Definitions containing müller, george

We've found 250 definitions:

St. Georges Cross

St. Georges Cross

St George's Cross (or the Cross of St George) is a red cross on a white background. This pattern was associated with Saint George from medieval times.

— Wiktionary

Bushism

Bushism

The political philosophy associated with either of the US presidents George W. Bush and George H. W. Bush

— Wiktionary

Mullerian

Mullerian

of, pertaining to, or discovered by, Johannes Muller

— Webster Dictionary

Rhinoptera

Rhinoptera

Rhinoptera is a genus of eagle rays, family Myliobatidae, commonly known as the cownose rays It contains the following species: ⁕Rhinoptera adspersa J. P. Müller & Henle, 1841 ⁕Rhinoptera bonasus ⁕Rhinoptera brasiliensis J. P. Müller, 1836 ⁕Rhinoptera javanica J. P. Müller & Henle, 1841 ⁕Rhinoptera jayakari Boulenger, 1895 ⁕Rhinoptera marginata ⁕Rhinoptera neglecta J. D. Ogilby, 1912 ⁕Rhinoptera steindachneri Evermann & O. P. Jenkins, 1891

— Freebase

01

01

Released in 2001,´01 is the seventh solo album by the Slovak singer Richard Müller. Müller wrote most of the lyrics and, due to the death of his favourite composer Jaro Filip, Müller also composed half of the music. The album was critically well received, and placed at number 9 in the Czech musicserver.cz's list of the 25 best Czech and Slovak albums of the decade.

— Freebase

Hyalite

Hyalite

a pellucid variety of opal in globules looking like colorless gum or resin; -- called also Muller's glass

— Webster Dictionary

The Mission

The Mission

The Mission: Memory of a Revolution, also known as The Task, is a postmodern drama by the German playwright Heiner Müller. The play was written and first published in 1979. Müller and his wife Ginka Cholakova co-directed its first theatrical production in 1980, at the intimate 'Theatre im 3.Stock' studio space of the Volksbühne in Berlin. Müller also directed a full-house production in 1982 at the Bochum Theatre in West Germany.

— Freebase

Müller

Müller

Unternehmensgruppe Theo Müller is a multinational producer of dairy products, with a headquarters in Fischach in the German state of Bavaria. Müller made a net turnover of €2.1 billion in 2006 and has 5,400 employees.

— Freebase

Geordie

Geordie

a name given by miners to George Stephenson's safety lamp

— Webster Dictionary

Washingtonian

Washingtonian

pertaining to, or characteristic of, George Washington; as, a Washingtonian policy

— Webster Dictionary

Culcita

Culcita

Culcita is a genus of cushion stars. They are found in tropical waters. Some are kept in home aquaruims. The genus contains three species: ⁕Culcita coriacea Müller & Troschel, 1842 ⁕Culcita novaeguineae Müller & Troschel, 1842 ⁕Culcita schmideliana

— Freebase

Georgiana

Georgiana

derived from George.

— Wiktionary

additionary

additionary

additional - George Herbert.

— Wiktionary

W

W

Nickname for George W. Bush

— Wiktionary

Dubya

Dubya

A nickname for George W. Bush.

— Wiktionary

Johann Muller

Johann Muller

Gysbert Johannes Muller, more commonly known as Johann Muller, is a South African Rugby Union player. He played lock for the Natal Sharks, Sharks in and the Springboks, before a move to Northern Ireland to play with Ulster in 2010, where he is currently team captain.

— Freebase

Georgina

Georgina

, the feminine form of George.

— Wiktionary

Max Müller

Max Müller

Friedrich Max Müller, generally known as Max Müller, was a German-born philologist and Orientalist, who lived and studied in Britain for most of his life. He was one of the founders of the western academic field of Indian studies and the discipline of comparative religion. Müller wrote both scholarly and popular works on the subject of Indology and the Sacred Books of the East, a 50-volume set of English translations, was prepared under his direction. He also put forward and promoted the idea of a Turanian family of languages and Turanian people.

— Freebase

View

View

the pictorial representation of a scene; a sketch, /ither drawn or painted; as, a fine view of Lake George

— Webster Dictionary

Kathenotheism

Kathenotheism

Kathenotheism is a term coined by the philologist Max Müller to mean the worship of one god at a time. It is closely related to henotheism. Müller coined the term in reference to the Vedas; where he explained each deity is treated as supreme in turn.

— Freebase

Geordie

Geordie

A diminutive of the male given name George.

— Wiktionary

Zograf

Zograf

Saint George the Zograf, an icon in

— Wiktionary

Georgie

Georgie

A diminutive of the male given name George.

— Wiktionary

Georgianna

Georgianna

, a spelling variant of Georgiana, confused with George + Anna.

— Wiktionary

Bradshaw

Bradshaw

A former railway guide and timetable published by George Bradshaw

— Wiktionary

George

George

or Georgia; also used in the conjoined name George Ann(e).

— Wiktionary

Hyalite

Hyalite

Hyalite is a form of opal with a glassy and clear appearance which exhibits an internal play of colors and has natural inclusions. It is also called Muller's glass, water opal and jalite. Its Mohs hardness is 5.5 to 6 and it has a specific gravity of 2.1. It is an amorphous form of silica. Its has a conchoidal fracture, a vitreous luster and a white streak. It is sometimes mistaken for resin opal, since they both look like little globs. It glows bright green under blacklight. The name Müller's glass derived from the name of its discoverer, Franz-Joseph Müller von Reichenstein

— Freebase

Hermann Joseph Muller

Hermann Joseph Muller

Hermann Joseph Muller was an American geneticist, educator, and Nobel laureate best known for his work on the physiological and genetic effects of radiation as well as his outspoken political beliefs. Muller frequently warned of the long-term dangers of radioactive fallout from nuclear war and nuclear testing, helping to raise public awareness in this area.

— Freebase

Big Brother

Big Brother

The nominal leader of Oceania in George Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four.

— Wiktionary

Georgie Porgie

Georgie Porgie

alternative form of George not used as a given name but often nominally.

— Wiktionary

Shawism

Shawism

A belief, quotation, etc. attributed to the Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950).

— Wiktionary

Geiger counter

Geiger counter

A Geiger–Müller counter, also called a Geiger counter, is a type of particle detector that measures ionizing radiation. It detects the emission of nuclear radiation — alpha particles, beta particles, or gamma rays — by the ionization produced in a low-pressure gas in a Geiger–Müller tube, which gives its name to the instrument. In wide and prominent use as a hand-held radiation survey instrument, it is perhaps society's best-known radiation instrument. The original operating principle was discovered in 1908 in early radiation research. Since the subsequent development of the Geiger-Müller tube in 1928 the Geiger-Müller counter has been a popular instrument for use in radiation dosimetry, health physics, experimental physics, the nuclear industry, geological exploration and other fields, due to its robust sensing element and relatively low cost. However there are limitations in measuring high radiation rates and in measuring the energy of incident radiation.

— Freebase

Affentheater

Affentheater

Affentheater is a musical album by Marius Müller-Westernhagen.

— Freebase

u00C6

u00C6

The pseudonym of the Irish writer George William Russell.

— Wiktionary

Boolean

Boolean

Of or pertaining to the work of George Boole.

— Wiktionary

Bushist

Bushist

A supporter of George W. Bush, or advocate of his policies

— Wiktionary

Shavian

Shavian

Of, or relating to George Bernard Shaw or his works.

— Wiktionary

Quaker

Quaker

one of a religious sect founded by George Fox, of Leicestershire, England, about 1650, -- the members of which call themselves Friends. They were called Quakers, originally, in derision. See Friend, n., 4

— Webster Dictionary

ectypal

ectypal

Copied, as contrasted with an archetypal original. Has a specialised sense when used by the philosopher George Berkeley.

— Wiktionary

Bushonomics

Bushonomics

The economic policies associated with the presidency of George W. Bush, 2001-2009.

— Wiktionary

accusatory

accusatory

Pertaining to, or containing, an accusation; "as, an accusatory libel" - George Grote

— Wiktionary

Nahaufnahme

Nahaufnahme

Nahaufnahme is a 2005 studio album by Marius Müller-Westernhagen.

— Freebase

Bushism

Bushism

A turn of phrase spoken by President George W. Bush that is unintentionally comical due to grammatical errors, malapropisms, etc.

— Wiktionary

Paschal Lamb

Paschal Lamb

A lamb depicted with nimbus and bearing a flag (usually St. George's cross: argent a cross gules).

— Wiktionary

Sequoyah

Sequoyah

Inventor of the syllabary for writing the Cherokee language, also known as George Guess.

— Wiktionary

Washington

Washington

popular during the first century of American independence, also in the form George Washington.

— Wiktionary

Bushonomics

Bushonomics

The economic policies associated with the presidency of George Herbert Walker Bush, 1989-1993.

— Wiktionary

Byronian

Byronian

Of or pertaining to British Romantic poet George Gordon Byron (1788-1824) or his writings.

— Wiktionary

Byronic

Byronic

Of or pertaining to British Romantic poet George Gordon Byron (1788-1824) or his writings.

— Wiktionary

bush administration

Bush administration

the executive under President George H. W. Bush

— Princeton's WordNet

bush administration

Bush administration

the executive under President George W. Bush

— Princeton's WordNet

downey heads

downey heads

British stamps with the image of King George V, based on a photograph by the court photographers W & D Downey.

— Wiktionary

Shavian alphabet

Shavian alphabet

a synthetic alphabet, invented by George Bernard Shaw in an attempt to overcome the difficulties in English spelling

— Wiktionary

washington's birthday

Washington's Birthday, February 22

the day on which George Washington is remembered

— Princeton's WordNet

George

George

a figure of St. George (the patron saint of England) on horseback, appended to the collar of the Order of the Garter. See Garter

— Webster Dictionary

Herschel

Herschel

The planet Uranus. In use until the mid-19th century as an alternative to Georgium Sidus after King George III.

— Wiktionary

Byron

Byron

George Gordon (Noel) Byron, 6th Baron Byron (January 22, 1788u2013April 19, 1824), a famous English poet and leading figure in romanticism.

— Wiktionary

bushwhacking

bushwhacking

criticizing, by someone or a person(s), on policies and stances by George W. Bush, in forums and discussions

— Wiktionary

hart

Hart, Moss Hart

United States playwright who collaborated with George S. Kaufman (1904-1961)

— Princeton's WordNet

moss hart

Hart, Moss Hart

United States playwright who collaborated with George S. Kaufman (1904-1961)

— Princeton's WordNet

Bushian

Bushian

Of or pertaining to a person named Bush, in particular and usually President of the United States, George W. Bush:

— Wiktionary

boolean algebra

Boolean logic, Boolean algebra

a system of symbolic logic devised by George Boole; used in computers

— Princeton's WordNet

society of friends

Religious Society of Friends, Society of Friends, Quakers

a Christian sect founded by George Fox about 1660; commonly called Quakers

— Princeton's WordNet

religious society of friends

Religious Society of Friends, Society of Friends, Quakers

a Christian sect founded by George Fox about 1660; commonly called Quakers

— Princeton's WordNet

quakers

Religious Society of Friends, Society of Friends, Quakers

a Christian sect founded by George Fox about 1660; commonly called Quakers

— Princeton's WordNet

boolean logic

Boolean logic, Boolean algebra

a system of symbolic logic devised by George Boole; used in computers

— Princeton's WordNet

Regency

Regency

the historical period in the United Kingdom - specifically 1811-1820 - in which King George IV ruled as Prince Regent.

— Wiktionary

Byronesque

Byronesque

Reminiscent of the works of George Gordon Byron, typified by gloomy Romantic themes and passionate, arrogant and self-destructive heroes.

— Wiktionary

sweeney todd

Todd, Sweeney Todd

fictional character in a play by George Pitt; a barber who murdered his customers

— Princeton's WordNet

todd

Todd, Sweeney Todd

fictional character in a play by George Pitt; a barber who murdered his customers

— Princeton's WordNet

spencer

spencer

A short, close-fitting jacket primarily worn by women and children in the early nineteenth century; probably named after George Spencer, 2nd Earl Spencer (1758-1834).

— Wiktionary

svengali

Svengali

the musician in a novel by George du Maurier who controls Trilby's singing hypnotically

— Princeton's WordNet

marquis de lafayette

Lafayette, La Fayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette

French soldier who served under George Washington in the American Revolution (1757-1834)

— Princeton's WordNet

marie joseph paul yves roch gilbert du motier

Lafayette, La Fayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette

French soldier who served under George Washington in the American Revolution (1757-1834)

— Princeton's WordNet

lafayette

Lafayette, La Fayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette

French soldier who served under George Washington in the American Revolution (1757-1834)

— Princeton's WordNet

la fayette

Lafayette, La Fayette, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette

French soldier who served under George Washington in the American Revolution (1757-1834)

— Princeton's WordNet

jakob bohme

Boehme, Jakob Boehme, Bohme, Jakob Bohme, Boehm, Jakob Boehm, Behmen, Jakob Behmen

German mystic and theosophist who founded modern theosophy; influenced George Fox (1575-1624)

— Princeton's WordNet

jakob boehm

Boehme, Jakob Boehme, Bohme, Jakob Bohme, Boehm, Jakob Boehm, Behmen, Jakob Behmen

German mystic and theosophist who founded modern theosophy; influenced George Fox (1575-1624)

— Princeton's WordNet

jakob boehme

Boehme, Jakob Boehme, Bohme, Jakob Bohme, Boehm, Jakob Boehm, Behmen, Jakob Behmen

German mystic and theosophist who founded modern theosophy; influenced George Fox (1575-1624)

— Princeton's WordNet

jakob behmen

Boehme, Jakob Boehme, Bohme, Jakob Bohme, Boehm, Jakob Boehm, Behmen, Jakob Behmen

German mystic and theosophist who founded modern theosophy; influenced George Fox (1575-1624)

— Princeton's WordNet

ira gershwin

Gershwin, Ira Gershwin

United States lyricist who frequently collaborated with his brother George Gershwin (1896-1983)

— Princeton's WordNet

gershwin

Gershwin, Ira Gershwin

United States lyricist who frequently collaborated with his brother George Gershwin (1896-1983)

— Princeton's WordNet

gilbert charles stuart

Stuart, Gilbert Stuart, Gilbert Charles Stuart

United States painter best known for his portraits of George Washington (1755-1828)

— Princeton's WordNet

gilbert stuart

Stuart, Gilbert Stuart, Gilbert Charles Stuart

United States painter best known for his portraits of George Washington (1755-1828)

— Princeton's WordNet

behmen

Boehme, Jakob Boehme, Bohme, Jakob Bohme, Boehm, Jakob Boehm, Behmen, Jakob Behmen

German mystic and theosophist who founded modern theosophy; influenced George Fox (1575-1624)

— Princeton's WordNet

boehm

Boehme, Jakob Boehme, Bohme, Jakob Bohme, Boehm, Jakob Boehm, Behmen, Jakob Behmen

German mystic and theosophist who founded modern theosophy; influenced George Fox (1575-1624)

— Princeton's WordNet

boehme

Boehme, Jakob Boehme, Bohme, Jakob Bohme, Boehm, Jakob Boehm, Behmen, Jakob Behmen

German mystic and theosophist who founded modern theosophy; influenced George Fox (1575-1624)

— Princeton's WordNet

bohme

Boehme, Jakob Boehme, Bohme, Jakob Bohme, Boehm, Jakob Boehm, Behmen, Jakob Behmen

German mystic and theosophist who founded modern theosophy; influenced George Fox (1575-1624)

— Princeton's WordNet

stuart

Stuart, Gilbert Stuart, Gilbert Charles Stuart

United States painter best known for his portraits of George Washington (1755-1828)

— Princeton's WordNet

Fort George

Fort George

Fort George was the name of a provincial electoral district in the Canadian province of British Columbia from 1916 to 1975. Its successor ridings were Prince George South and Prince George North.

— Freebase

George Foreman Grill

George Foreman Grill

The George Foreman Lean Mean Fat-Reducing Grilling Machine, commonly known as the George Foreman Grill, is an indoor, electrically-heated grill manufactured by Spectrum Brands. It is promoted by former boxing champion George Foreman. Since its introduction in 1994, over 100 million George Foreman grills have been sold worldwide.

— Freebase

Cancridae

Cancridae

Cancridae is a family of crabs. It comprises six extant genera, and eleven exclusively fossil genera, in two subfamilies: Cancrinae Latreille, 1802 ⁕Anatolikos Schweitzer & Feldmann, 2000 ⁕†Anisospinos Schweitzer & Feldmann, 2000 ⁕Cancer Linnaeus, 1758 ⁕†Ceronnectes De Angeli & Beschin, 1998 ⁕†Cyclocancer Beurlen, 1958 ⁕Glebocarcinus Nations, 1975 ⁕Metacarcinus A. Milne-Edwards, 1862 ⁕†Microdium Reuss, 1867 ⁕†Notocarcinus Schweitzer & Feldmann, 2000 ⁕Platepistoma Rathbun, 1906 ⁕Romaleon Gistel, 1848 ⁕†Santeecarcinus Blow & Manning, 1996 ⁕†Sarahcarcinus Blow & Manning, 1996 †Lobocarcininae Beurlen, 1930 ⁕†Lobocarcinus Reuss, 1857 ⁕†Miocyclus Müller, 1978 ⁕†Tasadia Müller in Janssen & Müller, 1984 Before 2000, the extant species were all placed in a single genus, but in that year Carrie Schweitzer and Rodney Feldmann elevated the existing subgenera to the rank of genus, and described three additional genera. Most of the family's current diversity is found in temperate waters of the Northern Hemisphere.

— Freebase

Lakoffian

Lakoffian

Of or pertaining to George P Lakoff (1941-), American cognitive linguist noted for his ideas about the centrality of metaphor to human thinking and behaviour.

— Wiktionary

Georgian

Georgian

Of, from, or characteristic of the reigns of Kings George I-IV of the UK (1714-1837).

— Wiktionary

Orwellian

Orwellian

Pertaining to or resembling the works of George Orwell, especially in reference to the dystopia in Nineteen Eighty-Four

— Wiktionary

steuben

Steuben, Baron Friedrich Wilhelm Ludolf Gerhard Augustin von Steuben

American Revolutionary leader (born in Prussia) who trained the troops under George Washington (1730-1794)

— Princeton's WordNet

baron friedrich wilhelm ludolf gerhard augustin von steuben

Steuben, Baron Friedrich Wilhelm Ludolf Gerhard Augustin von Steuben

American Revolutionary leader (born in Prussia) who trained the troops under George Washington (1730-1794)

— Princeton's WordNet

Washingtons Birthday

Washingtons Birthday

A federal holiday in the USA celebrated on the third Monday of February, during which the US presidents, especially George Washington, are celebrated or remembered.

— Wiktionary

Henotheism

Henotheism

Henotheism is the belief and worship of a single god while accepting the existence or possible existence of other deities that may also be worshipped. The term was originally coined by Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling to depict early stages of monotheism, however Max Müller, a German philologist and orientalist, brought the term into common usage. Müller made the term central to his criticism of Western theological and religious exceptionalism, focusing on a cultural dogma which held "monotheism" to be both fundamentally well-defined and inherently superior to differing conceptions of God.

— Freebase

robert walpole

Walpole, Robert Walpole, Sir Robert Walpole, First Earl of Orford

Englishman and Whig statesman who (under George I) was effectively the first British prime minister (1676-1745)

— Princeton's WordNet

steinman

Steinman, David Barnard Steinman

United States civil engineer noted for designing suspension bridges (including the George Washington Bridge) (1886-1960)

— Princeton's WordNet

north

North, Frederick North, Second Earl of Guilford

British statesman under George III whose policies led to rebellion in the American colonies (1732-1792)

— Princeton's WordNet

sir robert walpole

Walpole, Robert Walpole, Sir Robert Walpole, First Earl of Orford

Englishman and Whig statesman who (under George I) was effectively the first British prime minister (1676-1745)

— Princeton's WordNet

david barnard steinman

Steinman, David Barnard Steinman

United States civil engineer noted for designing suspension bridges (including the George Washington Bridge) (1886-1960)

— Princeton's WordNet

frederick north

North, Frederick North, Second Earl of Guilford

British statesman under George III whose policies led to rebellion in the American colonies (1732-1792)

— Princeton's WordNet

first earl of orford

Walpole, Robert Walpole, Sir Robert Walpole, First Earl of Orford

Englishman and Whig statesman who (under George I) was effectively the first British prime minister (1676-1745)

— Princeton's WordNet

second earl of guilford

North, Frederick North, Second Earl of Guilford

British statesman under George III whose policies led to rebellion in the American colonies (1732-1792)

— Princeton's WordNet

walpole

Walpole, Robert Walpole, Sir Robert Walpole, First Earl of Orford

Englishman and Whig statesman who (under George I) was effectively the first British prime minister (1676-1745)

— Princeton's WordNet

shavian

Shavian

of or relating to George Bernard Shaw or his works

— Princeton's WordNet

Harmonite

Harmonite

one of a religious sect, founded in Wurtemburg in the last century, composed of followers of George Rapp, a weaver. They had all their property in common. In 1803, a portion of this sect settled in Pennsylvania and called the village thus established, Harmony

— Webster Dictionary

allen

Allen, Gracie Allen, Grace Ethel Cecile Rosalie Allen, Gracie

United States comedienne remembered as the confused but imperturbable partner of her husband, George Burns (1906-1964)

— Princeton's WordNet

gracie

Allen, Gracie Allen, Grace Ethel Cecile Rosalie Allen, Gracie

United States comedienne remembered as the confused but imperturbable partner of her husband, George Burns (1906-1964)

— Princeton's WordNet

gracie allen

Allen, Gracie Allen, Grace Ethel Cecile Rosalie Allen, Gracie

United States comedienne remembered as the confused but imperturbable partner of her husband, George Burns (1906-1964)

— Princeton's WordNet

grace ethel cecile rosalie allen

Allen, Gracie Allen, Grace Ethel Cecile Rosalie Allen, Gracie

United States comedienne remembered as the confused but imperturbable partner of her husband, George Burns (1906-1964)

— Princeton's WordNet

Syncretist

Syncretist

an adherent of George Calixtus and other Germans of the seventeenth century, who sought to unite or reconcile the Protestant sects with each other and with the Roman Catholics, and thus occasioned a long and violent controversy in the Lutheran church

— Webster Dictionary

Blairism

Blairism

The political ideology attributed to the governments of British Prime Minister Tony Blair 1997-2007, characterised by, among other things, the Third Way, supporting the United States President George W Bush

— Wiktionary

mount vernon

Mount Vernon

the former residence of George Washington in northeastern Virginia overlooking the Potomac river

— Princeton's WordNet

Georgian

Georgian

Of the reign of a King George, or in the style of that reign. (mostly British).

— Wiktionary

St. Georges Day

St. Georges Day

The saint's day of Saint George, the patron saint of England, celebrated on April 23.

— Wiktionary

duke of cumberland

Cumberland, William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, Butcher Cumberland

English general; son of George II; fought unsuccessfully in the battle of Fontenoy (1721-1765)

— Princeton's WordNet

cumberland

Cumberland, William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, Butcher Cumberland

English general; son of George II; fought unsuccessfully in the battle of Fontenoy (1721-1765)

— Princeton's WordNet

president bush

Bush, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush, Dubyuh, Dubya

43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946)

— Princeton's WordNet

president george w. bush

Bush, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush, Dubyuh, Dubya

43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946)

— Princeton's WordNet

dubya

Bush, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush, Dubyuh, Dubya

43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946)

— Princeton's WordNet

george bush

Bush, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush, Dubyuh, Dubya

43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946)

— Princeton's WordNet

butcher cumberland

Cumberland, William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, Butcher Cumberland

English general; son of George II; fought unsuccessfully in the battle of Fontenoy (1721-1765)

— Princeton's WordNet

dubyuh

Bush, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush, Dubyuh, Dubya

43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946)

— Princeton's WordNet

william augustus

Cumberland, William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, Butcher Cumberland

English general; son of George II; fought unsuccessfully in the battle of Fontenoy (1721-1765)

— Princeton's WordNet

george w. bush

Bush, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush, Dubyuh, Dubya

43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946)

— Princeton's WordNet

george walker bush

Bush, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush, Dubyuh, Dubya

43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946)

— Princeton's WordNet

bush

Bush, George Bush, George W. Bush, George Walker Bush, President Bush, President George W. Bush, Dubyuh, Dubya

43rd President of the United States; son of George Herbert Walker Bush (born in 1946)

— Princeton's WordNet

Tonny

Tonny

Tonny is a 1962 Norwegian drama film directed by Nils R. Müller and Per Gjersøe. It was entered into the 12th Berlin International Film Festival.

— Freebase

trilby

Trilby

singer in a novel by George du Maurier who was under the control of the hypnotist Svengali

— Princeton's WordNet

Washington

Washington

George Washington, the Commander in Chief of the Continental Army of the American rebels and first President of the United States of America, from 1789 to 1797.

— Wiktionary

Mitchell principles

Mitchell principles

six recommendations, set out in a report by US Senator George Mitchell, urging everyone involved in the Northern Ireland conflict to renounce violence and agree to disarmament before entering into all-party negotiations

— Wiktionary

european recovery program

Marshall Plan, European Recovery Program

a United States program of economic aid for the reconstruction of Europe (1948-1952); named after George Marshall

— Princeton's WordNet

marshall plan

Marshall Plan, European Recovery Program

a United States program of economic aid for the reconstruction of Europe (1948-1952); named after George Marshall

— Princeton's WordNet

newburgh

Newburgh

a town on the Hudson River in New York; in 1782 and 1783 it was George Washington's headquarters

— Princeton's WordNet

john wilkes

Wilkes, John Wilkes

English reformer who published attacks on George III and supported the rights of the American colonists (1727-1797)

— Princeton's WordNet

wilkes

Wilkes, John Wilkes

English reformer who published attacks on George III and supported the rights of the American colonists (1727-1797)

— Princeton's WordNet

Gallup poll

Gallup poll

A poll of the opinion of randomly chosen persons, used to represent the opinion of the public, conducted by w:George Gallup or one the companies he founded.

— Wiktionary

orwellian

Orwellian

of or relating to the works of George Orwell (especially his picture of a future totalitarian state)

— Princeton's WordNet

william iv

William IV, Sailor King

King of England and Ireland; son of George III who ascended the throne after a long naval career (1765-1837)

— Princeton's WordNet

pygmalion

pygmalion

Bloody (only in 'not pygmalion likely'), from the sensational, and then scandalous, line 'not bloody likely' in George Bernard Shaw's play Pygmalion.

— Wiktionary

hanover

Hanover, House of Hanover, Hanoverian line

the English royal house that reigned from 1714 to 1901 (from George I to Victoria)

— Princeton's WordNet

washington monument

Washington Monument

a stone obelisk built in Washington in 1884 to honor George Washington; 555 feet tall

— Princeton's WordNet

hanoverian line

Hanover, House of Hanover, Hanoverian line

the English royal house that reigned from 1714 to 1901 (from George I to Victoria)

— Princeton's WordNet

house of hanover

Hanover, House of Hanover, Hanoverian line

the English royal house that reigned from 1714 to 1901 (from George I to Victoria)

— Princeton's WordNet

handelian

Handelian

of or relating to or in the manner of George Frederick Handel

— Princeton's WordNet

washingtonian

Washingtonian

of or relating to or in the manner of George Washington

— Princeton's WordNet

Newspeak

Newspeak

The fictional language devised to meet the needs of Ingsoc in the novel Nineteen Eighty-four (George Orwell, 1949). Designed to restrict the words, and hence the thoughts, of the citizens of Oceania.

— Wiktionary

betsy griscom ross

Ross, Betsy Ross, Betsy Griscom Ross

American seamstress said to have made the first American flag at the request of George Washington (1752-1836)

— Princeton's WordNet

betsy ross

Ross, Betsy Ross, Betsy Griscom Ross

American seamstress said to have made the first American flag at the request of George Washington (1752-1836)

— Princeton's WordNet

regency

Regency

the period from 1811-1820 when the Prince of Wales was regent during George III's periods of insanity

— Princeton's WordNet

ross

Ross, Betsy Ross, Betsy Griscom Ross

American seamstress said to have made the first American flag at the request of George Washington (1752-1836)

— Princeton's WordNet

Celtic Sea

Celtic Sea

the area of the Atlantic Ocean off the south coast of Ireland bounded by Saint George's Channel, the Bristol Channel, the English Channel, and the Bay of Biscay

— Wiktionary

Johannes Peter Müller

Johannes Peter Müller

Johannes Peter Müller, was a German physiologist, comparative anatomist, ichthyologist, and herpetologist, known not only for his discoveries but also for his ability to synthesize knowledge.

— Freebase

Winterreise

Winterreise

Winterreise is a song cycle for voice and piano by Franz Schubert, a setting of 24 poems by Wilhelm Müller. It is the second of Schubert's two great song cycles on Müller's poems, the earlier being Die schöne Müllerin. Both were originally written for tenor voice but are frequently transposed to suit other vocal ranges - the precedent being established by Schubert himself. These two works have posed interpretative demands on listeners and performers due to their scale and structural coherence. Although Ludwig van Beethoven's cycle An die ferne Geliebte had been published earlier, in 1816, Schubert's two cycles hold the foremost place in the history of the genre.

— Freebase

george macaulay trevelyan

Trevelyan, George Macaulay Trevelyan

English historian and son of Sir George Otto Trevelyan whose works include a social history of England and a biography of Garibaldi (1876-1962)

— Princeton's WordNet

trevelyan

Trevelyan, George Macaulay Trevelyan

English historian and son of Sir George Otto Trevelyan whose works include a social history of England and a biography of Garibaldi (1876-1962)

— Princeton's WordNet

elizabeth

Elizabeth, Elizabeth II

daughter of George VI who became the Queen of England and Northern Ireland in 1952 on the death of her father (1926-)

— Princeton's WordNet

elizabeth ii

Elizabeth, Elizabeth II

daughter of George VI who became the Queen of England and Northern Ireland in 1952 on the death of her father (1926-)

— Princeton's WordNet

quaker

Friend, Quaker

a member of the Religious Society of Friends founded by George Fox (the Friends have never called themselves Quakers)

— Princeton's WordNet

friend

Friend, Quaker

a member of the Religious Society of Friends founded by George Fox (the Friends have never called themselves Quakers)

— Princeton's WordNet

Lake George

Lake George

Lake George is a town in Warren County, New York, USA. The population was 3,578 at the 2000 census. The town is named after the lake, Lake George. Within the town is a village also named Lake George. The town is part of the Glens Falls Metropolitan Statistical Area.

— Freebase

Union Jack

Union Jack

The flag of the United Kingdom, consisting of the flags of England (St. George's Cross), Scotland (St. Andrew's Cross), and Ireland (St. Patrick's Cross) now only used in Northern Ireland combined.

— Wiktionary

Cross

Cross

an appendage or ornament or anything in the form of a cross; a badge or ornamental device of the general shape of a cross; hence, such an ornament, even when varying considerably from that form; thus, the Cross of the British Order of St. George and St. Michael consists of a central medallion with seven arms radiating from it

— Webster Dictionary

colin luther powell

Powell, Colin Powell, Colin luther Powell

United States general who was the first African American to serve as chief of staff; later served as Secretary of State under President George W. Bush (born 1937)

— Princeton's WordNet

colin powell

Powell, Colin Powell, Colin luther Powell

United States general who was the first African American to serve as chief of staff; later served as Secretary of State under President George W. Bush (born 1937)

— Princeton's WordNet

powell

Powell, Colin Powell, Colin luther Powell

United States general who was the first African American to serve as chief of staff; later served as Secretary of State under President George W. Bush (born 1937)

— Princeton's WordNet

boolean

Boolean

of or relating to a combinatorial system devised by George Boole that combines propositions with the logical operators AND and OR and IF THEN and EXCEPT and NOT

— Princeton's WordNet

Lunik

Lunik

Lunik is a band from Switzerland. There are currently three members. Lunik started in 1997 with Adi Amstutz, Luk Zimmermann, Mats Marti, Walo Müller and Anton Höglhammer. Singer Jaël joined the band in 1998 and Anton Höglhammer left the line-up. 1999 saw the release of their debut album Rumour, recorded largely in an atmospheric trip hop style. Bassist Walo Müller left the band after the accompanying tour, and the second album Ahead saw the band steering towards a pop sound. Oli Müller supported the band as bassist in the live performances, and Adi Amstutz left the band. The third album Weather was a huge success in Switzerland, with an acoustic approach from Jaël, Luk, and Mats replacing the electronica of the earlier albums. Cédric Monnier and Jacob Suske joined the band as supporting players on the acoustic tour for Weather. A live album, Life is On Our Side, appeared in 2004. Cédric Monnier and Jacob Suske joined the official line-up in 2005, and Mats Marti departed at the same time. In the beginning of 2006, Chrigel Bosshard joined Lunik as the new drummer, but left the band at the end of 2011. Jacob Suske left the band again in September 2008.

— Freebase

washington d.c.

Washington, Washington D.C., American capital, capital of the United States

the capital of the United States in the District of Columbia and a tourist mecca; George Washington commissioned Charles L'Enfant to lay out the city in 1791

— Princeton's WordNet

american capital

Washington, Washington D.C., American capital, capital of the United States

the capital of the United States in the District of Columbia and a tourist mecca; George Washington commissioned Charles L'Enfant to lay out the city in 1791

— Princeton's WordNet

washington

Washington, Washington D.C., American capital, capital of the United States

the capital of the United States in the District of Columbia and a tourist mecca; George Washington commissioned Charles L'Enfant to lay out the city in 1791

— Princeton's WordNet

capital of the united states

Washington, Washington D.C., American capital, capital of the United States

the capital of the United States in the District of Columbia and a tourist mecca; George Washington commissioned Charles L'Enfant to lay out the city in 1791

— Princeton's WordNet

Curious George

Curious George

Curious George is the protagonist of a series of popular children's books by the same name, written by Hans Augusto Rey and Margret Rey. The books feature a curious brown monkey named George, who is brought from his home in Africa by "The Man with The Yellow Hat" to live with him in a big city. When the first story, Cecily G. and the Nine Monkeys was published in France in 1939, George was named Fifi. In the United Kingdom, George was originally called "Zozo" in 1941, apparently to avoid using the name of the then King George VI for a monkey. Books featuring the adventures of Curious George have been translated from the original French into many other languages in addition to English. The books are popular worldwide.

— Freebase

Irish Sea

Irish Sea

A sea between the islands of Great Britain and Ireland; bordered to the north by the North Channel and to the south by St George's Channel and the Celtic Sea.

— Wiktionary

George Town

George Town

George Town is the capital of the state of Penang in Malaysia. Named after Britain's King George III, George Town is located on the north-east corner of Penang Island. The inner city has a population of 720,202 and the metropolitan area known as George Town Conurbation which consists of Penang Island, Seberang Prai, Sungai Petani and Kulim has a combined population of 2,251,042, making it the second largest metropolitan area in Malaysia. Formerly a municipality and then a city in its own right, since 1976 George Town has been part of the Municipality of Penang Island, though the area formerly governed by the City Council of George Town is still commonly referred to as a city. George Town is also known as Tanjung in Malay, 乔治市 in Chinese and ஜோர்ஜ் டவுன் in Tamil. Its Malay name is derived from the older name of the town, Tanjung Penaga. The inner city of George Town is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

— Freebase

Filmmaker

Filmmaker

Filmmaker, or "Filmmaker: a diary by george lucas", is a 32 minute documentary made in 1968 by George Lucas about the making of Francis Ford Coppola's The Rain People.

— Freebase

Nano Terra

Nano Terra

Nano Terra is developing so-called smart materials, including ultra-thin electronic displays, fuel cells, sensors and solar power devices, based on technology developed by its co-founder, Harvard University professor and serial entrepreneur George Whitesides.

— CrunchBase

Ahlden, Castle of

Ahlden, Castle of

a castle in Lüneburg Heath, the nearly lifelong prison-house of the wife of George I. and the mother of George II. and of Sophie Dorothea of Prussia.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

St. George

St. George

St. George is a city located in the southwestern part of the U.S. state of Utah on the Utah-Arizona border, and the county seat of Washington County, Utah. It is the principal city of and is included in the St. George Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city is 117 miles northeast of Las Vegas, Nevada, and 303 miles south-southwest of Salt Lake City on Interstate 15. As of 2012 St. George had a population of 75,561. St. George was the second fastest-growing metropolitan area in the United States, only after Greeley, Colorado in 2005, this trend continued through 2007, when growth slowed substantially due to the economic recession. In 2012, the St. George metropolitan area had an estimated 144,809 residents. The hub of southern Utah and Utah's Dixie, a nickname given to the area when Mormon pioneers grew cotton in the warm climate, St. George is the seventh-largest city in Utah and the largest city in the state outside of the Wasatch Front. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, it had the distinction in the late 2000s of having the fastest white population growth in the nation.

— Freebase

saint george

George, Saint George, St. George

Christian martyr; patron saint of England; hero of the legend of Saint George and the Dragon in which he slew a dragon and saved a princess (?-303)

— Princeton's WordNet

st. george

George, Saint George, St. George

Christian martyr; patron saint of England; hero of the legend of Saint George and the Dragon in which he slew a dragon and saved a princess (?-303)

— Princeton's WordNet

george

George, Saint George, St. George

Christian martyr; patron saint of England; hero of the legend of Saint George and the Dragon in which he slew a dragon and saved a princess (?-303)

— Princeton's WordNet

george iii

George, George III

King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1760 to 1820; the American colonies were lost during his reign; he became insane in 1811 and his son (later George IV) acted as regent until 1820 (1738-1820)

— Princeton's WordNet

george

George, George III

King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1760 to 1820; the American colonies were lost during his reign; he became insane in 1811 and his son (later George IV) acted as regent until 1820 (1738-1820)

— Princeton's WordNet

Field emission microscopy

Field emission microscopy

Field emission microscopy is an analytical technique used in materials science to investigate molecular surface structures and their electronic properties. Invented by Erwin Wilhelm Müller in 1936, the FEM was one of the first surface analysis instruments that approached near-atomic resolution.

— Freebase

teleological argument

teleological argument

A type of argument for the existence of God, advanced by a number of philosophers, including Thomas Aquinas and George Berkeley, which maintains that the design of the world reveals that objects have purposes or ends and that such an organized design must be the creation of a supreme designer (God). Also called the argument from design.

— Wiktionary

pygmalion

pygmalion

One who acts as the legendary Greek sculptor Pygmalion (who was granted the wish of having life given to a sculpture of his which he loved a great deal), as in George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion in which he sometimes refers to his main character (Henry Higgins) as Pygmalion Higgins.

— Wiktionary

New Brunswick

New Brunswick

A province of eastern Canada, one of the Maritime Provinces with NOVA SCOTIA; PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND; and sometimes NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR. Its capital is Fredericton. It was named in honor of King George III, of the House of Hanover, also called Brunswick. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p828 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p375)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Paul Hermann Müller

Paul Hermann Müller

Paul Hermann Müller also known as Pauly Mueller was a Swiss chemist who received the 1948 Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine for his 1939 discovery of insecticidal qualities and use of DDT in the control of vector diseases such as malaria and yellow fever.

— Freebase

Stay the course

Stay the course

"Stay the course" is a phrase used in the context of a war or battle meaning to pursue a goal regardless of any obstacles or criticism. The modern usage of this term was popularized by United States presidents George W. Bush, George H. W. Bush, and Ronald Reagan.

— Freebase

Proportional counter

Proportional counter

The proportional counter is a type of gaseous ionization detector device used to count particles of ionizing radiation. A key feature is its ability to measure the energy of incident radiation, and it is widely used where discrimination between radiation types is required, such as between alpha and beta particles. A proportional counter uses a combination of the mechanisms of a Geiger-Muller tube and an ionisation chamber, and operates in an intermediate voltage region between these. Considering a gas-filled chamber with a wire anode, if the field strength everywhere in the volume is below a critical value, Townsend avalanches do not occur at all, and the detector operates as an ionization chamber. If the applied voltage is too high, complete ionisation of the fill gas occurs with almost each ion pair and the detector operates as a Geiger-Müller counter, with the consequent loss of incident particle energy information. The accompanying plot shows the proportional operating region for a co-axial cylinder arrangement.

— Freebase

dc

District of Columbia, D.C., DC

the district occupied entirely by the city of Washington; chosen by George Washington as the site of the capital of the United States and created out of land ceded by Maryland and Virginia

— Princeton's WordNet

district of columbia

District of Columbia, D.C., DC

the district occupied entirely by the city of Washington; chosen by George Washington as the site of the capital of the United States and created out of land ceded by Maryland and Virginia

— Princeton's WordNet

d.c.

District of Columbia, D.C., DC

the district occupied entirely by the city of Washington; chosen by George Washington as the site of the capital of the United States and created out of land ceded by Maryland and Virginia

— Princeton's WordNet

Leonard Calvert

Leonard Calvert

Leonard Calvert was the First Proprietary Governor of Maryland. He was the second son of George Calvert, 1st Baron Baltimore, the first proprietary of the Province of Maryland. His elder brother Cecil, who inherited the colony and the title upon the death of their father George, April 15, 1632, appointed Leonard as governor of the Colony in his absence. Leonard was obviously named after his grandfather, the father of George who was also "Leonard Calvert" of Yorkshire

— Freebase

Hans Geiger

Hans Geiger

Johannes "Hans" Wilhelm Geiger was a German physicist. He is perhaps best known as the co-inventor of the Geiger counter and for the Geiger-Marsden experiment which discovered the Atomic nucleus. Geiger was born at Neustadt-an-der-Haardt, Germany. He was one of five children born to the Indologist Wilhelm Ludwig Geiger, who was professor at the University of Erlangen. In 1902, Geiger started studying physics and mathematics in University of Erlangen and was awarded a doctorate in 1906. In 1907 he began work with Ernest Rutherford at the University of Manchester and in 1909, along with Ernest Marsden, conducted the famous Geiger-Marsden experiment called the "gold foil experiment". Together they created the Geiger counter. In 1911 Geiger and John Mitchell Nuttall discovered the Geiger-Nuttall law and performed experiments that led to Rutherford's atomic model. In 1928 Geiger and his student Walther Müller created an improved version of the Geiger counter, the Geiger-Müller counter. Geiger also worked with James Chadwick. In 1912 he became leader of the Physical-Technical Reichsanstalt in Berlin, 1925 professor in Kiel, 1929 in Tübingen, and from 1936 in Berlin.

— Freebase

Kinesiology, Applied

Kinesiology, Applied

The study of muscles and the movement of the human body. In holistic medicine it is the balance of movement and the interaction of a person's energy systems. Applied kinesiology is the name given by its inventor, Dr. George Goodheart, to the system of applying muscle testing diagnostically and therapeutically to different aspects of health care. (Thorsons Introductory Guide to Kinesiology, 1992, p13)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Hermann Müller

Hermann Müller

Hermann Müller, born in Mannheim, was a German Social Democratic politician who served as Foreign Minister, and twice as Chancellor of Germany under the Weimar Republic. In his capacity as Foreign Minister, he was one of the German signatories of the Treaty of Versailles in 1919.

— Freebase

Dahlgren

Dahlgren

Dahlgren is a census-designated place in King George County, Virginia, United States. The population was 2,655 at the 2010 census, a large increase from the 997 reported in 2000. The community is located within the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace American Viticultural Area winemaking appellation established by the United States government.

— Freebase

dark side hacker

dark side hacker

A criminal or malicious hacker; a cracker. From George Lucas's Darth Vader, “seduced by the dark side of the Force”. The implication that hackers form a sort of elite of technological Jedi Knights is intended. Oppose samurai.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Cincinnatus of the Americans

Cincinnatus of the Americans

George Washington.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Doctor Squintum

Doctor Squintum

George Whitfield.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

C-Block

C-Block

C-Block were a German platinum-selling hip-hop group, founded in 1995 by music producers Frank Müller, Ulrich Buchmann and Jörg Wagner. The group is fronted by Anthony "Red Dogg" Joseph and James "Mr.P" White. C-Block were a well-known hip hop act in Europe in the 1990s, who along with Down Low and Nana, signified the rise of the American-influenced rap music in Europe.

— Freebase

John George

John George

John "Jack" Phelps George was a British athlete. He competed at the 1908 Summer Olympics in London. He was born in Croydon and died in Purley, London. George won the second heat of the 100 metres with a time of 11 ³⁄5 seconds, advancing to the semifinals. In the fourth semifinal, George placed last to drop out of further contention. He also won his heat of the 200 metres, advancing to the semifinals with a time of 23.4 seconds. His third place finish in his semifinal race kept him from advancing in that event as well.

— Freebase

George Washington Goethals

George Washington Goethals

George Washington Goethals was a United States Army officer and civil engineer, best known for his supervision of the construction and the opening of the Panama Canal. The Goethals Bridge between Staten Island, New York City and Elizabeth, New Jersey is named in his honor, as is the Goethals Medal and the troop ship USNS George W. Goethals .

— Freebase

Cross, Mrs.

Cross, Mrs.

George Eliot's married name.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Caroline of Brunswick

Caroline of Brunswick

Caroline of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel was the Queen consort of King George IV of the United Kingdom from 29 January 1820 until her death. Between 1795 and 1820, she was Princess of Wales. Her father was the ruler of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel in modern-day Germany, and her mother, Princess Augusta, was the sister of George III. In 1794, she was engaged to George III's eldest son and heir apparent, George, Prince of Wales, although they had never met and George was already married illegally to Maria Fitzherbert. George and Caroline married the following year, and nine months later Caroline had a child, Princess Charlotte of Wales. Shortly after Charlotte's birth, George and Caroline separated. By 1806, rumours that Caroline had taken lovers and had an illegitimate child led to an investigation into her private life. The dignitaries who led the investigation concluded that there was "no foundation" to the rumours, but Caroline's access to her daughter was restricted. In 1814, Caroline left England and moved to Italy, where she employed Bartolomeo Pergami as a servant. Pergami soon became Caroline's closest companion, and it was widely assumed that they were lovers. In 1817, Caroline was devastated when her daughter Charlotte died in childbirth; she heard the news from a passing courier as George had refused to write and tell her. He was determined to divorce Caroline, and set up a second investigation to collect evidence of her adultery.

— Freebase

Electroretinography

Electroretinography

Electroretinography measures the electrical responses of various cell types in the retina, including the photoreceptors, inner retinal cells, and the ganglion cells. Electrodes are usually placed on the cornea and the skin near the eye, although it is possible to record the ERG from skin electrodes. During a recording, the patient's eyes are exposed to standardized stimuli and the resulting signal is displayed showing the time course of the signal's amplitude. Signals are very small, and typically are measured in microvolts or nanovolts. The ERG is composed of electrical potentials contributed by different cell types within the retina, and the stimulus conditions can elicit stronger response from certain components. If a flash ERG is performed on a dark-adapted eye, the response is primarily from the rod system. Flash ERGs performed on a light adapted eye will reflect the activity of the cone system. Sufficiently bright flashes will elicit ERGs containing an a-wave followed by a b-wave. The leading edge of the a-wave is produced by the photoreceptors, while the remainder of the wave is produced by a mixture of cells including photoreceptors, bipolar, amacrine, and Muller cells or Muller glia. The pattern ERG, evoked by an alternating checkerboard stimulus, primarily reflects activity of retinal ganglion cells.

— Freebase

Personal Construct Theory

Personal Construct Theory

A psychological theory based on dimensions or categories used by a given person in describing or explaining the personality and behavior of others or of himself. The basic idea is that different people will use consistently different categories. The theory was formulated in the fifties by George Kelly. Two tests devised by him are the role construct repertory test and the repertory grid test. (From Stuart Sutherland, The International Dictionary of Psychology, 1989)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Ocean Power Technologies

Ocean Power Technologies

OPT was formed by Dr. George W. Taylor and the late Dr. Joseph R. Burns in pursuit of their vision of harnessing the boundless energy of the world™s oceans. Starting in 1994 OPT has focused on its proprietary PowerBuoy® technology, capturing wave energy using large floating buoys anchored to the sea bed and converting the energy into electricity using innovative power take-off systems.

— CrunchBase

Fraser River

Fraser River

the chief river of British Columbia, is formed by the junction near Fort George of two streams, one rising in the Rockies, the other flowing out of the Lakes Stuart and Fraser; it discharges into the Georgian Gulf, 800 m. below Fort George. Rich deposits of gold are found in the lower basin, and an active industry in salmon-catching and canning is carried on.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Evans, Mary Ann

Evans, Mary Ann

the real name of George Eliot (q. v.).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Prince Edward Island

Prince Edward Island

An island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence constituting a province of Canada in the eastern part of the country. It is very irregular in shape with many deep inlets. Its capital is Charlottetown. Discovered by the French in 1534 and originally named Ile Saint-Jean, it was renamed in 1799 in honor of Prince Edward, fourth son of George III and future father of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p981 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p433)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Genetic load

Genetic load

In population genetics, genetic load or genetic burden is a measure of the cost of lost alleles due to selection or mutation. It is a value in the range, where 0 represents no load. The concept was first formulated in 1937 by JBS Haldane, independently formulated, named and applied to humans in 1950 by H. J. Muller, and elaborated further by Haldane in 1957.

— Freebase

Fling

Fling

Fling, internationally titled Lie to Me, is an independent film about a couple navigating the hazards of an open relationship. It is the feature directorial debut of director John Stewart Muller and stars Brandon Routh, Steve Sandvoss, Courtney Ford, Nick Wechsler, Shoshana Bush and Ellen Hollman. It is the first feature from Santa Monica-based Steele Films and was written and produced by John Stewart Muller and his partner Laura Boersma. Fling features Brandon Routh in his first lead role since Superman Returns. It premiered to a sold out crowd at the 2008 Newport Beach Film Festival on April 26 in the Lido Theater on the Balboa Peninsula. The film received an award for "Outstanding Achievement in Filmmaking" from the festival's jury. Fling had its official Los Angeles premiere on October 18th at the Fine Arts Theatre on Wilshire Blvd. as part of the 2008 LA Femme Film Festival. Shortly thereafter, it had its completely sold out East Coast premiere on November 7 at the 2008 Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival. One week later on November 14, Fling had its Midwest premiere at the Screenland Theatre in the Crossroads District of Kansas City, Missouri which kicked off a month-long run at the theater.

— Freebase

Felix Holt

Felix Holt

a novel of George Eliot's, written in 1866.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

The Couch

The Couch

Elaine begins to date the guy who delivers Jerry's new couch. Kramer plans to start the pizza business he thought of back in "Male Unbonding" with Poppie. George joins a book club, but tries to rent the movie so he can bluff his way through the meeting. Jerry and Elaine's discussion of the abortion issue causes trouble for Poppie, Elaine's relationship & Jerry's new couch. George spends the evening with the family that has rented the film.

— Freebase

Brainfuck

Brainfuck

The brainfuck programming language is an esoteric programming language noted for its extreme minimalism. It is a Turing tarpit, designed to challenge and amuse programmers, and was not made to be suitable for practical use. It was created in 1993 by Urban Müller. The name of the language is generally not capitalized except at the start of a sentence, although it is a proper noun.

— Freebase

George V

George V

}} George V is a station on line 1 of the Paris Métro, under the Champs-Élysées. The station was opened on 13 August 1900, almost a month after trains began running on the original section of line 1 between Porte de Vincennes and Porte Maillot on 19 July 1900. It was originally called Alma, after the nearby street named in honour of the Battle of Alma in the Crimean War. On 27 May 1920 the street and station were renamed after George V in appreciation of the United Kingdom's support for France during World War I. The station entrance is located between Rue de Bassano and Avenue George V on the Champs-Élysées.

— Freebase

First Gentleman of Europe

First Gentleman of Europe

George IV., from his fine style and manners.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Fullscreen

Fullscreen

Fullscreen is a next-generation media company building a global network of YouTube channels with content creators and brands. The Fullscreen network generates over 1 billion monthly video views and reaches over 90 million subscribers, making Fullscreen a Top 5 YouTube Partner. Fullscreen was founded on January 2011 by CEO George Strompolos, the co-creator and co-founder of the YouTube Partner Program. Fullscreen is headquartered in Culver City, CA.

— CrunchBase

Shiftwork

Shiftwork

Shiftwork is a 2007 single by Kenny Chesney and George Strait.

— Freebase

Bushie

Bushie

A Bushie, or less commonly, Bushite or Bushy, is a term referring to a political supporter of George H. W. Bush or George W. Bush. More specifically, it is used to denote the inner circle of Bush advisors, appointees, and acolytes. The label carries much the same meaning as the terms "Reaganite" and "Clintonista," which are used to denote aides and followers of Presidents Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton, respectively.

— Freebase

Ira Gershwin

Ira Gershwin

Ira Gershwin was an American lyricist who collaborated with his younger brother, composer George Gershwin, to create some of the most memorable songs of the 20th century. With George he wrote more than a dozen Broadway shows, featuring songs such as "I Got Rhythm," "Embraceable You," "The Man I Love" and "Someone to Watch Over Me." He was also responsible, along with DuBose Heyward, for the libretto to George's opera Porgy and Bess. The success the brothers had with their collaborative works has often overshadowed the creative role that Ira played. However, his mastery of songwriting continued after the early death of George. He wrote additional hit songs with composers Jerome Kern, Kurt Weill and Harold Arlen. His critically acclaimed book Lyrics on Several Occasions of 1959, an amalgam of autobiography and annotated anthology, is an important source for studying the art of the lyricist in the golden age of American popular song.

— Freebase

Osso

Osso

Osso is an unincorporated community in King George County, Virginia, United States.

— Freebase

Leatherstocking

Leatherstocking

Leatherstocking is a 1924 American Western film serial directed by George B. Seitz.

— Freebase

Calorius, Abraham

Calorius, Abraham

a fiery Lutheran polemic, a bitter enemy of George Calixtus (1612-1686).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

James Van Allen

James Van Allen

James Alfred Van Allen was an American space scientist at the University of Iowa. He was instrumental in establishing the field of magnetospheric research in space. The Van Allen radiation belts were named after him, following their discovery by his Geiger–Müller tube instruments on the 1958 satellites: during the International Geophysical Year. Van Allen led the scientific community for the inclusion of scientific research instruments on space satellites.

— Freebase

E. G. Squier

E. G. Squier

Ephraim George Squier was an American archaeologist and newspaper editor.

— Freebase

Agnes de Mille

Agnes de Mille

Agnes George de Mille was an American dancer and choreographer.

— Freebase

George Enescu

George Enescu

George Enescu was a Romanian composer, violinist, pianist, conductor and teacher.

— Freebase

George Segal

George Segal

George Segal is an American film, stage, and television actor.

— Freebase

PluroGen Therapeutics

PluroGen Therapeutics

PluroGen™s core technology platform was developed by researchers and physicians in University of Virginia™s (UVA) Plastic Surgery Research Laboratory beginning in the 1970™s. Their co-founder, George T. Rodeheaver, Ph.D., is one of the inventors of this technology and has supervised the formulation and production at UVA of one of their first products for use on burn and chronic wound patients at the UVA Health System for the past fifteen years.

— CrunchBase

Porgy

Porgy

Porgy is a novel written by the American author DuBose Heyward and published by the George H. Doran Company in 1925, as well as a play which Dorothy Heyward helped him to write which was premiered in 1927. Even before the play had been fully written, Heyward was in discussions with George Gershwin for an operatic version of his novel, which appeared in 1935 as Porgy and Bess.

— Freebase

Brighton

Brighton

a much-frequented watering-place in Sussex, 50 m. S. of London, of which it is virtually a suburb; a place of fashionable resort ever since George IV. took a fancy to it; a fine parade extends along the whole length of the sea front; has many handsome edifices, a splendid aquarium, a museum, schools of science and art, public library and public gallery; the principal building is the Pavilion or Marine Palace, originally built for George IV. Also the name of a suburb of Melbourne.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Alexander Island

Alexander Island

Alexander Island, which is also known as Alexander I Island, Alexander I Land, Alexander Land, Alexander I Archipelago, and Zemlja Alexandra I, is the largest island of Antarctica. It lies in the Bellingshausen Sea west of Palmer Land, Antarctic Peninsula from which it is separated by Marguerite Bay and George VI Sound. George VI Ice Shelf entirely fills George VI Sound and connects Alexander island to Palmer Land. The island partly surrounds Wilkins Sound, which lies to its west. Alexander Island is about 240 miles long in a north-south direction, 50 miles wide in the north, and 150 miles wide in the south. Alexander Island is the second largest uninhabited island in the world, after Devon Island.

— Freebase

False Colors

False Colors

False Colors is a film directed by George Archainbaud released on November 5, 1943.

— Freebase

Edgehill

Edgehill

Edgehill is an unincorporated community in King George County, Virginia, United States.

— Freebase

Six Mile

Six Mile

Six Mile is a town in Pickens County, South Carolina, United States. The population was 553 at the 2000 census. It is part of the Greenville–Mauldin–Easley Metropolitan Statistical Area. Six Mile was named "Six Mile" because it was located six miles from Fort Prince George. Many other landmarks in this area were named by their distance from Fort Prince George such as 12 Mile River and 18 Mile Creek.

— Freebase

Gilbert Murray

Gilbert Murray

George Gilbert Aimé Murray, OM was an Australian-born British classical scholar and public intellectual, with connections in many spheres. He was an outstanding scholar of the language and culture of Ancient Greece, perhaps the leading authority in the first half of the twentieth century. He is the basis for the character of Adolphus Cusins in his friend George Bernard Shaw's play Major Barbara, and also appears as the chorus figure in Tony Harrison's play Fram.

— Freebase

The Money

The Money

Jerry's parents sell the Cadillac to Jack Klompus for $6000 in order to give Jerry some money to help him out. They along with Kramer suggest that Jerry might try a career move. Elaine talks about her Peterman stock options and buys George's coffee. He thinks she is sticking it to him. Jerry and George talk about the money their parents might have. This piques George's interest. Kramer seeks advice from Elaine about his girlfriend's post-sex bed habit "she's got the jimmy legs." Jerry flies to Florida to buy the Cadillac back. George seeks information on his family's health history. Kramer works out a deal with his girlfriend. Jerry meets with Klompus and agrees to pay $14,000 for it. George anticipating a big inheritance begins to spend money. Unfortunately for him, so do his parents. Klompus has a problem with the car and Jerry returns to Florida. Jerry's parents are still worried about him and wonder what to do. Morty decides to see Elaine about a job; she reluctantly agrees to give him a job, just as Peterman returns. Kramer, fearing a prowler (Jerry's dad), decides he can no longer sleep alone; unfortunately his girlfriend has decided she can. So he moves in with the Costanzas, who tell George that they are moving to Florida. Elaine returns to her regular position at Peterman, with no options. George and Elaine try to discuss their respective problems. Still in Florida, strapped for cash and credit, Jerry sleeps in the Cadillac. Kramer and Emily spend the night as an old married couple in the Costanzas' house. The Seinfelds make a change in their housing as the Costanzas try to settle into their new place.

— Freebase

Bushism

Bushism

Bushisms are unconventional words, phrases, pronunciations, malapropisms, and semantic or linguistic errors that often occurred in the public speaking of former President of the United States George W. Bush and of his father, George H. W. Bush. The term has become part of popular folklore and is the basis of a number of websites and published books. It is often used to caricature the two presidents. Common characteristics include malapropisms, the creation of neologisms, spoonerisms, stunt words and grammatically incorrect subject-verb agreement.

— Freebase

ananias

ananias

1. The first ad-writer.

2. Any person who adapts the truth to his needs.

3. An ancient Saint George who slew the dragon Truth--hence, any popular hero or revealer who displays his grinders.

— The Roycroft Dictionary

George Meredith

George Meredith

George Meredith, OM was an English novelist and poet of the Victorian era.

— Freebase

Dear One

Dear One

"Dear One" is the second track on George Harrison's 1976 album, Thirty Three & 1/3.

— Freebase

Farmer George

Farmer George

George III., a name given to him from his plain, homely, thrifty manners and tastes.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia


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