Definitions containing mèrimèe, prosper

We've found 37 definitions:

Prosper

Prosper

Prosper is America’s first peer-to-peer lending marketplace, with more than 1.9 million members and over $632,000,000 in funded loans. Prosper allows people to invest in each other in a way that is financially and socially rewarding. On Prosper, borrowers list loan requests between $2,000 and $35,000 and individual lenders invest as little as $25 in each loan listing they select. In addition to credit scores, ratings, and histories, investors can consider borrowers’ personal loan descriptions, endorsements from friends, and community affiliations. Prosper handles the servicing of the loan on behalf of the matched borrowers and investors. Prosper Marketplace, Inc. is run by CEO, Stephan Vermut, President, Aaron Vermut, and Head of Global Institutional Sales, Ron Suber. Steve and Aaron Vermut are the founders and former managing partners of Merlin Securities, a prime brokerage service based on cutting-edge technology. Prosper Marketplace, Inc.'s investors include Sequoia Capital and BlackRock.Prosper Marketplace, Inc. is using the Prosper logo and brand with the permission of its wholly-owned subsidiary, Prosper Funding LLC.

— CrunchBase

flourish

flourish

To prosper or fare well.

— Wiktionary

prospereth

prospereth

Third-person singular present simple form of prosper

— Wiktionary

Prospered

Prospered

of Prosper

— Webster Dictionary

Prospering

Prospering

of Prosper

— Webster Dictionary

Blossom

Blossom

to flourish and prosper

— Webster Dictionary

thrive

thrive

To increase in wealth or success; to prosper, be profitable.

— Wiktionary

speed

speed

To succeed; to prosper, be lucky.

— Wiktionary

American Dream

American Dream

A philosophy that with hard work, courage and determination, anyone can prosper and achieve success.

— Wiktionary

Prosper

Prosper

Prosper is a wealthy suburban town located in Collin and Denton counties within the state of Texas, United States. The Town of Prosper is located within the Dallas- Fort Worth metropolitan area.The median single-family home price is $401,000. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,423. As of 2013, the estimated population is close to 15,000.

— Freebase

long live

long live

May he, she or it live for a long time; may it prosper.

— Wiktionary

Malthusianism

Malthusianism

The viewpoint that population will always grow faster than the food supply that it needs to survive and prosper.

— Wiktionary

Thrive

Thrive

to prosper in any business; to have increase or success

— Webster Dictionary

succeed

succeed

To support; to prosper; to promote.

— Wiktionary

Speed

Speed

to fare well; to have success; to prosper

— Webster Dictionary

Thee

Thee

to thrive; to prosper

— Webster Dictionary

Spring

Spring

to grow; to prosper

— Webster Dictionary

Speed

Speed

to cause to be successful, or to prosper; hence, to aid; to favor

— Webster Dictionary

Succeed

Succeed

to support; to prosper; to promote

— Webster Dictionary

Thrive

Thrive

to prosper by industry, economy, and good management of property; to increase in goods and estate; as, a farmer thrives by good husbandry

— Webster Dictionary

ReverbNation

ReverbNation

ReverbNation provides over 3 million music industry professionals, artists, managers, labels, venues, festivals/events with powerful, easy-to-use technology to promote and prosper online.

— CrunchBase

Carmen

Carmen

Carmen is an opera in four acts by the French composer Georges Bizet. The libretto was written by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy, based on a novella of the same title by Prosper Mérimée. The opera was first performed at the Opéra-Comique in Paris, on 3 March 1875, and at first was not particularly successful. Its initial run extended to 36 performances, before the conclusion of which Bizet died suddenly, and thus knew nothing of the opera's later celebrity. The opera, written in the genre of opéra comique with musical numbers separated by dialogue, tells the story of the downfall of Don José, a naïve soldier who is seduced by the wiles of the fiery Gypsy, Carmen. José abandons his childhood sweetheart and deserts from his military duties, yet loses Carmen's love to the glamorous toreador Escamillo, after which José kills her in a jealous rage. The depictions of proletarian life, immorality and lawlessness, and the tragic outcome in which the main character dies on stage, broke new ground in French opera and were highly controversial. After the premiere, most reviews were critical, and the French public was generally indifferent. Carmen initially gained its reputation through a series of productions outside France, and was not revived in Paris until 1883; thereafter it rapidly acquired celebrity at home and abroad, and continues to be one of the most frequently performed operas; the "Toreador song" from act 2 is among the best known of all operatic arias. Later commentators have asserted that Carmen forms the bridge between the tradition of opéra comique and the realism or verismo that characterised late 19th-century Italian opera.

— Freebase

Prosper Ménière

Prosper Ménière

Prosper Ménière was born in Angers, France. He was lycée- and university-educated and he excelled at humanities and classics. He completed his gold medal in medical studies at Hôtel-Dieu de Paris in 1826, and his M.D. in 1828. He then assisted Guillaume Dupuytren. Ménière was originally set to be an assistant professor in faculty, but political tensions disturbed his professorship and he was sent to control the spread of cholera. He received a legion of honor for his work, but never gained professorship. After securing the position of physician-in-chief at the Institute for deaf-mutes, he focused on the diseases of the ear. Ménière's studies at the deaf-mute institute helped formulate his paper, On a particular kind of hearing loss resulting from lesions of the inner ear which ultimately led to the recognition of Ménière's disease. There is debate as to how Ménière's name is spelled. Prosper himself was known to write his name as "Menière" while his son used the spelling "Ménière." Many people omit the accent marks.

— Freebase

Postmillennialism

Postmillennialism

In Christian end-times theology, postmillennialism is an interpretation of chapter 20 of the Book of Revelation which sees Christ's second coming as occurring after the "Millennium", a Golden Age in which Christian ethics prosper. The term subsumes several similar views of the end times, and it stands in contrast to premillennialism and, to a lesser extent, amillennialism. Postmillenialism was a dominant theological belief among American Protestants who promoted reform movements in the 19th and 20th century such as abolitionism and the Social Gospel. It has been criticized by 20th century political conservatives as an attempt to Immanentize the eschaton.

— Freebase

Valence issue

Valence issue

A valence issue is a political issue about which voters will usually share a common preference. The archetypal examples are motherhood and apple pie. Prosperity is a common valence issue. All voters will want their community to prosper and so the consideration is not whether to seek prosperity or not but instead the issue is which party is most likely to deliver it. Valence issues may be contrasted with position issues — divisive issues for which there are different preferences. In a study of campaigns for the US Senate, candidates focussed upon valence issues in 77% of their advertising. The issues identified as positional or valence were:

— Freebase

Kiva

Kiva

Kiva is a nonprofit, personal micro-lending site that facilitates loans between lenders and low-income entrepreneurs in developing countries, using local lending companies and organizations as intermediaries. Lenders can find the business and entrepreneur they want to lend to based on region, business type, risk level, etc. Each posted loan is accompanied with bios for the respective entrepreneur, details on the why and what the loan is going to be used for, total amount raised from other lenders, loan duration (usually 6-12 months) and loan default risk. Taking small payments, usually $25, from a bunch of Kiva lenders raises the loans. Once a loan’s full amount has been raised it is transferred to one of Kiva’s field partners. In most cases the field partners have already disbursed the loans depicted before they are posted for “backfilling” by lenders on the Kiva website. Field partners are local microfinance institutions (MFIs) in developing countries that find, track and manage entrepreneurs and then disburse and collect the microloans. Even though lenders and Kiva do not charge interest, the field partners charge interest averaging 35% per year to the entrepreneurs.When loans have been repaid in full they are transferred back to Kiva and then to Kiva lenders via PayPal. PayPal has allowed Kiva to transfer loans back-and-forth from the lenders without transaction fees partly because of Kiva’s nonprofit nature and partly because of Kiva president Premal Shah’s past job of being a Principal Product Manager at PayPal. Kiva pioneered the concept of allowing local field partners to post individual loan stories for funding by individuals over the internet. Up until 2009 Kiva was alone in their business model of sourcing loan capital from individuals over the internet as a nonprofit entity. In 2009, the nonprofit lending platform Zidisha was founded with the purpose of reducing interest costs for borrowers by eliminating the local field partners and allowing lenders and entrepreneurs in developing to transact directly. Other p2p lending sites, like prosper" title="Prosper">Prosper, Zopa and Lending Club, make lower-risk loans to people in the same country as for-profit entities. Online p2p lending is new and it is hard to maneuver around financial regulations to make higher-risk, international loans as a for-profit entity, which is partly why Kiva formed as a non-profit.

— CrunchBase

Plasma lamp

Plasma lamp

Plasma lamps are a type of electrodeless lamp energized by radio frequency power. They are distinct from the novelty plasma lamps that were popular in the 1980s. The electrode-less lamp was invented by Nikola Tesla after his experimentation with high-frequency currents in an evacuated glass tube for the purpose of studying high voltage phenomena. The first practical plasma lamps were the sulfur lamps manufactured by Fusion Lighting. This lamp suffered a number of practical problems and did not prosper commercially. These problems have gradually been overcome by manufacturers such as Ceravision and Luxim, and high-efficiency plasma lamps have been introduced to the general lighting market. Plasma lamps covered with phosphor are called external electrode fluorescent lamps; these so-called external electrodes are the conductors providing the radio frequency electric field.

— Freebase

Hemet

Hemet

Hemet is a city in the San Jacinto Valley in Riverside County, California, United States. It covers a total area of 27.847 square miles, about half of the valley, which it shares with the neighboring city of San Jacinto. The population was 78,657 at the 2010 census. Founding of Hemet predates the formation of Riverside County. The formation of Lake Hemet helped the city grow and prosper, and stimulated agriculture in the area. The city is known for being the home of The Ramona Pageant, California's official outdoor play. Started in 1923, the play is one of the longest running outdoor plays in the United States. Hemet has been named a Tree City USA for 20 years by the Arbor Day Foundation for its dedication to the local forest. The city is home to the Hemet Valley Medical Center, a 320-bed general hospital.

— Freebase

Wareru

Wareru

‹The template Infobox royalty is being considered for merging.› Wareru was the founder of the Ramanya Kingdom located in today's Lower Burma. The kingdom is more commonly known as Kingdom of Hanthawady Pegu, or simply Pegu although the kingdom's first capital was Martaban. By using both diplomatic and military skills, the commoner of Shan and Mon descent successfully carved out a kingdom for the Mon people in Lower Burma following the collapse of the Pagan Empire in 1287. Wareru was nominally a vassal of his father-in-law Rama Khamheng of Sukhothai, and of the Mongols, and successfully repulsed attacks by the Three Shan Brothers of Myinsaing in 1287 and 1294. Wareru was assassinated by his grandsons in January 1307, and succeeded by his brother Hkun Law. The greatest achievements of his reign were his initiative to appoint a commission for the compilation of the Dhammathat, the earliest surviving law code of Burma; and the founding of the Mon kingdom which would prosper for another two and a half centuries.

— Freebase

Borough of Fylde

Borough of Fylde

The Borough of Fylde is a local government district with borough status in Lancashire, England. It covers part of the Fylde plain, after which it is named. The council's headquarters are in St Annes. Some council departments, including Planning and an office of the Registrar, were previously located in Wesham, but in 2007 these offices were transferred to the ownership of the NHS North Lancashire Primary Care Trust. Fylde borough was formed under the Local Government Act 1972, on 1 April 1974 by the merger of the borough of Lytham St Annes, Kirkham Urban District, and Fylde Rural District. The armorial arms of the borough bear the motto of the former Fylde RDC "Gaudeat Ager" from Psalm 96: ‘Let the field be joyful' - "Let Fylde Prosper". The armorial bearings comprise a complete Achievement of Arms, that is - shield, crest and helm and mantling, supporters, badge and motto. They reflect the union of the three local authorities in the area: Lytham St Annes Borough Council, Kirkham Urban District Council and Fylde Rural District Council.

— Freebase

Book of Judges

Book of Judges

The Book of Judges is the seventh book of the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Bible. Its title describes its contents: it contains the history of Biblical judges, divinely inspired leaders whose direct knowledge of Yahweh allows them to act as champions for the Israelites from oppression by foreign rulers, and models of wise and faithful behaviour required of them by their god Yahweh following the exodus from Egypt and conquest of Canaan. The events of Judges are set "between c. 1380 [B.C.E.] and the rise of Saul, c. 1050." The stories follow a consistent pattern: the people are unfaithful to Yahweh and he therefore delivers them into the hands of their enemies; the people repent and entreat Yahweh for mercy, which he sends in the form of a leader or champion; the judge delivers the Israelites from oppression and they prosper, but soon they fall again into unfaithfulness and the cycle is repeated. Judges forms part of Deuteronomistic history, a theologically-oriented history of Israel from the entry into Canaan to the destruction of the Temple. The details of this history's composition are still widely debated, but most scholars place its origins, or at least its final form, in the 6th century BCE and the community of the Babylonian exile. Nevertheless, fragments of Judges have been dated from much earlier, perhaps close to the period the book depicts.

— Freebase

Sustainable Life Media

Sustainable Life Media

Sustainable Life Media brings together dedicated communities of optimistic, visionary, and courageous individuals from around the globe who share a passion for purpose and a desire to create change that supports life for the long haul. As today's economic, social, and environmental landscapes rapidly change, we thrive on our desire to engage and equip forward-thinking leaders to navigate the dynamic wave of opportunity for new ways of living together on our planet. We do so by providing rich information resources, online and live event learning, peer-to-peer collaboration support, and robust access to solutions providers who are there to assist the shift to a flourishing future.Sustainable Brands - our flagship learning, collaboration, and commerce community, draws together sustainability, brand, and design/innovation professionals to share success stories and emerging best practices and to push the envelope of social and environmental brand innovation. Our goal in serving the Sustainable Brands community is to paint a clear picture of what is driving change in today's business landscape, uncover leading-edge sustainable brand strategies and tools, and facilitate community collaboration for shared benefit – all with the goal of helping more brands prosper by leading the way to a better world. To learn more, visit SustainableBrands.com

— CrunchBase

Beamer

Beamer

Beamer is a LaTeX class for creating slides for presentations. It supports both pdfLaTeX and LaTeX + dvips. The name is taken from the German word Beamer, a pseudo-anglicism for video projector. The beamer class is not the first LaTeX class for creating presentations, and like many of its predecessors, it has special syntax for defining 'slides'. Slides can be built up on-screen in stages as if by revealing text that was previously hidden or covered. This is handled with PDF output by creating successive pages that preserve the layout but add new elements, so that advancing to the next page in the PDF file appears to add something to the displayed page, when in fact it has redrawn the page. Source code for beamer presentations, like any other LaTeX file, can be created using any text editor, but there is specific support for beamer syntax in AUCTEX and LyX. Beamer supports syntax of other LaTeX presentation packages, including Prosper and Foils, by using compatibility packages. Beamer provides the ability to make 'handouts', that is a version of the output suitable for printing, without the dynamic features, so that the printed version of a slide shows the final version that will appear during the presentation. For actually putting more than one frame on the paper, pgfpages package is to be used.

— Freebase

Blyth

Blyth

Blyth is a town and civil parish in southeast Northumberland, England. It lies on the coast, to the south of the River Blyth and is approximately 21 kilometres northeast of Newcastle upon Tyne. It has a population of about 35,818. The port of Blyth dates from the 12th century, but the development of the modern town only began in the first quarter of the 18th century. The main industries which helped the town prosper were coal mining and shipbuilding, with the salt trade, fishing and the railways also playing an important role. These industries have largely vanished, but the port still thrives, shipping paper and pulp from Scandinavia for the newspaper industries of England and Scotland. The town was seriously affected when its principal industries went into decline, and it has undergone much regeneration since the early 1990s. The Keel Row Shopping Centre, opened in 1991, brought major high street retailers to Blyth, and helped to revitalise the town centre. The market place has recently been re-developed, with the aim of attracting further investment to the town. The Quayside has also seen much redevelopment and has been transformed into a peaceful open space, the centrepiece of which is a sculpture commemorating the industry which once thrived there. On the opposite side of the river are the nine wind turbines of the Blyth Harbour Wind Farm, which were constructed along the East Pier in 1992. They were joined in 2000 by Blyth Offshore Wind Farm, which is composed of two turbines situated 1 kilometre out to sea.

— Freebase

Burns, Robert

Burns, Robert

celebrated Scottish poet, born at Alloway, near Ayr, in 1759, son of an honest, intelligent peasant, who tried farming in a small way, but did not prosper; tried farming himself on his father's decease in 1784, but took to rhyming by preference; driven desperate in his circumstances, meditated emigrating to Jamaica, and published a few poems he had composed to raise money for that end; realised a few pounds thereby, and was about to set sail, when friends and admirers rallied round him and persuaded him to stay; he was invited to Edinburgh; his poems were reprinted, and money came in; soon after he married, and took a farm, but failing, accepted the post of exciseman in Dumfries; fell into bad health, and died in 1796, aged 37. "His sun shone as through a tropical tornado, and the pale shadow of death eclipsed it at noon.... To the ill-starred Burns was given the power of making man's life more venerable, but that of wisely guiding his own life was not given.... And that spirit, which might have soared could it but have walked, soon sank to the dust, its glorious faculties trodden under foot in the blossom; and died, we may almost say, without ever having lived." See Carlyle's "Miscellanies" for by far the justest and wisest estimate of both the man and the poet that has yet by any one been said or sung. He is at his best in his "Songs," he says, which he thinks "by far the best that Britain has yet produced.... In them," he adds, "he has found a tune and words for every mood of man's heart; in hut and hall, as the heart unfolds itself in many-coloured joy and woe of existence, the name, the voice of that joy and that woe, is the name and voice which Burns has given them."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Johnson, Samuel

Johnson, Samuel

the great English lexicographer, born in Lichfield, the son of a bookseller; received his early education in his native town and completed it at Pembroke College, Oxford, in 1728; in 1736 he married a widow named Porter, who brought him £800; started a boarding-school, which did not prosper, and in the end of a year he removed to London along with David Garrick, who had been a pupil under him; here he became connected with Cave, a printer, the proprietor of the Gentleman's Magazine, with whom he had previously corresponded, and contributed to the pages of the magazine, earning thereby a meagre livelihood, eking out his means by reporting Parliamentary debates in terms which expressed the drift of them, but in his own pompous language; in 1740 he published a poem entitled the "Vanity of Human Wishes," and about the same time commenced his world-famous Dictionary, which was Published in 1755, "a great, solid, square-built edifice, finished, symmetrically complete, the best of all dictionaries"; during the progress of the Dictionary Johnson edited the Rambler, writing most of the contents himself, carrying it on for two years; in 1758 he started the Idler; in 1762 the king granted him a pension of £300, and by this he was raised above the straitened circumstances which till then had all along weighed upon him, and able to live in comparative affluence for the last 22 years of his life; five years after he instituted the Literary Club, which consisted of the most celebrated men of the time, his biographer, Boswell, having by this time been introduced to him, as subsequently the family of Mr. Thrale; in 1770 he began his "Lives of the English Poets," and in 1773 he made a tour in the Highlands along with Boswell, of which journey he shortly afterwards published an account; Johnson's writings are now dead, as are many of his opinions, but the story of his life as written by Boswell (q. v.) will last as long as men revere those qualities of mind and heart that distinguish the English race, of which he is the typical representative (1709-1783).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Simar

Simar

A simar, as defined in the 1913 Webster's Dictionary, is "a woman's long dress or robe; also light covering; a scarf." The word is derived from French simarre, and is also written as cimar, cymar, samare, and simare. Collins English Dictionary defines "simar" and its variant "cymar" as "a woman's short fur-trimmed jacket, popular in the 17th and 18th centuries". The form "cymar" was used by John Dryden: "Her body shaded with a light cymar". Walter Scott used the spelling "simarre": "her sable tresses, which, each arranged in its own little spiral of twisted curls, fell down upon as much of a lovely neck and bosom as a simarre of the richest Persian silk, exhibiting flowers in their natural colors embossed upon a purple ground, permitted to be visible". In his 1909 book, Costume of Prelates of the Catholic Church, John Abel Felix Prosper Nainfa proposed the use of the English word "simar", instead of the word "cassock", for the cassock with the pellegrina worn by Catholic clergy, which he treated as distinct from the cassock proper. Others too have made the same distinction between the "simar" and the "cassock", but many scholars disagree with Nainfa's distinction. More particularly, the documents of the Holy See do not make this distinction, and use the term "cassock" or "vestis talaris" whether a pellegrina is attached or is not. Thus the Instruction on the Dress, Titles and Coats-of-Arms of Cardinals, Bishops and Lesser Prelates of 28 March 1969 states that, for cardinals and bishops, "the elbow-length cape, trimmed in the same manner as this cassock, may be worn over it". "Cassock", rather than "simar" is the term that is usually applied to the dress of Popes and other Catholic ecclesiastics. The Instruction also gives no support to Nainfa's claim that the cassock with shoulder cape should not be worn in church services. Nainfa wrote that the garment with the shoulder cape was at that time called a zimarra in Italian. However, the Italian term zimarra is today used rather of a historical loose-fitting overgown, quite unlike the close-fitting cassock with shoulder cape worn today by some Catholic clergy, and similar to the fur-lined Schaube that was used in northern Europe. Images of the historical zimarra as worn by women can be seen at Dressing the Italian Way and The Italian Showcase On the ecclesiastical simar, as defined by Nainfa, see Cassock.

— Freebase


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