Definitions containing m hler, johann adam

We've found 250 definitions:

eve

Eve

(Old Testament) Adam's wife in Judeo-Christian mythology: the first woman and mother of the human race; God created Eve from Adam's rib and placed Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden

— Princeton's WordNet

Bach

Bach

Johann Sebastian Bach, a German organist and composer

— Wiktionary

Adam and Steve

Adam and Steve

A phrase, often satirical, recasting the Biblical couple of Adam and Eve as a homosexual couple, Adam and Steve. In context, it may be used as a pejorative against either homosexuality or religious opposition to it.

— Wiktionary

Volapu00FCk

Volapu00FCk

An artificial language created in 1879 by Johann Martin Schleyer.

— Wiktionary

Goethean

Goethean

Of or relating to Johann Wolfgang Goethe, a German writer and thinker.

— Wiktionary

BACH motif

BACH motif

A sequence of four notes (B flat, A, C, B natural), included in a piece of music as a homage to Johann Sebastian Bach.

— Wiktionary

Ads

Ads

A nickname for Adam

— Wiktionary

Adie

Adie

derived from Adam.

— Wiktionary

laryngeal prominence

laryngeal prominence

the Adam's apple

— Wiktionary

Adams

Adams

derived from Adam.

— Wiktionary

Enos

Enos

A grandson of Adam.

— Wiktionary

Tagged

Tagged

Tagged is a social network designed for meeting new people. The company was founded in October 2004 by Greg Tseng and johann-schleier-smith" title="Johann Schleier-Smith" rel="nofollow">Johann Schleier-Smith. While other social networks focus on existing relationships, Tagged has established the category of social discovery.Tagged has over 300 million members in 220 countries. The company’s service is designed to enable anyone to meet and socialize with new people through social games, customized profiles, virtual gifts, advanced browsing features and more.Co-founders Greg and Johann met at Harvard and after moving to California to pursue their PhDs at Stanford, they took a leave of absence to focus full-time on Tagged.Tagged was originally a teen-only social network and opened up to all ages 13+ in October 2006.The company pivoted to its current social discovery focus in late-2007 and has been profitable since 2008.

— CrunchBase

Preadamic

Preadamic

prior to Adam

— Webster Dictionary

Adam's apple

Adam's apple

see under Adam

— Webster Dictionary

Atkins

Atkins

meaning "son of Atkin (Adam)".

— Wiktionary

forbidden fruit

forbidden fruit

The fruit forbidden to Adam.

— Wiktionary

adamite

adamite

A descendant of Adam; a human being.

— Wiktionary

Adamesque

Adamesque

in the style of Robert Adam

— Wiktionary

Adamic

Adamic

Of, relating to, or resembling Adam.

— Wiktionary

adapa

Adapa

a Babylonian demigod or first man (sometimes identified with Adam)

— Princeton's WordNet

Adamite

Adamite

a descendant of Adam; a human being

— Webster Dictionary

Seth

Seth

The third son of Adam and Eve.

— Wiktionary

original sin

original sin

a sin said to be inherited by all descendants of Adam

— Princeton's WordNet

Muckers

Muckers

Muckers, is the nickname given to the followers of the teaching of Johann Heinrich Schönherr and Johann Wilhelm Ebel.

— Freebase

Preadamite

Preadamite

an inhabitant of the earth before Adam

— Webster Dictionary

Preadamite

Preadamite

one who holds that men existed before Adam

— Webster Dictionary

pre-Adamite

pre-Adamite

A member of any race that predates Adam; an inhuman being.

— Wiktionary

pre-Adamite

pre-Adamite

Of or pertaining to a race that predates Adam; pre-human.

— Wiktionary

Preadamitic

Preadamitic

existing or occurring before Adam; preadamic; as, preadamitic periods

— Webster Dictionary

Edison

Edison

An English patronymic or metronymic surname derived from Adam and Edith.

— Wiktionary

Rib

Rib

a wife; -- in allusion to Eve, as made out of Adam's rib

— Webster Dictionary

Abel

Abel

The son of Adam and Eve who was killed by his brother Cain.

— Wiktionary

Egoism

Egoism

the doctrine of certain extreme adherents or disciples of Descartes and Johann Gottlieb Fichte, which finds all the elements of knowledge in the ego and the relations which it implies or provides for

— Webster Dictionary

Eden

Eden

the garden where Adam and Eve first dwelt; hence, a delightful region or residence

— Webster Dictionary

Adam Opel

Adam Opel

Adam Opel was the founder of the German automobile company Adam Opel AG.

— Freebase

Paradise

Paradise

the garden of Eden, in which Adam and Eve were placed after their creation

— Webster Dictionary

tree of knowledge

tree of knowledge

the biblical tree in the Garden of Eden whose forbidden fruit was tasted by Adam and Eve

— Princeton's WordNet

seth

Seth

(Old Testament) third son of Adam and Eve; given by God in place of the murdered Abel

— Princeton's WordNet

Adamical

Adamical

of or pertaining to Adam, or resembling him

— Webster Dictionary

bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthurnuk

bababadalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthurnuk

A sound which represents the symbolic thunderclap associated with the fall of Adam and Eve.

— Wiktionary

Cain

Cain

The eldest son of Adam and Eve as described in Genesis. (see Cain and Abel).

— Wiktionary

Adam

Adam

(with second or last) Jesus Christ, whose sacrifice, in Christian theology, makes possible the forgiveness of Adam's original sin.

— Wiktionary

General

General

having a relation to all; common to the whole; as, Adam, our general sire

— Webster Dictionary

Throatboll

Throatboll

the Adam's apple in the neck

— Webster Dictionary

prelapsarian

prelapsarian

of or relating to the time before the Fall of Adam and Eve

— Princeton's WordNet

Eden

Eden

A garden built by God as the home for Adam and Eve; sometimes identified as part of Mesopotamia

— Wiktionary

Lilith

Lilith

A Mesopotamian storm demon, a bearer of disease and death; also the first wife of Adam in Jewish folklore.

— Wiktionary

Garden of Eden

Garden of Eden

In the book of Genesis, the place where Adam and Eve first lived after being created by God.

— Wiktionary

original sin

original sin

The state of sin, present in each human at birth, that is a direct result of Adam's disobedience to God.

— Wiktionary

Adamos

Adamos

A transliteration of the Greek male given name u1F0Cu03B4u03B1u03BCu03BFu03C2 (Adamos), the equivalent of Adam.

— Wiktionary

fall

Fall

the lapse of mankind into sinfulness because of the sin of Adam and Eve

— Princeton's WordNet

Adam Kadmon

Adam Kadmon

Adam Kadmon is a phrase in the religious writings of Kabbalah meaning "original man". The oldest mainstream rabbinic source for the term Adam ha-Ḳadmoni is Numbers Rabbah x., where Biblical Adam is styled, not as usually Ha-Rishon, but "Ha-Kadmoni". In Kabbalah, Adam Kadmon is the first of the comprehensive Five spiritual Worlds in creation, distinguished from Biblical Adam Ha-Rishon, who included within himself all future human souls before the sin of the Tree of Knowledge. The spiritual real of Adam Kadmon represents the sephirah of Keter, the specific divine will and plan for subsequent creation. In the Lurianic systemisation of preceding Kabbalah, the anthropomorphic designation for Adam Kadmon describes its arrangement of the latent future sephirot in the harmonised configuration of man. However, Adam Kadmon itself is divine light without vessels, including all subsequent creation only in potential. This exalted anthropomorphism denotes that man is both the theocentric purpose of future creation, and the anthropocentric embodiment of the divine manifestations on high. This mythopoetic cosmogenesis and anthropogenesis enables the "Adam soul" to embody all human souls; the collective Yechidah soul essence in Adam Kadmon, and the collective Neshamah revealed soul in the Biblical Adam Ha-Rishon in the Garden of Eden.

— Freebase

Adam and Steve

Adam and Steve

"Adam and Steve" is a phrase that originated from a conservative Christian slogan "God made Adam and Eve, not Adam and Steve", intended to concisely summarize Judeo-Christian Bible-based arguments against homosexual practices or homosexuality. Among other things, it implies that the natural way of life for humanity is illustrated by the Biblical account of the creation of human beings as a male-female pair.

— Freebase

crew neck

crew neck

Occasionally, a collar whose front is meant to ride up onto the neck, sometimes to Adam's apple level, more often termed as high crew.

— Wiktionary

cataphatism

cataphatism

the religious belief that God has given enough clues to be known to humans positively and affirmatively (e.g., God created Adam `in his own image')

— Princeton's WordNet

Eblis

Eblis

in Mohammedan tradition the chief of the fallen angels, consigned to perdition for refusing to worship Adam at the command of his Creator, and who gratified his revenge by seducing Adam and Eve from innocency.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Eve

Eve

According to the Bible and Qur'an, the first woman and mother of the human race; Adam's wife.

— Wiktionary

Mandaeism

Mandaeism

A monotheistic religion of the Iraq region with a strongly dualistic worldview, whose adherents (the Mandaeans) revere Adam and other Biblical figures, especially John the Baptist.

— Wiktionary

Fall

Fall

The sudden fall of humanity into a state of sin, as brought about by the transgression of Adam and Eve.

— Wiktionary

Original Sin

Original Sin

the name given by the theologians to the inherent tendency to sin on the part of all mankind, due, as alleged, to their descent from Adam and the imputation of Adam's guilt to them as sinning in him.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Smithian

Smithian

of or characteristic of the theories of the political economist Adam Smith

— Wiktionary

Thyroid Cartilage

Thyroid Cartilage

The largest cartilage of the larynx consisting of two laminae fusing anteriorly at an acute angle in the midline of the neck. The point of fusion forms a subcutaneous projection known as the Adam's apple.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Doppler Effect

Doppler Effect

Changes in the observed frequency of waves (as sound, light, or radio waves) due to the relative motion of source and observer. The effect was named for the 19th century Austrian physicist Johann Christian Doppler.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

postlapsarian

postlapsarian

The state of being which followed the expulsion of Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden.

— Wiktionary

Adam

Adam

Adam is a figure in the Book of Genesis, the Quran and the Kitáb-i-Íqán. According to the creation myth of Abrahamic religions, he is the first human. In the Genesis creation narratives, he was created by Yahweh-Elohim, though the term "adam" can refer to both the first individual person, as well as to the general creation of humankind. Christian churches differ on how they view Adam's subsequent behavior, and to the consequences that those actions had on the rest of humanity. Christian and Jewish teachings sometimes hold Adam and Eve to a different level of responsibility for the Fall, though Islamic teaching holds both equally responsible. In addition, Islam holds that Adam was eventually forgiven, while Christianity holds that redemption occurred only later through the sacrifice of Jesus Christ. Bahá'í Faith, Islam and some Christian denominations consider Adam to be the first Prophet.

— Freebase

Jared

Jared

A man mentioned in the Book of Genesis, a descendant of Adam and of Seth, the father of Enoch, an ancestor of Noah.

— Wiktionary

Adamite

Adamite

one of a sect of visionaries, who, professing to imitate the state of Adam, discarded the use of dress in their assemblies

— Webster Dictionary

Pre-Adamite

Pre-Adamite

Pre-Adamite hypothesis or Preadamism is a hypothesis within theology that humans existed before Adam. This theoretical assumption is contrary to beliefs describing Adam as the first human, as stated in the Bible and the Qur'an. The theory of Preadamism is therefore distinct from the conventional religious belief that Adam was the first human. Preadamism has a long history, probably having its origins in early pagan responses to Abrahamic claims regarding the origins of the human race. Advocates of this hypothesis are known as "pre-Adamites", as are the humans believed by them to have existed before Adam.

— Freebase

Theory

Theory

the philosophical explanation of phenomena, either physical or moral; as, Lavoisier's theory of combustion; Adam Smith's theory of moral sentiments

— Webster Dictionary

abel

Abel

(Old Testament) Cain and Abel were the first children of Adam and Eve born after the Fall of Man; Abel was killed by Cain

— Princeton's WordNet

Adam and Eve

Adam and Eve

Adam and Eve, according to the Abrahamic religions, were the first man and woman. These religions teach that all humans are descended from Adam and Eve. In the Book of Genesis, chapters one through five, there are two creation narratives with two distinct perspectives on woman. In the first, Adam and Eve were created together in God's image and jointly given instructions to multiply and to be stewards over everything else that God had made. In the far more detailed second narrative, God fashions Adam from dust and places him in the Garden of Eden where he is to have dominion over the plants and animals. God places a tree in the garden which he prohibits Adam from eating. Eve is later created to be Adam's companion. However, "the serpent" tricks Eve into eating from it. God curses only the serpent and the ground. He prophetically tells the woman and the man what will be the consequences of their sin of disobeying God. Then he banishes the man from the Garden of Eden. Interpretations and beliefs regarding Adam and Eve and the story revolving around them vary across religions and sects.

— Freebase

cain

Cain

(Old Testament) Cain and Abel were the first children of Adam and Eve born after the Fall of Man; Cain killed Abel out of jealousy and was exiled by God

— Princeton's WordNet

Adam's Peak

Adam's Peak

a conical peak in the centre of Ceylon 7420 ft. high, with a foot-like depression 5 ft. long and 2½ broad atop, ascribed to Adam by the Mohammedans, and to Buddha by the Buddhists; it was here, the Arabs say, that Adam alighted on his expulsion from Eden and stood doing penance on one foot till God forgave him.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

fig leaf

fig leaf

A representation of leaf of a fig plant used to cover the genitals of a nude figure in a work of art (alluding to Genesis iii 7, in which Adam and Eve use fig leaves to hide their nakedness).

— Wiktionary

Puttyroot

Puttyroot

an American orchidaceous plant (Aplectrum hyemale) which flowers in early summer. Its slender naked rootstock produces each year a solid corm, filled with exceedingly glutinous matter, which sends up later a single large oval evergreen plaited leaf. Called also Adam-and-Eve

— Webster Dictionary

genesis

Genesis, Book of Genesis

the first book of the Old Testament: tells of Creation; Adam and Eve; the Fall of Man; Cain and Abel; Noah and the flood; God's covenant with Abraham; Abraham and Isaac; Jacob and Esau; Joseph and his brothers

— Princeton's WordNet

book of genesis

Genesis, Book of Genesis

the first book of the Old Testament: tells of Creation; Adam and Eve; the Fall of Man; Cain and Abel; Noah and the flood; God's covenant with Abraham; Abraham and Isaac; Jacob and Esau; Joseph and his brothers

— Princeton's WordNet

Science of Love

Science of Love

Science of Love is an NBC reality dating show hosted by Mark Consuelos and starring NFL football player Adam Johnson. It premiered on Monday, June 25, 2007. The show revolved around the notion if science can find a person's soul mate, or instincts rule love. The scientific match, Casey Dee, won Adam's heart. As a prize, the two were flown to Hawaii.

— Freebase

Robert Adam

Robert Adam

Robert Adam FRSE FRS FSA FSA FRSA was a Scottish neoclassical architect, interior designer and furniture designer. He was the son of William Adam, the country's foremost architect of the time, and trained under him. With his older brother John, Robert took on the family business, which included lucrative work for the Board of Ordnance, after William's death. In 1754 he left for Rome, spending nearly five years on the continent studying architecture under Charles-Louis Clérisseau and Giovanni Battista Piranesi. On his return to Britain he established a practice in London, where he was joined by his younger brother James. Here he developed the "Adam Style", and his theory of "movement" in architecture, based on his studies of antiquity and became one of the most successful and fashionable architects in the country. Adam held the post of Architect of the King's Works from 1761 to 1769. Robert Adam was a leader of the first phase of the classical revival in England and Scotland from around 1760 until his death. He influenced the development of Western architecture, both in Europe and in North America. Adam designed interiors and fittings as well as houses.

— Freebase

eden

Eden, Garden of Eden

a beautiful garden where Adam and Eve were placed at the Creation; when they disobeyed and ate the forbidden fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil they were driven from their paradise (the fall of man)

— Princeton's WordNet

garden of eden

Eden, Garden of Eden

a beautiful garden where Adam and Eve were placed at the Creation; when they disobeyed and ate the forbidden fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil they were driven from their paradise (the fall of man)

— Princeton's WordNet

businessworthy

businessworthy

Of business conduct in accordance with Adam Smith's dictum that "Markets could not flourish without a strong underlying moral culture, animated by empathy and Fellow-feeling, by our ability to understand our common bond as human beings and to recognize the needs of others."

— Wiktionary

Forbidden fruit

Forbidden fruit

Forbidden fruit is a phrase that originates from Genesis concerning Adam and Eve in Genesis 2:16–17. In the narrative, the fruit of good and evil was eaten by Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. As a metaphor, the phrase typically refers to any indulgence or pleasure that is considered illegal or immoral.

— Freebase

imputation

imputation

A setting of something to the account of; the attribution of personal guilt or personal righteousness of another; as, the imputation of the sin of Adam, or the righteousness of Christ.

— Wiktionary

Imputation

Imputation

a setting of something to the account of; the attribution of personal guilt or personal righteousness of another; as, the imputation of the sin of Adam, or the righteousness of Christ

— Webster Dictionary

Ivan Franko

Ivan Franko

Ivan Yakovych Franko was a Ukrainian poet, writer, social and literary critic, journalist, interpreter, economist, political activist, doctor of philosophy, ethnographer, the author of the first detective novels and modern poetry in the Ukrainian language. He was a political radical, and a founder of the socialist and nationalist movement in western Ukraine. In addition to his own literary work, he also translated the works of such renowned figures as William Shakespeare, Lord Byron, Pedro Calderón de la Barca, Dante Alighieri, Victor Hugo, Adam Mickiewicz, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Friedrich Schiller into the Ukrainian language. Along with Taras Shevchenko, he has had a tremendous impact on modern literary and political thought in Ukraine.

— Freebase

fall of man

Fall of Man

(Judeo-Christian mythology) when Adam and Eve ate of the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil in the Garden of Eden, God punished them by driving them out of the Garden of Eden and into the world where they would be subject to sickness and pain and eventual death

— Princeton's WordNet

Polka-mazurka

Polka-mazurka

The polka-mazurek is a dance, musically similar to the mazurek, but danced much like the polka. Many polka-mazureks were composed by Johann Strauss II and his family. Johann Strauss I did not compose any of this type of music; the first polka-mazurek example written by the Strauss family was in the year 1854 by Johann Strauss II, entitled La Viennoise op. 144. The polka-mazurek was not credited to the Strauss family alone, as many Viennese composers in the 1850s era also wrote many examples. This variant of the polka was seen as cross-cultural, as many of its influences can be seen in the French-polka with its feminine and deliberate steps as well as the exciting schnell-polka, where Eduard Strauss composed many famous pieces of this type.

— Freebase

Rauhes Haus

Rauhes Haus

a remarkable institution for the reclamation and training of neglected children, founded (1831), and for many years managed by Johann Heinrich Wichern at Hoon, near Hamburg; it is affiliated to the German Home Mission.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Illuminati

Illuminati

members of certain associations in Modern Europe, who combined to promote social reforms, by which they expected to raise men and society to perfection, esp. of one originated in 1776 by Adam Weishaupt, professor of canon law at Ingolstadt, which spread rapidly for a time, but ceased after a few years

— Webster Dictionary

Homeboys

Homeboys

Homeboys is the third album by alternative rock band Adam Again.

— Freebase

Perfecta

Perfecta

Perfecta is the fifth album by alternative rock band Adam Again.

— Freebase

Danites

Danites

or Destroying Angels, a band of Mormons organised to prevent the entrance into Mormon territory of other than Mormon immigrants, but whose leader, for a massacre they perpetrated, was in 1827 convicted and shot.

Dannecker, Johann Heinrich von

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Alois Senefelder

Alois Senefelder

Johann Alois Senefelder was a German actor and playwright who invented the printing technique of lithography in 1796.

— Freebase

Johann Eck

Johann Eck

Dr. Johann Maier von Eck was a German Scholastic theologian and defender of Catholicism during the Protestant Reformation.

— Freebase

Hermann and Dorothea

Hermann and Dorothea

Hermann and Dorothea is an epic poem, an idyll, written by German writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe between 1796 and 1797, and was to some extent suggested by Johann Heinrich Voss's Luise, an idyll in hexameters, which was first published in 1782-84. Goethe's work is set around 1792 at the beginning of the French Revolutionary Wars, when French forces under General Custine invaded and briefly occupied parts of the Palatinate. The hexameters of the nine cantos are at times irregular.

— Freebase

Airside Mobile

Airside Mobile

Airside Mobile provides a mobile transaction platform for airport passengers to find, purchase, and receive retail and services at the airport via their smartphones.Airside’s platform includes mobile apps for passengers, apps and web services for point-of-sale solutions, and a secure backend with CRM analytics, and a fully PCI-compliant payment gateway. Airside’s current customers have annual on-airport revenues of approximately $3 billion.Founders Hans Miller, Adam Tsao and Ganesh Ramachandran have extensive experience operating within the airport environment and have played a major role in multiple airport process re-designs over the past decade. In 2007, Hans and Adam coordinated the launch of mobile boarding passes in the US, working closely with IATA and Continental Airlines.

— CrunchBase

Beyond Oblivion

Beyond Oblivion

Beyond Oblivion is a music and technology company founded in 2008 by its CEO, Adam Kidron. Its principle shareholders are Wellcome Trust, News Corporation, Allen & Company, Intertrust Technologies Corporation, and Adam Kidron. Beyond Oblivion’s first go-to-market product is boinc.boinc is a magnetic and social music service that distributes a vast legal music library from a cloud (supplied by majors, independents, and artists the world over), and embeds the right to download and PLAY IT ALL within devices like PCs, tablets, autos and smartphones.boinc replaces paid-download, paid subscription, and advertiser-supported services with an inexpensive one-time, lifetime-of-device usage fee - paying copyright owners a micro-royalty per play, no matter if the original file were legally or illegally downloaded.

— CrunchBase

Prohibit

Prohibit

to forbid by authority; to interdict; as, God prohibited Adam from eating of the fruit of a certain tree; we prohibit a person from doing a thing, and also the doing of the thing; as, the law prohibits men from stealing, or it prohibits stealing

— Webster Dictionary

Chromatics

Chromatics

Chromatics is an American electronic music band from Portland, Oregon, formed in 2001. The band consists of Ruth Radelet, Adam Miller, Nat Walker, and Johnny Jewel. The band's latest album, Kill for Love, was released March 26, 2012. The band originally featured a trademark sound indebted to punk and lo-fi that was described as "noisy" and "chaotic". After numerous lineup changes, which left guitarist Adam Miller as the sole original member, the band began releasing material on the Italians Do It Better record label in 2007.

— Freebase

Jean Paul

Jean Paul

Jean Paul, born Johann Paul Friedrich Richter, was a German Romantic writer, best known for his humorous novels and stories.

— Freebase

A`bul-faraj

A`bul-faraj

a learned Armenian Jew, who became bishop of Aleppo, and wrote a history of the world from Adam onwards (1226-1286).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Palk's Strait

Palk's Strait

the channel which separates Ceylon from the mainland of India, 100 m. long and 40 m. wide, generally shallow. See Adam's Bridge.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Seventh Avenue

Seventh Avenue

Seventh Avenue, known as Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard north of Central Park, is a thoroughfare on the West Side of the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It is southbound below Central Park and a two-way street north of the park. Seventh Avenue originates in the West Village at Clarkson Street, where Varick Street becomes Seventh Avenue. It is interrupted by Central Park from 59th to 110th Street. Artisans' Gate is the 59th Street exit from Central Park to Seventh Avenue. North of Warriors' Gate at the north end of the Park, the road runs in both directions through Harlem, where it is called Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard which has the Adam Clayton Powell Jr. State Office Building. The street ends at the Macombs Dam Bridge over the Harlem River, where Jerome Avenue commences in the Bronx.

— Freebase

German Catholics

German Catholics

a sect formed in 1844 by secession from the Catholic Church of Germany, under the leadership of Johann Ronge, on account of the mummery under papal patronage connected with the exhibition of the Holy Coat of Trèves and the superstitious influence ascribed to it.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Helminthology

Helminthology

Helminthology is the study of parasitic worms. This field deals with the study of their taxonomy and the effect on their hosts. The origin of the first compound of the word is from the Greek ἕλμινς - helmins, meaning "worm". In the 18th and early 19th century there was wave of publications on helminthology in the 19th and at the beginning of the 19th century that has been described as “Golden Era” of helminthology. During that period the authors Peter Simon Pallas, Marcus Elieser Bloch, Otto Friedrich Müller, Johann Goeze, Friedrich Zenker, Carl Asmund Rudolphi and Johann Gottfried Bremser started systematic scientific studies of the subject.

— Freebase

Adam Revo

Adam Revo

Adam Revo was a city car made by the now defunct Adam Motor Company of Pakistan. It was the first car to be designed and assembled in Pakistan. Production of this model stopped by September 2006 due to unavailability of funds and lack of government support. There were two variants available, equipped with two different Chinese made engines; the Revo 80 and Revo 105. The Revo was envisaged to be between 10% and 15% cheaper than other local competitors, mainly the Mehran 800, which dominates Pakistan's automobile industry.

— Freebase

Pre-Adamites

Pre-Adamites

a race presumed to have existed on the earth prior to Adam; traditional first fathers of the Jews.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Ferdinand Lassalle

Ferdinand Lassalle

Ferdinand Johann Gottlieb Lassalle was a German jurist, philosopher, and socialist political activist. Lassalle is best remembered as an initiator of international-style socialism in Germany.

— Freebase

Prizes

Prizes

Prizes is a 1995 novel by Erich Segal. It tells stories of three principal characters: Adam Coopersmith, Isabel Da Costa and Sandy Raven.

— Freebase

James Wyatt

James Wyatt

James Wyatt RA, was an English architect, a rival of Robert Adam in the neoclassical style and neo-Gothic style.

— Freebase

Adam Freeland

Adam Freeland

Adam Freeland is an English record producer and DJ associated with breakbeat based electronic music. As a DJ and remixer he operates solo under his own full name, as a producer, he formed half of the electronic music duo Tsunami One with Kevin Beber, and released an album billed as 'Freeland'; He is the owner / creative director of record label Marine Parade, which has released material by artists including Evil Nine, ILS, Alex Metric and Jape. From 1999 to 2001 Adam hosted a show on Friday night on London's Kiss 100 FM.

— Freebase

Opel

Opel

Adam Opel AG is a German automobile company founded by Adam Opel in 1862. Opel has been building automobiles since 1899, and became an Aktiengesellschaft in 1929. The company is headquartered in Rüsselsheim, Hesse, Germany. It became a majority-stake subsidiary of the American General Motors Corporation in 1929 and has been a wholly owned subsidiary since 1931. In 2010, Opel announced that it will invest around €11 billion in the next five years. One billion of that is designated solely for the development of innovative and fuel-saving engines and transmissions.

— Freebase

Dead Fucking Last

Dead Fucking Last

Dead Fucking Last is an American punk hardcore band that was started in 1991 in Los Angeles, California by Tom Davis, Monty Messex, Adam Horovitz and Tony Converse.

— Freebase

Tree of life

Tree of life

The tree of life in the Book of Genesis is a tree planted by the Abrahamic God in midst of the Garden of Eden, whose fruit gives everlasting life, i.e. immortality. Together with the tree of life, God planted the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. According to some scholars, however, these are in fact two names for the same tree. In the biblical story, the serpent, who is regarded as Satan in Christianity but not in Judaism, tempted Eve into eating a fruit from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. Eve and Adam both ate the fruit, despite God's warning to Adam that "in the day that you eat from it you shall surely die". As a consequence of their transgression, the land, the Serpent, Adam, and Eve were each cursed by God. To prevent them access to the tree of life, God cast Adam and Eve out of the Garden of Eden: In the Book of Revelation, a Koine Greek phrase xylon zōës, ξύλον ζωής, is mentioned three times. This phrase, which is also used for the Genesis tree of life in the Ancient Greek translation of the Old Testament, literally means "wood of life". It is translated in nearly every English Bible version as "tree of life", see Revelation 2:7, 22:2, and 22:19.

— Freebase

Parow, Cape Town

Parow, Cape Town

Parow is a northern suburb of Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa founded by Johann Heinrich Ferdinand Parow who arrived to the locality in 1865.

— Freebase

Cold Steel

Cold Steel

Cold Steel is a 1987 thriller film directed by Dorothy Ann Puzo and starred Brad Davis, Sharon Stone, Jonathan Banks and Adam Ant.

— Freebase

Paludan-Müller, Frederick

Paludan-Müller, Frederick

distinguished Danish poet, born in Fünen; his greatest poem, "Adam Homo," a didactico-humorous composition; was an earnest man and a finished literary artist (1809-1876).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Eschscholzia

Eschscholzia

Eschscholzia is a genus of 12 annual or perennial plants in the Papaveraceae family. The genus was named after the Baltic German botanist Johann Friedrich von Eschscholtz.

— Freebase

Six Ways to Sunday

Six Ways to Sunday

Six Ways to Sunday is a 1997 comedy film directed by Adam Bernstein. It is based on Charles Perry's novel Portrait of a Young Man Drowning.

— Freebase

Billaut, Adam

Billaut, Adam

the carpenter poet, called "Maître Adam," born at Nevers, and designated "Virgile au Rabot" (a carpenter's plane); d. 1662.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Line by Line

Line by Line

Line by Line is jazz bass guitarist John Patitucci's 12th album as a sole leader, and his sixth with the Concord Records label. It features Adam Rogers, Brian Blade, Chris Potter, as well as a string quartet on several numbers. The record is primarily composed of Patitucci originals, except one composed by Adam Rogers, a Thelonious Monk tune, a classical piece by de Falla, and a traditional spiritual. It was recorded at Avatar Studios, New York City, and produced by John Patitucci. The album features the master bassist's best composing to date, as well as masterful work on both upright and electric bass on his part. Like several of John's revious outings, including Heart of the Bass and Communion, Line by Line is considerably versatile, spanning many time periods, styles, and emotions in music.

— Freebase

Cocceius

Cocceius

or Koch, Johann, a Dutch divine, professor at Leyden; held that the Old Testament was a type or foreshadow of the New, and was the founder of the federal theology, or the doctrine that God entered into a threefold compact with man, first prior to the law, second under the law, and third under grace (1603-1669).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Radon measure

Radon measure

In mathematics, a Radon measure, named after Johann Radon, is a measure on the σ-algebra of Borel sets of a Hausdorff topological space X that is locally finite and inner regular.

— Freebase

Open Land

Open Land

Open Land is an album by guitarist John Abercrombie with trumpeter Kenny Wheeler, saxophonist Joe Lovano, violinist Mark Feldman, organist Dan Wall and drummer Adam Nussbaum recorded in 1998 and released on the ECM label

— Freebase

Sorrows of Werther

Sorrows of Werther

Sorrows of Werther is a satirical poem by William Makepeace Thackeray written in response to the enormous success of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's novel The Sorrows of Young Werther.

— Freebase

Zurna

Zurna

The zurna, is a multinational outdoor wind instrument, usually accompanied by a davul in Anatolian folk music. The name is derived from Persian سرنای surnāy, composed of سور sūr “banquet, feast” and نای nāy “reed, pipe”. Turkish lore says that Adam, who was moulded from clay, had no soul. It is said only the melodious tuiduk-playing of Archangel Gabriel could breathe life into Adam. According to a Turkmen legend, the devil played the main role in tuiduk invention. A ritual of inviting guests for a celebration has survived since ancient times: two tuiduk players stand in front of each other, point their instruments upwards and play in unison. During this act, they perform circular movements in a ritualistic fashion suggestive of shamanism.

— Freebase

Puch

Puch

Puch is a manufacturing company located in Graz, Austria. The company was founded in 1889 by the industrialist Johann Puch and produced automobiles, bicycles, mopeds, and motorcycles.

— Freebase

Cain

Cain

according to Genesis, the first-born of Adam and Eve, and therefore of the race, and the murderer of his brother Abel.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Primordialism

Primordialism

Primordialism or perennialism is the argument which contends that nations are ancient, natural phenomena. Primordialism can be traced philosophically to the ideas of German Romanticism, particularly in the works of Johann Gottlieb Fichte and Johann Gottfried Herder. For Herder, the nation was synonymous with language group. In Herder's thinking, language was synonymous with thought, and as each language was learnt in community, then each community must think differently. This also suggests that the community would hold a fixed nature over time. Primordialism encountered enormous criticism after the Second World War, with a few scholars of nationalism coming to treat the nation as a community constructed by the technologies and politics of modernity. Though largely rejected by most theorists of nationalism, some of its ideas have found parallels in ethnosymbolism.

— Freebase

Stay Up!

Stay Up!

"Stay Up! (Viagra)" is the first single released from producer-rapper 88-Keys' debut album The Death of Adam and features the album's co-executive producer Kanye West. The song samples "All Night Loving" by British R&B three-piece band Imagination. The single was released digitally on August 25, 2008. According to both artists, the song, which follows the overall storyline of the concept album, is about a man named Adam, who after a bad string of relationships, decides to take Viagra in an attempt "stay up" longer. A snippet of the track was first previewed on Kanye West's 2007 Can't Tell Me Nothing mixtape and featured an additional spoken word verse delivered by Malik Yusef.

— Freebase

Wilhelm von Opel

Wilhelm von Opel

Wilhelm von Opel, known as Wilhelm Opel before being granted nobility in 1917, was one of the founding figures of the German automobile manufacturer Opel. He introduced the assembly line to the German automobily industry. His father, Adam Opel, founded the Opel firm as a manufacturer of sewing machines, then expanded into bicycle manufacturing. After Adam's death in 1895, control of the company passed to his five sons. In 1898, Wilhelm and his brother Fritz brought Opel into the automobile industry with the purchase of the small Lutzmann automobile factory of Dessau. Along with his brother Heinrich, Wilhelm was raised to grand-ducal nobility in 1917. Their brother Karl was raised to the same level in the next year.

— Freebase

Johann Sebastian Bach

Johann Sebastian Bach

Johann Sebastian Bach was a German composer, organist, harpsichordist, violist, and violinist of the Baroque period. He enriched many established German styles through his skill in counterpoint, harmonic and motivic organisation, and the adaptation of rhythms, forms, and textures from abroad, particularly from Italy and France. Bach's compositions include the Brandenburg Concertos, the Mass in B minor, the The Well-Tempered Clavier, his cantatas, chorales, partitas, Passions, and organ works. His music is revered for its intellectual depth, technical command, and artistic beauty. Bach was born in Eisenach, Saxe-Eisenach, into a very musical family; his father, Johann Ambrosius Bach was the director of the town musicians, and all of his uncles were professional musicians. His father taught him to play violin and harpsichord, and his brother, Johann Christoph Bach, taught him the clavichord and exposed him to much contemporary music. Bach also went to St Michael's School in Lüneburg because of his singing skills. After graduating, he held several musical posts across Germany: he served as Kapellmeister to Leopold, Prince of Anhalt-Köthen, Cantor of Thomasschule in Leipzig, and Royal Court Composer to August III. Bach's health and vision declined in 1749, and he died on 28 July 1750. Modern historians believe that his death was caused by a combination of stroke and pneumonia.

— Freebase

Jawbox

Jawbox

Jawbox was an alternative rock band from Washington, D.C., U.S.. Its original members were J. Robbins, Kim Coletta and Adam Wade. Bill Barbot and Zach Barocas later joined the group, with Barocas replacing Wade.

— Freebase

Sturm und Drang

Sturm und Drang

Sturm und Drang is a proto-Romantic movement in German literature and music taking place from the late 1760s to the early 1780s, in which individual subjectivity and, in particular, extremes of emotion were given free expression in reaction to the perceived constraints of rationalism imposed by the Enlightenment and associated aesthetic movements. The period is named for Friedrich Maximilian Klinger's play Sturm und Drang, which was first performed by Abel Seyler's famed theatrical company in 1777. The philosopher Johann Georg Hamann is considered to be the ideologue of Sturm und Drang, with Jakob Michael Reinhold Lenz, H. L. Wagner and Friedrich Maximilian Klinger also significant figures. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was also a notable proponent of the movement, though he and Friedrich Schiller ended their period of association with it by initiating what would become Weimar Classicism.

— Freebase

Abel

Abel

the second son of Adam and Eve; slain by his brother. The death of Abel is the subject of a poem by Gessner and a tragedy by Legouvé.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Le Procès-Verbal

Le Procès-Verbal

Le Procès-Verbal is the first novel of French Nobel laureate writer J. M. G. Le Clézio, about a troubled man named Adam Pollo who "struggles to contextualize what he sees" and "to negotiate often disturbing ideas while simultaneously navigating through, for him, life’s absurdity and emptiness".

— Freebase

Arafat`

Arafat`

a granite hill E. of Mecca, a place of pilgrimage as the spot where Adam received his wife after 200 years separation from her on account of their disobedience to the Lord in deference to the suggestion of Satan.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

SpaceCraft

SpaceCraft

SpaceCraft provides web-based software for small business owners to create and manage websites. Built with responsive and adaptive technologies, the websites work across devices including mobile phones, tablets, and PCs. Founded in 2010 by Adam Moore and Jeff Williams, SpaceCraft is based in Austin, Texas. For more information and to request a beta invite, visit http://gospacecraft.com.

— CrunchBase

Wilfred

Wilfred

Wilfred is an Australian comedy television series directed by Tony Rogers, produced by Jenny Livingston and starring Jason Gann, Adam Zwar and Cindy Waddingham. Created by Zwar, Gann and Rogers, it was based on their award-winning 2002 short film and later adapted to a series. The story follows the lives of the eponymous dog Wilfred, his owner Sarah, and her boyfriend Adam, who sees Wilfred as a man in a dog suit. Two seasons were broadcast on SBS One – the first in 2007 and the second in 2010. The series won three AFI Awards and was nominated for a Logie. Independent Film Channel acquired the international broadcast rights to the original two seasons of Wilfred in 2010. A U.S. version premiered on the cable channel FX on 23 June 2011.

— Freebase

Johann Bernoulli

Johann Bernoulli

Johann Bernoulli was a Swiss mathematician and was one of the many prominent mathematicians in the Bernoulli family. He is known for his contributions to infinitesimal calculus and educated Leonhard Euler in his youth.

— Freebase

EVOLUTION

EVOLUTION

A clever trick performed by one Darwin, who made a monkey of Adam.

— The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

Improbable

Improbable

Improbable is a 2005 science fiction thriller novel by Adam Fawer, about a gambler who gains the power to predict the future. It was awarded the 2006 International Thriller Writers Award for best first novel.

— Freebase

Laurens Janszoon Coster

Laurens Janszoon Coster

Laurens Janszoon Coster, or Laurens Jansz Koster, is the name of an inventor of a printing press from Haarlem. Since the late 1890s, Haarlem has been willing to concede that perhaps Mainz printed earlier, in the person of Johann Gutenberg.

— Freebase

Meckel syndrome

Meckel syndrome

Meckel syndrome is a rare, lethal, ciliopathic, genetic disorder, characterized by renal cystic dysplasia, central nervous system malformations, polydactyly ], hepatic developmental defects, and pulmonary hypoplasia due to oligohydramnios. Meckel–Gruber syndrome is named for Johann Meckel and Georg Gruber.

— Freebase

DeKalb

DeKalb

DeKalb is a city in DeKalb County, Illinois, United States. The population was 43,862 according to the 2010 census. The city is named after decorated German war hero Johann de Kalb, who died during the American Revolutionary War.

— Freebase

Satan

Satan

an archangel who, according to the Talmud, revolted against the Most High, particularly when required to do homage to Adam, and who for his disobedience was with all his following cast into the abyss of hell. See Devil.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Enoch

Enoch

Enoch is a character that appears in the Book of Genesis and a figure in the Generations of Adam. Enoch is described as the great-great-great-great grandson of Adam, the son of Jared, the father of Methuselah, and the great-grandfather of Noah. The text reads—uniquely in the Generations—that Enoch "walked with God: and he was not; for God took him", and in Hebrews 11: 5 it says "By faith Enoch was translated that he should not see death; and was not found, because God had translated him: for before his translation he had this testimony, that he pleased God." suggesting he did not experience the mortal death ascribed to Adam's other descendants and that he is still alive to this very day. Despite the brief descriptions of him, Enoch is one of the main two focal points for much of the 1st millennium BC Jewish mysticism, notably in the Book of Enoch. Additionally, Enoch is important in some Christian denominations: He is commemorated as one of the Holy Forefathers in the Calendar of Saints of the Armenian Apostolic Church and the Armenian Catholic Church on the second Thursday after the Feast of the Transfiguration. He also features in the Latter Day Saint movement. Enoch is also the oldest of the pre-Flood Patriarchs. It is explained that he is immortal and did not die at 365.

— Freebase

Wanda Landowska

Wanda Landowska

Wanda Alexandra Landowska was a Polish harpsichordist whose performances, teaching, recordings and writings played a large role in reviving the popularity of the harpsichord in the early 20th century. She was the first person to record Johann Sebastian Bach's Goldberg Variations on the harpsichord.

— Freebase

Tabitha

Tabitha

Tabitha is an American fantasy sitcom that aired during the 1977-1978 season on ABC. It is a spin-off of Bewitched, which had ended its run several years earlier. The series stars Lisa Hartman as Tabitha, Samantha and Darrin Stephens' daughter who was introduced on Bewitched during its second season. In the series, Tabitha is portrayed as a 20-something production assistant living and working in Los Angeles. The supporting cast includes David Ankrum as Tabitha's brother Adam with whom she works, Robert Urich as an egomaniacal talk show host who is a sometime love interest for Tabitha, and Mel Stewart as Tabitha and Adam's cranky but loveable boss. Unlike Bewitched, which was hit for ABC and aired for eight seasons, Tabitha failed to catch on with viewers and was canceled after one season.

— Freebase

Partita

Partita

Partita was originally the name for a single-instrumental piece of music, but Johann Kuhnau and later German composers used it for collections of musical pieces, as a synonym for suite. Johann Sebastian Bach wrote two sets of Partitas for different instruments. Those for solo keyboard the composer published as his Opus 1. One additional suite in B minor, the Overture in the French Style is sometimes also considered a Partita. Bach's Partitas are very rarely called the "German Suites", in analogy with the national naming of the English and French Suites. See Partitas for keyboard and choral partitas for organ. The "Partita" in A minor for solo flute which takes the form of a suite of four dances, has been given the title "partita" by its modern editors; it is sometimes transposed for oboe. Bach also wrote three partitas for solo violin in 1720 which he paired with sonatas. See: Sonatas and partitas for solo violin.

— Freebase

Chondroplasty

Chondroplasty

Chondroplasty refers to surgery of the cartilage, the most common being corrective surgery of the cartilage of the knee. Surgery known as thyroid chondroplasty is used to reduce the visibility of the Adam's Apple in transsexual women.

— Freebase

Tiemannite

Tiemannite

Tiemannite is a mineral, mercury selenide, formula HgSe. It occurs in hydrothermal veins associated with other selenides, or other mercury minerals such as cinnabar, and often with calcite. Discovered in 1855 in Germany, it is named after Johann Carl Wilhelm Tiemann.

— Freebase

Unreal Brands

Unreal Brands

UNREAL is a Boston-based food company attempting to rid the world of junk food by providing healthier candy and snack options.Michael Bronner and son Nicky Bronner partnered with chef Adam Melonas to eliminate unhealthy ingredients such as hydrogenated oils, corn syrup, artificial colors and flavors, and preservatives. Their candy is already on the shelves of 20,000 stores, including Staples and CVS, and will soon be sold in Target and 7-Eleven.

— CrunchBase

Goody Two Shoes

Goody Two Shoes

"Goody Two Shoes" is a popular song by Adam Ant. The song was released on the album Friend or Foe in 1982. The title phrase is a disparaging term for someone who is overly virtuous or conformist.

— Freebase

Socinianism

Socinianism

the tenets or doctrines of Faustus Socinus, an Italian theologian of the sixteenth century, who denied the Trinity, the deity of Christ, the personality of the Devil, the native and total depravity of man, the vicarious atonement, and the eternity of future punishment. His theory was, that Christ was a man divinely commissioned, who had no existence before he was conceived by the Virgin Mary; that human sin was the imitation of Adam's sin, and that human salvation was the imitation and adoption of Christ's virtue; that the Bible was to be interpreted by human reason; and that its language was metaphorical, and not to be taken literally

— Webster Dictionary

Eau de Cologne

Eau de Cologne

Eau de Cologne or simply cologne is a perfume originating from Cologne, Germany. Presumably originally mixed by Italian-born Johann Maria Farina in 1709, it has since come to be a generic term for scented formulations in typical concentration of 2%–5% essential oils or a blend of extracts, alcohol, and water.

— Freebase

Gemstones

Gemstones

Gemstones is the third solo album by Adam Green, released in 2005. The album is characterised by the heavy presence of Wurlitzer piano, whereas its predecessor relied on a string section in its instrumentation.

— Freebase

Zinkenite

Zinkenite

Zinkenite is a steel-gray metallic sulfosalt mineral composed of lead antimony sulfide Pb9Sb22S42. Zinkenite occurs as acicular needle-like crystals. It was first described in 1826 for an occurrence in the Harz Mountains, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany and named after its discoverer, German mineralogist and mining geologist, Johann Karl Ludwig Zinken.

— Freebase

Johann Muller

Johann Muller

Gysbert Johannes Muller, more commonly known as Johann Muller, is a South African Rugby Union player. He played lock for the Natal Sharks, Sharks in and the Springboks, before a move to Northern Ireland to play with Ulster in 2010, where he is currently team captain.

— Freebase

Werfen

Werfen

Werfen is a market town in the St. Johann im Pongau District, in the Austrian state of Salzburg. The municipality comprises the cadstral communities of Reitsam, Scharten, Sulzau and Wimm. It is mainly known for medieval Hohenwerfen Castle and the Eisriesenwelt ice cave, the largest in the world.

— Freebase

Wanderer

Wanderer

Wanderer was a German manufacturer of bicycles, motorcycles, automobiles, vans and other machinery. Established as Winklhofer & Jaenicke in 1896 by Johann Baptist Winklhofer und Richard Adolf Jaenicke, the company used the Wanderer brand name from 1911, making civilian automobiles until 1941 and military vehicles until 1945.

— Freebase

ADAMANT

ADAMANT

From "Adam's Aunt," reputed to be a hard character. Hence, anything tough, or hard.

— The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

Foxhole

Foxhole

Foxhole is a post-rock band from Bowling Green, Kentucky. They first began regular rehearsals in November 2000. The brainchild of founding members Adam Moore and Nathan Mcbroom, and finding practice space in various places on Western Kentucky University's campus, Foxhole was heavily influenced by other Kentucky bands such as Slint and June of '44. The first performance featured Nathan on guitar and bass, Adam on guitar, Matthew and Joey on drums and percussion, Justin playing glockenspiel, and two of the bandmates' girlfriends providing sparse vocals. The second performance featured the aforementioned players together with Derek on bass, Greg improvising on trumpet and sans girlfriends. By their third performance, the lineup had solidified to Nathan, Adam, Justin, Derek, Matt, and Greg. The band initially focused on melding experimental sounds with melody. A staple of early performances was a fully improvised song randomly inserted into the set list, and which often featured several homemade instruments, including the "juggophone", "shatterophone", "topophone", and "pyrophone", which utilized the sounds of beating water jugs, breaking bottles, clinking pot tops, and micing fireworks, respectively. They also made frequent use of the sounds of a signal generator. Gradually, Foxhole integrated slightly more traditional song structures and held to typical instruments, dispensing mostly with the use of gimmick instrumentation. Songs typically featured a gradual build in intensity, and featured rare and unaugmented vocals.

— Freebase

Johann Friedrich Herbart

Johann Friedrich Herbart

Johann Friedrich Herbart was a German philosopher, psychologist, and founder of pedagogy as an academic discipline. Herbart is now remembered amongst the post-Kantian philosophers mostly as making the greatest contrast to Hegel; this in particular in relation to aesthetics. That does not take into account his thought on education.

— Freebase

Orbs

Orbs

Orbs is an American band consisting of Dan Briggs of Between the Buried and Me, Adam Fisher and Clayton Holyoak of Fear Before the March of Flames, Ashley Ellyllon, formerly of Abigail Williams and Cradle of Filth, and Chuck Johnson of Torch Runner.

— Freebase

Regiomontanus

Regiomontanus

name adopted by Johann Müller, a celebrated German astronomer and mathematician, born at Königsberg, in Franconia; appointed professor of Astronomy in Vienna (1461); sojourned in Italy; settled in Nüremberg, where much of his best work was done; assisted Pope Sixtus IV. in reforming the Calendar; was made Bishop of Ratisbon; died at Rome; was regarded as the most learned astronomer of the time in Europe, and his works were of great value to Columbus and other early navigators (1436-1476).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Lilith

Lilith

Lilith is a Hebrew name for a figure in Jewish mythology, developed earliest in the Babylonian Talmud, who is generally thought to be in part derived from a class of female demons Līlīṯu in Mesopotamian texts of Assyria and Babylonia. Evidence in later Jewish materials is plentiful, but little information has been found relating to the original Akkadian and Babylonian view of these demons. The relevance of two sources previously used to connect the Jewish Lilith to an Akkadian Lilitu – the Gilgamesh appendix and the Arslan Tash amulets – are now both disputed by recent scholarship. The two problematic sources are discussed below. The Hebrew term Lilith first occurs in Isaiah 34:14, either singular or plural according to variations in the earliest manuscripts, though in a list of animals. In the Dead Sea Scrolls Songs of the Sage the term first occurs in a list of monsters. In Jewish magical inscriptions, on bowls and amulets from the 6th century CE onwards, Lilith is identified as a female demon and the first visual depictions appear. In Jewish folklore, from the 8th–10th centuries Alphabet of Ben Sira onwards, Lilith becomes Adam's first wife, who was created at the same time and from the same earth as Adam. This contrasts with Eve, who was created from one of Adam's ribs. The legend was greatly developed during the Middle Ages, in the tradition of Aggadic midrashim, the Zohar and Jewish mysticism. In the 13th Century writings of Rabbi Isaac ben Jacob ha-Cohen, for example, Lilith left Adam after she refused to become subservient to him and then would not return to the Garden of Eden after she mated with archangel Samael. The resulting Lilith legend is still commonly used as source material in modern Western culture, literature, occultism, fantasy, and horror.

— Freebase

Link Medicine

Link Medicine

Link Medicine was launched in 2005 by three men with a shared vision: Peter Lansbury, Link’s founder and a leading neuroscience researcher from Harvard University, Ed Rudman, a private investor and philanthropist who less than a decade before had been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, and Adam Rosenberg, an entrepreneur who years before saw his grandfather struggle with Parkinson’s disease and his grandmother battle Alzheimer’s disease.

— CrunchBase

Unsterblich

Unsterblich

Unsterblich is the eighth studio album by the German punk band Die Toten Hosen. The band has stated dissatisfaction with the cover, which is a photo by Johann Zambryski. This album is considered overall one of the more peaceful and quiet DTH albums, although there are some loud songs on the album.

— Freebase

Jan Kochanowski

Jan Kochanowski

Jan Kochanowski was a Polish Renaissance poet who established poetic patterns that would become integral to the Polish literary language. He is commonly regarded as the greatest Polish poet before Adam Mickiewicz, and the greatest Slavic poet prior to the 19th century.

— Freebase

Nonpoint

Nonpoint

Nonpoint is an American metal band formed in 1997. The band currently consists of vocalist Elias Soriano, drummer Robb Rivera, guitarists Rasheed Thomas and Dave Lizzio, and bassist Adam Woloszyn. They are currently signed with Razor & Tie and released their latest album, a self-titled, on October 9, 2012.

— Freebase

August Ferdinand Möbius

August Ferdinand Möbius

August Ferdinand Möbius was a German mathematician and theoretical astronomer. He is best known for his discovery of the Möbius strip, a non-orientable two-dimensional surface with only one side when embedded in three-dimensional Euclidean space. It was independently discovered by Johann Benedict Listing around the same time. The Möbius configuration, formed by two mutually inscribed tetrahedra, is also named after him. Möbius was the first to introduce homogeneous coordinates into projective geometry. Many mathematical concepts are named after him, including the Möbius transformations, important in projective geometry, and the Möbius transform of number theory. His interest in number theory led to the important Möbius function μ and the Möbius inversion formula. In Euclidean geometry, he systematically developed the use of signed angles and line segments as a way of simplifying and unifying results. Möbius was born in Schulpforta, Saxony-Anhalt, and was descended on his mother's side from religious reformer Martin Luther. He studied mathematics under Carl Friedrich Gauss and Johann Pfaff. Möbius died in Leipzig in 1868 at the age of 77.

— Freebase

Kirkcaldy

Kirkcaldy

a manufacturing and seaport town in Fifeshire, extending 4 m. along the north shore of the Forth, known as the "lang toon." It was the birthplace of Adam Smith, and one of the scenes of the schoolmastership period of Thomas Carlyle's life; manufactures textile fabrics and floorcloth; is a busy town.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Friday

Friday

the sixth day of the week, so called as consecrated to Freyia or Frigga, the wife of Odin; is proverbially a day of ill luck; held sacred among Catholics as the day of the crucifixion, and the Mohammedan Sunday in commemoration as the day on which, as they believe, Adam was created.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Coyote Ugly

Coyote Ugly

Coyote Ugly is a 2000 romantic comedy/drama based on the actual Coyote Ugly Saloon, set in New York City. The film stars Piper Perabo and Adam Garcia. It was directed by David McNally, produced by Jerry Bruckheimer and Chad Oman and written by Gina Wendkos.

— Freebase

Adeem

Adeem

Adam Michael Arnone, known by the stage name Adeem is an independent American rapper from Keene, New Hampshire. Adeem is best known for his work in the hip-hop group Glue and for winning the Scribble Jam Emcee Battle in 1998 and 2001.

— Freebase

Gravitar

Gravitar

Gravitar is a shoot 'em up arcade game released by Atari, Inc in 1982. It was the first of over twenty games Mike Hally designed and produced for Atari, including Star Wars. The main programmer was Rich Adam and the cabinet art was designed by Brad Chaboya.

— Freebase

Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen

Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen

Fabian Gottlieb Thaddeus von Bellingshausen was an officer in the Imperial Russian Navy, cartographer and explorer, who ultimately rose to the rank of Admiral. He was a notable participant of the first Russian circumnavigation and subsequently a leader of another circumnavigation expedition, which discovered the continent of Antarctica. Bellingshausen started his service in the Baltic Fleet, and after distinguishing himself, he joined the First Russian circumnavigation in 1803-1806, where he served on frigate Nadezhda under the captaincy of Adam Johann von Krusenstern. After the journey he published a collection of maps of the newly explored areas and islands of the Pacific Ocean. Subsequently he commanded several ships of the Baltic and Black Sea Fleets. As a prominent cartographer, Bellingshausen was appointed to command the circumnavigation of the globe in 1819-1821, intended to explore the Southern Ocean and to find land in the proximity of the South Pole. The expedition was prepared by Mikhail Lazarev, who was made Bellingshausen's second-in-command and the captain of sloop Mirny, while Bellingshausen himself commanded sloop Vostok. During this expedition Bellingshausen and Lazarev became the first explorers to see the land of Antarctica on January 28, 1820. They managed to twice circumnavigate the continent and never lost each other from view. Thus they disproved Captain Cook's assertion that it was impossible to find land in the southern ice fields. The expedition discovered and named Peter I Island, Zavodovski, Leskov and Visokoi Islands, Antarctic Peninsula and Alexander Island, and made some discoveries in the tropical waters of the Pacific.

— Freebase

Baroque music

Baroque music

Baroque music is a style of Western art music composed from approximately 1600 to 1750. This era follows the Renaissance, and was followed in turn by the Classical era. The word "baroque" comes from the Portuguese word barroco, meaning misshapen pearl, a negative description of the ornate and heavily ornamented music of this period. Later, the name came to apply also to the architecture of the same period. Baroque music forms a major portion of the "classical music" canon, being widely studied, performed, and listened to. Composers of the Baroque era include Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frideric Handel, Alessandro Scarlatti, Domenico Scarlatti, Antonio Vivaldi, Georg Philipp Telemann, Jean-Baptiste Lully, Arcangelo Corelli, François Couperin, Denis Gaultier, Claudio Monteverdi, Jean-Philippe Rameau, Johann Pachelbel, and Henry Purcell. The Baroque period saw the creation of tonality. During the period, composers and performers used more elaborate musical ornamentation, made changes in musical notation, and developed new instrumental playing techniques. Baroque music expanded the size, range, and complexity of instrumental performance, and also established opera, cantata, oratorio, concerto, and sonata as musical genres. Many musical terms and concepts from this era are still in use today.

— Freebase

Persicaria maculosa

Persicaria maculosa

The Redshank is an annual plant from the Knotweed family Polygonaceae. It is also called Persicaria, Redleg, Lady's-thumb, Spotted Ladysthumb, Gambetta, willow weed, and Adam's Plaster. Native to Europe, it is an invasive species in the Great Lakes region where it was first spotted in 1843.

— Freebase

Wilhelm Keitel

Wilhelm Keitel

Wilhelm Bodewin Johann Gustav Keitel was a German field marshal. As head of the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht and de facto war minister under Adolf Hitler, he was one of Germany's most senior military leaders during World War II. At the Allied court at Nuremberg he was tried, sentenced to death and hanged as a war criminal.

— Freebase

Accepted

Accepted

Accepted is a 2006 American comedy film directed by Steve Pink and written by Adam Cooper, Bill Collage, and Mark Perez. The main plot centers around a group of would-be college freshmen who create their own "college" after being rejected from all the public colleges and universities for which they had already applied.

— Freebase

PCU

PCU

PCU is a 1994 American comedy film written by Adam Leff and Zak Penn and directed by Hart Bochner about college life at the fictional Port Chester University, and represents "an exaggerated view of contemporary college life...." The film is based on the experiences of Leff and Penn at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut.

— Freebase

Off Season

Off Season

Off Season is a 2001 television film directed by Bruce Davison, and starring Sherilyn Fenn, Rory Culkin, Hume Cronyn, Adam Arkin, and Bruce Davison. It is about a presumably disturbed little boy who has been orphaned, and who comes to believe that a local guest who is staying at the hotel at which the boy's aunt works is actually Santa Claus.

— Freebase

Arum maculatum

Arum maculatum

Arum maculatum is a common woodland plant species of the Araceae family. It is widespread across temperate northern Europe and is known by an abundance of common names including wild arum, lords and ladies, devils and angels, cows and bulls, cuckoo-pint, Adam and Eve, bobbins, naked boys, starch-root and wake robin.

— Freebase

Bagge`sen, Jens Emmanuel

Bagge`sen, Jens Emmanuel

a Danish poet, travelled a good deal, wrote mostly in German, in which he was quite at home; his chief works, a pastoral epic, "Parthenais oder die Alpenreise," and a mock epic, "Adam and Eve"; his minor pieces are numerous and popular, though from his egotism and irritability he was personally unpopular (1764-1826).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Lilith

Lilith

or Lilis, the name of Adam's first wife, whom, according to Jewish tradition, he had before Eve, and who bore him in that wedlock the whole progeny of aërial, aquatic, and terrestrial devils, and who, it seems, still wanders about the world bewitching men to like issue and slaying little children not protected by amulets against her.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Adam Bede

Adam Bede

Adam Bede, the first novel written by George Eliot, was published in 1859. It was published pseudonymously, even though Evans was a well-published and highly respected scholar of her time. The novel has remained in print ever since, and is used in university studies of 19th century English literature.

— Freebase

He-Man

He-Man

He-Man is a fictional character and the protagonist of the Masters of the Universe franchise. In most variations, he is the alter ego of Prince Adam. He-Man and his friends defend the realm of Eternia and the secrets of Castle Grayskull from the evil forces of Skeletor.

— Freebase

Johann Maier

Johann Maier

Johann Maier was from 1939 until his death a preacher at Regensburg Cathedral. On 22 April 1945, Reich Defence Commissar Ludwig Ruckdeschel took city defence to the extreme in Regensburg when United States Army tanks had already reached the Danube. The next day, an excited crowd of people gathered at the Moltkeplatz – nowadays known as Dachauplatz. Johann Maier was there and bade the crowd be quiet as he had something to say. He called for the town's peaceful handover. Even before he had finished his speech, he was seized by plainclothes police. Likewise, several other demonstrators were arrested. That evening, Maier was brought before a drumhead court and sentenced to death by hanging. Michael Buchberger, the Bishop of Regensburg, was frightened into silence and hid himself in a cellar. On the morning of 24 April 1945 at 3:25, Maier was hanged at Moltkeplatz. About his neck, he wore a sign that said "I am a saboteur". Later the Wehrmacht and the SS both fled southwards out of town; Regensburg fell without a fight. Maier's grave can be found in the Cathedral among the bishops' graves. There is also a memorial plaque at the Cathedral.

— Freebase

honeymoon

honeymoon

1. A happiness not quite worn out.

2. A postlude to a wedding-march and a prelude to a funeral ditto. _E. g._, "I did not drive Adam and Eve out of Eden because they ate my pet pippin, but because they insisted on carrying on their honeymoon before the modest animals."--From _The Private Journal of Démiurge_.

— The Roycroft Dictionary

Waldmeister

Waldmeister

Waldmeister is an operetta written by Johann Strauss II. It was first performed on 4 December 1895 at the Theater an der Wien. Although not as popular as some of Strauss' other operettas, such as Der Zigeunerbaron and Die Fledermaus, it was given eighty-eight performances, and was much admired by Johannes Brahms, a friend of the composer.

— Freebase

Werther

Werther

Werther is an opera in four acts by Jules Massenet to a French libretto by Édouard Blau, Paul Milliet and Georges Hartmann, based on the German epistolary novel The Sorrows of Young Werther by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, based partly on fact and Goethe's own early life. Earlier examples of operas using the story were made by Kreutzer and Pucitta.

— Freebase

Har

Har

Har is a character in the mythological writings of William Blake, who roughly corresponds to an aged Adam. His wife, Heva, corresponds to Eve. Har appears in Tiriel and The Song of Los and is briefly mentioned in The Book of Thel and Vala, or The Four Zoas.

— Freebase

Keetmanshoop

Keetmanshoop

Keetmanshoop is a city in Karas Region, southern Namibia, lying on the Trans-Namib Railway from Windhoek to Upington in South Africa. It is named after Johann Keetman, a German industrialist and benefactor of the city. The town is situated in a semi-arid area, normally receiving an annual average rainfall of only 152 millimetres, although in the 2010/2011 rainy season 254 millimetres were measured.

— Freebase

Conrad Weiser

Conrad Weiser

Conrad Weiser, born Johann Conrad Weiser, Jr., was a Pennsylvania German pioneer, interpreter and effective diplomat between the Pennsylvania Colony and Native Americans. He was a farmer, soldier, monk, tanner and judge. He contributed as an emissary in councils between Native Americans and the colonies, especially Pennsylvania, during the 18th century's tensions of the French and Indian War.

— Freebase

Abandoned

Abandoned

"Abandoned" is the 31st episode of the television series Lost, and is the sixth episode of the second season. The episode was directed by Adam Davidson and written by Elizabeth Sarnoff. It first aired on November 9, 2005 on ABC. The character of Shannon Rutherford is featured in the episode's flashbacks.

— Freebase

A-Plus

A-Plus

Adam Carter, known by the stage name, A-Plus, is an American rapper and producer. He is one of the founding four members of the Oakland, California-based underground hip hop group Souls of Mischief, and, with Souls of Mischief, a part of the eight-person, alternative hip hop collective, the Hieroglyphics.

— Freebase

Adam Beyer

Adam Beyer

Adam Beyer is a Swedish techno producer and DJ. He is the founder of Drumcode Records, Truesoul Records, Code Red and Mad Eye Recordings. He is one of several Swedish techno artists to emerge in the mid-1990s along the likes of Cari Lekebusch, Joel Mull, Jesper Dahlback, Alexi Delano, Christian Smith and more. Beyer is the partner of fellow Swedish DJ Ida Engberg. In 2011, their first child was born.

— Freebase

Carl Linnaeus

Carl Linnaeus

Carl Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as Carl von Linné, was a Swedish botanist, physician, and zoologist, who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of binomial nomenclature. He is known as the father of modern taxonomy, and is also considered one of the fathers of modern ecology. Many of his writings were in Latin, and his name is rendered in Latin as Carolus Linnæus. Linnaeus was born in the countryside of Småland, in southern Sweden. Linnaeus received most of his higher education at Uppsala University, and began giving lectures in botany there in 1730. He lived abroad between 1735 and 1738, where he studied and also published a first edition of his Systema Naturae in the Netherlands. He then returned to Sweden, where he became professor of botany at Uppsala. In the 1740s, he was sent on several journeys through Sweden to find and classify plants and animals. In the 1750s and 60s, he continued to collect and classify animals, plants, and minerals, and published several volumes. At the time of his death, he was one of the most acclaimed scientists in Europe. The Swiss philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau sent him the message: "Tell him I know no greater man on earth." The German writer Johann Wolfgang von Goethe wrote: "With the exception of Shakespeare and Spinoza, I know no one among the no longer living who has influenced me more strongly." Swedish author August Strindberg wrote: "Linnaeus was in reality a poet who happened to become a naturalist". Among other compliments, Linnaeus has been called Princeps botanicorum, "The Pliny of the North," and "The Second Adam".

— Freebase

Giant pangolin

Giant pangolin

The giant pangolin is a pangolin species. Members of the species inhabit Africa with a range stretching along the equator from West Africa to Uganda. The giant pangolin is the largest species of pangolin, or "scaly anteaters" – the large, scaled mammals belonging to the Manidae family. It subsists almost entirely on ants and termites. The species was first described by Johann Karl Wilhelm Illiger in 1815.

— Freebase

Idris

Idris

Idris‘ is an ancient prophet mentioned in the Qur'an. He is described in the Qur'an as "trustworthy" and "patient" and the Qur'an also says that he was "exalted to a high station", which has generally been understood in Islamic tradition to mean that he ascended into Heaven without dying. Because of this and other parallels, traditionally Idris has been identified with the Biblical Enoch, and therefore Islamic tradition usually places Idris in the early Generations of Adam, and considers him one of the oldest prophets mentioned in the Qur'an, placing him sometime between Adam and Noah. Idris' unique status inspired many future traditions and stories surrouding him in Islamic lore. According to hadith, narrated by Malik ibn Anas and found in Sahih Muslim, it is said that on Muhammad's Night Journey, he encountered Idris in the fourth heaven. The traditions that have developed around the figure of Idris have given him the scope of a prophet as well as a philosopher and mystic, and many later Muslim mystics, or Sufis, including Ruzbihan Baqli and Ibn Arabi, also mentioned having encountered Idris in their spiritual visions.

— Freebase

OpenPeak

OpenPeak

OpenPeak is a leading mobility technology provider. OpenPeak designs end-to-end managed systems and solutions that enable Enterprises, SMBs, and Education, Healthcare and service providers to provision and manage their customer's mobile devices and applications remotely. OpenPeak's Advanced Device and Application Management (ADAM™) mobility management suite is comprised of three core components: SANCTION™, SECTOR™, and OPENSHOP™. Each component can be deployed individually to complement pre-existing device and network management configurations, or together as a complete end-to-end Device, Application, and Profile Management solution. For more information, visit www.openpeak.com.

— CrunchBase

Sundials

Sundials

"Sundials" is the debut single by the Chicago-based punk rock band Alkaline Trio, released in 1997 by Johann's Face Records. It is the band's only studio release to include original bassist Rob Doran, who left the group after the single's release and was replaced by Dan Andriano. Both tracks from the single were reissued on the compilation album Alkaline Trio in 2000.

— Freebase

Phlogiston theory

Phlogiston theory

The phlogiston theory, first stated in 1667 by Johann Joachim Becher, is an obsolete scientific theory that postulated the existence of a fire-like element called "phlogiston", which was contained within combustible bodies and released during combustion. The theory was an attempt to explain processes of burning such as combustion and the rusting of metals, which are now collectively known as oxidation.

— Freebase

Original sin

Original sin

Original sin, also called ancestral sin, is, according to a Christian theological doctrine, humanity's state of sin resulting from the fall of man, stemming from Adam's rebellion in Eden. This condition has been characterized in many ways, ranging from something as insignificant as a slight deficiency, or a tendency toward sin yet without collective guilt, referred to as a "sin nature", to something as drastic as total depravity or automatic guilt of all humans through collective guilt. The concept of original sin was first alluded to in the 2nd century by Irenaeus, Bishop of Lyons in his controversy with certain dualist Gnostics. Its scriptural foundation is based on the New Testament teaching of Paul the Apostle, and Psalm 51:5. Tertullian, Cyprian, Ambrose and Ambrosiaster considered that mankind shares in Adam's sin, transmitted by human generation. Augustine's formulation of original sin was popular among Reformers, such as Martin Luther and John Calvin who equated original sin with concupiscence, affirming that it persisted even after baptism and completely destroyed freedom. Within Roman Catholicism, the Jansenist movement, which the Church then declared heretical, also maintained that original sin destroyed freedom of will.

— Freebase

Big Daddy

Big Daddy

Big Daddy is a 1999 American comedy film directed by Dennis Dugan and starring Adam Sandler and the Sprouse brothers. The film was produced by Robert Simonds and released on June 25, 1999, by Columbia Pictures where it opened #1 at the box office with a $41,536,370 first weekend as well as a score of 41% on Metacritic.

— Freebase

Camelina

Camelina

Camelina is a genus within the flowering plant family Brassicaceae. The Camelina species, commonly known as false flax, are native to Mediterranean regions of Europe and Asia. Most species ot this genus have been little studied, with the exception of Camelina sativa, historically cultivated as oil plant. Heinrich Johann Nepomuk von Crantz was the first botanist to use the genus Camelina in his classification works in 1762.

— Freebase

Zinnia

Zinnia

Zinnia is a genus of 20 species of annual and perennial plants of the family Asteraceae. They are native to scrub and dry grassland in an area stretching from the Southwestern United States to South America, with a centre of diversity in Mexico. Members of the genus are notable for their solitary long-stemmed flowers that come in a variety of bright colors. The name honours genus German botanist Johann Gottfried Zinn.

— Freebase

FIG

FIG

Nothing. Note, "I don't care a fig," etc. =FIG LEAF= A small outer garment, next to nothing, worn by Adam 4000 B.C. and occasionally revived by Bostonian Art Committees.

— The Foolish Dictionary, by Gideon Wurdz

Seth

Seth

Seth, in Judaism, Christianity and Islam, was the third son of Adam and Eve and brother of Cain and Abel, who were the only other of their children mentioned by name. According to Genesis 4:25, Seth was born after the slaying of Abel by Cain, and Eve believed God had appointed him as a replacement for Abel.

— Freebase

Søren Kierkegaard

Søren Kierkegaard

Søren Aabye Kierkegaard was a Danish philosopher, theologian, poet, social critic, and religious author. He wrote critical texts on organized religion, Christendom, morality, ethics, psychology and philosophy of religion, displaying a fondness for metaphor, irony and parables. He is widely considered to be the first existentialist philosopher. Much of his philosophical work deals with the issues of how one lives as a "single individual", giving priority to concrete human reality over abstract thinking, and highlighting the importance of personal choice and commitment. He was a fierce critic of idealist intellectuals and philosophers of his time, such as Emanuel Swedenborg, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Johann Gottlieb Fichte, Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling and Karl Wilhelm Friedrich Schlegel, as well as Danish pastors Jacob Peter Mynster and Hans Lassen Martensen and Danish poet Johan Ludvig Heiberg. His theological work focuses on Christian ethics, on the institution of the Church, and on the differences between purely objective proofs of Christianity and the individual's subjective relationship to Jesus Christ, the God-Man, which came through faith. Much of his work deals with the art of Christian love. He was extremely critical of the practice of Christianity as a state religion, primarily that of the Church of Denmark. His psychological work explored the emotions and feelings of individuals when faced with life choices.

— Freebase

Hooper

Hooper

Hooper is a 1978 action-comedy film starring Burt Reynolds, based loosely on the experiences of director Hal Needham, a one-time stuntman in his own right. It serves as a tribute to stuntmen and stuntwomen in what was at one time an underrecognized profession. Co-starring in the film are Sally Field, Jan-Michael Vincent, Brian Keith, Robert Klein, James Best and Adam West.

— Freebase

Unspeakable

Unspeakable

Unspeakable is the 17th album by Bill Frisell to be released on the Elektra Nonesuch label. It was released in 2004 and features performances by Frisell, Hal Willner, Tony Scherr, Kenny Wollesen, Don Alias, Steven Bernstein, Briggan Krauss, Curtis Fowlkes, Adam Dorn, Jenny Scheinman, Eyvind Kang, and Hank Roberts. It won the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Jazz Album in 2005.

— Freebase

Joseph Butler

Joseph Butler

Joseph Butler was an English bishop, theologian, apologist, and philosopher. He was born in Wantage in the English county of Berkshire. He is known, among other things, for his critique of Thomas Hobbes's egoism and John Locke's theory of personal identity. During his life and after his death, Butler influenced many philosophers, including David Hume, Thomas Reid, and Adam Smith.

— Freebase

Freieslebenite

Freieslebenite

Freieslebenite is a sulfosalt mineral composed of antimony, lead, and silver. Sulfosalt minerals are complex sulfide minerals with the formula: AmBnSp. The formula of freieslebenite is AgPbSbS3. Freieslebenite was discovered in approximately 1773 in the Himmelsfurst mines of Freiberg, Saxony, Germany. The mineral was initially called Schilf-Glaserz; however, in 1845 it was given the current name Freieslebenite after the Mining Commissioner of Saxony, Johann Carl Freiesleben.

— Freebase

Rann

Rann

Rann is a fictional planet in the Polaris star system of the DC Comics Universe whose capital city is Ranagar. Rann is most famous for being the adopted planet of the Earth explorer and hero Adam Strange and for their teleportation device called the Zeta Beam. The planet Rann, along with her famous non-native son, first appeared in Showcase #17.

— Freebase

Classical period

Classical period

The dates of the Classical period in Western music are generally accepted as being between about 1730 and 1820. However, the term classical music is used in a colloquial sense to describe a variety of Western musical styles from the ninth century to the present, and especially from the sixteenth or seventeenth to the nineteenth. This article is about the specific period from 1750 to 1820. The Classical period falls between the Baroque and the Romantic periods. The best known composers from this period are Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, and Ludwig van Beethoven; other notable names include Luigi Boccherini, Muzio Clementi, Antonio Soler, Antonio Salieri, François Joseph Gossec, Johann Stamitz, Carl Friedrich Abel, Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, and Christoph Willibald Gluck. Ludwig van Beethoven is also sometimes regarded either as a Romantic composer or a composer who was part of the transition to the Romantic. Franz Schubert is also something of a transitional figure, as are Johann Nepomuk Hummel, Mauro Giuliani, Friedrich Kuhlau, Fernando Sor, Luigi Cherubini, Jan Ladislav Dussek, and Carl Maria von Weber. The period is sometimes referred to as the era of Viennese Classic or Classicism, since Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Joseph Haydn, Antonio Salieri, and Ludwig van Beethoven all worked at some time in Vienna, and Franz Schubert was born there.

— Freebase

Peyer's patch

Peyer's patch

Peyer's patches are organized lymphoid nodules, named after the 17th-century Swiss anatomist Johann Conrad Peyer. They are aggregations of lymphoid tissue that are usually found in the lowest portion of the small intestine, the ileum, in humans; as such, they differentiate the ileum from the duodenum and jejunum. The duodenum can be identified by Brunner's glands. The jejunum has neither Brunner's glands nor Peyer's Patches.

— Freebase

Trio sonata

Trio sonata

The trio sonata is a musical form that was popular in the 17th and early 18th centuries. A trio sonata is written for two solo melodic instruments and basso continuo, making three parts in all, hence the name trio sonata. However, because the basso continuo is usually made up of at least two instruments, performances of trio sonatas typically involve at least four musicians, and some 18th-century published editions have duplicate partbooks for the bass. The trio sonatas by Arcangelo Corelli were of unparalleled influence during his lifetime and for a long time after, inspiring slavish imitation by composers whose numbers were legion. The melody instruments used are often both violins. A well-known exception is the trio sonata in Johann Sebastian Bach's The Musical Offering, which is for violin and flute. Johann Sebastian Bach's trio sonatas for organ combine all three parts on one instrument. Typically the right hand, left hand and pedals will each take a different part thus creating the same texture as in a trio. A further innovation by Bach was the trio sonatas involving a concertante right-hand harpsichord part in addition to the bass line, plus one melodic instrument, thus for two players. Examples are the six sonatas for harpsichord and solo violin, three sonatas for harpsichord and viola da gamba, and three sonatas for harpsichord and flute

— Freebase

From

From

out of the neighborhood of; lessening or losing proximity to; leaving behind; by reason of; out of; by aid of; -- used whenever departure, setting out, commencement of action, being, state, occurrence, etc., or procedure, emanation, absence, separation, etc., are to be expressed. It is construed with, and indicates, the point of space or time at which the action, state, etc., are regarded as setting out or beginning; also, less frequently, the source, the cause, the occasion, out of which anything proceeds; -- the aritithesis and correlative of to; as, it, is one hundred miles from Boston to Springfield; he took his sword from his side; light proceeds from the sun; separate the coarse wool from the fine; men have all sprung from Adam, and often go from good to bad, and from bad to worse; the merit of an action depends on the principle from which it proceeds; men judge of facts from personal knowledge, or from testimony

— Webster Dictionary

Gregor Mendel

Gregor Mendel

Gregor Johann Mendel was a German-speaking Silesian scientist and Augustinian friar who gained posthumous fame as the founder of the new science of genetics. Mendel demonstrated that the inheritance of certain traits in pea plants follows particular patterns, now referred to as the laws of Mendelian inheritance. The profound significance of Mendel's work was not recognized until the turn of the 20th century, when the independent rediscovery of these laws initiated the modern science of genetics.

— Freebase

Atrocities

Atrocities

Atrocities was Christian Death's fourth album and the first with Valor Kand taking over main duties after Rozz Williams' departure. The album's subject matter deals almost exclusively with the Holocaust including songs about Auschwitz and Josef Mengele. Recorded at Rockfield Studios in Monmouth, Wales it also featured the songwriting and arrangement skills of Barry Galvin, who, along with Johann Schumann, would leave the group upon the completion of Atrocities - both went on to form Mephisto Walz.

— Freebase

BACH motif

BACH motif

In music, the BACH motif is the motif, a succession of notes important or characteristic to a piece, B flat, A, C, B natural. In German musical nomenclature, in which the note B natural is written as H and the B flat as B, it forms Johann Sebastian Bach's family name. One of the most frequently occurring examples of a musical cryptogram, the motif has been used by countless composers, especially after the Bach Revival in the first half of the 19th century.

— Freebase

Floored

Floored

Floored is Sugar Ray's second album, released on June 24, 1997. It includes the hit song "Fly", and another moderately successful single, "RPM". Also includes "Speed Home California" which was featured on the soundtrack for Road Rash 3D, and a cover of Adam Ant's 80's classic, "Stand and Deliver". Two versions of "Fly" are found on the album, one of them featuring reggae artist Super Cat.

— Freebase

Pavo

Pavo

Pavo is a constellation in the southern sky. Its name is Latin for peacock. It is one of twelve constellations created by Petrus Plancius from the observations of Pieter Dirkszoon Keyser and Frederick de Houtman and it first appeared on a 35-cm diameter celestial globe published in 1597 in Amsterdam by Plancius with Jodocus Hondius. The first depiction of this constellation in a celestial atlas was in Johann Bayer's Uranometria of 1603.

— Freebase

Overcome

Overcome

Overcome is the fourth studio album by the American heavy metal band, All That Remains. It was released on September 16, 2008. Overcome is the first and only album by All That Remains that was not produced by Adam Dutkiewicz of Killswitch Engage, as well as the first with the band's current drummer, Jason Costa.

— Freebase

Tripsis

Tripsis

Tripsis is the sixth and final full-length studio album by the Australian progressive metal band, Alchemist. Recorded in 2007, Adam Agius stated that the songwriting focused on a consistently heavy approach. A promotional music video for the song "Wrapped in Guilt" is planned. A music video for "Tongues and Knives" premiered on 8 October 2008. When asked on the meaning of the album, Agius remarked:

— Freebase

Hypergrowth

Hypergrowth

Hypergrowth: The Rise and Fall of the Osborne Computer Corporation was published in 1984 and coauthored by Adam Osborne and John C. Dvorak. It tells the story of the Osborne Computer Corporation from the establishment of the company in 1980 until its bankruptcy in 1983, written from Osborne's point of view. A paperback version was published in 1985.

— Freebase

Roll Away

Roll Away

Roll Away is the debut album by the British blues rock power trio Back Door Slam. It was recorded with the classic lineup of Davey Knowles on guitar, Adam Jones on Bass and Ross Doyle on drums and released on 18 June 2007 in the Isle of Man, 1 July in the United States and 25 September 2007 in the United Kingdom, under Blix Street Records. The album incorporates predominantly blues-rock, with hints of Celtic music, folk rock and country rock.

— Freebase

Musca

Musca

Musca is one of the minor southern constellations. The constellation was one of twelve constellations created by Petrus Plancius from the observations of Pieter Dirkszoon Keyser and Frederick de Houtman and it first appeared on a 35-cm diameter celestial globe published in 1597 in Amsterdam by Petrus Plancius and Jodocus Hondius. The first depiction of this constellation in a celestial atlas was in Johann Bayer's Uranometria of 1603.

— Freebase

Faded

Faded

"Faded" is a pop song and international debut single by Canadian boy band soulDecision. It incorporates soul, 1980s pop music and hip hop. The song was written by Adam Stillman, who described the song as "being intoxicated and letting one's object of affection know how you feel." The song was very successful, reaching #1 in Canada and being nominated for song of the year at 2001 Juno Awards.

— Freebase

Circulating capital

Circulating capital

Circulating capital includes intermediate goods and operating expenses, i.e., short-lived items that are used in production and used up in the process of creating other goods or services. This is roughly equal to intermediate consumption. Finer distinction include raw materials, intermediate goods, inventories, ancillary operating expenses and. It is contrasted with fixed capital. The term was used in more specialized ways by classical economists such as Adam Smith, David Ricardo and Karl Marx. Where the distinction is used, circulating capital is a component of capital, also including fixed capital used in a single cycle of production. In contrast to fixed capital, it is used up in every cycle. In accounting, the circulating capital comes under the heading of current assets. Building on the work of Quesnay and Turgot, Adam Smith made the first explicit distinction between fixed and circulating capital. In his usage, circulating capital includes wages and labour maintenance, money, and inputs from land, mines, and fisheries associated with production. According to Karl Marx the turnover of capital influences "the processes of production and self-expansion", the two new forms of capital, circulating and fixed, "accrue to capital from the process of circulation and affect the form of its turnover". In the following chapter Marx defines fixed capital and circulating capital. In chapter 9 he claims: "We have here not alone quantitative but also qualitative difference."

— Freebase

French Kiss

French Kiss

French Kiss is a 1995 American romantic comedy film directed by Lawrence Kasdan and starring Meg Ryan and Kevin Kline. Written by Adam Brooks, the film is about a woman who flies to France to confront her straying fiancé and gets into trouble when the charming crook seated next to her uses her to smuggle a stolen diamond necklace. French Kiss was filmed on location in France.

— Freebase

Herzenslust

Herzenslust

Herzenslust, Op. 3, is a polka composed by Johann Strauss II in the fall of 1844 for his debut as a composer at the Dommayer's Casino establishment in Vienna. It was performed along with several of Strauss' other early compositions, such as the waltzes Sinngedichte and Gunstwerber, and the Debut-Quadrille. Reviewing Strauss' debut, the journal Der Wanderer noted that both the Debut-Quadrille and the Herzenslust Polka "are so piquant in their inspiration, and handled with such glittering effect in the instrumentation that we […] have to recognise and commend the bold and exuberant talent of Strauss Son."

— Freebase

Black Stone

Black Stone

The Black Stone is the eastern cornerstone of the Kaaba, the ancient stone building toward which Muslims pray, in the center of the Grand Mosque in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. It is revered by Muslims as an Islamic relic which, according to Muslim tradition, dates back to the time of Adam and Eve. The stone was venerated at the Kaaba in pre-Islamic pagan times. It was set intact into the Kaaba's wall by the Islamic prophet Muhammad in the year 605 A.D., five years before his first revelation. Since then it has been broken into a number of fragments and is now cemented into a silver frame in the side of the Kaaba. Its physical appearance is that of a fragmented dark rock, polished smooth by the hands of millions of pilgrims. Islamic tradition holds that it fell from Heaven to show Adam and Eve where to build an altar. Although it has often been described as a meteorite, this hypothesis is now uncertain. Muslim pilgrims circle the Kaaba as part of the Tawaf ritual of the Hajj. Many of them try, if possible, to stop and kiss the Black Stone, emulating the kiss that Islamic tradition records that it received from Muhammad. If they cannot reach it, they point to it on each of their seven circuits around the Kaaba.

— Freebase

Gypsophila paniculata

Gypsophila paniculata

Gypsophila paniculata is a species of flowering plant in the Caryophyllaceae family, native to central and eastern Europe. It is an herbaceous perennial growing to 1.2 m tall and wide, with mounds of branching stems covered in clouds of tiny white flowers in summer. Its natural habitat is on the Steppes in dry, sandy and stony places, often on calcareous soils. Specimens of this plant were first sent to Linnaeus from St Petersburg by the Swiss-Russian botanist Johann Amman.

— Freebase

Robinsonade

Robinsonade

Robinsonade is a literary genre that takes its name from the 1719 novel Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe. The success of this novel spawned so many imitations that its name was used to define a genre, which is sometimes described simply as a "desert island story". The word "robinsonade" was coined by the German writer Johann Gottfried Schnabel in the Preface of his 1731 work Die Insel Felsenburg. It is often viewed as a subgenre of survivalist fiction.

— Freebase

Dropped

Dropped

Dropped is the fifth full-length album by industrial/hip hop artists Consolidated, which was released in 1998. The title could be a reaction to having been "dropped" by London Records because of poor album sales, but in some interviews Adam Sherburne explained that the title is a general reference to men having "dropped the ball" -- having failed to live up to their responsibilities -- in their relationships.

— Freebase

Nation of shopkeepers

Nation of shopkeepers

The phrase "a nation of Shopkeepers" is a phrase made famous by Napoleon to describe the United Kingdom. This phrase can be translated from French to English as: Although the description was often seen as a disparaging one, Napoleon claimed that it was not intended to be so, but was merely a statement of the obvious fact that British power, unlike that of its main continental rivals, derived from commerce and not from the extent of its lands nor its population. The phrase, however, did not originate with Napoleon. It first appears in The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith, who wrote: Smith is also quoted as saying that Britain was "a nation that is governed by shopkeepers", which is how he put it in the first edition. It is unlikely that either Adam Smith or Napoleon used the phrase to describe that class of small retailers who would not even have had the franchise. The phrase may have been part of standard 18th century economic dialogue. It has been suggested that Napoleon may have heard it during a meeting of the French Convention on 11 June 1794, when Bertrand Barère de Vieuzac quoted Smith's phrase. The phrase has also been attributed to Samuel Adams, but this is disputed; Josiah Tucker, Dean of Gloucester, produced a slightly different phrase in 1766:

— Freebase

Adam Smith

Adam Smith

Adam Smith was a Scottish moral philosopher and a pioneer of political economy. One of the key figures of the Scottish Enlightenment, Adam Smith is best known for two classic works: The Theory of Moral Sentiments, and An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. The latter, usually abbreviated as The Wealth of Nations, is considered his magnum opus and the first modern work of economics. Smith is cited as the "father of modern economics" and is still among the most influential thinkers in the field of economics today. Smith studied social philosophy at the University of Glasgow and at Balliol College in the University of Oxford, where he was one of the first students to benefit from scholarships set up by his fellow Glaswegian John Snell. After graduating, he delivered a successful series of public lectures at the University of Edinburgh, leading him to collaborate with David Hume during the Scottish Enlightenment. Smith obtained a professorship at Glasgow teaching moral philosophy, and during this time he wrote and published The Theory of Moral Sentiments. In his later life, he took a tutoring position that allowed him to travel throughout Europe, where he met other intellectual leaders of his day. Smith then returned home and spent the next ten years writing The Wealth of Nations, publishing it in 1776. He died in 1790 at the age of 67.

— Freebase

My Head

My Head

My Head was a grunge/alternative rock power trio from Los Angeles, California, United States formed in 1993 by singer-songwriter and guitarist Adam Siegel and drummer Greg Saenz. Due to its member's past on Excel, My Head's sound was influenced by early 1980s Crossover Thrash music, but also by the growing grunge movement impulsed by bands like Nirvana, Pearl Jam and Soundgarden. Even after its dissolution My Head recorded three tracks for two different Mike Muir's releases: Pneumonia and Friends & Family, Vol. 2 by Suicidal Tendencies.

— Freebase

Pancreatic duct

Pancreatic duct

The pancreatic duct, or duct of Wirsung, is a duct joining the pancreas to the common bile duct to supply pancreatic juices which aid in digestion provided by the "exocrine pancreas". The pancreatic duct joins the common bile duct just prior to the ampulla of Vater, after which both ducts perforate the medial side of the second portion of the duodenum at the major duodenal papilla. The duct of Wirsung is named after its discoverer, the German anatomist Johann Georg Wirsung.

— Freebase

Monopsychism

Monopsychism

Monopsychism is the belief that all humans share one and the same eternal consciousness, soul, mind or intellect. It is a recurring theme in many mystical traditions. Monopsychism is a doctrine of Sabianism, Jewish Kabbalah, and Averroism, and is also a part of Rastafarian beliefs. A similar belief in some mystical Judeo-Christian-Islamic traditions is that all human beings have different souls but once composed a single unified soul in Adam.

— Freebase

Candy corn

Candy corn

Candy corn is a confection in the United States and Canada, popular primarily around Halloween. Candy corn was created in the 1880s by William Johann of Port Washington, Wisconsin; the three colors of the candy – a broad yellow end, a tapered orange center, and a pointed white tip – mimic the appearance of kernels of corn. Each piece is approximately three times the size of a real kernel from a ripe or dried ear. Candy corn is made primarily from sugar, corn syrup, wax, artificial coloring and binders.

— Freebase

Luce

Luce

Luce is a rock band based in San Francisco, California. The band was founded in 2000 by lead singer Tom Luce and is made up of keyboardist/producer Adam Rossi, drummer Brian Zalewski, bassist Alex Cordrey and lead guitarist Dylan Brock. Luce's self-titled first album, released in 2001, met with success in the San Francisco Bay Area, winning the California Music Award for Outstanding Debut. It was promoted heavily on the San Francisco radio station KFOG; a single from the album entitled "Good Day" peaked at #39 on the Billboard Adult Top 40 chart. "Good Day" was heard in the movies 13 Going on 30 and How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days and TV shows The O.C. and Alias, and was also featured in commercials for American Leather and for northern California Toyota dealers. The band makes appearances all over northern California and the U.S.; one notable appearance was at Golden Gate Park for the finish of the 2005 Bay to Breakers race. Luce's second album, Never Ending, was released April 19, 2005, and the first single, "Buy A Dog", was the most played song on at least 13 radio stations, including KFOG and WRLT in Nashville. On Nov. 6 of '05, Tom Luce and Adam Rossi sang the national anthem at Arrowhead Stadium before the Kansas City Chiefs hosted the Oakland Raiders.

— Freebase

Breach

Breach

Breach is a 2007 American historical drama film directed by Billy Ray. The screenplay by Ray, Adam Mazer, and William Rotko is based on the true story of Robert Hanssen, an FBI agent convicted of spying for the Soviet Union and later Russia for more than two decades, and Eric O'Neill, who worked as his assistant and helped bring about his downfall. O'Neill served as a consultant on the film.

— Freebase

Photopia

Photopia

Photopia is a piece of literature by Adam Cadre rendered in the form of interactive fiction, and written in Inform. It has received both praise and criticism for its heavy focus on fiction rather than on interactivity. It won first place in the 1998 Interactive Fiction Competition. Photopia has few puzzles and a linear structure, allowing the player no way to alter the eventual conclusion but maintaining the illusion of non-linearity.

— Freebase

Bonbon

Bonbon

The name bonbon refers to any of several types of sweets, especially small candies enrobed in chocolate. The first reports of bonbons come from the 17th century, when they were made at the French royal court. Their name arose from infantile reduplication of the word bon, meaning 'good'. In modern French and several other European languages, the term simply refers to any type of candy or small confection. This sweet inspired Johann Strauss II to compose a waltz named "Wiener Bonbons".

— Freebase


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