Definitions containing müller, george

We've found 250 definitions:

Geiger counter

Geiger counter

A Geiger–Müller counter, also called a Geiger counter, is a type of particle detector that measures ionizing radiation. It detects the emission of nuclear radiation — alpha particles, beta particles, or gamma rays — by the ionization produced in a low-pressure gas in a Geiger–Müller tube, which gives its name to the instrument. In wide and prominent use as a hand-held radiation survey instrument, it is perhaps society's best-known radiation instrument. The original operating principle was discovered in 1908 in early radiation research. Since the subsequent development of the Geiger-Müller tube in 1928 the Geiger-Müller counter has been a popular instrument for use in radiation dosimetry, health physics, experimental physics, the nuclear industry, geological exploration and other fields, due to its robust sensing element and relatively low cost. However there are limitations in measuring high radiation rates and in measuring the energy of incident radiation.

— Freebase

St. Georges Cross

St. Georges Cross

St George's Cross (or the Cross of St George) is a red cross on a white background. This pattern was associated with Saint George from medieval times.

— Wiktionary

Max Müller

Max Müller

Friedrich Max Müller, generally known as Max Müller, was a German-born philologist and Orientalist, who lived and studied in Britain for most of his life. He was one of the founders of the western academic field of Indian studies and the discipline of comparative religion. Müller wrote both scholarly and popular works on the subject of Indology and the Sacred Books of the East, a 50-volume set of English translations, was prepared under his direction. He also put forward and promoted the idea of a Turanian family of languages and Turanian people.

— Freebase

Cancridae

Cancridae

Cancridae is a family of crabs. It comprises six extant genera, and eleven exclusively fossil genera, in two subfamilies: Cancrinae Latreille, 1802 ⁕Anatolikos Schweitzer & Feldmann, 2000 ⁕†Anisospinos Schweitzer & Feldmann, 2000 ⁕Cancer Linnaeus, 1758 ⁕†Ceronnectes De Angeli & Beschin, 1998 ⁕†Cyclocancer Beurlen, 1958 ⁕Glebocarcinus Nations, 1975 ⁕Metacarcinus A. Milne-Edwards, 1862 ⁕†Microdium Reuss, 1867 ⁕†Notocarcinus Schweitzer & Feldmann, 2000 ⁕Platepistoma Rathbun, 1906 ⁕Romaleon Gistel, 1848 ⁕†Santeecarcinus Blow & Manning, 1996 ⁕†Sarahcarcinus Blow & Manning, 1996 †Lobocarcininae Beurlen, 1930 ⁕†Lobocarcinus Reuss, 1857 ⁕†Miocyclus Müller, 1978 ⁕†Tasadia Müller in Janssen & Müller, 1984 Before 2000, the extant species were all placed in a single genus, but in that year Carrie Schweitzer and Rodney Feldmann elevated the existing subgenera to the rank of genus, and described three additional genera. Most of the family's current diversity is found in temperate waters of the Northern Hemisphere.

— Freebase

Hyalite

Hyalite

Hyalite is a form of opal with a glassy and clear appearance which exhibits an internal play of colors and has natural inclusions. It is also called Muller's glass, water opal and jalite. Its Mohs hardness is 5.5 to 6 and it has a specific gravity of 2.1. It is an amorphous form of silica. Its has a conchoidal fracture, a vitreous luster and a white streak. It is sometimes mistaken for resin opal, since they both look like little globs. It glows bright green under blacklight. The name Müller's glass derived from the name of its discoverer, Franz-Joseph Müller von Reichenstein

— Freebase

Rhinoptera

Rhinoptera

Rhinoptera is a genus of eagle rays, family Myliobatidae, commonly known as the cownose rays It contains the following species: ⁕Rhinoptera adspersa J. P. Müller & Henle, 1841 ⁕Rhinoptera bonasus ⁕Rhinoptera brasiliensis J. P. Müller, 1836 ⁕Rhinoptera javanica J. P. Müller & Henle, 1841 ⁕Rhinoptera jayakari Boulenger, 1895 ⁕Rhinoptera marginata ⁕Rhinoptera neglecta J. D. Ogilby, 1912 ⁕Rhinoptera steindachneri Evermann & O. P. Jenkins, 1891

— Freebase

Lunik

Lunik

Lunik is a band from Switzerland. There are currently three members. Lunik started in 1997 with Adi Amstutz, Luk Zimmermann, Mats Marti, Walo Müller and Anton Höglhammer. Singer Jaël joined the band in 1998 and Anton Höglhammer left the line-up. 1999 saw the release of their debut album Rumour, recorded largely in an atmospheric trip hop style. Bassist Walo Müller left the band after the accompanying tour, and the second album Ahead saw the band steering towards a pop sound. Oli Müller supported the band as bassist in the live performances, and Adi Amstutz left the band. The third album Weather was a huge success in Switzerland, with an acoustic approach from Jaël, Luk, and Mats replacing the electronica of the earlier albums. Cédric Monnier and Jacob Suske joined the band as supporting players on the acoustic tour for Weather. A live album, Life is On Our Side, appeared in 2004. Cédric Monnier and Jacob Suske joined the official line-up in 2005, and Mats Marti departed at the same time. In the beginning of 2006, Chrigel Bosshard joined Lunik as the new drummer, but left the band at the end of 2011. Jacob Suske left the band again in September 2008.

— Freebase

01

01

Released in 2001,´01 is the seventh solo album by the Slovak singer Richard Müller. Müller wrote most of the lyrics and, due to the death of his favourite composer Jaro Filip, Müller also composed half of the music. The album was critically well received, and placed at number 9 in the Czech musicserver.cz's list of the 25 best Czech and Slovak albums of the decade.

— Freebase

The Mission

The Mission

The Mission: Memory of a Revolution, also known as The Task, is a postmodern drama by the German playwright Heiner Müller. The play was written and first published in 1979. Müller and his wife Ginka Cholakova co-directed its first theatrical production in 1980, at the intimate 'Theatre im 3.Stock' studio space of the Volksbühne in Berlin. Müller also directed a full-house production in 1982 at the Bochum Theatre in West Germany.

— Freebase

Caroline of Brunswick

Caroline of Brunswick

Caroline of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel was the Queen consort of King George IV of the United Kingdom from 29 January 1820 until her death. Between 1795 and 1820, she was Princess of Wales. Her father was the ruler of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel in modern-day Germany, and her mother, Princess Augusta, was the sister of George III. In 1794, she was engaged to George III's eldest son and heir apparent, George, Prince of Wales, although they had never met and George was already married illegally to Maria Fitzherbert. George and Caroline married the following year, and nine months later Caroline had a child, Princess Charlotte of Wales. Shortly after Charlotte's birth, George and Caroline separated. By 1806, rumours that Caroline had taken lovers and had an illegitimate child led to an investigation into her private life. The dignitaries who led the investigation concluded that there was "no foundation" to the rumours, but Caroline's access to her daughter was restricted. In 1814, Caroline left England and moved to Italy, where she employed Bartolomeo Pergami as a servant. Pergami soon became Caroline's closest companion, and it was widely assumed that they were lovers. In 1817, Caroline was devastated when her daughter Charlotte died in childbirth; she heard the news from a passing courier as George had refused to write and tell her. He was determined to divorce Caroline, and set up a second investigation to collect evidence of her adultery.

— Freebase

George Town

George Town

George Town is the capital of the state of Penang in Malaysia. Named after Britain's King George III, George Town is located on the north-east corner of Penang Island. The inner city has a population of 720,202 and the metropolitan area known as George Town Conurbation which consists of Penang Island, Seberang Prai, Sungai Petani and Kulim has a combined population of 2,251,042, making it the second largest metropolitan area in Malaysia. Formerly a municipality and then a city in its own right, since 1976 George Town has been part of the Municipality of Penang Island, though the area formerly governed by the City Council of George Town is still commonly referred to as a city. George Town is also known as Tanjung in Malay, 乔治市 in Chinese and ஜோர்ஜ் டவுன் in Tamil. Its Malay name is derived from the older name of the town, Tanjung Penaga. The inner city of George Town is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

— Freebase

Bushism

Bushism

The political philosophy associated with either of the US presidents George W. Bush and George H. W. Bush

— Wiktionary

The Money

The Money

Jerry's parents sell the Cadillac to Jack Klompus for $6000 in order to give Jerry some money to help him out. They along with Kramer suggest that Jerry might try a career move. Elaine talks about her Peterman stock options and buys George's coffee. He thinks she is sticking it to him. Jerry and George talk about the money their parents might have. This piques George's interest. Kramer seeks advice from Elaine about his girlfriend's post-sex bed habit "she's got the jimmy legs." Jerry flies to Florida to buy the Cadillac back. George seeks information on his family's health history. Kramer works out a deal with his girlfriend. Jerry meets with Klompus and agrees to pay $14,000 for it. George anticipating a big inheritance begins to spend money. Unfortunately for him, so do his parents. Klompus has a problem with the car and Jerry returns to Florida. Jerry's parents are still worried about him and wonder what to do. Morty decides to see Elaine about a job; she reluctantly agrees to give him a job, just as Peterman returns. Kramer, fearing a prowler (Jerry's dad), decides he can no longer sleep alone; unfortunately his girlfriend has decided she can. So he moves in with the Costanzas, who tell George that they are moving to Florida. Elaine returns to her regular position at Peterman, with no options. George and Elaine try to discuss their respective problems. Still in Florida, strapped for cash and credit, Jerry sleeps in the Cadillac. Kramer and Emily spend the night as an old married couple in the Costanzas' house. The Seinfelds make a change in their housing as the Costanzas try to settle into their new place.

— Freebase

Hyalite

Hyalite

a pellucid variety of opal in globules looking like colorless gum or resin; -- called also Muller's glass

— Webster Dictionary

Mullerian

Mullerian

of, pertaining to, or discovered by, Johannes Muller

— Webster Dictionary

The Centaur

The Centaur

The Centaur is a novel by John Updike, published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1963. It won the U.S. National Book Award for Fiction. The story concerns George Caldwell, a school teacher, and his son Peter, outside of Alton, Pennsylvania. The novel explores the relationship between the depressive Caldwell and his anxious son. George has largely given up on life; what glory he knew, as a football player and soldier in World War I, has passed. He feels put upon by the school's principal, and he views his students as hapless and uninterested in anything he has to teach them. Peter, meanwhile, is a budding aesthete who idolizes Vermeer and dreams of becoming a painter in a big city, like New York. He has no friends his age, and regularly worries that his peers might detect his psoriasis, which stains his skin and flecks his clothes every season but summer. One thing George and Peter share is the desire to get out, to escape their hometown. This masculine desire for escape appears in Updike's famed "Rabbit" novels. Similarly, the novel's image of Peter's mother alone on an unfarmed farm is one we later see in Updike's 1965 novel Of the Farm. Like James Joyce in Ulysses, Updike drew on the myths of antiquity in an attempt to turn a modern and common scene into something more profound, a meditation on life and man's relationship to nature and eternity. George is both the Centaur Chiron and Prometheus, Mr. Hummel, the automobile mechanic, is Hephaestus; and so forth. The novel's structure is unusual; the narrative shifts from present day to retrospective, from describing the characters as George, Vera, and the rest, to the Centaur, Venus, and so forth. It also is punctuated with a feverish dream scene and a newspaper obituary of George. Near the end of the book, Updike includes two untranslated Greek sentences. Their translation is as follows:

— Freebase

Curious George

Curious George

Curious George is the protagonist of a series of popular children's books by the same name, written by Hans Augusto Rey and Margret Rey. The books feature a curious brown monkey named George, who is brought from his home in Africa by "The Man with The Yellow Hat" to live with him in a big city. When the first story, Cecily G. and the Nine Monkeys was published in France in 1939, George was named Fifi. In the United Kingdom, George was originally called "Zozo" in 1941, apparently to avoid using the name of the then King George VI for a monkey. Books featuring the adventures of Curious George have been translated from the original French into many other languages in addition to English. The books are popular worldwide.

— Freebase

St. George

St. George

St. George is a city located in the southwestern part of the U.S. state of Utah on the Utah-Arizona border, and the county seat of Washington County, Utah. It is the principal city of and is included in the St. George Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city is 117 miles northeast of Las Vegas, Nevada, and 303 miles south-southwest of Salt Lake City on Interstate 15. As of 2012 St. George had a population of 75,561. St. George was the second fastest-growing metropolitan area in the United States, only after Greeley, Colorado in 2005, this trend continued through 2007, when growth slowed substantially due to the economic recession. In 2012, the St. George metropolitan area had an estimated 144,809 residents. The hub of southern Utah and Utah's Dixie, a nickname given to the area when Mormon pioneers grew cotton in the warm climate, St. George is the seventh-largest city in Utah and the largest city in the state outside of the Wasatch Front. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, it had the distinction in the late 2000s of having the fastest white population growth in the nation.

— Freebase

Müller

Müller

Unternehmensgruppe Theo Müller is a multinational producer of dairy products, with a headquarters in Fischach in the German state of Bavaria. Müller made a net turnover of €2.1 billion in 2006 and has 5,400 employees.

— Freebase

Proportional counter

Proportional counter

The proportional counter is a type of gaseous ionization detector device used to count particles of ionizing radiation. A key feature is its ability to measure the energy of incident radiation, and it is widely used where discrimination between radiation types is required, such as between alpha and beta particles. A proportional counter uses a combination of the mechanisms of a Geiger-Muller tube and an ionisation chamber, and operates in an intermediate voltage region between these. Considering a gas-filled chamber with a wire anode, if the field strength everywhere in the volume is below a critical value, Townsend avalanches do not occur at all, and the detector operates as an ionization chamber. If the applied voltage is too high, complete ionisation of the fill gas occurs with almost each ion pair and the detector operates as a Geiger-Müller counter, with the consequent loss of incident particle energy information. The accompanying plot shows the proportional operating region for a co-axial cylinder arrangement.

— Freebase

Fling

Fling

Fling, internationally titled Lie to Me, is an independent film about a couple navigating the hazards of an open relationship. It is the feature directorial debut of director John Stewart Muller and stars Brandon Routh, Steve Sandvoss, Courtney Ford, Nick Wechsler, Shoshana Bush and Ellen Hollman. It is the first feature from Santa Monica-based Steele Films and was written and produced by John Stewart Muller and his partner Laura Boersma. Fling features Brandon Routh in his first lead role since Superman Returns. It premiered to a sold out crowd at the 2008 Newport Beach Film Festival on April 26 in the Lido Theater on the Balboa Peninsula. The film received an award for "Outstanding Achievement in Filmmaking" from the festival's jury. Fling had its official Los Angeles premiere on October 18th at the Fine Arts Theatre on Wilshire Blvd. as part of the 2008 LA Femme Film Festival. Shortly thereafter, it had its completely sold out East Coast premiere on November 7 at the 2008 Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival. One week later on November 14, Fling had its Midwest premiere at the Screenland Theatre in the Crossroads District of Kansas City, Missouri which kicked off a month-long run at the theater.

— Freebase

Hans Geiger

Hans Geiger

Johannes "Hans" Wilhelm Geiger was a German physicist. He is perhaps best known as the co-inventor of the Geiger counter and for the Geiger-Marsden experiment which discovered the Atomic nucleus. Geiger was born at Neustadt-an-der-Haardt, Germany. He was one of five children born to the Indologist Wilhelm Ludwig Geiger, who was professor at the University of Erlangen. In 1902, Geiger started studying physics and mathematics in University of Erlangen and was awarded a doctorate in 1906. In 1907 he began work with Ernest Rutherford at the University of Manchester and in 1909, along with Ernest Marsden, conducted the famous Geiger-Marsden experiment called the "gold foil experiment". Together they created the Geiger counter. In 1911 Geiger and John Mitchell Nuttall discovered the Geiger-Nuttall law and performed experiments that led to Rutherford's atomic model. In 1928 Geiger and his student Walther Müller created an improved version of the Geiger counter, the Geiger-Müller counter. Geiger also worked with James Chadwick. In 1912 he became leader of the Physical-Technical Reichsanstalt in Berlin, 1925 professor in Kiel, 1929 in Tübingen, and from 1936 in Berlin.

— Freebase

Electroretinography

Electroretinography

Electroretinography measures the electrical responses of various cell types in the retina, including the photoreceptors, inner retinal cells, and the ganglion cells. Electrodes are usually placed on the cornea and the skin near the eye, although it is possible to record the ERG from skin electrodes. During a recording, the patient's eyes are exposed to standardized stimuli and the resulting signal is displayed showing the time course of the signal's amplitude. Signals are very small, and typically are measured in microvolts or nanovolts. The ERG is composed of electrical potentials contributed by different cell types within the retina, and the stimulus conditions can elicit stronger response from certain components. If a flash ERG is performed on a dark-adapted eye, the response is primarily from the rod system. Flash ERGs performed on a light adapted eye will reflect the activity of the cone system. Sufficiently bright flashes will elicit ERGs containing an a-wave followed by a b-wave. The leading edge of the a-wave is produced by the photoreceptors, while the remainder of the wave is produced by a mixture of cells including photoreceptors, bipolar, amacrine, and Muller cells or Muller glia. The pattern ERG, evoked by an alternating checkerboard stimulus, primarily reflects activity of retinal ganglion cells.

— Freebase

Henotheism

Henotheism

Henotheism is the belief and worship of a single god while accepting the existence or possible existence of other deities that may also be worshipped. The term was originally coined by Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling to depict early stages of monotheism, however Max Müller, a German philologist and orientalist, brought the term into common usage. Müller made the term central to his criticism of Western theological and religious exceptionalism, focusing on a cultural dogma which held "monotheism" to be both fundamentally well-defined and inherently superior to differing conceptions of God.

— Freebase

Kathenotheism

Kathenotheism

Kathenotheism is a term coined by the philologist Max Müller to mean the worship of one god at a time. It is closely related to henotheism. Müller coined the term in reference to the Vedas; where he explained each deity is treated as supreme in turn.

— Freebase

Johann Muller

Johann Muller

Gysbert Johannes Muller, more commonly known as Johann Muller, is a South African Rugby Union player. He played lock for the Natal Sharks, Sharks in and the Springboks, before a move to Northern Ireland to play with Ulster in 2010, where he is currently team captain.

— Freebase

Culcita

Culcita

Culcita is a genus of cushion stars. They are found in tropical waters. Some are kept in home aquaruims. The genus contains three species: ⁕Culcita coriacea Müller & Troschel, 1842 ⁕Culcita novaeguineae Müller & Troschel, 1842 ⁕Culcita schmideliana

— Freebase

Hermann Joseph Muller

Hermann Joseph Muller

Hermann Joseph Muller was an American geneticist, educator, and Nobel laureate best known for his work on the physiological and genetic effects of radiation as well as his outspoken political beliefs. Muller frequently warned of the long-term dangers of radioactive fallout from nuclear war and nuclear testing, helping to raise public awareness in this area.

— Freebase

Winterreise

Winterreise

Winterreise is a song cycle for voice and piano by Franz Schubert, a setting of 24 poems by Wilhelm Müller. It is the second of Schubert's two great song cycles on Müller's poems, the earlier being Die schöne Müllerin. Both were originally written for tenor voice but are frequently transposed to suit other vocal ranges - the precedent being established by Schubert himself. These two works have posed interpretative demands on listeners and performers due to their scale and structural coherence. Although Ludwig van Beethoven's cycle An die ferne Geliebte had been published earlier, in 1816, Schubert's two cycles hold the foremost place in the history of the genre.

— Freebase

Going

Going

Going.com (previously HeyLetsGo.com) lets users connect with other event-goers before, during and after events. The site has over 500,000 users which isn’t bad considering the site currently only operates in four cities (New York, Boston, San Francisco and Chicago). The site is trying to become the local entertainment destination for 20 somethings in the cities mentioned above. So far they are doing pretty well – from January 2007 to July 2007, the site grew twelve-fold. Going has said that their future plans consist of expanding their platform and moving into new markets.The two venture capitalists who have led investments in Going and sit on the board, George Bell" rel="nofollow">George Bell and Bob Davis, used to be rivals. They respectively lead Excite@Home and Lycos.There are many other event sites out there including Zvents and Eventful, but most aren’t focusing on the 20 something crowd. Another site that could be looked at as competition is nightlife social networking site LateNightShots, but it’s currently dedicated to Washington DC.

— CrunchBase

Mount Vernon

Mount Vernon

Mount Vernon, located in Fairfax County, Virginia near Alexandria, was the plantation home of the first President of the United States, George Washington. The estate is situated on the banks of the Potomac River across from Prince George's County, Maryland. The Washington family had owned land in the area since the time of Washington's great-grandfather in 1674, and in 1739 embarked on an expansion of the estate that continued under George Washington. He came into possession of the estate in 1754, but did not become its sole owner until 1761. The mansion is built of wood in a loose Palladian style, and was constructed by George Washington in stages between 1757 and 1778; it occupies the site of an earlier, smaller house built for George Washington's brother, Lawrence, in 1741. It remained Washington's country home for the rest of his life. Following his death in 1799, under the ownership of several successive generations of the family, the estate progressively declined. In 1858, the house's historical importance was recognized and it was saved from ruin by the The Mount Vernon Ladies' Association; this philanthropic organization acquired it together with part of the Washington estate. Escaping the damage suffered by many plantation houses during the American Civil War, Mount Vernon was restored.

— Freebase

Cross

Cross

an appendage or ornament or anything in the form of a cross; a badge or ornamental device of the general shape of a cross; hence, such an ornament, even when varying considerably from that form; thus, the Cross of the British Order of St. George and St. Michael consists of a central medallion with seven arms radiating from it

— Webster Dictionary

Geordie

Geordie

a name given by miners to George Stephenson's safety lamp

— Webster Dictionary

George

George

a figure of St. George (the patron saint of England) on horseback, appended to the collar of the Order of the Garter. See Garter

— Webster Dictionary

Harmonite

Harmonite

one of a religious sect, founded in Wurtemburg in the last century, composed of followers of George Rapp, a weaver. They had all their property in common. In 1803, a portion of this sect settled in Pennsylvania and called the village thus established, Harmony

— Webster Dictionary

Quaker

Quaker

one of a religious sect founded by George Fox, of Leicestershire, England, about 1650, -- the members of which call themselves Friends. They were called Quakers, originally, in derision. See Friend, n., 4

— Webster Dictionary

Syncretist

Syncretist

an adherent of George Calixtus and other Germans of the seventeenth century, who sought to unite or reconcile the Protestant sects with each other and with the Roman Catholics, and thus occasioned a long and violent controversy in the Lutheran church

— Webster Dictionary

View

View

the pictorial representation of a scene; a sketch, /ither drawn or painted; as, a fine view of Lake George

— Webster Dictionary

Washingtonian

Washingtonian

pertaining to, or characteristic of, George Washington; as, a Washingtonian policy

— Webster Dictionary

St George's Channel

St George's Channel

St George's Channel is a sea channel connecting the Irish Sea to the north and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. Historically, the name "St Georges Channel" was used interchangeably with "Irish Sea" or "Irish Channel" to encompass all the waters between Ireland to the west and Great Britain to the east. Later it was restricted to the portion separating Wales from Leinster, sometimes extending south to the waters between the West Country of England and East Munster; the latter have since the 1970s come to be called the Celtic Sea. In Ireland "St George's Channel" is now usually taken to refer only to the narrowest part of the channel, between Carnsore Point in Wexford and St David's Head in Pembrokeshire. However, it remains common in Ireland to talk about a cross-channel trip, cross-channel soccer, etc., where "cross-channel" means "to/from Great Britain". The current edition of the International Hydrographic Organization's publication Limits of Oceans and Seas defines the southern limit of "Irish Sea and St. George's Channel" as "A line joining St. David's Head to Carnsore Point"; it does not define the two waterbodies separately. The 2002 draft fourth edition omits the "and St. George's Channel" part of the label.

— Freebase

George Foreman Grill

George Foreman Grill

The George Foreman Lean Mean Fat-Reducing Grilling Machine, commonly known as the George Foreman Grill, is an indoor, electrically-heated grill manufactured by Spectrum Brands. It is promoted by former boxing champion George Foreman. Since its introduction in 1994, over 100 million George Foreman grills have been sold worldwide.

— Freebase

Ira Gershwin

Ira Gershwin

Ira Gershwin was an American lyricist who collaborated with his younger brother, composer George Gershwin, to create some of the most memorable songs of the 20th century. With George he wrote more than a dozen Broadway shows, featuring songs such as "I Got Rhythm," "Embraceable You," "The Man I Love" and "Someone to Watch Over Me." He was also responsible, along with DuBose Heyward, for the libretto to George's opera Porgy and Bess. The success the brothers had with their collaborative works has often overshadowed the creative role that Ira played. However, his mastery of songwriting continued after the early death of George. He wrote additional hit songs with composers Jerome Kern, Kurt Weill and Harold Arlen. His critically acclaimed book Lyrics on Several Occasions of 1959, an amalgam of autobiography and annotated anthology, is an important source for studying the art of the lyricist in the golden age of American popular song.

— Freebase

Boolean

Boolean

Of or pertaining to the work of George Boole.

— Wiktionary

accusatory

accusatory

Pertaining to, or containing, an accusation; "as, an accusatory libel" - George Grote

— Wiktionary

Georgian

Georgian

Of the reign of a King George, or in the style of that reign. (mostly British).

— Wiktionary

Georgian

Georgian

Of, from, or characteristic of the reigns of Kings George I-IV of the UK (1714-1837).

— Wiktionary

Sequoyah

Sequoyah

Inventor of the syllabary for writing the Cherokee language, also known as George Guess.

— Wiktionary

George

George

or Georgia; also used in the conjoined name George Ann(e).

— Wiktionary

Big Brother

Big Brother

The nominal leader of Oceania in George Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four.

— Wiktionary

Dubya

Dubya

A nickname for George W. Bush.

— Wiktionary

additionary

additionary

additional - George Herbert.

— Wiktionary

pygmalion

pygmalion

One who acts as the legendary Greek sculptor Pygmalion (who was granted the wish of having life given to a sculpture of his which he loved a great deal), as in George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion in which he sometimes refers to his main character (Henry Higgins) as Pygmalion Higgins.

— Wiktionary

pygmalion

pygmalion

Bloody (only in 'not pygmalion likely'), from the sensational, and then scandalous, line 'not bloody likely' in George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion.

— Wiktionary

Orwellian

Orwellian

Pertaining to or resembling the works of George Orwell, especially in reference to the dystopia in Nineteen Eighty-Four

— Wiktionary

Washington

Washington

George Washington, the Commander in Chief of the Continental Army of the American rebels and first President of the United States of America, from 1789 to 1797.

— Wiktionary

Washington

Washington

popular during the first century of American independence, also in the form George Washington.

— Wiktionary

St. Georges Day

St. Georges Day

The saint's day of Saint George, the patron saint of England, celebrated on April 23.

— Wiktionary

Bushism

Bushism

A turn of phrase spoken by President George W. Bush that is unintentionally comical due to grammatical errors, malapropisms, etc.

— Wiktionary

Bushian

Bushian

Of or pertaining to a person named Bush, in particular and usually President of the United States, George W. Bush:

— Wiktionary

W

W

Nickname for George W. Bush

— Wiktionary

Mitchell principles

Mitchell principles

six recommendations, set out in a report by US Senator George Mitchell, urging everyone involved in the Northern Ireland conflict to renounce violence and agree to disarmament before entering into all-party negotiations

— Wiktionary

Shavian

Shavian

Of, or relating to George Bernard Shaw or his works.

— Wiktionary

Shavian alphabet

Shavian alphabet

a synthetic alphabet, invented by George Bernard Shaw in an attempt to overcome the difficulties in English spelling

— Wiktionary

Byron

Byron

George Gordon (Noel) Byron, 6th Baron Byron (January 22, 1788u2013April 19, 1824), a famous English poet and leading figure in romanticism.

— Wiktionary

Georgie

Georgie

A diminutive of the male given name George.

— Wiktionary

bushwhacking

bushwhacking

criticizing, by someone or a person(s), on policies and stances by George W. Bush, in forums and discussions

— Wiktionary

Irish Sea

Irish Sea

A sea between the islands of Great Britain and Ireland; bordered to the north by the North Channel and to the south by St George's Channel and the Celtic Sea.

— Wiktionary

Geordie

Geordie

A diminutive of the male given name George.

— Wiktionary

Georgina

Georgina

, the feminine form of George.

— Wiktionary

downey heads

downey heads

British stamps with the image of King George V, based on a photograph by the court photographers W & D Downey.

— Wiktionary

Union Jack

Union Jack

The flag of the United Kingdom, consisting of the flags of England (St. George's Cross), Scotland (St. Andrew's Cross), and Ireland (St. Patrick's Cross) now only used in Northern Ireland combined.

— Wiktionary

Newspeak

Newspeak

The fictional language devised to meet the needs of Ingsoc in the novel Nineteen Eighty-four (George Orwell, 1949). Designed to restrict the words, and hence the thoughts, of the citizens of Oceania.

— Wiktionary

Blairism

Blairism

The political ideology attributed to the governments of British Prime Minister Tony Blair 1997-2007, characterised by, among other things, the Third Way, supporting the United States President George W Bush

— Wiktionary

u00C6

u00C6

The pseudonym of the Irish writer George William Russell.

— Wiktionary

Bradshaw

Bradshaw

A former railway guide and timetable published by George Bradshaw

— Wiktionary

teleological argument

teleological argument

A type of argument for the existence of God, advanced by a number of philosophers, including Thomas Aquinas and George Berkeley, which maintains that the design of the world reveals that objects have purposes or ends and that such an organized design must be the creation of a supreme designer (God). Also called the argument from design.

— Wiktionary

ectypal

ectypal

Copied, as contrasted with an archetypal original. Has a specialised sense when used by the philosopher George Berkeley.

— Wiktionary

Gallup poll

Gallup poll

A poll of the opinion of randomly chosen persons, used to represent the opinion of the public, conducted by w:George Gallup or one the companies he founded.

— Wiktionary

Herschel

Herschel

The planet Uranus. In use until the mid-19th century as an alternative to Georgium Sidus after King George III.

— Wiktionary

spencer

spencer

A short, close-fitting jacket primarily worn by women and children in the early nineteenth century; probably named after George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer (1758-1834).

— Wiktionary

Georgiana

Georgiana

derived from George.

— Wiktionary

Georgianna

Georgianna

, a spelling variant of Georgiana, confused with George + Anna.

— Wiktionary

Bushonomics

Bushonomics

The economic policies associated with the presidency of George Herbert Walker Bush, 1989-1993.

— Wiktionary

Bushonomics

Bushonomics

The economic policies associated with the presidency of George W. Bush, 2001-2009.

— Wiktionary

Washingtons Birthday

Washingtons Birthday

A federal holiday in the USA celebrated on the third Monday of February, during which the US presidents, especially George Washington, are celebrated or remembered.

— Wiktionary

Byronic

Byronic

Of or pertaining to British Romantic poet George Gordon Byron (1788-1824) or his writings.

— Wiktionary

Lakoffian

Lakoffian

Of or pertaining to George P Lakoff (1941-), American cognitive linguist noted for his ideas about the centrality of metaphor to human thinking and behaviour.

— Wiktionary

Georgie Porgie

Georgie Porgie

alternative form of George not used as a given name but often nominally.

— Wiktionary

Bushist

Bushist

A supporter of George W. Bush, or advocate of his policies

— Wiktionary

Regency

Regency

the historical period in the United Kingdom - specifically 1811-1820 - in which King George IV ruled as Prince Regent.

— Wiktionary

Shawism

Shawism

A belief, quotation, etc. attributed to the Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950).

— Wiktionary

Byronian

Byronian

Of or pertaining to British Romantic poet George Gordon Byron (1788-1824) or his writings.

— Wiktionary

Zograf

Zograf

Saint George the Zograf, an icon in

— Wiktionary

Paschal Lamb

Paschal Lamb

A lamb depicted with nimbus and bearing a flag (usually St. George's cross: argent a cross gules).

— Wiktionary

Byronesque

Byronesque

Reminiscent of the works of George Gordon Byron, typified by gloomy Romantic themes and passionate, arrogant and self-destructive heroes.

— Wiktionary

Celtic Sea

Celtic Sea

the area of the Atlantic Ocean off the south coast of Ireland bounded by Saint George's Channel, the Bristol Channel, the English Channel, and the Bay of Biscay

— Wiktionary

New Brunswick

New Brunswick

A province of eastern Canada, one of the Maritime Provinces with NOVA SCOTIA; PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND; and sometimes NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR. Its capital is Fredericton. It was named in honor of King George III, of the House of Hanover, also called Brunswick. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p828 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p375)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Prince Edward Island

Prince Edward Island

An island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence constituting a province of Canada in the eastern part of the country. It is very irregular in shape with many deep inlets. Its capital is Charlottetown. Discovered by the French in 1534 and originally named Ile Saint-Jean, it was renamed in 1799 in honor of Prince Edward, fourth son of George III and future father of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p981 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p433)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Tonga

Tonga

An archipelago in Polynesia in the southwest Pacific Ocean, comprising about 150 islands. It is a kingdom whose capital is Nukualofa. It was discovered by the Dutch in 1616, visited by Tasman in 1643, and by Captain Cook in 1773 and 1777. The modern kingdom was established during the reign of King George Tupou I, 1845-93. It became a British protectorate in 1900 and gained independence in 1970. The name Tonga may be of local origin, meaning either island or holy. Its other name, Friendly Islands, was given by Captain Cook from the welcome given him by the natives. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1219 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p549)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Personal Construct Theory

Personal Construct Theory

A psychological theory based on dimensions or categories used by a given person in describing or explaining the personality and behavior of others or of himself. The basic idea is that different people will use consistently different categories. The theory was formulated in the fifties by George Kelly. Two tests devised by him are the role construct repertory test and the repertory grid test. (From Stuart Sutherland, The International Dictionary of Psychology, 1989)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Kinesiology, Applied

Kinesiology, Applied

The study of muscles and the movement of the human body. In holistic medicine it is the balance of movement and the interaction of a person's energy systems. Applied kinesiology is the name given by its inventor, Dr. George Goodheart, to the system of applying muscle testing diagnostically and therapeutically to different aspects of health care. (Thorsons Introductory Guide to Kinesiology, 1992, p13)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Grenada

Grenada

An island of the West Indies. Its capital is St. George's. It was discovered in 1498 by Columbus who called it Concepcion. It was held at different times by the French and the British during the 18th century. The British suppressed a native uprising in 1795. It was an associate state of Great Britain 1967-74 but became an independent nation within the British Commonwealth in 1974. The original name referred to the Feast of the Immaculate Conception but it was later renamed for the Spanish kingdom of Granada. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p467 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p219)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

TISH

TISH

TISH was a Canadian poetry newsletter, founded by student-poets at the University of British Columbia in 1961 and edited by a number of Vancouver poets until 1969. The newsletter's poetics were built on those of writers associated with North Carolina's Black Mountain College experiment. Contributing writers included George Bowering, Fred Wah, Frank Davey, Daphne Marlatt, David Cull, Carol Bolt, Dan McLeod, Robert Hogg, Jamie Reid, and Lionel Kearns. Influenced by the poetry theorist Warren Tallman, the Tish Group also drew inspiration from Robert Creeley, Robert Duncan, Charles Olson and Jack Spicer. TISH was the launching pad for a number of other publications including the alternative newspaper The Georgia Straight, edited by McLeod, the poetry newsletter SUM, edited by Wah, the magazine of the long poem Imago, edited by Bowering, the journal of writing and theory Open Letter, edited by Davey, the prose journal Periodics, edited by Marlatt and Paul de Barros, and the on-line journal Swift Current, edited by Davey and Wah, and described by them as the world's first e-magazine. Of Tish George Fetherling wrote in 2001 in The Georgia Straight that "The journal started by George Bowering, Frank Davey, David Dawson, Jamie Reid and Fred Wah is probably the most influential literary magazine ever produced in Canada, of greater significance than even Preview or First Statement, the two that brought poetic modernism to the country in the 1940s."

— Freebase

Monstrosity

Monstrosity

Monstrosity is an American death metal band originating from Fort Lauderdale, Florida during the death metal scene of the early 1990s. Vocalist, George "Corpsegrinder" Fisher and drummer, Lee Harrison, were the founders of Monstrosity. Harrison had just left the band Malevolent Creation and George Fisher gave up a band in his hometown of Maryland and came to Florida in 1991. Jon Rubin who had played guitar in Malevolent Creation also joined to form Monstrosity. Mark Van Erp played bass, in the band Cynic and he left Cynic to join Monstrosity. The four members of Monstrosity signed with Nuclear Blast Germany. Jason Goble who was a member of Cynic helped Monstrosity record Imperial Doom when they entered the recording studio. He was never a member of Monstrosity. The album was released in 1992 by Nuclear Blast. Monstrosity toured Europe in support of the band Pestilence for this album. After a number of problems with the label, Lee Harrison formed his own music label, Conquest Music in 1996. Now signed to Conquest Music, The band entered the studio again to record Millennium. Jon Rubin, guitar player, was replaced by Jason Morgan and Mark Van Erp, bass player, was replaced by Kelly Conlon. George "Corpsegrinder" Fisher performed the vocals and Lee Harrison was on drums. The album was licensed to Nuclear Blast Germany in 1996 for Europe and later re-released in 2002 by Hammerheart Records, Netherlands. for Europe. After completing the recording of the album Millennium, Fisher joined Cannibal Corpse. Jason Avery replaced Fisher on vocals.

— Freebase

Patton

Patton

Patton is a 1970 American biographical war film about U.S. General George S. Patton during World War II. It stars George C. Scott, Karl Malden, Michael Bates, and Karl Michael Vogler. It was directed by Franklin J. Schaffner from a script by Francis Ford Coppola and Edmund H. North, who based their screenplay on the biography Patton: Ordeal and Triumph by Ladislas Farago and Omar Bradley's memoir A Soldier's Story. The film was shot in 65mm Dimension 150 by cinematographer Fred J. Koenekamp, and has a music score by Jerry Goldsmith. Patton won seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture. The opening monologue, delivered by George C. Scott as General Patton with an enormous American flag behind him, remains an iconic and often quoted image in film. The film was a success and has become an American classic. In 2003, Patton was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

— Freebase

Alexander Island

Alexander Island

Alexander Island, which is also known as Alexander I Island, Alexander I Land, Alexander Land, Alexander I Archipelago, and Zemlja Alexandra I, is the largest island of Antarctica. It lies in the Bellingshausen Sea west of Palmer Land, Antarctic Peninsula from which it is separated by Marguerite Bay and George VI Sound. George VI Ice Shelf entirely fills George VI Sound and connects Alexander island to Palmer Land. The island partly surrounds Wilkins Sound, which lies to its west. Alexander Island is about 240 miles long in a north-south direction, 50 miles wide in the north, and 150 miles wide in the south. Alexander Island is the second largest uninhabited island in the world, after Devon Island.

— Freebase

Sessions

Sessions

Sessions was a compilation album by The Beatles planned for release by EMI in 1985, but never issued due to objections by the surviving Beatles. The album consisted of thirteen finished, but unreleased, Beatles songs. A single—"Leave My Kitten Alone", with an alternative version of "Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da", which was not to appear on the album, as its B-side—was also planned; but it, too, was left unissued. "Come and Get It" was a demo recording performed by Paul McCartney solo and eventually recorded by the group Badfinger. George Harrison would re-record "Not Guilty" on his album George Harrison in 1979. "How Do You Do It" had been recorded for a possible early single at the request of George Martin, but scrapped in favour of "Please Please Me". The album also was to include an edit of "Christmas Time", from the group's 1967 fan club Christmas single. Versions of all the songs planned for Sessions would eventually see official release as part of The Beatles Anthology series in 1995–96, with the exception of "Christmas Time", which was concurrently released on the "Free as a Bird" single. Several of the tracks are altered from their original states. For example, "Not Guilty" is completely re-edited, removing around a minute of the song. "What's the New Mary Jane" was drastically remixed to make the song more musical and less of a discordant "Revolution 9"-type track.

— Freebase

Waverley

Waverley

Waverley is an 1814 historical novel by Sir Walter Scott. Initially published anonymously in 1814 as Scott's first venture into prose fiction, Waverley is often regarded as the first historical novel. It became so popular that Scott's later novels were advertised as being "by the author of Waverley". His series of works on similar themes written during the same period have become collectively known as the "Waverley Novels". In 1815, Scott was given the honour of dining with George, Prince Regent, who wanted to meet "the author of Waverley". It is thought that at this meeting Scott persuaded George that as a Stuart prince he could claim to be a Jacobite Highland Chieftain, a claim that would be dramatised when George became King and visited Scotland.

— Freebase

Grin and Bear It

Grin and Bear It

Grin and Bear It is a daily panel created by George Lichtenstein under the penname George Lichty. Initially distributed by United Feature Syndicate, it was syndicated by Field Enterprises beginning in 1940. Field Enterprises was sold in 1986 to King Features Syndicate which continues to distribute the feature today. Lichty created Grin and Bear it in 1932. Frequent subjects included computers, excessive capitalism and Soviet bureaucracy. Situations in his cartoons often took place in the offices of commissars or the showrooms of "Belchfire" dealers with enormous cars in the background. His series "Is Party Line, Comrade!" skewered Soviet bureaucrats, always wearing a five-pointed star medal with the label "Hero." For his Sunday feature, George Lichty sometimes grouped four cartoons into a layout of two horizontal cartoons between a circular panel and a vertical panel. A similar approach was used by Fred Neher with the layout of gag cartoons on his Sunday Life’s Like That. After Lichty, cartoonists who worked on the panel included Fred Wagner, Rick Yager and Ralph Dunagin. It received the National Cartoonists Society's Newspaper Panel Cartoon Award for 1956, 1960, 1962 and 1964. It is still published, currently "by Fred Wagner and written by Ralph Dunagin".

— Freebase

John Mercer

John Mercer

John Mercer was a colonial American lawyer, land speculator, and author. Born in Dublin, Ireland, he came to Virginia in 1720 where he built the colonial estate Marlborough. He was a leading Virginia attorney and lawyer to George Washington, as well as a colonial prosecutor for the King's court of Virginia. He authored "Dinwiddianae", "Abridgement of the Public Acts", "First Code of Virginia Laws", and "Abridgment of Virginia Laws". Mercer was also a founding member, secretary and general counsel of the Ohio Company of Virginia, a land speculating company that had George Washington as a member. His private library consisted of between 1500 and 1800 volumes. Did legal work for George Washington land deals as a down payment as a partner, died owing Washington the balance of partnership. His heirs deeded 790 acres to Washington in payment.

— Freebase

Fort George

Fort George

Fort George was the name of a provincial electoral district in the Canadian province of British Columbia from 1916 to 1975. Its successor ridings were Prince George South and Prince George North.

— Freebase

George V

George V

}} George V is a station on line 1 of the Paris Métro, under the Champs-Élysées. The station was opened on 13 August 1900, almost a month after trains began running on the original section of line 1 between Porte de Vincennes and Porte Maillot on 19 July 1900. It was originally called Alma, after the nearby street named in honour of the Battle of Alma in the Crimean War. On 27 May 1920 the street and station were renamed after George V in appreciation of the United Kingdom's support for France during World War I. The station entrance is located between Rue de Bassano and Avenue George V on the Champs-Élysées.

— Freebase

Exuma

Exuma

Exuma is a district of the Bahamas, consisting of over 360 islands. The largest of the cays is Great Exuma, which is 37 mi in length and joined to another island, Little Exuma by a small bridge. The capital and largest city in the district is George Town, founded 1793 and located on Great Exuma. The Tropic of Cancer runs across a beach close to the city. The entire island chain is 130 mi long and 27 sq. mi in area. Between 2000 and 2010, the population of Exuma more than doubled, reflecting the construction of large and small resort properties and the related increased direct airlift to Great Exuma from locations as distant as Toronto, Canada. Exuma was settled in or around 1783 by American loyalists fleeing the Revolutionary War. The expatriates brought a cotton plantation economy to the islands. George Town was named in honor of George III, to whom the settlers maintained their loyalty. A few smaller Cays still remain grandfathered as partially or wholly private,. Located by three digit suffix number Most noted Exuma 642, and 643 which in recent years, receding shorelines have shortened the lifespan of these particular adjoined cays.

— Freebase

Seven Champions of Christendom

Seven Champions of Christendom

The Seven Champions of Christendom is a moniker referring to St. George, St. Andrew, St. Patrick, St. Denis, St. James Boanerges, St. Anthony the Lesser, and St. David. They are the patron saints of, respectively, England, Scotland, Ireland, France, Spain, Portugal, and Wales. The champions have been depicted in Christian art and folklore as heroic warriors, most notably in a 1596 book by Richard Johnson titled Famous Historie of the Seaven Champions of Christendom. Legend often portrays God sending James to the Battle of Clavijo to fight against the Moors, while George is usually thought of as being a knightly dragon-slayer. The legend of Patrick casting all of the serpents out of Ireland is also quite famous. The stories of the Seven Champions were especially popular in Europe during the Dark Ages. Four of the Seven Champions—Andrew, George, James, and Denis—died as martyrs.

— Freebase

David Lloyd George

David Lloyd George

David Lloyd George, 1st Earl Lloyd-George of Dwyfor OM PC was a British Liberal politician and statesman. He was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and led a Wartime Coalition Government between 1916 and 1922 and was the Leader of the Liberal Party from 1926 to 1931. During a long tenure of office, mainly as Chancellor of the Exchequer, he was a key figure in the introduction of many reforms which laid the foundations of the modern welfare state. He was the last Liberal to serve as Prime Minister, his coalition premiership being supported more by Conservatives than by his own Liberals, and the subsequent split was a key factor in the decline of the Liberal Party as a serious political force thereafter. After 1922 he was a marginalised and widely mistrusted figure. Lloyd George is best known as the highly energetic Prime Minister who guided the Empire through the First World War to victory over Germany and its allies. He was a major player at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 that reordered Europe after the Great War. As an icon of 20th-century liberalism, he is regarded as the founder of the British welfare state. He made a greater impact on British public life than any other 20th-century leader, thanks to his leadership of the war, his postwar role in reshaping Europe, and his introduction of Britain's social welfare system before the war.

— Freebase

Lake George

Lake George

Lake George is a town in Warren County, New York, USA. The population was 3,578 at the 2000 census. The town is named after the lake, Lake George. Within the town is a village also named Lake George. The town is part of the Glens Falls Metropolitan Statistical Area.

— Freebase

Dick Cheney

Dick Cheney

Richard Bruce Cheney (born January 30, 1941) served as the 46th Vice President of the United States from 2001 to 2009 in the administration of George W. Bush. Cheney was born in Lincoln, Nebraska, but soon moved with his family to Casper, Wyoming, where he grew up. He began his political career as an intern for Congressman William A. Steiger, eventually working his way into the White House during the Ford administration, where he served as White House Chief of Staff. In 1978, Cheney was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Wyoming; he was reelected five times, eventually becoming House Minority Whip. Cheney was selected to be the Secretary of Defense during the presidency of George H. W. Bush, holding the position for the majority of Bush's term. During this time, Cheney oversaw the 1991 Operation Desert Storm, among other actions. Out of office during the Clinton presidency, Cheney was chairman and CEO of Halliburton Company from 1995 to 2000. Cheney joined the presidential campaign of George W. Bush in 2000, who selected him as his running mate. After becoming Vice President, Cheney remained a very public and controversial figure.

— Freebase

Leonard Calvert

Leonard Calvert

Leonard Calvert was the First Proprietary Governor of Maryland. He was the second son of George Calvert, 1st Baron Baltimore, the first proprietary of the Province of Maryland. His elder brother Cecil, who inherited the colony and the title upon the death of their father George, April 15, 1632, appointed Leonard as governor of the Colony in his absence. Leonard was obviously named after his grandfather, the father of George who was also "Leonard Calvert" of Yorkshire

— Freebase

John George

John George

John "Jack" Phelps George was a British athlete. He competed at the 1908 Summer Olympics in London. He was born in Croydon and died in Purley, London. George won the second heat of the 100 metres with a time of 11 ³⁄5 seconds, advancing to the semifinals. In the fourth semifinal, George placed last to drop out of further contention. He also won his heat of the 200 metres, advancing to the semifinals with a time of 23.4 seconds. His third place finish in his semifinal race kept him from advancing in that event as well.

— Freebase

George Huntington

George Huntington

George Huntington was an American physician who contributed a classic clinical description of the disease that bears his name -- Huntington's disease. Huntington described this condition in the first of only two scientific papers he ever wrote. He wrote this paper when he was 22, a year after receiving his medical degree from Columbia University in New York. He first read the paper before the Meigs and Mason Academy of Medicine in Middleport, Ohio on February 15, 1872 and then published it in the Medical and Surgical Reporter of Philadelphia on April 13, 1872. Huntington's father and grandfather, George Lee Huntington and Abel Huntington, were also physicians in the same family practice. Their longitudinal observations combined with his own were invaluable in precisely describing this hereditary disease in multiple generations of a family in East Hampton on Long Island. In a 1908 review, the eminent physician William Osler said of this paper: "In the history of medicine, there are few instances in which a disease has been more accurately, more graphically or more briefly described." In 1874 George Huntington returned to Duchess County, New York to practice medicine. He joined a number of medical associations and started working for the Matteawan General Hospital. In 1908 the scientific journal Neurograph dedicated him a special edition.

— Freebase

Widley

Widley

Widley is an area of the Greater Portsmouth conurbation in the South East of England near Waterlooville and Purbrook. It is on the dip slope of the South Downs just north of the ridge called Portsdown Hill. Widley is served by the A3, trunk road which runs from Portsmouth to London. The main A3 to London is very close by, making it commutable by road. By car, journey time to Wandsworth Town in London is around 1hour 15minutes in good traffic. The recent construction of the Hindhead tunnel has greatly reduced journey times. Widley is served by Cosham or Havant rail stations. It is possible to walk to Cosham station in under 30 minutes, and to Havant in under 1 hour. In 2013, the average taxi cost to Havant station was £5.50 by private hire during the day. From Havant station, is it possible to be in London within 1 hour 20 minutes, and from Cosham around 1 hour 55 minutes. Widley has three local pubs within walking distance. The George Inn sits on the top of Portsdown Hill and is considered a fine real ale pub. Further west, approximately ten minutes by foot away from the George, lies the Churchillian. The Churchillian is considered a fine restaurant serving decent quality pub food throughout the day as well as quality real ales as well as offering fine panoramic views of Portsmouth to the South and the South Downs to the North. Further North on the A3 lies the Hampshire Rose which is considered a family pub serving pub food and international lagers. All three pubs are within ten minutes of one another by foot. For example, starting at the Hampshire Rose, you can walk to the George Inn within ten minutes, and from there you can reach the Churchillian within a further ten minutes.

— Freebase

Love Is Here to Stay

Love Is Here to Stay

"Love Is Here to Stay" is a popular song and a jazz standard. The music was written by George Gershwin, the lyrics by Ira Gershwin, for the movie The Goldwyn Follies which was released shortly after George Gershwin's death. It is performed in the film by Kenny Baker. "Love Is Here to Stay" also appeared, perhaps most memorably, in the 1951 MGM picture An American in Paris, for which it served as the main theme. It also appeared in 1995's Forget Paris in which it is actually a reference to An American In Paris. The song was the last composition George Gershwin completed. Ira Gershwin wrote the words after his brother's death, giving the song a special poignancy. Originally titled "It's Here to Stay" and then "Our Love Is Here to Stay", the song was finally published as "Love Is Here to Stay". Ira Gershwin has said that he wanted to change the song's name back to "Our Love Is Here to Stay" for years, but felt that it wouldn't be right since the song had already become a standard. The song is emblematic of the Great American Songbook, with both an introductory verse and a chorus. The song is also used in the musical, The 1940's Radio Hour.

— Freebase

Religious Studies

Religious Studies

Religious studies is the academic field of multi-disciplinary, secular study of religious beliefs, behaviors, and institutions. It describes, compares, interprets, and explains religion, emphasizing systematic, historically based, and cross-cultural perspectives. While theology attempts to understand the nature of transcendent or supernatural forces, religious studies tries to study religious behavior and belief from outside any particular religious viewpoint. Religious studies draws upon multiple disciplines and their methodologies including anthropology, sociology, psychology, philosophy, and history of religion. Religious studies originated in the nineteenth century, when scholarly and historical analysis of the Bible had flourished, and Hindu and Buddhist texts were first being translated into European languages. Early influential scholars included Friedrich Max Müller, in England, and Cornelius P. Tiele, in the Netherlands. Today religious studies is practiced by scholars worldwide. In its early years, it was known as Comparative Religion or the Science of Religion and, in the USA, there are those who today also know the field as the History of religion. The field is known as Religionswissenschaft in Germany and Sciences des religions in the French-speaking world.

— Freebase

DDT

DDT

DDT is an organochlorine insecticide which is a colorless, crystalline solid, tasteless and almost odorless chemical compound. Technical DDT has been formulated in almost every conceivable form including solutions in xylene or petroleum distillates, emulsifiable concentrates, water-wettable powders, granules, aerosols, smoke candles, and charges for vaporisers and lotions. First synthesized in 1873, DDT's insecticidal properties were not discovered until 1939, and it was used with great success in the second half of World War II to control malaria and typhus among civilians and troops. The Swiss chemist Paul Hermann Müller was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1948 "for his discovery of the high efficiency of DDT as a contact poison against several arthropods." After the war, DDT was made available for use as an agricultural insecticide, and soon its production and use skyrocketed. In 1962, Silent Spring by American biologist Rachel Carson was published. The book catalogued the environmental impacts of the indiscriminate spraying of DDT in the US and questioned the logic of releasing large amounts of chemicals into the environment without fully understanding their effects on ecology or human health. The book suggested that DDT and other pesticides may cause cancer and that their agricultural use was a threat to wildlife, particularly birds. Its publication was one of the signature events in the birth of the environmental movement, and resulted in a large public outcry that eventually led to DDT being banned for agricultural use in the US in 1972. DDT was subsequently banned for agricultural use worldwide under the Stockholm Convention, but its limited use in disease vector control continues to this day and remains controversial.

— Freebase

Helminthology

Helminthology

Helminthology is the study of parasitic worms. This field deals with the study of their taxonomy and the effect on their hosts. The origin of the first compound of the word is from the Greek ἕλμινς - helmins, meaning "worm". In the 18th and early 19th century there was wave of publications on helminthology in the 19th and at the beginning of the 19th century that has been described as “Golden Era” of helminthology. During that period the authors Peter Simon Pallas, Marcus Elieser Bloch, Otto Friedrich Müller, Johann Goeze, Friedrich Zenker, Carl Asmund Rudolphi and Johann Gottfried Bremser started systematic scientific studies of the subject.

— Freebase

Barfly

Barfly

Barfly is a 1987 American film which is a semi-autobiography of poet/author Charles Bukowski during the time he spent drinking heavily in Los Angeles. The screenplay by Bukowski was commissioned by the French film director Barbet Schroeder – it was published, with illustrations by the author, in 1984 when film production was still pending. Barfly stars Mickey Rourke and Faye Dunaway, with direction by Schroeder, and was presented by Francis Ford Coppola. The movie also features a silent cameo appearance by Bukowski himself. The Kino Flo light, now a ubiquitous tool in the film industry, was specially created by Robby Muller's electrical crew for a scene in this film which would have been difficult to light using the conventional lampheads available at the time. The film was entered into the 1987 Cannes Film Festival.

— Freebase

ECM Records

ECM Records

ECM is a record label founded in Munich, Germany, in 1969 by Manfred Eicher. While ECM is best known for jazz music, the label has released a wide variety of recordings, and ECM's artists often refuse to acknowledge boundaries between genres. ECM's motto is the Most Beautiful Sound Next to Silence, taken from a 1971 review of ECM releases in CODA, a Canadian jazz magazine. The label was distributed in the USA by Warner Bros. Records, PolyGram Records, BMG, and, since 1999, by Universal Music, the successor of PolyGram. Its album covers have been profiled in two books thus far, Sleeves of Desire and Windfall Light, both published by Lars Müller.

— Freebase

Cardinal Sin

Cardinal Sin

Cardinal Sin are a death/black metal band formed in 1995 by ex-Dissection member John Zwetsloot. In 1996, they released a 4-track EP called Spiteful Intents, which featured a trademark classical composition by Zwetsloot. Having disbanded after the EP, they reformed in 2003 with a partially new lineup, but have yet to release anything beyond Spiteful Intents. Daniel Ekeroth described their musical style as "typical mid-90’s death/thrash". Metal Hammer journalist Robert Müller wrote that since the group were focussed around the guitarists John Zwetsloot and Devo Andersson there were no doubts about the technical quality, though the EP's sound was "established and all to well-known".

— Freebase

Tragedy

Tragedy

Tragedy is a form of drama based on human suffering that invokes in its audience an accompanying catharsis or pleasure in the viewing. While many cultures have developed forms that provoke this paradoxical response, the term tragedy often refers to a specific tradition of drama that has played a unique and important role historically in the self-definition of Western civilization. That tradition has been multiple and discontinuous, yet the term has often been used to invoke a powerful effect of cultural identity and historical continuity—"the Greeks and the Elizabethans, in one cultural form; Hellenes and Christians, in a common activity," as Raymond Williams puts it. From its obscure origins in the theatre of ancient Greece 2,500 years ago, from which there survives only a fraction of the work of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides, through its singular articulations in the works of Shakespeare, Lope de Vega, Racine, and Schiller, to the more recent naturalistic tragedy of Strindberg, Beckett's modernist meditations on death, loss and suffering, and Müller's postmodernist reworkings of the tragic canon, tragedy has remained an important site of cultural experimentation, negotiation, struggle, and change. A long line of philosophers—which includes Plato, Aristotle, Saint Augustine, Voltaire, Hume, Diderot, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Freud, Benjamin, Camus, Lacan, and Deleuze—have analysed, speculated upon, and criticised the tragic form.

— Freebase

Orthodox

Orthodox

Orthodox is the fourth album by the Czech death metal band Krabathor. It was released in March 1998. The album was recorded in December 1997 at Exponent Studio in Hlohovec, Slovak Republic, and mastered at TTM Mastering in Berlin, Germany by Tom Müller. The recording line-up consisted of Christopher, Bruno and Skull. Tomáš Kmeť, a studio engineer, played keyboards in the last song About Death. The title track Orthodox was previously released on Mortal Memories album. A videoclip for the second song Liquid was released. Shit Comes Brown is an anti-Nazi song and To Red Ones is an anti-communist song.

— Freebase

Johannes Peter Müller

Johannes Peter Müller

Johannes Peter Müller, was a German physiologist, comparative anatomist, ichthyologist, and herpetologist, known not only for his discoveries but also for his ability to synthesize knowledge.

— Freebase

Paul Hermann Müller

Paul Hermann Müller

Paul Hermann Müller also known as Pauly Mueller was a Swiss chemist who received the 1948 Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine for his 1939 discovery of insecticidal qualities and use of DDT in the control of vector diseases such as malaria and yellow fever.

— Freebase

Schreibkraft

Schreibkraft

Schreibkraft is an Austrian literary magazine, which was founded in 1998 by the Literature Council of the Forum Stadtpark in Graz. The magazine prints feature articles. Since 1999 the edition schreibkraft is the publisher. Schreibkraft appears twice a year. Every issue has a specific topic. The essays and feature articles are chosen by the five editors. In addition, the magazine publishes some narrative texts and book reviews; the latter review primarily books from small publishing houses. Published authors stem from Austria, Switzerland and Germany. E.g. the following authors have published in Schreibkraft: Bettina Balàka, Moritz Baßler, Julian Blunk, Helwig Brunner, Thomas E. Brunnsteiner, Martin Büsser], Ann Cotten, Julius Deutschbauer & Gerhard Spring, Hans Durrer, Klaus Ebner, Helmut Eisendle, Bernhard Flieher, Franzobel, Harald A. Friedl, Brigitte Fuchs, Egyd Gstättner, Wolf Haas, Sonja Harter, Klaus_Händl, Christian Ide Hintze, Paulus Hochgatterer, Elfriede Jelinek, Ralf B. Korte, Christian Loidl, Friederike Mayröcker, Gisela Müller, Andreas Okopenko, Andreas R. Peternell, Claus Philipp, Peter Piller, Rosemarie Poiarkov, Wolfgang Pollanz, Birgit Pölzl, Manfred Prisching, Peter Rosei, Werner Schandor, Ferdinand Schmatz, Katja Schmid, Helmuth Schönauer, Franz Schuh, Werner Schwab, Gudrun Sommer, Enno Stahl, Christine Werner, Serjoscha Wiemer, and Christiane Zintzen.

— Freebase

Tellurium

Tellurium

Tellurium is a chemical element with symbol Te and atomic number 52. A brittle, mildly toxic, rare, silver-white metalloid which looks similar to tin, tellurium is chemically related to selenium and sulfur. It is occasionally found in native form, as elemental crystals. Tellurium is far more common in the universe as a whole than it is on Earth. Its extreme rarity in the Earth's crust, comparable to that of platinum, is partly due to its high atomic number, but also due to its formation of a volatile hydride which caused the element to be lost to space as a gas during the hot nebular formation of the planet. Tellurium was discovered in Transylvania in 1782 by Franz-Joseph Müller von Reichenstein in a mineral containing tellurium and gold. Martin Heinrich Klaproth named the new element in 1798 after the Latin word for "earth", tellus. Gold telluride minerals are the most notable natural gold compounds. However, they are not a commercially significant source of tellurium itself, which is normally extracted as a by-product of copper and lead production. Commercially, the primary use of tellurium is in alloys, foremost in steel and copper to improve machinability. Applications in solar panels and as a semiconductor material also consume a considerable fraction of tellurium production.

— Freebase

Ionization chamber

Ionization chamber

The ionization chamber is the simplest of all gas-filled radiation detectors, and is widely used for the detection and measurement of certain types of ionizing radiation; X-rays, gamma rays and beta particles. Conventionally, the term "ionization chamber" is used exclusively to describe those detectors which collect all the charges created by direct ionisation within the gas through the application of an electric field. It only uses the discrete charges created by each interaction between the incident radiation and the gas, and does not involve the gas multiplication mechanisms used by other radiation instruments, such as the Geiger-Muller counter or the proportional counter. Ion chambers have a good uniform response to radiation over a wide range of energies and are the preferred means of measuring high levels of gamma radiation. They are widely used in the nuclear power industry, research labs, radiography and other medical radiation fields, and in environmental monitoring.

— Freebase

Anobiidae

Anobiidae

Anobiidae is a family of beetles. The larvae of a number of species tend to bore into wood, earning them the name "woodworm" or "wood borer". A few species are pests, causing damage to wooden furniture and house structures, notably the death watch beetle, Xestobium rufovillosum, and the common furniture beetle, Anobium punctatum. It includes the subgroups: ⁕Anobiinae Kirby, 1837 ⁕Anobium Fabricius, 1775 ⁕Gastrallus Jacquelin du Val, 1860 ⁕Hadrobregmus Thomson, 1859 ⁕Microbregma Seidlitz, 1889 ⁕Oligomerus Redtenbacher, 1849 ⁕Priobium Motschulsky, 1845 ⁕Stegobium Motschulsky, 1860 ⁕Dorcatominae Thomson, 1859 ⁕Anitys Thomson, 1863 ⁕Caenocara Thomson, 1859 ⁕Dorcatoma Herbst, 1792 ⁕Stagetus Wollaston, 1861 ⁕Dryophilinae LeConte, 1861 ⁕Dryophilus Chevrolat, 1832 ⁕Grynobius Thomson, 1859 ⁕Ernobiinae Pic, 1912 ⁕Episernus Thomson, 1863 ⁕Ernobius Thomson, 1859 ⁕Ochina Sturm, 1826 ⁕Xestobium Motschulsky,1845 ⁕Eucradinae Le Conte, 1861 ⁕Hedobia Dejean, 1821 ⁕Ptilininae Shuckard, 1840 ⁕Pseudoptilinus Leiler, 1963 ⁕Ptilinus Müller, 1764 ⁕Ptininae Latreille, 1802 ⁕Eupauloecus Mulsant & Rey, 1868 ⁕Gibbium Scopoli, 1777Mezium Curtis, 1828Niptus Boieldieu, 1856Pseudeurostus Heyden, 1906Ptinus Linnaeus, 1767Sphaericus Wollaston, 1854Trigonogenius Solier, 1849

— Freebase

Regiomontanus

Regiomontanus

Johannes Müller von Königsberg, today best known by the Latin epithet Regiomontanus, was a German mathematician, astronomer, astrologer, translator, instrument maker and Catholic bishop. He was born in the Franconian village of Unfinden — not in the more famous East-Prussian Königsberg. He was also known as Johannes der Königsberger. His writings were published under the name of Joannes de Monte Regio, a Latinized version of his name. Both names mean "John of King's Mountain". The name "Regiomontanus" was first coined by Phillip Melanchthon in 1534, fifty-eight years after Regiomontanus' death.

— Freebase

Psorosperm

Psorosperm

Psorosperm is a name formerly given to a number of parasitic protozoa which produce cystlike or sporelike structures in the tissue of hosts, but now essentially obsolete. ⁕Some which affect vertebrate hosts are now identified as coccidia. ⁕Others, such as the cause of pébrine in silkworms, are now recognized as microsporidians, and some are regarded as myxosporidians. ⁕The genus Psorospermium itself is a parasite of crayfishes, and belongs to an enigmatic group of unicellular organisms which some biologists think may be related to the common ancestors of animals and fungi. The term was introduced in German by J. Müller in 1841. Psorosperm was at one point believed to be the cause of Darier's disease. "Psorospermiasis" is classified under 136.4 in ICD-9.

— Freebase

Field emission microscopy

Field emission microscopy

Field emission microscopy is an analytical technique used in materials science to investigate molecular surface structures and their electronic properties. Invented by Erwin Wilhelm Müller in 1936, the FEM was one of the first surface analysis instruments that approached near-atomic resolution.

— Freebase

Foveola

Foveola

The foveola is located within a region called the macula, a yellowish, cone photo receptor filled portion of the human retina. The foveola is approximately 0.35 mm in diameter and lies in the center of the fovea and contains only cone cells, and a cone-shaped zone of Müller cells. In this region the cone receptors are found to be longer, slimmer and more densely packed than anywhere else in the retina, thus allowing that region to have the potential to have the highest visual acuity in the eye.

— Freebase

Genetic load

Genetic load

In population genetics, genetic load or genetic burden is a measure of the cost of lost alleles due to selection or mutation. It is a value in the range, where 0 represents no load. The concept was first formulated in 1937 by JBS Haldane, independently formulated, named and applied to humans in 1950 by H. J. Muller, and elaborated further by Haldane in 1957.

— Freebase

Liebfraumilch

Liebfraumilch

Liebfraumilch or Liebfraunmilch is a style of semi-sweet white German wine which may be produced, mostly for export, in the regions Rheinhessen, Palatinate, Rheingau and Nahe. The name is a German word literally meaning "Beloved lady's milk". The original German spelling of the word is Liebfrauenmilch, given to the wine produced from the vineyards of the Liebfrauenkirche or Church of Our Lady in the Rhineland-Palatinate city of Worms since the 18th century. The spelling Liebfraumilch is more common on labels of exported wine. The generic label Liebfraumilch is typically used to market vintages from anywhere in the most of the major wine growing areas of Germany, the notable exception being the Mosel. Wine with very similar characteristics but made from higher quality grapes can be labeled as Spätlese or Auslese. In the U.S. and the UK, perhaps the best known example has been Blue Nun, which no longer uses the Liebfraumilch designation. While the term Liebfraumilch is associated with low quality wine, German Wine Law requires it to be at the Qualitätswein bestimmter Anbaugebiete level - the 3rd rank of 4. It must also be from Rheinhessen, Pfalz, Nahe or Rheingau, the grapes used must be at least 70% Riesling, Silvaner or Müller-Thurgau, and it must have 18-40g/li residual sugar.

— Freebase

Rule The School

Rule The School

CBBC's Rule the School is a modern role-reversal, reality TV show for teenagers. The basis of the show was to take five talented school pupils and 10 school teachers and swap roles. The pupils became the teachers and the teachers became the pupils. The series first aired in 2002, with lessons including text-messaging, break-dancing, computer gaming, customising clothes, popstar skills and 'funky footballing'. The series was nominated for a BAFTA in 2003 when lessons included dance, rap and, slightly more conventionally, physical education. In 2004 the timetable included dance lessons, djing, skateboarding and fashion. The BAFTA nominated show ended in 2005 after four seasons, with lessons including Music, Dance, IT Factor, Taekwondo and Web Design. The Headteacher was Adelaide Lumor who also appeared in the 2007 Muller commercial 'Lid Lickers'. The show was presented by Jake Humphrey.

— Freebase

Hyporchema

Hyporchema

The hyporchema was a lively kind of mimic dance which accompanied the songs used in the worship of Apollo, especially among the Dorians. It was performed by men and women. It is comparable to the geranos, the ritual "crane dance" associated with Theseus. A chorus of singers at the festivals of Apollo usually danced around the altar, while several other persons were appointed to accompany the action of the song with an appropriate mimic performance. Hyporchema was thus a lyric dance, and often passed into the playful and comic, whence Athenaeus compares it with the cordax of comedy. It had, according to the supposition of Müller, like all the music and poetry of the Dorians, originated in Crete, but was at an early period introduced in the island of Delos, where it seems to have continued to be performed down to the time of Lucian. A similar kind of dance was the geranos, which Theseus on his return from Crete was said to have performed in Delos, and which was customary in this island as late as the time of Plutarch. The leader of this dance was called geranoulkos. It was performed with blows, and with various turnings and windings, and was said to be an imitation of the windings of the Cretan labyrinth. When the chorus was at rest, it formed a semicircle, with leaders at the two wings.

— Freebase

Petaurista

Petaurista

Petaurista is a genus of rodent in the Sciuridae family. Squirrels in this family are generally large nocturnal squirrels. It contains the following species, listed alphabetically: ⁕Petaurista alborufus Milne-Edwards, 1870 – Red And White Giant Flying Squirrel ⁕Petaurista elegans Müller, 1840 – Spotted Giant Flying Squirrel ⁕Petaurista leucogenys Temminck, 1827 – Japanese Giant Flying Squirrel ⁕Petaurista magnificus Hodgson, 1836 – Hodgson's Giant Flying Squirrel ⁕Petaurista nobilis Gray, 1842 – Bhutan Giant Flying Squirrel ⁕Petaurista petaurista Pallas, 1766 – Red Giant Flying Squirrel ⁕Petaurista philippensis Elliot, 1839 – Indian Giant Flying Squirrel ⁕Petaurista xanthotis Milne-Edwards, 1872 – Chinese Giant Flying Squirrel

— Freebase

Brainfuck

Brainfuck

The brainfuck programming language is an esoteric programming language noted for its extreme minimalism. It is a Turing tarpit, designed to challenge and amuse programmers, and was not made to be suitable for practical use. It was created in 1993 by Urban Müller. The name of the language is generally not capitalized except at the start of a sentence, although it is a proper noun.

— Freebase

James Van Allen

James Van Allen

James Alfred Van Allen was an American space scientist at the University of Iowa. He was instrumental in establishing the field of magnetospheric research in space. The Van Allen radiation belts were named after him, following their discovery by his Geiger–Müller tube instruments on the 1958 satellites: during the International Geophysical Year. Van Allen led the scientific community for the inclusion of scientific research instruments on space satellites.

— Freebase

Hermann Müller

Hermann Müller

Hermann Müller, born in Mannheim, was a German Social Democratic politician who served as Foreign Minister, and twice as Chancellor of Germany under the Weimar Republic. In his capacity as Foreign Minister, he was one of the German signatories of the Treaty of Versailles in 1919.

— Freebase

Catch the Sun

Catch the Sun

"Catch the Sun" is the second single from Doves' debut studio album Lost Souls. The single was released on 29 May 2000 in the UK on 2 CDs and 10" vinyl, and charted at #32 on the UK Singles Chart. The psychedelic, kaleidoscopic music video for "Catch the Sun" was directed by Sophie Muller. Jamie Cullum covered "Catch the Sun" on his album Catching Tales. "Down to Sea" is an early demo of "Sea Song." The B-sides for CD2 are songs from Doves' previous incarnation as Sub Sub. The versions of "Crunch" and "Lost In Watts" differ slightly from those found on Sub Sub's album Delta Tapes. "Crunch" is an edit, and "Lost in Watts" is an alternate mix omitting some background vocals. The B-side "Valley" features the piano riff from The Beach Boys' Smile-era songs "Do You Like Worms" and "Heroes And Villains". The song was also featured in the soundtrack of the videogame Project Gotham Racing.

— Freebase

Affentheater

Affentheater

Affentheater is a musical album by Marius Müller-Westernhagen.

— Freebase

Nahaufnahme

Nahaufnahme

Nahaufnahme is a 2005 studio album by Marius Müller-Westernhagen.

— Freebase

C-Block

C-Block

C-Block were a German platinum-selling hip-hop group, founded in 1995 by music producers Frank Müller, Ulrich Buchmann and Jörg Wagner. The group is fronted by Anthony "Red Dogg" Joseph and James "Mr.P" White. C-Block were a well-known hip hop act in Europe in the 1990s, who along with Down Low and Nana, signified the rise of the American-influenced rap music in Europe.

— Freebase

Tonny

Tonny

Tonny is a 1962 Norwegian drama film directed by Nils R. Müller and Per Gjersøe. It was entered into the 12th Berlin International Film Festival.

— Freebase

Dynamo, Non-polar

Dynamo, Non-polar

A name given by Prof. George Forbes to a dynamo invented by him. In it a cylinder of iron rotates within a perfectly self-contained iron-clad field magnet. The current is taken off by brushes bearing near the periphery, at two extremities of a diameter. A machine with a disc 18 inches in diameter was said to give 3,117 amperes, with 5.8 volts E. M. F. running at 1,500 revolutions per second. The E. M. F. of such machines varies with the square of the diameter of the disc or cylinder.

— The Standard Electrical Dictionary

allen

Allen, Gracie Allen, Grace Ethel Cecile Rosalie Allen, Gracie

United States comedienne remembered as the confused but imperturbable partner of her husband, George Burns (1906-1964)

— Princeton's WordNet

american capital

Washington, Washington D.C., American capital, capital of the United States

the capital of the United States in the District of Columbia and a tourist mecca; George Washington commissioned Charles L'Enfant to lay out the city in 1791

— Princeton's WordNet

baron friedrich wilhelm ludolf gerhard augustin von steuben

Steuben, Baron Friedrich Wilhelm Ludolf Gerhard Augustin von Steuben

American Revolutionary leader (born in Prussia) who trained the troops under George Washington (1730-1794)

— Princeton's WordNet

behmen

Boehme, Jakob Boehme, Bohme, Jakob Bohme, Boehm, Jakob Boehm, Behmen, Jakob Behmen

German mystic and theosophist who founded modern theosophy; influenced George Fox (1575-1624)

— Princeton's WordNet

betsy griscom ross

Ross, Betsy Ross, Betsy Griscom Ross

American seamstress said to have made the first American flag at the request of George Washington (1752-1836)

— Princeton's WordNet

betsy ross

Ross, Betsy Ross, Betsy Griscom Ross

American seamstress said to have made the first American flag at the request of George Washington (1752-1836)

— Princeton's WordNet

boehme

Boehme, Jakob Boehme, Bohme, Jakob Bohme, Boehm, Jakob Boehm, Behmen, Jakob Behmen

German mystic and theosophist who founded modern theosophy; influenced George Fox (1575-1624)

— Princeton's WordNet

boehm

Boehme, Jakob Boehme, Bohme, Jakob Bohme, Boehm, Jakob Boehm, Behmen, Jakob Behmen

German mystic and theosophist who founded modern theosophy; influenced George Fox (1575-1624)

— Princeton's WordNet

bohme

Boehme, Jakob Boehme, Bohme, Jakob Bohme, Boehm, Jakob Boehm, Behmen, Jakob Behmen

German mystic and theosophist who founded modern theosophy; influenced George Fox (1575-1624)

— Princeton's WordNet

boolean algebra

Boolean logic, Boolean algebra

a system of symbolic logic devised by George Boole; used in computers

— Princeton's WordNet

boolean

Boolean

of or relating to a combinatorial system devised by George Boole that combines propositions with the logical operators AND and OR and IF THEN and EXCEPT and NOT

— Princeton's WordNet

boolean logic

Boolean logic, Boolean algebra

a system of symbolic logic devised by George Boole; used in computers

— Princeton's WordNet

bush administration

Bush administration

the executive under President George H. W. Bush

— Princeton's WordNet

bush administration

Bush administration

the executive under President George W. Bush

— Princeton's WordNet

bush

Bush, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush, Dubyuh, Dubya

43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946)

— Princeton's WordNet

butcher cumberland

Cumberland, William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, Butcher Cumberland

English general; son of George II; fought unsuccessfully in the battle of Fontenoy (1721-1765)

— Princeton's WordNet

capital of the united states

Washington, Washington D.C., American capital, capital of the United States

the capital of the United States in the District of Columbia and a tourist mecca; George Washington commissioned Charles L'Enfant to lay out the city in 1791

— Princeton's WordNet

colin luther powell

Powell, Colin Powell, Colin luther Powell

United States general who was the first African American to serve as chief of staff; later served as Secretary of State under President George W. Bush (born 1937)

— Princeton's WordNet

colin powell

Powell, Colin Powell, Colin luther Powell

United States general who was the first African American to serve as chief of staff; later served as Secretary of State under President George W. Bush (born 1937)

— Princeton's WordNet

cumberland

Cumberland, William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, Butcher Cumberland

English general; son of George II; fought unsuccessfully in the battle of Fontenoy (1721-1765)

— Princeton's WordNet

david barnard steinman

Steinman, David Barnard Steinman

United States civil engineer noted for designing suspension bridges (including the George Washington Bridge) (1886-1960)

— Princeton's WordNet

d.c.

District of Columbia, D.C., DC

the district occupied entirely by the city of Washington; chosen by George Washington as the site of the capital of the United States and created out of land ceded by Maryland and Virginia

— Princeton's WordNet

dc

District of Columbia, D.C., DC

the district occupied entirely by the city of Washington; chosen by George Washington as the site of the capital of the United States and created out of land ceded by Maryland and Virginia

— Princeton's WordNet

district of columbia

District of Columbia, D.C., DC

the district occupied entirely by the city of Washington; chosen by George Washington as the site of the capital of the United States and created out of land ceded by Maryland and Virginia

— Princeton's WordNet

dubya

Bush, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush, Dubyuh, Dubya

43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946)

— Princeton's WordNet

dubyuh

Bush, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush, Dubyuh, Dubya

43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946)

— Princeton's WordNet

duke of cumberland

Cumberland, William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, Butcher Cumberland

English general; son of George II; fought unsuccessfully in the battle of Fontenoy (1721-1765)

— Princeton's WordNet

elizabeth

Elizabeth, Elizabeth II

daughter of George VI who became the Queen of England and Northern Ireland in 1952 on the death of her father (1926-)

— Princeton's WordNet

elizabeth ii

Elizabeth, Elizabeth II

daughter of George VI who became the Queen of England and Northern Ireland in 1952 on the death of her father (1926-)

— Princeton's WordNet

european recovery program

Marshall Plan, European Recovery Program

a United States program of economic aid for the reconstruction of Europe (1948-1952); named after George Marshall

— Princeton's WordNet

first earl of orford

Walpole, Robert Walpole, Sir Robert Walpole, First Earl of Orford

Englishman and Whig statesman who (under George I) was effectively the first British prime minister (1676-1745)

— Princeton's WordNet

frederick north

North, Frederick North, Second Earl of Guilford

British statesman under George III whose policies led to rebellion in the American colonies (1732-1792)

— Princeton's WordNet

friend

Friend, Quaker

a member of the Religious Society of Friends founded by George Fox (the Friends have never called themselves Quakers)

— Princeton's WordNet

george bush

Bush, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush, Dubyuh, Dubya

43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946)

— Princeton's WordNet

george

George, Saint George, St. George

Christian martyr; patron saint of England; hero of the legend of Saint George and the Dragon in which he slew a dragon and saved a princess (?-303)

— Princeton's WordNet

george

George, George III

King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1760 to 1820; the American colonies were lost during his reign; he became insane in 1811 and his son (later George IV) acted as regent until 1820 (1738-1820)

— Princeton's WordNet

george iii

George, George III

King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1760 to 1820; the American colonies were lost during his reign; he became insane in 1811 and his son (later George IV) acted as regent until 1820 (1738-1820)

— Princeton's WordNet

george macaulay trevelyan

Trevelyan, George Macaulay Trevelyan

English historian and son of Sir George Otto Trevelyan whose works include a social history of England and a biography of Garibaldi (1876-1962)

— Princeton's WordNet

george walker bush

Bush, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush, Dubyuh, Dubya

43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946)

— Princeton's WordNet

george w. bush

Bush, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush, Dubyuh, Dubya

43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946)

— Princeton's WordNet

gershwin

Gershwin, Ira Gershwin

United States lyricist who frequently collaborated with his brother George Gershwin (1896-1983)

— Princeton's WordNet

gilbert charles stuart

Stuart, Gilbert Stuart, Gilbert Charles Stuart

United States painter best known for his portraits of George Washington (1755-1828)

— Princeton's WordNet

gilbert stuart

Stuart, Gilbert Stuart, Gilbert Charles Stuart

United States painter best known for his portraits of George Washington (1755-1828)

— Princeton's WordNet

grace ethel cecile rosalie allen

Allen, Gracie Allen, Grace Ethel Cecile Rosalie Allen, Gracie

United States comedienne remembered as the confused but imperturbable partner of her husband, George Burns (1906-1964)

— Princeton's WordNet

gracie allen

Allen, Gracie Allen, Grace Ethel Cecile Rosalie Allen, Gracie

United States comedienne remembered as the confused but imperturbable partner of her husband, George Burns (1906-1964)

— Princeton's WordNet

gracie

Allen, Gracie Allen, Grace Ethel Cecile Rosalie Allen, Gracie

United States comedienne remembered as the confused but imperturbable partner of her husband, George Burns (1906-1964)

— Princeton's WordNet

handelian

Handelian

of or relating to or in the manner of George Frederick Handel

— Princeton's WordNet

hanover

Hanover, House of Hanover, Hanoverian line

the English royal house that reigned from 1714 to 1901 (from George I to Victoria)

— Princeton's WordNet

hanoverian line

Hanover, House of Hanover, Hanoverian line

the English royal house that reigned from 1714 to 1901 (from George I to Victoria)

— Princeton's WordNet

hart

Hart, Moss Hart

United States playwright who collaborated with George S. Kaufman (1904-1961)

— Princeton's WordNet

house of hanover

Hanover, House of Hanover, Hanoverian line

the English royal house that reigned from 1714 to 1901 (from George I to Victoria)

— Princeton's WordNet

ira gershwin

Gershwin, Ira Gershwin

United States lyricist who frequently collaborated with his brother George Gershwin (1896-1983)

— Princeton's WordNet

jakob behmen

Boehme, Jakob Boehme, Bohme, Jakob Bohme, Boehm, Jakob Boehm, Behmen, Jakob Behmen

German mystic and theosophist who founded modern theosophy; influenced George Fox (1575-1624)

— Princeton's WordNet

jakob boehme

Boehme, Jakob Boehme, Bohme, Jakob Bohme, Boehm, Jakob Boehm, Behmen, Jakob Behmen

German mystic and theosophist who founded modern theosophy; influenced George Fox (1575-1624)

— Princeton's WordNet

jakob boehm

Boehme, Jakob Boehme, Bohme, Jakob Bohme, Boehm, Jakob Boehm, Behmen, Jakob Behmen

German mystic and theosophist who founded modern theosophy; influenced George Fox (1575-1624)

— Princeton's WordNet

jakob bohme

Boehme, Jakob Boehme, Bohme, Jakob Bohme, Boehm, Jakob Boehm, Behmen, Jakob Behmen

German mystic and theosophist who founded modern theosophy; influenced George Fox (1575-1624)

— Princeton's WordNet

john wilkes

Wilkes, John Wilkes

English reformer who published attacks on George III and supported the rights of the American colonists (1727-1797)

— Princeton's WordNet

la fayette

Lafayette, La Fayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette

French soldier who served under George Washington in the American Revolution (1757-1834)

— Princeton's WordNet

lafayette

Lafayette, La Fayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette

French soldier who served under George Washington in the American Revolution (1757-1834)

— Princeton's WordNet

marie joseph paul yves roch gilbert du motier

Lafayette, La Fayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette

French soldier who served under George Washington in the American Revolution (1757-1834)

— Princeton's WordNet

marquis de lafayette

Lafayette, La Fayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette

French soldier who served under George Washington in the American Revolution (1757-1834)

— Princeton's WordNet

marshall plan

Marshall Plan, European Recovery Program

a United States program of economic aid for the reconstruction of Europe (1948-1952); named after George Marshall

— Princeton's WordNet

moss hart

Hart, Moss Hart

United States playwright who collaborated with George S. Kaufman (1904-1961)

— Princeton's WordNet

mount vernon

Mount Vernon

the former residence of George Washington in northeastern Virginia overlooking the Potomac river

— Princeton's WordNet

newburgh

Newburgh

a town on the Hudson River in New York; in 1782 and 1783 it was George Washington's headquarters

— Princeton's WordNet

north

North, Frederick North, Second Earl of Guilford

British statesman under George III whose policies led to rebellion in the American colonies (1732-1792)

— Princeton's WordNet

orwellian

Orwellian

of or relating to the works of George Orwell (especially his picture of a future totalitarian state)

— Princeton's WordNet

powell

Powell, Colin Powell, Colin luther Powell

United States general who was the first African American to serve as chief of staff; later served as Secretary of State under President George W. Bush (born 1937)

— Princeton's WordNet

president bush

Bush, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush, Dubyuh, Dubya

43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946)

— Princeton's WordNet

president george w. bush

Bush, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush, Dubyuh, Dubya

43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946)

— Princeton's WordNet

quaker

Friend, Quaker

a member of the Religious Society of Friends founded by George Fox (the Friends have never called themselves Quakers)

— Princeton's WordNet

quakers

Religious Society of Friends, Society of Friends, Quakers

a Christian sect founded by George Fox about 1660; commonly called Quakers

— Princeton's WordNet

regency

Regency

the period from 1811-1820 when the Prince of Wales was regent during George III's periods of insanity

— Princeton's WordNet

religious society of friends

Religious Society of Friends, Society of Friends, Quakers

a Christian sect founded by George Fox about 1660; commonly called Quakers

— Princeton's WordNet

robert walpole

Walpole, Robert Walpole, Sir Robert Walpole, First Earl of Orford

Englishman and Whig statesman who (under George I) was effectively the first British prime minister (1676-1745)

— Princeton's WordNet

ross

Ross, Betsy Ross, Betsy Griscom Ross

American seamstress said to have made the first American flag at the request of George Washington (1752-1836)

— Princeton's WordNet

saint george

George, Saint George, St. George

Christian martyr; patron saint of England; hero of the legend of Saint George and the Dragon in which he slew a dragon and saved a princess (?-303)

— Princeton's WordNet

second earl of guilford

North, Frederick North, Second Earl of Guilford

British statesman under George III whose policies led to rebellion in the American colonies (1732-1792)

— Princeton's WordNet

shavian

Shavian

of or relating to George Bernard Shaw or his works

— Princeton's WordNet

sir robert walpole

Walpole, Robert Walpole, Sir Robert Walpole, First Earl of Orford

Englishman and Whig statesman who (under George I) was effectively the first British prime minister (1676-1745)

— Princeton's WordNet

society of friends

Religious Society of Friends, Society of Friends, Quakers

a Christian sect founded by George Fox about 1660; commonly called Quakers

— Princeton's WordNet

steinman

Steinman, David Barnard Steinman

United States civil engineer noted for designing suspension bridges (including the George Washington Bridge) (1886-1960)

— Princeton's WordNet

steuben

Steuben, Baron Friedrich Wilhelm Ludolf Gerhard Augustin von Steuben

American Revolutionary leader (born in Prussia) who trained the troops under George Washington (1730-1794)

— Princeton's WordNet

st. george

George, Saint George, St. George

Christian martyr; patron saint of England; hero of the legend of Saint George and the Dragon in which he slew a dragon and saved a princess (?-303)

— Princeton's WordNet

stuart

Stuart, Gilbert Stuart, Gilbert Charles Stuart

United States painter best known for his portraits of George Washington (1755-1828)

— Princeton's WordNet

svengali

Svengali

the musician in a novel by George du Maurier who controls Trilby's singing hypnotically

— Princeton's WordNet

sweeney todd

Todd, Sweeney Todd

fictional character in a play by George Pitt; a barber who murdered his customers

— Princeton's WordNet

todd

Todd, Sweeney Todd

fictional character in a play by George Pitt; a barber who murdered his customers

— Princeton's WordNet

trevelyan

Trevelyan, George Macaulay Trevelyan

English historian and son of Sir George Otto Trevelyan whose works include a social history of England and a biography of Garibaldi (1876-1962)

— Princeton's WordNet

trilby

Trilby

singer in a novel by George du Maurier who was under the control of the hypnotist Svengali

— Princeton's WordNet

walpole

Walpole, Robert Walpole, Sir Robert Walpole, First Earl of Orford

Englishman and Whig statesman who (under George I) was effectively the first British prime minister (1676-1745)

— Princeton's WordNet

washington d.c.

Washington, Washington D.C., American capital, capital of the United States

the capital of the United States in the District of Columbia and a tourist mecca; George Washington commissioned Charles L'Enfant to lay out the city in 1791

— Princeton's WordNet

washington

Washington, Washington D.C., American capital, capital of the United States

the capital of the United States in the District of Columbia and a tourist mecca; George Washington commissioned Charles L'Enfant to lay out the city in 1791

— Princeton's WordNet

washingtonian

Washingtonian

of or relating to or in the manner of George Washington

— Princeton's WordNet

washington monument

Washington Monument

a stone obelisk built in Washington in 1884 to honor George Washington; 555 feet tall

— Princeton's WordNet

washington's birthday

Washington's Birthday, February 22

the day on which George Washington is remembered

— Princeton's WordNet


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