, Massive Töne, Afrob, Breite Seite and Skillz en Masse, to name a few. The Kolchose Members Jean-Christophe "Schowi" Ritter and Johannes "Strachi" Strachwitz started the 0711Büro, out of which the company "0711 Entertainment" developed. The name "Kolchose" is derived from the German word for kolkhoz, a type of collective farm that was common in the Soviet Union.

— Freebase

Grey goo

Grey goo

Grey goo is a hypothetical end-of-the-world scenario involving molecular nanotechnology in which out-of-control self-replicating robots consume all matter on Earth while building more of themselves, a scenario that has been called ecophagy. The original idea assumed machines designed to have this capability, while popularizations have assumed that machines might somehow gain this capability by accident. Self-replicating machines of the macroscopic variety were originally described by mathematician John von Neumann, and are sometimes referred to as von Neumann machines. The term grey goo was coined by nanotechnology pioneer Eric Drexler in his 1986 book Engines of Creation. In 2004 he stated "I wish I had never used the term 'grey goo'." Engines of Creation mentions "grey goo" in two paragraphs and a note, while the popularized idea of grey goo was first publicized in a mass-circulation magazine, Omni, November 1986.

— Freebase

Hardenbergia

Hardenbergia

Hardenbergia is a small genus of leguminous vines from Australia. The genus was named in honour of Franziska Countess von Hardenberg, by English botanist George Bentham, in 1837. There are three species as follows: ⁕Hardenbergia comptoniana Benth. ⁕Hardenbergia perbrevidens R.J.F.Hend. ⁕Hardenbergia violacea Stearn

— Freebase

The Adventures of Baron Munchausen

The Adventures of Baron Munchausen

Münchhausen is a 1943 fantasy comedy film directed by Josef von Báky, a prominent director who remained in Germany under the national socialist regime. Science fiction author David Wingrove has commented that this work "sidesteps immediate political issues whilst conjuring up marvellous visual images of an ageless pastoral Germany."

— Freebase

Zoysia

Zoysia

Zoysia is a genus of creeping grasses native to southeast and east Asia and Australasia. These species, commonly called zoysia or zoysiagrass, are found in coastal areas or grasslands. The genus is named after the Austrian botanist Karl von Zois.

— Freebase

Lites

Lites

Lites was a Unix-like operating system, based on 4.4BSD and the Mach microkernel. Specifically, Lites was a multi-threaded server and emulation library that provided unix functionality to a Mach based system. At the time of its release Lites provided binary compatibility with 4.4BSD, NetBSD, FreeBSD, 386BSD, UX and Linux. Lites was originally written by Johannes Helander at Helsinki University of Technology, and was further developed by The Flux Research Group at the University of Utah.

— Freebase

Platelet Glycoprotein GPIb-IX Complex

Platelet Glycoprotein GPIb-IX Complex

Platelet membrane glycoprotein complex essential for normal platelet adhesion and clot formation at sites of vascular injury. It is composed of three polypeptides, GPIb alpha, GPIb beta, and GPIX. Glycoprotein Ib functions as a receptor for von Willebrand factor and for thrombin. Congenital deficiency of the GPIb-IX complex results in Bernard-Soulier syndrome. The platelet glycoprotein GPV associates with GPIb-IX and is also absent in Bernard-Soulier syndrome.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Volborthite

Volborthite

Volborthite is a mineral containing copper and vanadium, with the formula Cu3V2O7(OH)2·2H2O. Found originally in 1838 in the Urals, it was first named knaufite but was later changed to volborthite for Alexander von Volborth, a Russian paleontologist. Tangeite, CaCuVO4, is closely related.

— Freebase

Hoelderlin

Hoelderlin

Hoelderlin is a German progressive rock band that was formed in 1970 as Hölderlin by Joachim and Christian von Grumbkow with Nanny de Ruig. They are influenced by rock, jazz, and folk music. They changed their name to Hoelderlin in 1973.

— Freebase

Johannes Brahms

Johannes Brahms

Johannes Brahms was a German composer and pianist. Born in Hamburg into a Lutheran family, Brahms spent much of his professional life in Vienna, Austria, where he was a leader of the musical scene. In his lifetime, Brahms's popularity and influence were considerable; following a comment by the nineteenth-century conductor Hans von Bülow, he is sometimes grouped with Johann Sebastian Bach and Ludwig van Beethoven as one of the "Three Bs". Brahms composed for piano, chamber ensembles, symphony orchestra, and for voice and chorus. A virtuoso pianist, he premiered many of his own works; he worked with some of the leading performers of his time, including the pianist Clara Schumann and the violinist Joseph Joachim. Many of his works have become staples of the modern concert repertoire. Brahms, an uncompromising perfectionist, destroyed some of his works and left others unpublished. Brahms is often considered both a traditionalist and an innovator. His music is firmly rooted in the structures and compositional techniques of the Baroque and Classical masters. He was a master of counterpoint, the complex and highly disciplined art for which Johann Sebastian Bach is famous, and of development, a compositional ethos pioneered by Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Ludwig van Beethoven, and other composers. Brahms aimed to honour the "purity" of these venerable "German" structures and advance them into a Romantic idiom, in the process creating bold new approaches to harmony and melody. While many contemporaries found his music too academic, his contribution and craftsmanship have been admired by subsequent figures as diverse as Arnold Schoenberg and Edward Elgar. The diligent, highly constructed nature of Brahms's works was a starting point and an inspiration for a generation of composers.

— Freebase

Firmiana

Firmiana

Firmiana is a genus of flowering plant in the Sterculiaceae family. Genus name honors Karl Joseph von Firmian. The genus contains about 16 species, including the following: ⁕Firmiana colorata ⁕Firmiana danxiaensis ⁕Firmiana hainanensis ⁕Firmiana kwangsiensis ⁕Firmiana major ⁕Firmiana pulcherrima ⁕Firmiana simplex — Chinese parasol tree, or wutong

— Freebase

Deepfield

Deepfield

Deepfield is an American alternative rock band from Charleston, South Carolina, consisting of members Baxter Teal III, Aron Robinson, Sean Von Tersch and PJ Farley. They have released two albums and one EP. Their music has been classified as alternative rock and post-grunge. The band is currently based in Chicago, Illinois.

— Freebase

Klatcher

Klatcher

Klatcher.com is a free self-publishing platform that provides authors with impactful, automated business technologies to fuel their online publishing success. Its tools enable everyone to publish texts, rich media and all file formats, build and retain their reader base, and take part in an advanced creative economy that maximizes productivity and income for authors. Klatcher’s strategic goal is to empower every creative mind to make a living from its creativity in less than 60 days.Klatcher currently has a headcount of 9, located in the San Francisco Bay Area (CA), New York (NY), Berlin (Germany), and Chennai (India). It was first launched in August 2008 as a universal publishing tool, focusing on easy to use publishing tools and a one click monetization technology. In beginning of 2009, powerful social networking features, a new user interface and a monetary stimulus technology were added, and launched in public beta testing in April 2009.The company is led by Johannes Bhakdi (CEO) and Robert Kunze (CTO), and is currently a division of Sophotec VC Inc., a Silicon Valley based innovation company focusing on knowledge and mind technologies.

— CrunchBase

Helminthology

Helminthology

Helminthology is the study of parasitic worms. This field deals with the study of their taxonomy and the effect on their hosts. The origin of the first compound of the word is from the Greek ἕλμινς - helmins, meaning "worm". In the 18th and early 19th century there was wave of publications on helminthology in the 19th and at the beginning of the 19th century that has been described as “Golden Era” of helminthology. During that period the authors Peter Simon Pallas, Marcus Elieser Bloch, Otto Friedrich Müller, Johann Goeze, Friedrich Zenker, Carl Asmund Rudolphi and Johann Gottfried Bremser started systematic scientific studies of the subject.

— Freebase

Philipp Lenard

Philipp Lenard

Philipp Eduard Anton von Lenard, was a German physicist and the winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1905 for his research on cathode rays and the discovery of many of their properties. He was also an active proponent of Nazi ideology.

— Freebase

Empiricism

Empiricism

Empiricism is a theory of knowledge which states that knowledge comes only or primarily from sensory experience. One of several views of epistemology, the study of human knowledge, along with rationalism, idealism, and historicism, empiricism emphasizes the role of experience and evidence, especially sensory experience, in the formation of ideas, over the notion of innate ideas or traditions; empiricists may argue however that traditions arise due to relations of previous sense experiences. Empiricism in the philosophy of science emphasizes evidence, especially as discovered in experiments. It is a fundamental part of the scientific method that all hypotheses and theories must be tested against observations of the natural world rather than resting solely on a priori reasoning, intuition, or revelation. Philosophers associated with empiricism include Aristotle, Alhazen, Avicenna, Ibn Tufail, Robert Grosseteste, William of Ockham, Francis Bacon, Thomas Hobbes, Robert Boyle, John Locke, George Berkeley, Hermann von Helmholtz, David Hume, Leopold von Ranke, and John Stuart Mill.

— Freebase

Ernst Werner von Siemens

Ernst Werner von Siemens

Ernst Werner Siemens, von Siemens since 1888, was a German inventor and industrialist. Siemens' name has been adopted as the SI unit of electrical conductance, the siemens. He was also the founder of the electrical and telecommunications company Siemens.

— Freebase

Orthodox

Orthodox

Orthodox is the fourth album by the Czech death metal band Krabathor. It was released in March 1998. The album was recorded in December 1997 at Exponent Studio in Hlohovec, Slovak Republic, and mastered at TTM Mastering in Berlin, Germany by Tom Müller. The recording line-up consisted of Christopher, Bruno and Skull. Tomáš Kmeť, a studio engineer, played keyboards in the last song About Death. The title track Orthodox was previously released on Mortal Memories album. A videoclip for the second song Liquid was released. Shit Comes Brown is an anti-Nazi song and To Red Ones is an anti-communist song.

— Freebase

Subfactor

Subfactor

In the theory of von Neumann algebras, a subfactor of a factor M is a subalgebra that is a factor and contains 1. The theory of subfactors led to the discovery of the Jones polynomial in knot theory.

— Freebase

Vacuum pump

Vacuum pump

A vacuum pump is a device that removes gas molecules from a sealed volume in order to leave behind a partial vacuum. The first vacuum pump was invented in 1650 by Otto von Guericke, and was preceded by the suction pump, which dates to antiquity.

— Freebase

Radnorshire

Radnorshire

the least populous of the Welsh counties; lies on the English border between Montgomery (N.) and Brecknock (S.); has a wild and dreary surface, mountainous and woody. Radnor Forest covers an elevated heathy tract in the E.; is watered by the Wye and the Teme. The soil does not favour agriculture, and stock-raising is the chief industry. Contains some excellent spas, that at Llandrindod the most popular. County town, Presteign.

Radowitz, Joseph von

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Jacquinia

Jacquinia

Jacquinia is a genus of evergreen shrubs and trees in the family Theophrastaceae, native to Central America and the Caribbean. The genus was established by Linnaeus in 1760 and named by him in honor of Nikolaus Joseph von Jacquin. There are about 86 species. IPNI.

— Freebase

ECM Records

ECM Records

ECM is a record label founded in Munich, Germany, in 1969 by Manfred Eicher. While ECM is best known for jazz music, the label has released a wide variety of recordings, and ECM's artists often refuse to acknowledge boundaries between genres. ECM's motto is the Most Beautiful Sound Next to Silence, taken from a 1971 review of ECM releases in CODA, a Canadian jazz magazine. The label was distributed in the USA by Warner Bros. Records, PolyGram Records, BMG, and, since 1999, by Universal Music, the successor of PolyGram. Its album covers have been profiled in two books thus far, Sleeves of Desire and Windfall Light, both published by Lars Müller.

— Freebase

Puffendorf, Samuel

Puffendorf, Samuel

Baron von, eminent German jurist, born at Chemnitz, Saxony; wrote several works on jurisprudence, one of which, under the ban of Austria, was burned there by the hangman, but his "De Jure Naturæ et Gentium" is the one on which his fame rests; was successively in the service of Charles XI. of Sweden and the Elector of Brandenburg (1632-1694).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Cardinal Sin

Cardinal Sin

Cardinal Sin are a death/black metal band formed in 1995 by ex-Dissection member John Zwetsloot. In 1996, they released a 4-track EP called Spiteful Intents, which featured a trademark classical composition by Zwetsloot. Having disbanded after the EP, they reformed in 2003 with a partially new lineup, but have yet to release anything beyond Spiteful Intents. Daniel Ekeroth described their musical style as "typical mid-90’s death/thrash". Metal Hammer journalist Robert Müller wrote that since the group were focussed around the guitarists John Zwetsloot and Devo Andersson there were no doubts about the technical quality, though the EP's sound was "established and all to well-known".

— Freebase

Lucid

Lucid

Lucid is a dataflow programming language. It is designed to experiment with non-von Neumann programming models. It was designed by Bill Wadge and Ed Ashcroft and described in the book Lucid, the Dataflow Programming Language.

— Freebase

Joseph von Fraunhofer

Joseph von Fraunhofer

Joseph Fraunhofer, ennobled in 1824 as Ritter von Fraunhofer was a German optician. He is known for the discovery of the dark absorption lines known as Fraunhofer lines in the Sun's spectrum, and for making excellent optical glass and achromatic telescope objectives.

— Freebase

Glycogen storage disease type I

Glycogen storage disease type I

Glycogen storage disease type I or von Gierke's disease, is the most common of the glycogen storage diseases. This genetic disease results from deficiency of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase, and has an incidence in the American population of approximately 1 in 50,000 to 100,000 births. The deficiency impairs the ability of the liver to produce free glucose from glycogen and from gluconeogenesis. Since these are the two principal metabolic mechanisms by which the liver supplies glucose to the rest of the body during periods of fasting, it causes severe hypoglycemia and results in increased glycogen storage in liver and kidneys. This can lead to enlargement of both. Both organs function normally in childhood, but are susceptible to a variety of problems in adult years. Other metabolic derangements include lactic acidosis and hyperlipidemia. Frequent or continuous feedings of cornstarch or other carbohydrates are the principal treatment. Other therapeutic measures may be needed for associated problems. The disease was named after Edgar von Gierke, the German doctor who discovered it.

— Freebase

Bromellite

Bromellite

Bromellite, whose name derives from the Swedish chemist Magnus von Bromell, is a white oxide mineral, found in complex pegmatitic manganese-iron deposits, but is more frequently made synthetically. This is a rare mineral to encounter in its natural state, but it has been made synthetically for over 40 years.

— Freebase

Bonpland, Aimé

Bonpland, Aimé

a French botanist and traveller, born at Rochelle; companion of Alexander von Humboldt in his S. American scientific explorations; brought home a large collection of plants, thousands of species of them new to Europe; went out again to America, arrested by Dr. Francia in Paraguay as a spy, kept prisoner there for about nine years; released, settled in the prov. of Corrientes, where he died; wrote several works bearing on plants (1773-1858).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

J. Hans D. Jensen

J. Hans D. Jensen

Johannes Hans Daniel Jensen was a German nuclear physicist. During World War II, he worked on the German nuclear energy project, known as the Uranium Club, in which he made contributions to the separation of uranium isotopes. After the war Jensen was a professor at the University of Heidelberg. He was a visiting professor at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, the Institute for Advanced Study, Indiana University, and the California Institute of Technology. Jensen shared half of the 1963 Nobel Prize for Physics with Maria Göppert-Mayer for their proposal of the nuclear shell model.

— Freebase

Potsdam

Potsdam

18 m. SW. of Berlin, stands on an island at the confluence of the Nuthe and Havel, and is the capital of the Prussian province of Brandenburg; a handsome town, with broad streets, many parks and squares, numberless statues and fine public buildings; it is a favourite residence of Prussian royalty, and has several royal palaces; was the birthplace of Alexander von Humboldt; has sugar and chemical works, and a large violet-growing industry.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Plastination

Plastination

Plastination is a technique or process used in anatomy to preserve bodies or body parts, first developed by Gunther von Hagens in 1977. The water and fat are replaced by certain plastics, yielding specimens that can be touched, do not smell or decay, and even retain most properties of the original sample.

— Freebase

Steuben

Steuben

Steuben is a town in Oneida County, New York, United States. The population was 1,110 at the 2010 census. The town is named after Baron von Steuben. The Town of Steuben in northeast of Utica, New York.

— Freebase

Karl Baedeker

Karl Baedeker

Karl Ludwig Johannes Baedeker, known universally as Karl Baedeker, was a German publisher whose company Baedeker set the standard for authoritative guidebooks for tourists. Karl Baedeker was descended from a long line of printers, booksellers and publishers. He was the eldest of ten children of Gottschalk Diederich Bädeker, who had inherited the publishing house founded by his own father, Zacharias Gerhard Bädeker. The company also published the local newspaper, the Essendische Zeitung, and the family expected that Karl, too, would eventually join the firm. Karl changed the spelling of the family name from Bädeker with the umlaut to Baedeker around 1850.

— Freebase

Humboldt Glacier

Humboldt Glacier

Humboldt Glacier is the widest tidewater glacier in the Northern Hemisphere. It borders the Kane Basin in North West Greenland. Its front is 110 km wide. It has been retreating in the period of observation spanning 1975-2010. The glacier is named after German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt.

— Freebase


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