Definitions containing mälar lake

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Lake Victoria

Lake Victoria

Lake Victoria is one of the African Great Lakes. The lake was named after Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom, by John Hanning Speke, the first European to discover this lake. With a surface area of 68,800 square kilometres, Lake Victoria is Africa’s largest lake by area, and it is the largest tropical lake in the world. Lake Victoria is the world's 2nd largest freshwater lake by surface area; only Lake Superior in North America is larger. In terms of its volume, Lake Victoria is the world's ninth largest continental lake, and it contains about 2,750 cubic kilometers of water. Lake Victoria receives its water primarily from direct precipitation and thousands of small streams. The largest stream flowing into this lake is the Kagera River, the mouth of which lies on the lake's western shore. Two rivers leave the lake, the White Nile, flows out at Jinja, Uganda on the lake's north shore, and the Katonga River flows out at Lukaya on the western shore connecting the lake to Lake George. Lake Victoria occupies a shallow depression in Africa and has a maximum depth of 84 m and an average depth of 40 m. Its catchment area covers 184,000 square kilometers. The lake has a shoreline of 4,828 km, with islands constituting 3.7% of this length, and is divided among three countries: Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania.

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Lake Saint Clair

Lake Saint Clair

Lake St. Clair is a fresh-water lake named after Clare of Assisi that lies between the province of Ontario and the state of Michigan, and its midline also forms the boundary between Canada and the United States of America. Lake St. Clair includes the Anchor Bay along the Metro Detroit coastline. This lake is situated about 6.0 miles northeast of the downtown areas of Detroit, Michigan, and Windsor, Ontario. With about 430 square miles of water area, this lake is part of the Great Lakes System. It links the Great Lakes system, but is rarely included in the listings of the Great Lakes. There are ongoing proposals for its official recognition as a Great Lake, which would affect its inclusion in scientific research projects, etc., designated as being for "The Great Lakes". Along with the St. Clair River and Detroit River, Lake St. Clair connects Lake Huron with Lake Erie. Note that Michigan lies to the north and west of the lake, Ontario to the south and east. Lake Saint Clair is about 22.5 nautical miles from north to south and about 21 nautical miles from east to west. This is a rather shallow lake for its size with an average depth of about 11 feet, and a maximum natural depth of 21.3 feet. However, it is 27 feet deep in the navigation channel which has been dredged for lake freighter passage. Lake Saint Clair is fed by the St. Clair River, which flows southwards from Lake Huron and has an extensive river delta where it enters Lake Saint Clair. This is the largest delta of the Great Lakes System. Also, the Thames River and Sydenham River flow into Lake Saint Clair from Southwestern Ontario, and the Clinton River flows into it from Michigan. The outflow from Lake Saint Clair flows from its southwestern end into the Detroit River, and thence into Lake Erie.

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Lake Peipus

Lake Peipus

Lake Peipus, is the biggest transboundary lake in Europe on the border between Estonia and Russia. The lake is the fifth largest in Europe after Lake Ladoga and Lake Onega in Russia north of St. Petersburg, Lake Vänern in Sweden, and Lake Saimaa in Finland. Lake Peipus is a remnant of a bigger body of water which existed in this area during an Ice Age. It covers 3,555 km², and has an average depth of 7.1 m, the deepest point being 15 m. The lake has several islands and consists of 3 parts: ⁕Lake Peipsi/Chudskoe is the northern part of the lake with the area of 2611 km². ⁕Lake Pihkva/Pskovskoe is the southern part of the lake. ⁕Lake Lämmijärv/Teploe is the sound connecting both parts of the lake. The lake is used for fishing and recreation, but suffered from some environmental degradation from Soviet era agriculture. Some 30 rivers and streams discharge into Lake Peipus. The largest rivers are the Emajõgi and the Velikaya River. The lake is drained by the Narva River.

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Great Lakes

Great Lakes

A group of five lakes on the United States-Canada border, consisting of Lake Superior, Lake Michigan and Lake Huron (Lake Michiganu2013Huron), Lake Erie and Lake Ontario.

— Wiktionary

Wollaston Lake

Wollaston Lake

Wollaston Lake is located in northeastern Saskatchewan, Canada. With a surface area of 2286 km², it is the largest bifurcation lake in the world that drains naturally in two directions. The Fond du Lac River flows out of the lake to the northwest, where it drains into Lake Athabasca, which ultimately drains into the Arctic Ocean via the Mackenzie River system. The Cochrane River flows out of the northeastern side of the lake and into Reindeer Lake, which drains via the Churchill River system into Hudson Bay. The Geikie River flows from the southwest into the southwest section of the lake . Wollaston Lake is also the largest lake entirely within Saskatchewan, although the Saskatchewanian portions of Lake Athabasca and Reindeer Lake are both larger. Samuel Hearne learned of the lake in 1770 and David Thompson noted in 1796 the dual outlets as “perhaps without parallel in the world.” In 1807, Peter Fidler named the lake after George Hyde Wollaston. The only settlement on its shores is also named Wollaston Lake. The settlement includes the northern hamlet of Wollaston Lake with a population of 129 and the adjacent village of Wollaston Post of the Hatchet Lake Dene Nation with a population of 1251.

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Onondaga Lake

Onondaga Lake

Onondaga Lake is a lake in Central New York located northwest of Syracuse, New York. The southeastern end of the lake and the southwestern shore abut industrial areas and expressways; the northeastern shore and northwestern end border a series of parks and museums. Although it is near the Finger Lakes region, it is not traditionally counted as one of the Finger Lakes. Onondaga Lake is a dimictic lake, meaning that the lake water completely mixes from top to bottom twice a year. The lake is 4.6 miles long and 1 mile wide making a surface area of 4.6 square miles. The maximum depth of the lake is 63 feet with an average depth of 35 feet. Its drainage basin has a surface area of 642 square kilometers, encompassing Syracuse, Onondaga County except the eastern and northern edges, the southeastern corner of Cayuga County and the Onondaga Nation Territory, and supports approximately 450,000 people. Onondaga Lake has two natural tributaries that contribute approximately 70% of the total water flow to the lake. These tributaries are: Ninemile Creek and Onondaga Creek. The Metropolitan Syracuse Wastewater Treatment Plant contributes 20% of the annual flow. No other lake in the United States receives as much of its inflow as treated wastewater. The other tributaries, which include Ley Creek, Bloody Brook, Harbor Brook, Sawmill Creek, Tributary 5A, and East Flume, contribute the remaining 10% of water flow into the lake. The tributaries flush the lake out about four times a year. Onondaga Lake is flushed much more rapidly than most other lakes. The lake flows to the northwest and discharges into Seneca River which combines with the Oneida River to form the Oswego River, and ultimately ends up in Lake Ontario.

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Lake Winnipegosis

Lake Winnipegosis

Lake Winnipegosis is a large lake in central North America, in Manitoba, Canada, some 300 km northwest of Winnipeg. It is Canada's eleventh-largest lake. An alternate spelling, once common but now rare, is Lake Winipigoos or simply 'Lake Winipigis'. The elongated, 240 kilometre long lake is the second-largest of three large lakes in central Manitoba; the other two are Lake Winnipeg, the largest, and Lake Manitoba. All three lakes are on the floor of the prehistoric glacial Lake Agassiz. The lake's watershed extends over some 49,825 km² in Manitoba and Saskatchewan. Tributaries include the Red Deer, Woody, and Swan rivers. The lake drains through the Waterhen River into Lake Manitoba, and is thus part of the Lake Winnipeg, Nelson River, and Hudson Bay watersheds. The lake's name derives from that of Lake Winnipeg, with a diminutive suffix. Winnipeg means 'big muddy waters' and Winnipegosis means 'little muddy waters'. The lake is famous for its commercial fishery of walleye and other freshwater species. Northern pike and mullet together now account for over 80 percent of its commercial fishing. It is also well known for its migratory bird populations, which make it a prime hunting area in the fall.

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Lake Bonneville

Lake Bonneville

Lake Bonneville was a prehistoric pluvial lake that covered much of North America's Great Basin region. Most of the territory it covered was in present-day Utah, though parts of the lake extended into present-day Idaho and Nevada. Formed about 32,000 years ago, it existed until about 14,500 years ago, when a large portion of the lake was released through the Red Rock Pass in Idaho. Following the Bonneville Flood, as the release is now known, the lake receded to a level called the Provo Level. Many of the unique geological characteristics of the Great Basin are due to the effects of the lake. At more than 1,000 ft deep and more than 19,691 square miles in area, the lake was nearly as large as Lake Michigan and significantly deeper. With the change in climate, the lake began drying up, leaving Great Salt Lake, Utah Lake, Sevier Lake, Rush Lake, and Little Salt Lake as remnants. Lake Bonneville was named by the geologist G. K. Gilbert after Benjamin Louis Eulalie de Bonneville, a French-born officer in the United States Army, who was also a fur trapper, and explorer in the American West. Bonneville was noted for his expeditions to the Oregon Country and the Great Basin.

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Lake Kyoga

Lake Kyoga

Lake Kyoga is a large shallow lake of Uganda, about 1,720 km² in area and at an elevation of 1034 metres. The Victoria Nile flows through the lake on its way from Lake Victoria to Lake Albert. The main inflow from Lake Victoria is regulated by the Nalubaale Power Station in Jinja. Another source of water is the Mount Elgon region on the border between Uganda and Kenya. While Lake Kyoga is part of the Great Lakes system, it is not itself considered a great lake. The lake reaches a depth of about 5.7 metres, and most of it is less than 4 metres deep. Areas that are less than 3 metres deep are completely covered by water lilies, while much of the swampy shoreline is covered with papyrus and water hyacinth. The papyrus also forms floating islands that drift between a number of small permanent islands. Extensive wetlands fed by a complex system of streams and rivers surround the lakes. Nearby Lake Kwania is a smaller lake but deeper. Forty-six species of fish have been found in Lake Kyoga, and crocodiles are numerous. Excessive El Niño rains in 1997–98 resulted in exceptionally high water levels, causing large islands of papyrus and water hyacinth mats to become dislodged on the lake and to accumulate at the lake's outlet into the Victoria Nile. This blockage caused the water level to become even higher, flooding about 580 square kilometres of the surrounding land and resulting in population displacement and severe socioeconomic damage. In 2004, the Egyptian government granted Uganda a gift of 13 million USD to streamline the flow of the Nile at Lake Kyoga. As of 2005, the outlet was still largely blocked.

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Lake Zaysan

Lake Zaysan

Lake Zaysan is a freshwater lake, ca. 1,810 km², in eastern Kazakhstan, in a hollow between the Altai and Tarbagatai Mountains. It is the largest lake in the East Kazakhstan Province. The lake lies at an altitude of 420 m, is 105 km long and 22–48 km wide, with a maximum depth of 15 m. Its major tributaries are the Kara Irtysh and Kendyrlyk from the east; its only outlet is the Irtysh River. The lake is generally frozen from the beginning of November to the end of April, but still has an abundance of fish. Since the construction of the Bukhtarma dam the lake has risen 6 m above its natural level. As the result, the area of lake essentially increased, thus, in some sources the lake is indicated as the "part" of artificial reservoir. The lake has existed since the late Cretaceous Period. Commonly, Lake Baikal is considered to be the oldest lake on the planet. The approximate duration of Cretaceous Period is from 136 to 65 million years before present, and, hence, if the Lake Zaysan existed from "the late Cretaceous Period", that means Zaysan must be older than 65 million years, and is the oldest lake on the planet, nearly three times older than Baikal. The direct indication of the Lake Zaysan's age is difficult to find, although some geological studies of the Zaysan Basin have been reviewed. Artificial reservoirs cover large surrounding areas. Modern geological analysis of the entire field, apparently, supports an exceptionally old age for Lake Zaysan.

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Lake of the Woods

Lake of the Woods

Lake of the Woods is a lake occupying parts of the Canadian provinces of Ontario and Manitoba and the U.S. state of Minnesota. It separates a small land area of Minnesota from the rest of the United States. The Northwest Angle and the town of Angle Township can only be reached from the rest of Minnesota by crossing the lake or by traveling through Canada. The Northwest Angle is the northernmost part of the contiguous United States. Lake of the Woods is fed by the Rainy River, Shoal Lake, Kakagi Lake and other smaller rivers. The lake drains into the Winnipeg River and then into Lake Winnipeg. Ultimately, its outflow goes north through the Nelson River to Hudson Bay. Lake of the Woods is over seventy miles long and wide, and contains more than 14,552 islands and 65,000 miles of shoreline. It would amount to the longest coastline of any Canadian lake, except that the lake is not entirely within Canada. Lake of the Woods is also the 6th largest freshwater lake located in the United States- after the five Great Lakes. The lake's islands provide nesting habitat for the piping plover and large numbers of American white pelicans. There are also several hundred nesting pairs of bald eagles in this area.

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Great Salt Lake

Great Salt Lake

The Great Salt Lake, located in the northern part of the U.S. state of Utah, is the largest salt water lake in the Western Hemisphere, and the fourth-largest terminal lake in the world. In an average year the lake covers an area of around 1,700 square miles, but the lake's size fluctuates substantially due to its shallowness. For instance, in 1963 it reached its lowest recorded level at 950 square miles, but in 1988 the surface area was at the historic high of 3,300 square miles. In terms of surface area, it is the largest lake in the United States that is not part of the Great Lakes region. The lake is the largest remnant of Lake Bonneville, a prehistoric pluvial lake that once covered much of western Utah. The three major tributaries to the lake, the Jordan, Weber, and Bear rivers together deposit around 1.1 million tons of minerals in the lake each year. As it is endorheic, it has very high salinity, far saltier than sea water, and its mineral content is constantly increasing. Its shallow, warm waters cause frequent, sometimes heavy lake-effect snows from late fall through spring. Although it has been called "America's Dead Sea", the lake provides habitat for millions of native birds, brine shrimp, shorebirds, and waterfowl, including the largest staging population of Wilson's Phalarope in the world.

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Lake Tahoe

Lake Tahoe

Lake Tahoe is a large freshwater lake in the Sierra Nevada of the United States. At a surface elevation of 6,225 ft, it is located along the border between California and Nevada, west of Carson City. Lake Tahoe is the largest alpine lake in North America. Its depth is 1,645 ft, making it the second-deepest in the United States. Additionally, Lake Tahoe is listed as the 26th largest lake by volume in the world at 122,160,280 acre·ft. The lake was formed about 2 million years ago and is a part of the Lake Tahoe Basin with the modern lake being shaped during the ice ages. It is known for the clarity of its water and the panorama of surrounding mountains on all sides. The area surrounding the lake is also referred to as Lake Tahoe, or simply Tahoe. Lake Tahoe is a major tourist attraction in both Nevada and California. It is home to a number of ski resorts, summer outdoor recreation, and tourist attractions. Snow and skiing are a significant part of the area's economy and reputation. Mountain and lake scenery are attractions throughout the year. The Nevada side also includes large casinos. Highways provide year-round access from Reno, Carson City, and Sacramento.

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Lake Biel

Lake Biel

Lake Biel or Lake Bienne is a lake in the west of Switzerland. Together with Lake Morat and Lake Neuchâtel, it is one of the three large lakes in the Jura region of Switzerland. It lies approximately at 47°5′N 7°10′E / 47.083°N 7.167°E, at the language boundary between German & French speaking areas. The lake is 15 km long and up to 4.1 km wide. Its surface area is 39.3 km², the maximum depth 74 m. The lake is located at 429 metres above sea level. Lake Biel has a catchment area of about 8,305 km². Water remains in the lake for an average of 58 days. The river Aare, the river Zihl/Thielle flowing from Lake Neuchâtel, the Twannbach draining water down from the surplombing first Jura mountain range and the river Suze draining water down from the Vallon de St. Imier, are the main tributaries. The river Aare was redirected into the lake in 1878, in order to prevent the flooding of the nearby area called "Seeland", and drains the water out of the lake down to Büren through a simultaneously man-made channel. The level of all three lakes is being controlled by a dam built across the channel, in Port. The largest settlement along the shores of Lake Biel are the bilingual city of Biel/Bienne and its sister city Nidau, both located on the northern end The Sankt-Petersinsel attracts tourists, mainly families. The island is located near Erlach. Jean-Jacques Rousseau once spent a few months on the island.

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Lake Louise

Lake Louise

Lake Louise, named Lake of the Little Fishes by the Stoney Natoka First Nations people, is a glacial lake within Banff National Park in Alberta, Canada. It is located 5 km west of the Hamlet of Lake Louise and the Trans-Canada Highway. Lake Louise is named after the Princess Louise Caroline Alberta, the fourth daughter of Queen Victoria and the wife of the Marquess of Lorne, who was the Governor General of Canada from 1878 to 1883. The emerald colour of the water comes from rock flour carried into the lake by melt-water from the glaciers that overlook the lake. The lake has a surface of 0.8 km² and is drained through the 3 km long Louise Creek into the Bow River. Fairmont's Chateau Lake Louise, one of Canada's grand railway hotels, is located on Lake Louise's eastern shore. It is a luxury resort hotel built in the early decades of the 20th century by the Canadian Pacific Railway. Moraine Lake and Lake Agnes are also accessible from Lake Louise.

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Lake Turkana

Lake Turkana

Lake Turkana, formerly known as Lake Rudolf, is a lake in the Kenyan Rift Valley, with its far northern end crossing into Ethiopia. It is the world's largest permanent desert lake and the world's largest alkaline lake. By volume it is the world's fourth-largest salt lake after the Caspian Sea, Issyk-Kul, and Lake Van, and among all lakes it ranks 24th. The water is potable, but not palatable. It supports a rich lacustrine wildlife. The climate is hot and very dry. The rocks of the surrounding area are predominantly volcanic. Central Island is an active volcano, emitting vapors. Outcrops and rocky shores are found on the east and south shores of the lake, while dunes, spits and flats are on the west and north, at a lower elevation. On-shore and off-shore winds can be extremely strong, as the lake warms and cools more slowly than the land. Sudden, violent storms are frequent. Three rivers flow into the lake, but lacking outflow, its only water loss is by evaporation. Lake volume and dimensions are variable. For example, its level fell by 10 metres between 1975 and 1993. Due to temperature, aridity and geographic inaccessibility, the lake retains its wild character. Nile crocodiles are found in great abundance on the flats. The rocky shores are home to scorpions and carpet vipers. Although the lake and its environs have been popular for expeditions of every sort under the tutelage of guides, rangers and experienced persons, they certainly must be considered hazardous for unguided tourists.

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Keuka Lake

Keuka Lake

Keuka Lake is an unusual member of the U.S. state of New York's Finger Lakes because it is Y-shaped, instead of long and narrow. Because of its shape, it was referred to in the past as Crooked Lake. Keuka means "canoe landing" in the Iroquois language and "lake with an elbow" in the Seneca language. Keuka Lake empties into another Finger Lake, Seneca Lake, from a stream, called Keuka Lake Outlet, at the lake's northeastern end in Penn Yan, New York. The stream empties into Seneca Lake at the village of Dresden. At one time the outlet was developed into a canal, the Crooked Lake Canal, connecting the lakes. This canal was later replaced by a railroad branch line which is now a hiking and cycling trail. The lake is about 20 miles long and varies in width from a half mile to two miles. The length of the shoreline is about 60 miles. It has a surface area of 11,730 acres, and a maximum and mean depth of 186 feet and 101 feet respectively. This body of water possesses large and healthy populations of lake trout, brown trout, rainbow trout, landlocked salmon, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, and yellow perch. The productive fishery is supported by huge numbers of baitfish, most notably alewives, and is a very popular lake with area fishermen.

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Lake Thun

Lake Thun

Lake Thun is an Alpine lake in the Bernese Oberland in Switzerland. It took its name from the city of Thun, on its northern shore. Lake Thun's approximately 2,500 km² large catchment area frequently causes local flooding after heavy rainfalls. This occurs because the river Aar, which drains Lake Thun, has only limited capacity to handle the excess runoff. The lake is fed by water from Lake Brienz to the south east, which lies 6 metres higher than Lake Thun, and various streams in the Oberland, including the Kander. Lake Thun was created after the last ice age and was originally part of Lake Brienz. The historic combined lake is called Wendelsee by geologists and historians. Since 1835 passenger ships have operated on the lake. There are ten passenger ships in total, operated by the local railway company BLS AG. In order to enable these ships to serve the towns of Interlaken and Thun, the Interlaken ship canal and Thun ship canal connect the lake to Interlaken West railway station and Thun railway station respectively. Fishing is important enough to keep a handful of professional fishers employed. In 2001 the total catch was 53,000 kg.

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Barrier Lake

Barrier Lake

Barrier Lake is a man made reservoir at the north end of Kananaskis Country in Alberta, Canada. Highway 40 runs between the lake and Mount Baldy, on the eastern shore. It is entirely located in the Bow Valley Provincial Park. Barrier Lake was created for hydroelectric power generation on the Kananaskis River. The dam that impounds the lake is at the north end of the lake. The lake is also used for recreational activities, with hiking paths surrounding the lake. A visitor centre is located on the eastern shore. Two day-use areas, Barrier Dam and Barrier Lake, are maintained by Alberta Community Development. The Jewell Bay Backcountry Campground is established 4 km from the dam. Water-skiing is permitted on the lake, but is rarely done due to the low temperatures of the water. Barrier Lake was used in the 2003 film X2: X-Men United as the stand in for Alkali Lake and in Heartland as Eagle Lake.

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Lake Constance

Lake Constance

Lake Constance is a lake on the Rhine at the northern foot of the Alps, and consists of three bodies of water: the Obersee, the Untersee, and a connecting stretch of the Rhine, called the Seerhein. The lake is situated in Germany, Switzerland and Austria near the Alps. Specifically, its shorelines lie in the German federal states of Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg, the Austrian federal state of Vorarlberg, and the Swiss cantons of Thurgau and St. Gallen. The Rhine flows into it from the south following the Austro-Swiss frontier. Lake Constance was first mentioned by the Roman geographer Pomponius Mela about 43 AD. He noted that the Rhine flows through two lakes, and gave them the Latin names Lacus Venetus and Lacus Acronius. Pliny the Elder used the name Lacus Brigantinus, after the Roman city of Brigantium. The lake is also colloquially known as the Swabian Sea. The freshwater lake sits at 395 m above sea level and is Central Europe's third largest, after Lake Balaton and Lake Geneva. It is 63 km long, and at its widest point, nearly 14 km. It covers approximately 571 km² of total area. The greatest depth is 252 metres in the middle of the eastern part. Its volume is approximately 1e10 m³. The lake has four parts: the main section, called Obersee, 476 km²; the north section, Überlinger See, 61 km²; the west section, Untersee, 63 km²; and the northwest section, the Zeller See and Gnadensee. The regulated Rhine flows into the lake in the southeast, through the Obersee, the city of Konstanz and the Untersee and flows out near Stein am Rhein. Lake Constance provides fresh water to many cities in south Germany.

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Crater Lake

Crater Lake

Crater Lake is a caldera lake located in the south-central region of the U.S. state of Oregon. It is the main feature of Crater Lake National Park and famous for its deep blue color and water clarity. The lake partly fills a nearly 2,148-foot deep caldera that was formed around 7,700 years ago by the collapse of the volcano Mount Mazama. Human interaction is traceable back to the indigenous Native Americans witnessing the eruption of Mount Mazama. There are no rivers flowing into or out of the lake; the evaporation is compensated for by rain and snowfall at a rate such that the total amount of water is replaced every 250 years. At 1,943 feet, it is the deepest lake in the United States, and the seventh deepest in the world. Crater Lake is known for the "Old Man of the Lake", a full-sized tree which is now a stump that has been bobbing vertically in the lake for more than a century. The low temperature of the water has slowed the decomposition of the wood, hence the longevity of the bobbing tree. Two islands are in Crater Lake, with Wizard Island from a cinder cone that erupted after Crater Lake began to fill with water, and Phantom Ship Island with seven different trees living on it. There are also colonies of violet green swallows, and several varieties of wildflowers and lichens living there.

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Crater Lake National Park

Crater Lake National Park

Crater Lake National Park is a United States National Park located in southern Oregon. Established in 1902, Crater Lake National Park is the fifth oldest national park in the United States and the only one in the state of Oregon. The park encompasses the caldera of Crater Lake, a remnant of a destroyed volcano, Mount Mazama, and the surrounding hills and forests. The lake is 1,943 feet deep at its deepest point, which makes it the deepest lake in the United States, the second deepest in North America and the ninth deepest in the world. Crater Lake is often referred to as the seventh deepest lake in the world, but this former listing excludes the approximately 3,000-foot depth of subglacial Lake Vostok in Antarctica, which resides under nearly 13,000 feet of ice, and the recent report of a 2,740-foot maximum depth for Lake O'Higgins/San Martin, located on the border of Chile and Argentina. However, when comparing its average depth of 1,148 feet to the average depth of other deep lakes, Crater Lake becomes the deepest in the Western Hemisphere and the third deepest in the world. The impressive average depth of this volcanic lake is due to the nearly symmetrical 4,000-foot deep caldera formed 7,700 years ago during the violent climactic eruptions and subsequent collapse of Mount Mazama and the relatively moist climate that is typical of the crest of the Cascade Range.²

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Lake Winnipeg

Lake Winnipeg

Lake Winnipeg is a large, 24,514-square-kilometre lake in central North America, in the province of Manitoba, Canada, with its southern tip about 55 kilometres north of the city of Winnipeg. It is the largest lake within the borders of southern Canada, and it is part of the most undeveloped large watershed of southern Canada. Lake Winnipeg is the sixth-largest freshwater lake in Canada, and the third-largest freshwater lake contained entirely within Canada, but it is relatively shallow excluding a narrow 36 m deep channel between the northern and southern basins. It is the eleventh-largest freshwater lake on Earth. The east side of the lake has pristine boreal forests and rivers that are being promoted as a potential United Nations World Heritage Park. The lake is elongated in shape and is 416 km from north to south, with remote sandy beaches, large limestone cliffs, and many bat caves in some areas. Manitoba Hydro uses the lake as one of the largest reservoirs in the world. There are many islands in the lake, most of them undeveloped.

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Snowbelt

Snowbelt

Snowbelt is a term describing of a number of regions near the Great Lakes in North America where heavy snowfall in the form of lake-effect snow is particularly common. Snowbelts are typically found downwind of the lakes, principally off the eastern and southern shores. Lake-effect snow occurs when cold air moves over warmer water, taking up moisture that later precipitates as snow when the air moves over land and cools. The lakes produce snowsqualls and persistently cloudy skies throughout the winter months, as long as air temperatures are colder than water temperatures, or until a lake freezes over. In the United States, snowbelts are located southeast of Lake Erie from Cleveland, Ohio to Buffalo, New York, and south of Lake Ontario stretching roughly from Rochester, New York to Utica, New York, and northward to Watertown, New York. Other snowbelts are located on the eastern shore of Lake Michigan from Gary, Indiana northward through Western Michigan and Northern Michigan to the Straits of Mackinac, and on the eastern and southern shores of Lake Superior from northwest Wisconsin through the northern half of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Portions of the snowbelt located in Ontario, Canada include the eastern shore of Lake Superior from Sault Ste. Marie northward to Wawa, as well as the eastern and southern shores of Lake Huron and Georgian Bay from Parry Sound to London. During the winter season, north-westerly winds cause frequent road closures, with Highway 21 on the Lake Huron coast and Highway 26 south of Georgian Bay as far east as Barrie, Ontario being strongly affected. The Niagara Peninsula and the north-eastern shores of Lake Ontario are especially hard-hit by heavy snowfall when south-western winds are predominant.

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Lake Managua

Lake Managua

Lake Managua is a lake in Nicaragua. The Spanish name is Lago de Managua or Lago Xolotlán. At 1,042 km², it is approximately 65 kilometres long and 25 kilometres wide. Similarly to the name of Lake Nicaragua, its name was coined by the Spanish conquerors from "Mangue" and agua. The city of Managua, the capital of Nicaragua, lies on its southwestern shore. The lake has been severely polluted, mostly by decades of sewage being dumped into the lake. Despite the pollution, some of the people of Managua still live along the lake's shores and eat the fish. It rose 3 metres in five days during Hurricane Mitch in 1998, destroying the homes of many who lived on its edge. It is also joined by the Tipitapa River to another lake, Lake Nicaragua; however, owing to the extreme pollution, the Bull sharks of Lake Nicaragua cannot migrate to Lake Managua. In 2007 the "malecón" area was dredged and the sediment hauled off on barges. A strong odor which permeated the area from the sediment disappeared. A stone rip-rap and concrete wharf was constructed and a sight seeing boat called "La Novia de Xolotlán" makes hour-long lake tours when there are sufficient tourists.

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Lake Sakakawea

Lake Sakakawea

Lake Sakakawea is a reservoir in the Missouri River basin in central North Dakota. Named for the Shoshone-Hidatsa woman Sakakawea, it is the largest man-made lake in North Dakota and the third largest in the United States, after Lake Mead and Lake Powell. The lake lies in parts of six counties in western North Dakota: Dunn, McKenzie, McLean, Mercer, Mountrail, and Williams. A map centered around the Van Hook Arm 47°53′00″N 102°21′14″W / 47.88333°N 102.35389°W of the lake perhaps better shows its westward extent from its origin at the Garrison Dam. It is located about 80 km from Bismarck, North Dakota; the distance by the river is about 120 km. The lake averages between 2 and 3 miles in width and is 14 miles wide at its widest point. Lake Sakakawea marks the maximum southwest extent of glaciation during the ice age. The reservoir was created with the completion of Garrison Dam in 1956, the second of six main-stem dams on the Missouri River built and managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for flood control, hydroelectric power, navigation and irrigation. The creation of the lake displaced members of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation from the villages of Van Hook and Sanish, forcing the creation of New Town and Mandaree. Incidentally, one name that had been proposed for New Town was Vanish. A third reservation town, Elbowoods, where the agency headquarters, boarding school, hospital and jail were located, was also lost to the lake. These three towns are commemorated in the names of the three campground sections at Lake Sakakawea State Park, a state park located adjacent to Garrison Dam.

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Lake Simcoe

Lake Simcoe

Lake Simcoe is a lake in Southern Ontario, Canada, the fourth-largest lake wholly in the province, after Lake Nipigon, Lac Seul, and Lake Nipissing. At the time of the first European contact in the 17th century the lake was called Ouentironk by the Huron natives. It was also known as Lake Toronto until it was renamed by John Graves Simcoe, the first Lieutenant-Governor of Upper Canada, in memory of his father. The lake is bordered by Simcoe County, Durham Region, and York Region. The city of Barrie is located on Kempenfelt Bay, and Orillia is located at the entrance to Lake Couchiching. The watershed draining into the lake contains a population of roughly half a million people, including the northern portion of the Greater Toronto Area. The town of Georgina lies along the entire south shore of Lake Simcoe and consists smaller residential towns and communities, including Keswick on Cook's Bay, Sutton, Jackson's Point, Pefferlaw, and Udora. The town of Innisfil occupies the western shore south of Barrie and north of Bradford.

— Freebase

Lake Washington

Lake Washington

Lake Washington is a large freshwater lake adjacent to the city of Seattle. It is the largest lake in King County and the second largest natural lake in the state of Washington, after Lake Chelan. It is bordered by the cities of Seattle on the west, Bellevue and Kirkland on the east, Renton on the south and Kenmore on the north, and surrounds Mercer Island. The lake is fed by the Sammamish River at its north end and the Cedar River at its south. Lake Washington received its present name in 1854 after Thomas Mercer suggested it be named after George Washington, as the new Washington Territory had been named the year before. Prior names for Lake Washington have included the Duwamish name Xacuabš, as well as Lake Geneva, Lake Duwamish, and the Chinook jargon name, "Hyas Chuck," meaning, "Big Lake."

— Freebase

Kern River

Kern River

The Kern River is a river in the U.S. state of California, approximately 165 miles long. It drains an area of the southern Sierra Nevada mountains northeast of Bakersfield. Fed by snowmelt near Mount Whitney, the river passes through scenic canyons in the mountains and is a popular destination for whitewater rafting and kayaking. It is the only major river in the Sierra Nevada mountain range that drains in a southerly direction. The Kern River formerly emptied into now dry Buena Vista Lake and Kern Lake via the Kern River Slough and Kern Lake in turn emptied into Buena Vista Lake via the Connecting Slough at the southern end of the Central Valley. Buena Vista Lake when overflowing, first backed up into Kern Lake and then upon rising higher drained into Tulare Lake via Buena Vista Slough and a changing series of sloughs of the Kern River. The lakes were part of a partially endorheic basin that sometimes overflowed into the San Joaquin River. This basin also included the Kaweah and Tule Rivers as well as southern distributaries of the Kings that all flowed into Tulare Lake. Since the late 19th century the Kern has been almost entirely diverted for irrigation, recharging aquifers and the California Aqueduct, although some water empties into Lake Webb and Lake Evans, two small lakes in a portion of the former Buena Vista Lakebed. The lakes were created in 1973 for recreational use. The lakes hold 6,800 acre·ft combined. Crops are grown in the rest of the former lakebed. In extremely wet years the river will reach the Tulare Lake basin through a series of sloughs and flood channels.

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Seneca Lake

Seneca Lake

Seneca Lake is the largest of the glacial Finger Lakes of the U.S. state of New York, and the deepest lake entirely within the state. It is promoted as being the lake trout capital of the world, and is host of the National Lake Trout Derby. Because of its depth and relative ease of access, the US Navy uses Seneca Lake to perform test and evaluation of equipment ranging from single element transducers to complex sonar arrays and systems. The lake takes its name from the Seneca nation of Native Americans. At the north end of Seneca Lake is the city of Geneva, New York, home of Hobart and William Smith Colleges and the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, a division of Cornell University. At the south end of the lake is the village of Watkins Glen, New York, famed for auto racing and waterfalls. Due to Seneca Lake's unique macroclimate it is home to over 50 wineries, many of them farm wineries and is the location of the Seneca Lake AVA..

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Pyramid Lake

Pyramid Lake

Pyramid Lake is the geographic sink of the Truckee River Basin and is located 40 mi northeast of Reno. The inflow is moderately high silt-loaded surface runoff. Pyramid Lake is fed by the Truckee River, which is mostly the outflow from Lake Tahoe. The Truckee River enters Pyramid Lake at its southern end. Pyramid Lake has no outlet, with water leaving only by evaporation, or sub-surface seepage. The lake has about 10% of the area of the Great Salt Lake, but it has about 25% more volume. The salinity is approximately 1/6 that of sea water. Although clear Lake Tahoe forms the headwaters that drain to Pyramid Lake, the Truckee River delivers more turbid waters to Pyramid Lake after traversing the steep Sierra terrain and collecting moderately high silt-loaded surface runoff.

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Windermere Lake

Windermere Lake

Lake Windermere is a very large widening in the Columbia River. The village of Windermere is located on the east side of the lake, and the larger town of Invermere is located on the lake's northwestern corner. The average depth of the lake is only 15 feet. Lake Windermere is a very popular vacationing spot, especially for residents of Calgary, which is a 3-hour car drive to the east. The western side of the lake which fronts the Purcell Mountains has a railroad running along its shore, and as a result, housing and recreational development is minimal there. The eastern side of the lake has a more extensive flatland between the lake and the Rocky Mountains and has experienced considerable development including cottages, camping grounds, recreational beaches, golf courses and various tourist attractions. Windermere Lake was once known as Lower Columbia Lake, and will be seen as such on older maps of the area.

— Freebase

Lake Lucerne

Lake Lucerne

Lake Lucerne is a lake in central Switzerland and the fourth largest in the country. The lake has a complicated shape, with bends and arms reaching from the city of Lucerne into the mountains. It has a total area of 114 km², an elevation of 434 m, and a maximum depth of 214 m. Its volume is 11.8 km³. Much of the shoreline rises steeply into mountains up to 1,500 m above the lake, resulting in many picturesque views including those of Mount Rigi and Mount Pilatus. The Reuss River enters the lake at Flüelen and exits at Lucerne. The lake also receives the Muota Engelberger Aa, the Sarner Aa. It is possible to circumnavigate the lake by road, though the route is slow, twisted, and goes through tunnels part of the way. Steamers and other passenger boats ply between the different towns on the lake. It is a popular tourist destination, both for native Swiss and foreigners, and there are many hotels and resorts along the shores. In addition, the meadow of the Rütli, traditional site of the founding of the Swiss Confederation, is on the southeast shore of the lake. A 35 km commemorative walkway, the Swiss Path, was built around the lake to celebrate the country's 700th anniversary.

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Lake Neuchâtel

Lake Neuchâtel

Lake Neuchâtel is a lake primarily in Romandy, Switzerland. The lake lies mainly in the canton of Neuchâtel, but is also shared by the cantons of Vaud, of Fribourg, and of Bern. With a surface of 218.3 km², it is the largest lake entirely in Switzerland and the 59th largest lake in Europe. Lake Neuchâtel lies approximately at coordinates 46°54′N 6°51′E / 46.900°N 6.850°E. It is 38.3 km long and no more than 8.2 km wide. Its surface is 429 m above sea-level, with a maximum depth of 152 m. The total water volume is 14.0 km³ and its drainage area is approximately 2,670 km². The lake receives the Orbe River, the Arnon, the Areuse, Seyon, the canal de la Sauge, and the Mentue. The canal of Thielle drains the lake into Lake Biel-Bienne and is part of regulation system for the lakes and the rivers of the Seeland region. Lake Neuchâtel was the home of the now extinct species of deepwater trout Salvelinus neocomensis.

— Freebase

Lake Nicaragua

Lake Nicaragua

Lake Nicaragua or Cocibolca or Granada is a vast freshwater lake in Nicaragua of tectonic origin. With an area of 8,264 km², it is the largest lake in Central America, the 19th largest lake in the world and the 9th largest in the Americas. It is slightly smaller than Lake Titicaca. With an elevation of 32.7 metres above sea level, the lake reaches a depth of 26 metres. It is intermittently joined by the Tipitapa River to Lake Managua. The lake drains to the Caribbean Sea via the San Juan River, historically making the lakeside city of Granada, Nicaragua, an Atlantic port although it is closer to the Pacific. The lake has a history of Caribbean pirates who assaulted nearby Granada on three occasions. Despite draining into the Caribbean Sea, the Pacific Ocean is near enough to be seen from the mountains of Ometepe. Before construction of the Panama Canal, a stagecoach line owned by Cornelius Vanderbilt's Accessory Transit Company connected the lake with the Pacific across the low hills of the narrow Isthmus of Rivas. Plans were made to take advantage of this route to build an interoceanic canal, the Nicaragua Canal, but the Panama Canal was built instead. In order to quell competition with the Panama Canal, the U.S. secured all rights to a canal along this route in the Bryan-Chamorro Treaty of 1916. However, since this treaty was mutually rescinded by the United States and Nicaragua in 1970, the idea of another canal in Nicaragua still periodically resurfaces. Ecocanal is one of these projects.

— Freebase

Lake Rukwa

Lake Rukwa

Lake Rukwa is an endorheic lake in the Rukwa Valley of southwestern Tanzania. The alkaline Lake Rukwa lies midway between Lake Tanganyika and Lake Nyasa at an elevation of about 800 metres, in a parallel branch of the rift system. Almost half of the lake lies in Uwanda Game Reserve. The lake has seen large fluctuations in its size over the years, due to varying inflow of streams. Currently it is about 180 kilometres long and averages about 32 kilometres wide, making it about 5,760 square kilometres in size. In 1929 it was only about 48 kilometres long, but in 1939 it was about 128 kilometres long and 40 kilometres wide. The lake may at times have been even higher and linked Lake Tanganyika with Lake Malawi; ancient shorelines suggest a final date of overflow into Tanganyika of 33,000BP.

— Freebase

Lake Baikal

Lake Baikal

Lake Baikal is a rift lake in the south of the Russian region of Siberia, between the Irkutsk Oblast to the northwest and the Buryat Republic to the southeast. Lake Baikal is the most voluminous freshwater lake in the world, containing roughly 20% of the world's unfrozen surface fresh water, and at 1,642 m, the deepest. It is also among the clearest of all lakes, and thought to be the world's oldest lake at 25 million years. Similar to Lake Tanganyika, Lake Baikal was formed as an ancient rift valley, having the typical long crescent shape with a surface area of 31,722 km². Baikal is home to more than 1,700 species of plants and animals, two thirds of which can be found nowhere else in the world and was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1996. It is also home to Buryat tribes who reside on the eastern side of Lake Baikal, rearing goats, camels, cattle and sheep, where the regional average temperatures vary from a minimum of −19 °C in winter to maximum of 14 °C in summer. Lake Baikal is nicknamed "Older sister of Sister Lakes".

— Freebase

Lake Ilmen

Lake Ilmen

Lake Ilmen is a historically important lake in the Novgorod Oblast of Russia, formerly a vital part of the Trade route from the Varangians to the Greeks. The city of Novgorod lies six kilometers below the lake's outflow. According to the Max Vasmer's Etymological Dictionary, the name of the lake originates from the Finnish "Ilmajärvi", which means "small lake". There are many lakes in Russia with their names being derivative from Lake Ilmen. The average surface area is 982 square kilometres. The lake is fed by 52 inflowing rivers, the four main ones being the Msta, the Pola, the Lovat, and the Shelon. It is drained through a single outlet, the Volkhov, into Lake Ladoga, and subsequently via the Neva into the Gulf of Finland. The source of the Volkhov is marked by the Peryn Chapel built in the 1220s. The basin of Lake Ilmen contains vast areas in Novgorod, Pskov, and Tver Oblasts of Russia, as well as minor areas in the north of Vitebsk Region in Belarus. The water level is regulated by the Volkhov hydroelectric plant situated downstream the Volkhov River. Water temperature in July is 19-20°C. Bathing season is about 90 days.

— Freebase

Lake Okeechobee

Lake Okeechobee

Lake Okeechobee, locally referred to as The Lake or The Big O, is the largest freshwater lake in the state of Florida. It is the seventh largest freshwater lake in the United States and the second largest freshwater lake contained entirely within the lower 48 states. However, it is the largest freshwater lake completely within a single one of the lower 48 states. Okeechobee covers 1,900 square kilometres, approximately half the size of the state of Rhode Island, and is exceptionally shallow for a lake of its size, with an average depth of only 3 metres. The lake is divided between Glades, Okeechobee, Martin, Palm Beach, and Hendry counties. All five counties meet at one point near the center of the lake.

— Freebase

Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City

Salt Lake City, often shortened to Salt Lake or SLC, is the capital and the most populous city of the U.S. state of Utah. With an estimated population of 189,314 in 2012, the city lies in the core of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area, which has a total population of 1,175,905. Salt Lake City is further situated in a larger urban area known as the Wasatch Front, which has a population of 2,328,299. It is one of only two major urban areas in the Great Basin, and the largest in the Intermountain West. The city was founded in 1847 by Brigham Young, Isaac Morley, George Washington Bradley and several other Mormon followers, who extensively irrigated and cultivated the arid valley. Due to its proximity to the Great Salt Lake, the city was originally named "Great Salt Lake City"—the word "great" was dropped from the official name in 1868. Although Salt Lake City is still home to the headquarters of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, less than half the population of Salt Lake City proper are members of the LDS Church today. Immigration of international LDS members, mining booms, and the construction of the first transcontinental railroad initially brought economic growth, and the city was nicknamed the Crossroads of the West. It was traversed by the Lincoln Highway, the first transcontinental highway, in 1913, and presently two major cross-country freeways, I-15 and I-80, intersect in the city. Salt Lake City has since developed a strong outdoor recreation tourist industry based primarily on skiing, and hosted the 2002 Winter Olympics. It is the industrial banking center of the United States.

— Freebase

Ullswater

Ullswater

Ullswater is the second largest lake in the English Lake District, being approximately nine miles long and 0.75 miles wide with a maximum depth of slightly more than 60 metres. Many regard Ullswater as the most beautiful of the English lakes: it has been compared to Lake Lucerne in Switzerland. It is a typical Lake District narrow "ribbon lake" formed after the last ice age when a glacier scooped out the valley floor and when the glacier retreated, the deepened section filled with meltwater which became a lake. A total of three separate glaciers formed the lake. The surrounding mountains give Ullswater the shape of a stretched 'Z' with three distinct segments that wend their way through the surrounding hills. For much of its length Ullswater forms the border between the ancient counties of Cumberland and Westmorland. The village of Glenridding, situated at the southern end of the lake, is popular with tourists of all kinds but especially with mountain walkers, who can scale England's third highest mountain, Helvellyn, and many other challenging peaks from there. The village has ample accommodation including two Youth Hostels and camp sites. The village of Pooley Bridge is at the northern extremity of the lake. Its narrow 16th-century bridge straddles the River Eamont as it flows out of Ullswater; it is overlooked by Dunmallard Hill, which was the site of an Iron Age fort.

— Freebase

Lake Eyre

Lake Eyre

Lake Eyre, officially known as Kati Thanda–Lake Eyre, is the lowest point in Australia, at approximately 15 m below sea level, and, on the rare occasions that it fills, the largest lake in Australia and 18th largest in the world. The temporary, shallow lake is the depocenter of the vast Lake Eyre Basin and is found in South Australia, some 700 km north of Adelaide. The lake was named in honour of Edward John Eyre, who was the first European to see it, in 1840. The lake's official name was changed in December 2012 to combine the name "Lake Eyre" with the indigenous name, Kati Thanda. Native title over the lake and surrounding region is held by the Arabana people.

— Freebase

Soda Lake

Soda Lake

Soda Lake is a dry lake at the terminus of the Mojave River in the Mojave Desert of San Bernardino County, California. The lake has standing water during wet periods, and water can be found beneath the surface. Soda Lake along with Silver Lake are what remains of the large, perennial, Holocene Lake Mojave. The waters of the lake, now with no outlet, evaporate and has left alkaline evaporites of sodium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate. Soda Lake is located on the southern side of Interstate 15, and can be seen at the Zzyzx Road interchange and the Oat Ditch bridge, as well as the Soda Lake bridge looking south from Baker.

— Freebase

Lake Como

Lake Como

Lake Como is a lake of glacial origin in Lombardy, Italy. It has an area of 146 km², making it the third largest lake in Italy, after Lake Garda and Lake Maggiore. At over 400 m deep, it is one of the deepest lakes in Europe, and the bottom of the lake is more than 200 metres below sea-level. Lake Como has been a popular retreat for aristocrats and wealthy people since Roman times, and a very popular tourist attraction with many artistic and cultural gems. It has many villas and palaces. Many famous people have or have had homes on the shores of Lake Como, such as Matthew Bellamy, Madonna, George Clooney, Gianni Versace, Ronaldinho, Sylvester Stallone, Richard Branson, Ben Spies, and Pierina Legnani. Lake Como is widely regarded as one of the most beautiful lakes in Europe.

— Freebase

Lake Inari

Lake Inari

Lake Inari is the third largest lake in Finland and the largest lake in Sápmi. It is located in the northern part of Lapland, north of the Arctic Circle. The lake is 117–119 meters above sea level and it is regulated at the Kaitakoski power plant in Russia. The freezing period normally extends from November to early June. The most well known islands of the lake are Hautuumaasaari, which served as cemetery of ancient Sami people and Ukonkivi, a historical sacrifice place of the ancient inhabitants of the area. There are over 3,000 islands in total. Trout, lake salmon, white fish, perch and pike are found in Lake Inari's waters. The lake covers 1,040 square kilometres. It empties northwards through the Paatsjoki at the mouth of the Varangerfjord, which is a bay of Barents Sea. Philip Pullman, author of the His Dark Materials book series, chose this lake to be the home of the witch Serafina Pekkala.

— Freebase

Lake Mendota

Lake Mendota

Lake Mendota is the northernmost and largest of the four lakes near Madison, Wisconsin. The lake borders Madison on the north, east and south, Middleton on the west, Shorewood Hills on the southwest, Maple Bluff on the northeast, and Westport on the northwest. The shorelines of Lakes Mendota and Monona define the isthmus upon which Madison was built, with the lakes connected by the Yahara River. The Wisconsin State Capitol building and much of the state government is located in this narrow stretch of land. The University of Wisconsin–Madison campus is situated along the southern shore of Lake Mendota. In the early 20th century, Chancey Juday and Edward A. Birge founded an influential school of limnology there as a component of the university. The university's Hoofer Sailing Club operates at Memorial Union. Much of the shore of Lake Mendota is lined with expensive luxury homes and condominiums. The banks of Lake Mendota also contain government protected natural areas and parks, including James Madison Park, as well as university housing, the UW Student Union and a handful of hotels and restaurants. Summers bring boaters out in force, especially on the weekends, though Lake Mendota is rarely crowded. There are several boat launching sites and two major marinas serving the lake. On a typical summer day, the lake is filled with those engaging in water sports, including fishing, water-skiing, wakeboarding, tubing, canoeing, wind-surfing, kayaking, and sailing. With an average freeze date of December 20, Lake Mendota is still used in the winter by sports enthusiasts for ice-boating, ice-skating, ice fishing, cross country skiing, ice hockey and snowkiting.

— Freebase

Lake Nyos

Lake Nyos

Lake Nyos is a crater lake in the Northwest Region of Cameroon, located about 315 km northwest of Yaoundé. Nyos is a deep lake high on the flank of an inactive volcano in the Oku volcanic plain along the Cameroon line of volcanic activity. A volcanic dam impounds the lake waters. A pocket of magma lies beneath the lake and leaks carbon dioxide into the water, changing it into carbonic acid. Nyos is one of only three known exploding lakes to be saturated with carbon dioxide in this way, the others being Lake Monoun, also in Cameroon, and Lake Kivu in Democratic Republic of Congo. On August 21, 1986, possibly as the result of a landslide, Lake Nyos suddenly emitted a large cloud of CO2, which suffocated 1,700 people and 3,500 livestock in nearby towns and villages. Though not completely unprecedented, it was the first known large-scale asphyxiation caused by a natural event. To prevent a recurrence, a degassing tube that siphons water from the bottom layers of water to the top allowing the carbon dioxide to leak in safe quantities was installed in 2001, and two additional tubes were installed in 2011. Today, the lake also poses a threat because its natural wall is weakening. A geological tremor could cause this natural dike to give way, allowing water to rush into downstream villages all the way into Nigeria and allowing much carbon dioxide to escape.

— Freebase

Lake Superior

Lake Superior

A lake in North America; the largest of the Great Lakes and second largest lake in the world by area. It is located higher than Lake Huron, hence the name.

— Wiktionary

Lake

Lake

a pigment formed by combining some coloring matter, usually by precipitation, with a metallic oxide or earth, esp. with aluminium hydrate; as, madder lake; Florentine lake; yellow lake, etc

— Webster Dictionary

Namaycush

Namaycush

a large North American lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush). It is usually spotted with red, and sometimes weighs over forty pounds. Called also Mackinaw trout, lake trout, lake salmon, salmon trout, togue, and tuladi

— Webster Dictionary

jugal

jugal

A bone found in the skull of most reptiles, amphibians and birds; the equivalent of a malar in mammals.

— Wiktionary

Albert Lea

Albert Lea

Albert Lea is a city in and the county seat of Freeborn County in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of Minnesota. The population was 18,016 at the 2010 census. The city is at the junction of Interstates 35 and 90, about 90 miles south of the Twin Cities. It is on the shores of Fountain Lake, Pickerel Lake, Albert Lea Lake, Goose Lake, School Lake, and Lake Chapeau. Fountain Lake and Albert Lea Lake are part of the Shell Rock River flowage. The city's early growth was based upon agriculture, farming support services and manufacturing and was a significant rail center. At one time it was the site of Cargill's headquarters. Other manufacturing included Edwards Manufacturing, Scotsman Ice Machines, Streater Store fixtures, and Universal Milking Machines. Like many U.S. towns much of the manufacturing base has diminished. A long-time center of the city's job opportunity was the Wilson & Company meat packing plant, later known as Farmstead and Farmland. This facility was destroyed by fire in July 2001. The largest employer is currently Mayo Clinic Health System with over 1,500 employees.

— Freebase

Lake Onega

Lake Onega

Lake Onega is a lake in the north-west European part of Russia, located on the territory of Republic of Karelia, Leningrad Oblast and Vologda Oblast. It belongs to the basin of Baltic Sea, Atlantic Ocean, and is the second largest lake in Europe after Lake Ladoga. The lake is fed by about 50 rivers and is drained by the Svir River. There are about 1650 islands on the lake. They include Kizhi, which hosts a historical complex of 89 orthodox wooden churches and other wooden constructions of 15th–20th centuries. The complex includes a UNESCO World Heritage site Kizhi Pogost. Eastern shores of the lake contain about 1200 petroglyphs dated to 4th–2nd millennia BC. The major cities on the lake are Petrozavodsk, Kondopoga and Medvezhyegorsk.

— Freebase

Lake Charles

Lake Charles

Lake Charles is the fifth-largest incorporated city in the U.S. state of Louisiana, located on Lake Charles, Prien Lake, and the Calcasieu River. Founded in 1861 in Calcasieu Parish, it is a major cultural, industrial, and educational center in the southwest region of the state, and one of the most important in Acadiana. As of the 2010 census, the population was 71,993. Lake Charles is the principal city of the Lake Charles Metropolitan Statistical Area, having a population of 194,138. It is the larger principal city of the Lake Charles-Jennings Combined Statistical Area, with a population of 225,235. A 2010 population estimate of the five parish area was over 292,619. It is considered a major center of petrochemical refining, tourism, gaming, and education, being home to McNeese State University and Sowela Technical Community College. Because of the lakes and waterways throughout the city, metropolitan Lake Charles is often referred to as the Lake Area.

— Freebase

Hypersaline lake

Hypersaline lake

A hypersaline lake is a landlocked body of water that contains significant concentrations of sodium chloride or other mineral salts, with saline levels surpassing that of ocean water. Specific microbial and crustacean species thrive in these high salinity environments that are otherwise inhospitable to most lifeforms. Some of these species attain dormancy when they are desiccated and organisms of certain species have been shown to survive for over 250 million years. The most saline lake in the world is the Don Juan Pond, located in the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica. The Don Juan Pond has a salinity level of over 44%. Its high salinity prevents the Don Juan from freezing even when temperatures are below −50 °C. There are other hypersaline lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, but most of them are covered year round with ice, which contributed to the relatively late discovery of their existence. The most saline lake outside of Antarctica is Lake Assal, in Djibouti, which has a salinity level of 34.8%. But probably the best known examples of hypersaline lakes are the Dead Sea and the Great Salt Lake. The Dead Sea, dividing Israel and the West Bank from Jordan, is the world's deepest hypersaline lake. The Great Salt Lake, located in Utah, while having nearly three times the surface area of the Dead Sea, is shallower and experiences much greater fluctuations in level than the Dead Sea. Because of this, the Great Salt Lake's degree of salinity also fluctuates greatly. At its lowest recorded levels, it approaches 7.7 times the salinity of ocean water, but when its levels are high, its salinity drops to only slightly higher than the ocean.

— Freebase

Lake stratification

Lake stratification

Lake stratification is the separation of lakes into three layers: ⁕Epilimnion - top of the lake. ⁕Metalimnion - middle layer that may change depth throughout the day. ⁕Hypolimnion - the bottom layer. The thermal stratification of lakes refers to a change in the temperature at different depths in the lake, and is due to the change in water's density with temperature. Cold water is denser than warm water and the epilimnion generally consists of water that is not as dense as the water in the hypolimnion. However, the temperature of maximum density for freshwater is 4 °C. In temperate regions where lake water warms up and cools through the seasons, a cyclical pattern of overturn occurs that is repeated from year to year as the cold dense water at the top of the lake sinks. For example, in dimictic lakes the lake water turns over during the spring and the fall. This process occurs more slowly in deeper water and as a result, a thermal bar may form. If the stratification of water lasts for extended periods, the lake is meromictic. Conversely, for most of the time, the relatively shallower meres are unstratified; that is, the mere is considered all epilimnion. The accumulation of dissolved carbon dioxide in three meromictic lakes in Africa is potentially dangerous because if one of these lakes is triggered into limnic eruption, a very large quantity of carbon dioxide can quickly leave the lake and displace the oxygen needed for life by people and animals in the surrounding area.

— Freebase

Sevan trout

Sevan trout

The Sevan trout is an endemic fish species of Lake Sevan in Armenia. It is a salmonid fish related to the brown trout. The fish is endangered, because various competitors were introduced into the lake during the Soviet period, including common whitefish from Lake Ladoga, goldfish and narrow-clawed crayfish; and because of lake level change. On the other hand, the Sevan trout itself has been successfully introduced to the Issyk Kul lake in Kyrgyzstan. A resolution by Armenia's Council of Ministers in 1976 stopped the commercial fishing of Sevan trout and organized National Park "Sevan". The fish are nowadays also reared in hatcheries. The Sevan trout has four distinct strains differing in their breeding time and place, and growth rate: ⁕winter bakhtak ⁕summer bakhtak ⁕gegharkuni ⁕bojak. The winter bakhtak is the largest form and can grow to considerable size, up to 90 cm and 15 kg. It breeds within the lake. The summer bakhtak is smaller, and breeds naturally both in rivers and within lake near river mouths. Gegharkuni is a migratory form that naturally breeds exclusively in rivers; it also feeds on plankton in addition to benthos. Bojak in turn is a dwarfed form that breeds within the lake in the winter, and does not exceed 33 cm and 0.25 kg.

— Freebase

Maranao people

Maranao people

Maranao, also spelled as Meranao, Meranaw and Maranaw, is the term used officially by the Philippine government in reference to the southern tribe who are now the people of the lake called Ranao in the Iranaon language, a predominantly Muslim region in the Philippines island of Mindanao. They are famous for their artwork, sophisticated weaving, wood and metal crafts, and their epic literature. The word Maranao, also spelled Maranaw is a misnomer as it does not have a sense in reference to nouns such as people, place or thing. The prefix MA- means 'to be', i.e., Maranao means to be lake. The real term is IRANAON which when pronounced fluently is IRANON meaning "People of the Lake," referring to the indigenous people who inhabited the lands around Lake Lanao whose principal town is Marawi City. The Maranaos are part of the wider Moro ethnic group, who constitute the sixth largest Filipino ethnic group. The life of the Maranaos is centered on Lake Lanao, the largest in Mindanao, and the second largest and deepest lake in the Philippines. This breathtakingly beautiful lake is surrounded with myths and legends, it is the main source of fisheries, and the main source of a hydroelectric plant installed on it; and the Agus River system that generates 70% of the electricity used by the people of Mindanao. A commanding view of the lake is offered by Marawi City, the provincial capital.

— Freebase

Lake Güija

Lake Güija

Lake Güija is a lake in Central America. The lake is situated on the border between Guatemala and El Salvador and has an area of 45 km², of which approximately 32 km² lies in El Salvador. The lake is of volcanic origin and was formed by a large basaltic lava flow from the San Diego volcano which blocked the Güija depression's original drainage. Lake Güija is fed by the Ostúa, Angue and Cusmapa rivers and is drained on its southeastern side by the río Desagüe, a tributary of the río Lempa. The lake is surrounded by the volcanic cones of the Mita, San Diego and Cerro Quemado. The Salvadoran side of the lake has several small isles: Teotipa, Cerro de Tule and Iguatepec, where a substantial number of pre-Columbian céramics have been discovered since excavations started in 1924. Bosque San Diego La Barra lies on the eastern side of the lake.

— Freebase

Lake Petén Itzá

Lake Petén Itzá

Lake Petén Itzá is a lake in the northern Petén Department in Guatemala. It is the second largest lake in Guatemala, after the Izabal Lake. It is located around 16°59′0″N 89°48′0″W / 16.98333°N 89.80000°W. It has an area of 99 km² some 32 km. long and 5 km wide. Its maximum depth is 160 m. The lake area presents high levels of migration, due to the existence of natural resources such as wood, chewing gum, oil, and agricultural and pasture activities. Because of its archaeological richness, around 150,000 tourists pass through this region yearly. The city of Flores, the capital of El Petén, lies on an island near its southern shore. There are at least 27 Maya sites around this lake and the arhcaoelogical remains of Tayasal, located across the lake on a peninsula close to the former Itza Maya capital, the last to be conquered in Mesoamerica in 1697. This lake is also a wildlife paradise, with more than 100 important indigenous species such as the red snook fish, crocodiles, jaguars, Pumas, White-tailed deer, red brocket, and several bird species, including parrots, toucans, and macaws. On its northeast shore is the Cerro Cahui Protected Biotope, a natural reserve for butterflies is a 1,600-acre reserve is home to toucans, spider monkeys, howler monkeys, and many other rain forest species.

— Freebase

Lake Winnebago

Lake Winnebago

Lake Winnebago is a 137,700-acre freshwater lake in eastern Wisconsin, United States. It is the largest lake entirely within the state and one of the largest inland lakes in the United States. Lake Winnebago is about 30 by 10 miles, with 88 miles of shoreline, an average depth of 15.5 feet and a maximum depth of 21 feet. The lake has many shallow reefs along the west shore, and a drop-off type shoreline on the east. There are several islands along the west shore. Lake Winnebago has two primary tributaries, the Wolf River and the Fox River. It is drained by the Fox River which flows north towards Green Bay and serves as part of the Fox-Wisconsin Waterway. Lake Winnebago is part of a larger system of lakes in Wisconsin known as the Winnebago Pool. Cities on its shores include Oshkosh, Fond du Lac, Neenah and Menasha. Municipal drinking water systems serving over 250,000 people draw directly from the lake, including systems serving the cities of Oshkosh, Neenah, Menasha and Appleton.

— Freebase

Devils Lake

Devils Lake

Devils Lake is a city in Ramsey County, North Dakota, in the United States. It is the county seat of Ramsey County. The population was 7,141 at the 2010 census. It is named after the nearby body of water, Devils Lake. The first house in Devils Lake was built in 1882. It was surveyed in 1883 and named Creelsburg and later Creel City, after the surveyor, Heber M. Creel. In 1884 it was renamed Devils Lake. The local paper is the Devils Lake Journal. Devils Lake Municipal Airport serves the city. Devils Lake is home to Lake Region State College and the North Dakota School for the Deaf.

— Freebase

Cramer

Cramer

Cramer is an unincorporated community in Lake County, Minnesota, United States. The community is located 23 miles northeast of Silver Bay at the intersection of Lake County Road 7 and Lake County Road 8. Cramer is located 11 miles west of Schroeder. Cramer Lake, Kowalski Lake, and George H. Crosby Manitou State Park are in the vicinity. Cramer is 12 miles northeast of the community of Finland on Lake County Road 7. Cramer is located within Lake No. 1 Unorganized Territory of Lake County.

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lake saint clair

Lake St. Clair, Lake Saint Clair

a lake between Ontario and Michigan; connected with Lake Huron and Lake Erie

— Princeton's WordNet

lake st. clair

Lake St. Clair, Lake Saint Clair

a lake between Ontario and Michigan; connected with Lake Huron and Lake Erie

— Princeton's WordNet

Lake sturgeon

Lake sturgeon

The lake sturgeon is a North American temperate freshwater fish, one of about 25 species of sturgeon. Like other sturgeons, this species is an evolutionarily ancient bottomfeeder with a partly cartilaginous skeleton, a overall streamlined shape and skin bearing rows of bony plates on its sides and back, resembling an armored torpedo. The fish uses its elongated, spadelike snout to stir up the substrate and sediments on the beds of rivers and lakes while feeding. The lake sturgeon has four purely sensory organs that dangle near its mouth. These organs, called barbels, help the sturgeon to locate bottom-dwelling prey.Lake sturgeons can grow to a relatively large size, topping six feet long and weighing nearly 200 pounds. Lake sturgeon are also extremely long-lived fish, males may live some 55 years, and female lake sturgeon can reach 150 years. The lake sturgeon doesn't reach sexual maturity until its third decade of life. This species occurs in the Mississippi River drainage basin south to Alabama and Mississippi. It occurs in the Great Lakes and east down the St. Lawrence River to the limits of fresh water. In the west it reaches Lake Winnipeg and the North and South Saskatchewan Rivers. In the north it is found in the Hudson Bay Lowland. This distribution makes sense in that all these areas were linked by the large lakes that formed as the glaciers retreated from North America at the end of the last ice age.

— Freebase

Lake Michigan

Lake Michigan

Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America and the only one located entirely within the United States. The other four Great Lakes are shared by the U.S. and Canada. It is the second largest of the Great Lakes by volume and the third largest by surface area, after Lake Superior and Lake Huron. To the east, its basin is conjoined with that of Lake Huron through the wide Straits of Mackinac, giving it the same surface elevation as its easterly counterpart; the two are technically a single lake. Lake Michigan is bounded, from west to east, by the U.S. states of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan. The word "Michigan" originally referred to the lake itself, and is believed to come from the Ojibwa word mishigami meaning "great water".

— Freebase

Bemidji

Bemidji

Bemidji is a city in Beltrami County, Minnesota, United States. Its population was 13,431 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat. Bemidji is the principal city in North Central Minnesota and the largest commercial center between Grand Forks, North Dakota and Duluth, Minnesota. Bemidji houses many Native American services, including the Indian Health Service. The city is the central hub of the Red Lake Indian Reservation, White Earth Indian Reservation and the Leech Lake Indian Reservation. Bemidji lies on the southwest shore of Lake Bemidji, the northernmost lake feeding the Mississippi River and, as such, is deemed "the first city on the Mississippi." Bemidji is also dubbed the "curling capital," of the U.S. Its name derives from the Ojibwe Bay-may-ji-ga-maug, meaning "lake that traverses another body of water". On occasion, in Ojibwe, the city of Bemidji is called Wabigamaang, because part of the city is situated on the Lakes Bemidji/Irving narrows, located on the south end of Lake Bemidji, and extends to the eastern shore of Lake Irving. Some people also credit the name to Chief Bemidji, an Ojibwe chief.

— Freebase

Yellowstone Lake

Yellowstone Lake

Yellowstone Lake is the largest body of water in Yellowstone National Park, The lake is 7,732 feet above sea level and covers 136 square miles with 110 miles of shoreline. While the average depth of the lake is 139 feet its deepest spot is at least 390 feet. Yellowstone Lake is the largest freshwater lake above 7,000 feet in North America. In winter, ice nearly 3 feet thick covers much of the lake, except where shallow water covers hot springs. The lake freezes over by early December and can remain frozen until late May or early June.

— Freebase

Valdai Hills

Valdai Hills

The Valdai Hills are an upland region in north-west of central Russia running north-south, about midway between Saint Petersburg and Moscow, spanning Leningrad, Novgorod, Tver, Pskov, and Smolensk Oblasts. The hills are a northward extension of the Central Russian Upland. The ridge is overlain by deposited glacial materials in the form of terminal moraines and other detritus. The Valdai Hills reach maximum height, near Vyshny Volochyok, of 346.9 m. The Volga, the Daugava, the Lovat, the Msta, the Dnieper, the Syas, and others rivers originate in the Valdai Hills. The region thus is divided between the drainage basins of the Caspian Sea, the Black Sea, and the Baltic Sea. It is a place of many lakes, among them Lake Volgo, Lake Peno, Lake Seliger, Lake Brosno, and Lake Valdayskoye. The Valdai Hills are a popular tourist destination, particularly for fishing. The towns of Ostashkov and Valday are also remarkable for their historical associations. Valdaysky National Park was established in 1990 in the southern part of Novgorod Oblast to protect the landscapes of the highest part of the hills. The park includes Lake Valdayskoye and the northern section of Lake Seliger, as well as the town of Valday. Since 2004, the National Park has the status of a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve.

— Freebase

Sea of Galilee

Sea of Galilee

The Sea of Galilee, also Kinneret, Lake of Gennesaret, or Lake Tiberias, is the largest freshwater lake in Israel, and it is approximately 53 km in circumference, about 21 km long, and 13 km wide. The lake has a total area of 166.7 km² at its fullest, and a maximum depth of approximately 43 m. At levels between 215 metres and 209 metres below sea level, it is the lowest freshwater lake on Earth and the second-lowest lake overall. The lake is fed partly by underground springs although its main source is the Jordan River which flows through it from north to south.

— Freebase

Baker Lake

Baker Lake

Baker Lake is a lake in Kivalliq Region, Nunavut, Canada. It is fed by the Thelon River from the west and the Kazan River from the south. Its outflows into Chesterfield Inlet. The lake is approximately 1,887 km² in size. It has several named bays, and a few islands. In 1762 William Christopher reached Baker Lake via Chesterfield Inlet. The Inuit hamlet of Baker Lake is situated at the west end of the lake near the mouth of the Thelon River. Although the Inuit had been in the area for some time, the first outside presence was the Royal Canadian Mounted Police post at the east end of the lake in 1915. This was followed in 1916 by the Hudson's Bay Company post set up at the Kazan River delta until 1930 when it moved to the present location.

— Freebase

Manipogo

Manipogo

Manipogo is the name given to the lake monster reported to live in Lake Manitoba, Manitoba, Canada. Sightings of this serpent-like sea monster have been going on since roughly 1908. The creature was dubbed Manipogo in 1957, the name echoing British Columbia's Ogopogo. There is also a Lake Winnipegosis sea monster called Winnepogo, thought possibly to be the same creature as the lakes are connected. Some have speculated that the monster sightings may be attributed to sightings of an unusually large lake sturgeon, or a relict population of prehistoric plesiosaurs. Although many experts believe the correct name is Winnipego, as confirmed by local residents. The monster is thought to be anywhere from 12 feet to 50 feet long. It is described as being "A long muddy-brown body with humps that show above the water, and a sheep-like head." There is a provincial park on the west shore of Lake Manitoba named Manipogo Provincial Park. St Laurent, a community on the south east shores of Lake Manitoba, holds a Manipogo festival the first week of March every year. Since the 1800s, people have claimed to have seen the sea monster Manipogo. The local native population has legends of serpent-like creatures in Lake Manitoba going back hundreds of years.

— Freebase

Lake Tanganyika

Lake Tanganyika

Lake Tanganyika is an African Great Lake. It is estimated to be the second largest freshwater lake in the world by volume, and the second deepest, in both cases, after only Lake Baikal in Siberia; it is also the world's longest freshwater lake. The lake is divided among four countries – Tanzania, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi, and Zambia, with Tanzania and the DRC possessing the majority of the lake. The water flows into the Congo River system and ultimately into the Atlantic Ocean.

— Freebase

Oneida Lake

Oneida Lake

Oneida Lake is the largest lake entirely within New York State. The lake is located northeast of Syracuse and near the Great Lakes. It feeds the Oneida River, a tributary of the Oswego River, which flows into Lake Ontario. From the earliest times until the opening of the Erie Canal in 1825, the lake was part of an important waterway connecting the Atlantic seaboard of North America to the continental interior. The lake is about 21 miles long and about 5 miles wide with an average depth of 22 feet. The shoreline is about 55 miles. Portions of six counties and sixty-nine communities are in the watershed. Oneida Creek, which flows past the cities of Oneida and Sherrill, empties into the southeast part of the lake at South Bay. While not included as one of the Finger Lakes, Oneida is sometimes referred to as their "thumb". Because it is shallow, it is warmer than the deeper Finger Lakes in summer, and freezes solidly in winter. It is relatively safe and popular for the winter sports of ice fishing and snowmobiling.

— Freebase

Lake Brienz

Lake Brienz

Lake Brienz is a lake just north of the Alps, in the Canton of Berne in Switzerland. It has a length of about 14 kilometres, a width of 2.8 kilometres and a maximum depth of 260 metres. Its area is 29.8 square kilometres, and the surface is 564 metres above the sea-level. It is fed by the upper reaches of the Aar river at its eastern end and by the Lütschine river, flowing from the valleys of Grindelwald and Lauterbrunnen, at its south-western corner. It flows out into a further stretch of the Aar river at its western end. The village of Brienz, from which the lake takes its name, lies to its eastern end. In the west the lake is terminated by the Bödeli, a tongue of land that separates it from neighbouring Lake Thun. The village of Bönigen occupies the lake frontage of the Bödeli, whilst the larger resort town of Interlaken lies on the reach of the Aar river between the two lakes. The village of Iseltwald lies on the south shore, whilst the villages of Ringgenberg, Niederried and Oberried are on the north shore. The lake is poor in nutritients, and consequently fishing is not very important. Nevertheless, in 2001 10,000 kg fish were caught.

— Freebase

Lake Chany

Lake Chany

Although Lake Chany is not well known outside of Russia, it is one of the largest lakes in Russia. Lake Chany is a shallow, freshwater lake that has a fluctuating water level, which can change from season to season and year to year. At the time that this picture was taken, the water level in the lake appears to be low, even to the point where the western end and the northeast corner of the lake seem to be separate lakes. A variety of ecosystems that surround the lake include a mixture of wetlands, salt marshes, and a mixture of birch and aspen forests. Lake Chany in particular is critically important for the migratory birds of Siberia.

— Freebase

Lake Forest

Lake Forest

Lake Forest is a city located in Lake County, Illinois, United States. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 19,375. The city is south of Waukegan along the shore of Lake Michigan, and is a part of the Chicago metropolitan area and the North Shore. Lake Forest was founded around Lake Forest College and was laid out as a town in 1857 as a stop for travelers making their way south to Chicago. The Lake Forest City Hall, designed by an architect named Frost, was completed in 1898 and originally housed the fire department, the Lake Forest Library, and city offices.

— Freebase

Lake Keitele

Lake Keitele

Keitele is a lake located in central Finland. With the area of 493.59 km² it is the 9th largest lake in the country. The lake is divided into three regions, Ylä-, Keski-, and Ala-Keitele, of which Keski-Keitele is the largest. Water in the lake is clear and in an excellent condition. The towns of Äänekoski and Viitasaari are located on the shores of Keitele. A leading figure in modern Finnish painting, Akseli Gallen-Kallela first worked at Lake Keitele, in summer 1904. This Lake Keitele landscape is his third and most elaborate depiction of the lake, and he exhibited it in Helsinki that same year. The painting is signed with the Swedish form of the artist's name; in later years he used the Finnish form, as above, by which he is best known today. This painting now hangs in the National Gallery, London.

— Freebase

Lake Maracaibo

Lake Maracaibo

Lake Maracaibo is a large brackish bay in Venezuela at 09°48′57″N 71°33′24″W / 9.81583°N 71.55667°W. It is connected to the Gulf of Venezuela by Tablazo Strait at the northern end, and fed by numerous rivers, the largest being the Catatumbo. It is sometimes considered a lake rather than a bay or lagoon, and at 13,210 km² it would be the largest lake in South America. The geological record shows that it has been a true lake in the past, and as such is one of the oldest lakes on Earth at 20–36 million years old. Lake Maracaibo acts as a major shipping route to the ports of Maracaibo and Cabimas. The surrounding Maracaibo Basin contains large reserves of crude oil, making the lake a major profit center for Venezuela. A dredged channel gives oceangoing vessels access to the bay. The General Rafael Urdaneta Bridge, spanning the bay's outlet, is one of the longest bridges in the world. The lake is also the location of Catatumbo lightning.

— Freebase

Lake Ngami

Lake Ngami

Lake Ngami is an endorheic lake in Botswana north of the Kalahari Desert. It is seasonally filled by the Taughe River an effluent of the Okavango River system flowing out of the western side of the Okavango Delta. It is one of the fragmented remnants of the ancient Lake Makgadikgadi. Although the lake has shrunk dramatically beginning from 1890, it remains an important habitat for birds and wildlife, especially in flood years. Lake Ngami had many famous visitors during the 19th century. In 1849 David Livingstone described it as a "shimmering lake, some 80 miles long and 20 wide". Livingstone also made a few cultural notes about the people living in this area; he noticed they had a story similar to that of the Tower of Babel, except that the builders' heads were "cracked by the fall of the scaffolding". Charles John Andersson and Frederick Thomas Green also visited the area in the early 1850s. Frederick Lugard led a British expedition to the lake in 1896. Arnold Weinholt Hodson passed through the area on his journey from Serowe to Victoria Falls in 1906.

— Freebase

Lake No

Lake No

Lake No is a lake in South Sudan. It is located just north of the vast swamp of the Sudd, at the confluence of the Bahr al Jabal and Bahr el Ghazal rivers. It marks the transition between the Bahr al Jabal and White Nile proper. Lake No is located approximately 1,156 km downstream of Uganda's Lake Albert, the major lake on the White Nile preceding Lake No. The lake is considered the center of the Reweng people of Panrou section of Dinka peoples.

— Freebase

Lake Winnipesaukee

Lake Winnipesaukee

Lake Winnipesaukee is the largest lake in the U.S. state of New Hampshire. It is approximately 21 miles long and from 1 to 9 miles wide, covering 69 square miles —71 square miles when Paugus Bay is included—with a maximum depth of 212 feet. The lake contains at least 253 islands, half of which are less than a quarter-acre in size, and is indented by several peninsulas, yielding a total shoreline of approximately 288 miles. The driving distance around the lake is 63 miles. It is 504 feet above sea level. Winnipesaukee is the third-largest lake in New England after Lake Champlain and Moosehead Lake. Outflow is regulated by the Lakeport Dam on the Winnipesaukee River.

— Freebase

Lake Texcoco

Lake Texcoco

Lake Texcoco was a natural lake formation within the Valley of Mexico. The Aztecs built the city of Tenochtitlan on an island in the lake. The Spaniards built Mexico City over Tenochtitlan. Efforts to control flooding led to most of the lake being drained, leaving a much smaller Lake Texcoco east of the city, surrounded by salt marsh. The Valley of Mexico is a basin with an average elevation of 2,236 metres above mean sea level located in the southern highlands of Mexico's central altiplano. It formerly extended over a large portion in the southern half of the basin, where it was the largest of an interconnected chain of five major and several smaller lakes. During periods of high water levels—typically after the May-to-October rainy seasons—the lakes were often joined as one body of water, at an average elevation of 2,242 metres above mean sea level. In the drier winter months the lake system tended to separate into individual bodies of water, a flow that was mitigated by the construction of dikes and causeways in the Late Postclassic period of Mesoamerican chronology. Lake Texcoco was the lowest-lying of all the lakes, and occupied the minimum elevation in the valley so that water ultimately drained towards it. The Valley of Mexico has been a closed basin since at least the Late Pliocene, and the lakes subsequently had no natural surface outflow, with the drainage basin forming an endorheic system.

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Ribbon lake

Ribbon lake

A ribbon lake or loch is a long and narrow, finger-shaped lake, usually found in a glacial trough. Its formation begins when a glacier moves over an area containing alternate bands of hard and soft bedrock. The sharp-edged boulders that are picked up by the glacier and carried at the bottom of the glacier erode the softer rock more quickly by abrasion, thus creating a hollow called a rock basin. On either side of the rock basin, the more resistant rock is eroded less and these outcrops of harder rock are known as rock bars, which act as dams between which rainwater may accumulate after the retreat of the ice age, filling up the rock basin and creating a ribbon lake. A ribbon lake may also form behind a terminal or recessional moraine, both of which also act as dams, enabling water to accumulate behind them. A ribbon lake may also occur if a tributary glacier joins a main glacier. The increase in power can create a trough, which is filled with water from a river/meltwater to create a ribbon lake. A ribbon lake is one of a number of glacial landscapes. These include arêtes, corries, rock lips, rock basins and terminal moraines.

— Freebase

Ontario

Ontario

A province of Canada lying between the provinces of Manitoba and Quebec. Its capital is Toronto. It takes its name from Lake Ontario which is said to represent the Iroquois oniatariio, beautiful lake. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p892 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p391)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Great Slave Lake

Great Slave Lake

Great Slave Lake is the second-largest lake in the Northwest Territories of Canada, the deepest lake in North America at 614 metres, and the ninth-largest lake in the world. It is 480 km long and 19 to 109 km wide. It covers an area of 27,200 km² in the southern part of the territory. Its given volume ranges from 1,070 km³ to 1,580 km³ and up to 2,088 km³ making it the 10th or 12th largest. The lake shares its name with the Slavey First Nations. Towns situated on the lake include: Yellowknife, Hay River, Behchoko, Fort Resolution, Lutselk'e, Hay River Reserve, Dettah and N'Dilo. The only community in the East Arm is Lutselk'e, a hamlet of about 350 people, largely Chipewyan Aboriginals of the Dene Nation and the now abandoned winter camp/Hudson's Bay Company post, Fort Reliance.

— Freebase

Moosehead Lake

Moosehead Lake

Moosehead Lake is the largest lake in the U.S. state of Maine and the largest mountain lake in the eastern United States. Situated in the Longfellow Mountains in the Maine Highlands Region, the lake is the source of the Kennebec River. Towns that border the lake include Greenville to the south and Rockwood to the northwest. There are over 80 islands in the lake, the largest being Sugar Island. The area has been the focal point of a controversy surrounding planned large scale commercial development, and the environmental practices of the developer.

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Lake Tana

Lake Tana

Lake Tana is the source of the Blue Nile and is the largest lake in Ethiopia. Located in Amhara Region in the north-western Ethiopian Highlands, the lake is approximately 84 kilometers long and 66 kilometers wide, with a maximum depth of 15 meters, and an elevation of 1,840 meters. Lake Tana is fed by the Lesser Abay, Reb and Gumara Rivers and its surface area ranges from 3,000 to 3,500 km² depending on season and rainfall. The lake level has been regulated since the construction of the control weir where the lake discharges into the Blue Nile, which regulates the flow to the Blue Nile Falls and hydro-power station.

— Freebase

Lake Placid

Lake Placid

Lake Placid is a village in the Adirondack Mountains in Essex County, New York, United States. As of the 2000 census, the village had a population of 4,549. The Village of Lake Placid is near the center of the Town of North Elba, 52 miles southwest of Plattsburgh. Lake Placid, along with nearby Saranac Lake and Tupper Lake, comprise what is known as the Tri-Lakes region. Lake Placid hosted the 1932 and 1980 Winter Olympics.

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Dry lake

Dry lake

A dry lake is an ephemeral lakebed, or a remnant of an endorheic lake. Such flats consist of fine-grained sediments infused with alkali salts. Alternative names for the dry lake include alkali flat and playa. A playa lake may cover a wide area, but it is never deep. Most water in it evaporates, leaving a layer of salt on the surface. These salt covered stretches are called saltpans. If its basin is primarily salt then the dry lake is called a salt pan, pan, hardpan, or salt flat. Other dry lake types include the sabkha and the mudflat.

— Freebase

Salt Lake

Salt Lake

Salt Lake is a suburban neighborhood of Honolulu, Hawaii on the island of O‘ahu. The area is also known as Āliamanu after a nearby crater, although Salt Lake itself is in a crater called Ālia pa‘akai — meaning "salt pond" in the Hawaiian language. The Salt Lake community was developed in the 1960s during a construction boom, providing residents with an expansive view of downtown Honolulu and the sugarcane plantations of the central plain of O‘ahu. It is a community of high-rise condominiums, mid-rise town-dwellings, and houses snaking around the remnants of a now freshwater lake. The U.S. Postal Code for Salt Lake is 96818. Salt Lake is a part of the 15th District of the Hawaii Senate, currently represented by State Senator Glenn Wakai and the 32nd District of the Hawaii House of Representatives, currently represented by Linda Ichiyama. It is also a part of Council District VII of the City and County of Honolulu, currently represented by Romy Cachola.

— Freebase

Great Lake

Great Lake

The Great Lake is a lake located in the central north region of Tasmania, Australia, within the sparsely inhabited Central Highlands municipality. Its original size was much smaller; it has been dammed at its southern outflow for hydro-electricity production. It is Australia's second largest freshwater lake, 1,030 metres above sea level. The lake has an area of 114 km². It is used for hydro-electric power, fishing, and tourism. Nearby towns Liaweenee and Miena are popular holiday shack destinations for local tourists, despite the area's reputation as being one of the coldest places in the generally mild-weathered state. During the winter months when the weather is hardly conducive to camping, the population of these two small towns drops to two or three hundred. The Lake Highway runs along the west side of the lake.

— Freebase

Ontario

Ontario

Ontario is one of the provinces of Canada, located in east-central Canada. It is Canada's most populous province or territory by an impressive margin, accounting for almost 40% of all Canadians, and is the second largest province in total area. Ontario is fourth largest in total area when the territories of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are included. It is home to the nation's capital city, Ottawa, and the nation's most populous city, Toronto. Ontario is bordered by the province of Manitoba to the west, Hudson Bay and James Bay to the north, and Quebec to the east, and to the south by the U.S. states of Minnesota, Michigan, New York, Ohio and Pennsylvania. All but a small part of Ontario's 2,700 km border with the United States follows inland waterways: from the west at Lake of the Woods, eastward along the major rivers and lakes of the Great Lakes/Saint Lawrence River drainage system. These are the Rainy River, the Pigeon River, Lake Superior, the St. Marys River, Lake Huron, the St. Clair River, Lake St. Clair, the Detroit River, Lake Erie, the Niagara River, Lake Ontario and along the St. Lawrence River from Kingston, Ontario, to the Quebec boundary just east of Cornwall, Ontario.

— Freebase

Saimaa

Saimaa

Saimaa is a lake in southeastern Finland. At approximately 4,400 square kilometres, it is the largest lake in Finland, and the fourth largest natural sweetwater lake in Europe. It was formed by glacial melting at the end of the Ice Age. Major towns on the lakeshore include Lappeenranta, Imatra, Savonlinna, Mikkeli, Varkaus, and Joensuu. The Vuoksi River flows from Saimaa to Lake Ladoga. Most of the lake is spotted with islands, and narrow canals divide the lake in many parts, each having their own names. In places in the Saimaa basin, "there is more shoreline here per unit of area than anywhere else in the world, the total length being nearly 15,000 kilometres. The number of islands in the region, 14,000, also shows what a maze of detail the system is." The Saimaa Canal from Lappeenranta to Vyborg connects Saimaa to the Gulf of Finland. Other canals connect Saimaa to smaller lakes in Eastern Finland and form a network of waterways. These waterways are mainly used to transport wood, minerals, metals, pulp and other cargo, but also tourists use the waterways.

— Freebase

Rore

Rore

Rore is a lake in the municipalities of Grimstad and Arendal in Aust-Agder county, Norway. This lake, which is used as a reservoir, lies mostly in Grimstad. There is a public beach area at the southern end of the lake, near the Roresanden village. The lake is located about 3 kilometres from the city center of Grimstad, near Landvik. The lake Syndle flows into Rore from the east and Rore is connected to the river Nidelva at the northern end. The lake has an area of 7.76 square kilometres at an elevation of 39 metres above sea level.

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Vuoksi River

Vuoksi River

The Vuoksi River runs in the northernmost part of the Karelian Isthmus from Lake Saimaa in southeastern Finland to Lake Ladoga in northwestern Russia. The river enters Lake Ladoga in three branches, an older main northern branch at Priozersk, a smaller branch a few kilometres to the north of it, and a new southern branch entering fifty kilometers further southeast as Burnaya River, which has become the main stream in terms of water discharge. Since 1857, the old northern distributaries drain only the lower reaches of the Vuoksi basin and are not fed by Lake Saimaa. The northern and southern branches actually belong to two separate river systems, which at times get isolated from each other in dry seasons. The descent between Lake Saimaa and Lake Ladoga is 69 metres. The entire run of the river is 162 kilometers via the Priozersk branch, or 150 kilometres via the Taipale branch. For most of its length, the river broadens out to a series of lakes bound together by shorter riverlike connections. One of these lakes, Uusijärvi close to Priozersk, was renamed Ozero Vuoksa by the Soviets.

— Freebase

Hurricane Deck

Hurricane Deck

Hurricane Deck is an unincorporated community in Camden County, Missouri, United States, on the Lake of the Ozarks. It is part of the lake's resort area, and according to one source is named for a tornado which struck the area, tornadoes once being called "hurricanes" locally. According to lakehistory.info it derives its name from the nautical name for the top deck of a river steam ship which is called a "Hurricane Deck" because the wind always blew up there. There is a high ridge at the location on the lake. One of the most distinctive bridges in the Lake of the Ozarks is the Hurricane Deck Bridge which carries Route 5 across the Osage Arm of the lake. The bridge which was completed in 1936 is one of three "upside down" bridges where its truss support is below the road deck enabling passengers in cars to see the lake. The bridge's design is similar to the I-35W Mississippi River bridge bridge that collapsed in Minneapolis, Minnesota in 2007. The other two bridges—the Grand Glaize Bridge over the Grand Glaize Arm and the Niangua Bridge over the Niangua Arm have since been torn down and replaced by girder bridges.

— Freebase

Amictic lake

Amictic lake

Amictic lakes are, “perennially sealed off by ice from most of the annual seasonal variations in temperature.” Amictic lakes exhibit inverse cold water stratification whereby water temperature increases with depth below the ice surface 0°C up to a theoretical maximum of 4°C. Hutchinson-Löffler classified amictic and other types of lakes based on physical/thermal processes. These processes are influenced by solar radiation and wind. They are strongly tied with seasonality and thus associated with latitude and altitude. Amictic lakes occur in Arctic, Antarctic, and alpine regions and due to permanent ice-cover, these physical/thermal influences have a limited effect on circulation in the water column. For this reason, amictic lakes are commonly referred to as lakes that never mix. "Mixing" in this context, however, refers to homogenization of the water column and so the term "amictic" is not meant to imply that the lake water is stagnant. With the rare exception of lakes near the edges of the permanent icecaps in Greenland and Antarctica, amictic lakes do experience melting around the lake's perimeter during summer, resulting in a "moat" of water surrounding a thick pan of ice that remains in the centre of the lake. This melting occurs as a result of heat absorbed by water and sediments below the ice, particularly in the shallow-water areas, when snow does not cover the ice, and also by heat flow and meltwater runoff from the surrounding land. Mixing below the ice occurs due to density currents generated by heat from direct solar radiation and from meltwater runoff which may differ in density from the lake water due to both temperature and suspended sediment content, depending on its source and flow path. Despite these processes, the effects of wind at the lake surface are highly reduced due to the ice cover, and so vertical mixing of the water column may be incomplete. This may result in anoxic conditions, which has implications for biogeochemical processes within the lake.

— Freebase

Cyprinus

Cyprinus

Cyprinus is the genus of typical carps in family Cyprinidae. They are of East Asian origin and closely related to some more barb-like genera, such Cyclocheilichthys and the recently-established Barbonymus. The crucian carps of western Eurasia, which include the goldfish, are apparently not as closely related. This genus' most widespread and well-known member is the common carp. It is famed as a food fish and widely traded and introduced since antiquity, but in certain areas has multiplied inordinately and become a pest. In some places, such as Australia, it is illegal to not kill a Common Carp when you can, due to their severe overpopulation. In its long use it has been domesticated, and a number of breeds have been developed for food and other purposes. The koi are well-known common carp breeds, selectively bred for being enjoyed by spectators from above. Strictly speaking, "koi" is simply the Japanese name of the common carp. The other species of typical carps are generally found in more restricted areas of eastern Asia, centered around the Yunnan region. In some cases, they are endemic to a single lakes, most notably Lake Er, as well as Lake Dian, Lake Jilu Lake Qilihu, Lake Xingyun and Lake Yi-Lung, which are all in Yunnan proper. A species from the last-named, C. yilongensis, was apparently endemic; if so, it is probably now extinct.

— Freebase

Lake Natron

Lake Natron

Lake Natron is a salt lake located in northern Tanzania, close to the Kenyan border, in the eastern branch of the East African Rift. The lake is fed by the Southern Ewaso Ng'iro River and also by mineral-rich hot springs. It is quite shallow, less than three meters deep, and varies in width depending on its water level, which changes due to high levels of evaporation, leaving concentrations of salt and other minerals, notably sodium carbonate. The surrounding country is dry and receives irregular seasonal rainfall. The lake falls within the Lake Natron Basin Wetlands of International Importance Ramsar Site. Temperatures in the lake can reach 50 degrees Celsius, and depending on rainfall, the alkalinity can reach a pH of 9 to 10.5.

— Freebase

Lake Zug

Lake Zug

Lake Zug is a lake in Central Switzerland, situated between Lucerne and Zurich. The Lorze as the main feeder river empties its waters into the lake at its northern extremity, but 1 km further west issues from the lake to pursue its course towards the Reuss. Due to this poor feeding, Environmental protection is very important as the lake would suffer long term damage if polluted as the second of the rivers, Rigiaa, feeds only a marginal amount into the lake at its southern end.

— Freebase

Lake Taupo

Lake Taupo

Lake Taupo is a lake situated in the North Island of New Zealand. With a surface area of 616 square kilometres, it is the largest lake by surface area in New Zealand, and the second largest freshwater lake by surface area in geopolitical Oceania after Lake Murray. Lake Taupo has a perimeter of approximately 193 kilometres, a deepest point of 186 metres. It is drained by the Waikato River, while its main tributaries are the Waitahanui River, the Tongariro River, and the Tauranga Taupo River. It is a noted trout fishery with stocks of introduced brown trout and rainbow trout.

— Freebase

Lake Titicaca

Lake Titicaca

Lake Titicaca is a lake in the Andes on the border of Peru and Bolivia. By volume of water, it is the largest lake in South America. Lake Maracaibo has a larger surface area, but it is considered to be a large brackish bay due to its direct connection with the sea. It is often called the highest navigable lake in the world, with a surface elevation of 3,812 m. Although this refers to navigation by large boats, it's generally considered to mean commercial craft. For many years the largest vessel afloat on the lake was the 2,200-ton, 260-foot, SS Ollanta. Today the largest vessel is probably the similarly sized, but broader, train barge/float Manco Capac, operated by PeruRail. At least two dozen bodies of water around the world are at higher elevations, but all are much smaller and shallower.

— Freebase

Lost River

Lost River

Lost River begins and ends in a closed basin in northern California and southwestern Oregon in the United States. The river, 60 miles long, flows in an arc from Clear Lake Reservoir in Modoc County, California, through Klamath County, Oregon to Tule Lake in Siskiyou County. About 46 miles of Lost River are in Oregon, and 14 miles are in California. From its source, the river flows into Langell Valley, where Miller Creek enters from the right. Near Bonanza, the river turns west and passes through Olene Gap, about 10 miles east of Klamath Falls. The river then turns southeast and flows along the base of Stukel Mountain, where it provides diversion canals for small lakes including Nuss Lake for irrigation and flood control. It then re-enters California south of Merrill. Dams, canals, pumps, and other artificial structures on Lost River, Clear Lake, and Tule Lake are part of the Klamath Project of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, which manages the basin's water flow mainly for farming and flood-control. The project provides water to about 210,000 acres of cropland, 62 percent of which are in Oregon and 38 percent in California. Water from the Lost River basin enters the Klamath River basin, mainly through the Lost River Diversion Channel, about 4 miles downstream of Olene. The 8-mile channel can also supply water by reverse flow from the Klamath when irrigation water is needed for farms in drained parts of Tule Lake.

— Freebase

Jugal

Jugal

pertaining to, or in the region of, the malar, or cheek bone

— Webster Dictionary

Malar

Malar

of or pertaining to the region of the cheek bone, or to the malar bone; jugal

— Webster Dictionary

Temporomalar

Temporomalar

of or pertaining to both the temple and the region of the malar bone; as, the temporomalar nerve

— Webster Dictionary

Zygoma

Zygoma

the jugal, malar, or cheek bone

— Webster Dictionary

Victoria

Victoria

Lake Victoria, the largest lake in Africa.

— Wiktionary

Winnipeg

Winnipeg

Lake Winnipeg, a large lake in Manitoba.

— Wiktionary

Winnipeg

Winnipeg

Winnipeg River, a river that flows 813 km from Lake of the Woods, Ontario, into Lake Winnipeg.

— Wiktionary

Bessie

Bessie

Bessie, a lake monster supposed to exist in Lake Erie in the United States.

— Wiktionary

Niagara

Niagara

A river which flows from Lake Erie, over Niagara Falls into Lake Ontario; the geographical region of the United States and Canada in proximity to this river.

— Wiktionary

Titicaca

Titicaca

A lake in the South American Andes, noted for being the highest lake in the world.

— Wiktionary

Baikal

Baikal

A large freshwater lake in southern Siberia, Russia; the deepest lake in the world.

— Wiktionary

Lake Peipus

Lake Peipus

A large fresh water lake, on the border between Estonia and Russia in Northern Europe. It is the fifth largest lake in Europe, and largest in Estonia.

— Wiktionary

Niagara River

Niagara River

A river in North America flowing to the north from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario and including the Niagara Falls.

— Wiktionary

Lake Ladoga

Lake Ladoga

A freshwater lake located in the Republic of Karelia and Leningrad Oblast in northwestern Russia, not far from Saint Petersburg. It is the largest lake in Europe.

— Wiktionary

lakebed

lakebed

The bottom of a lake, especially after the lake has gone dry.

— Wiktionary

Emaju00F5gi

Emaju00F5gi

A river in Estonia which flows from Lake Vu00F5rtsju00E4rv through Tartu County into Lake Peipus, crossing the city of Tartu for 10 km. It has a length of 101 km.

— Wiktionary

Urmia

Urmia

A saltwater lake in northwestern Iran near Turkey. Second largest saltwater lake on earth.

— Wiktionary

alkali flat

alkali flat

A dry lake; a remnant of lake consisting of fine-grained sediments infused with alkali salts.

— Wiktionary

siscowet

siscowet

A freshwater fish from Lake Superior in the Great Lakes, a variety of the lake trout.

— Wiktionary

Amia

Amia

a genus of fresh-water ganoid fishes, exclusively confined to North America; called bowfin in Lake Champlain, dogfish in Lake Erie, and mudfish in South Carolina, etc. See Bowfin

— Webster Dictionary

Cisco

Cisco

the Lake herring (Coregonus Artedi), valuable food fish of the Great Lakes of North America. The name is also applied to C. Hoyi, a related species of Lake Michigan

— Webster Dictionary

Crannoge

Crannoge

one of the stockaded islands in Scotland and Ireland which in ancient times were numerous in the lakes of both countries. They may be regarded as the very latest class of prehistoric strongholds, reaching their greatest development in early historic times, and surviving through the Middle Ages. See also Lake dwellings, under Lake

— Webster Dictionary

Lake-dweller

Lake-dweller

see Lake dwellers, under Lake

— Webster Dictionary

Powen

Powen

a small British lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeoides, or C. ferus); -- called also gwyniad and lake herring

— Webster Dictionary

Winnebagoes

Winnebagoes

a tribe of North American Indians who originally occupied the region about Green Bay, Lake Michigan, but were driven back from the lake and nearly exterminated in 1640 by the IIlinnois

— Webster Dictionary

Vespula

Vespula

Vespula is a small genus of social wasps, widely distributed in the Northern Hemisphere. Along with members of their sister genus Dolichovespula, they are collectively known by the common name yellowjackets in North America. Vespula species have a shorter oculo-malar space and a more pronounced tendency to nest underground than Dolichovespula.

— Freebase

Malar

Malar

Malar is the Faerûnian deity of the hunt, evil lycanthropes, and bestial savagery and bloodlust in Ed Greenwood's Forgotten Realms fictional world of Abeir-Toril for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. His dogma, such as it is, concerns savage hunts, the spreading of the curse of lycanthropy, and general contempt for civilization.

— Freebase

Jugal bone

Jugal bone

The jugal is a skull bone found in most reptiles, amphibians, and birds. In mammals, the jugal is often called the malar or Zygomatic. It is connected to the quadratojugal and maxilla, as well as other bones, which may vary by species. This bone is considered key in the determination of general traits of the skull, in the case of creatures, as with dinosaurs in paleontology, whose entire skull has not been found.

— Freebase

Zygomatic bone

Zygomatic bone

In the human skull, the zygomatic bone is a paired bone which articulates with the maxilla, the temporal bone, the sphenoid bone and the frontal bone. The zygomatic is homologous to the jugal bone of other tetrapods. It is situated at the upper and lateral part of the face and forms the prominence of the cheek, part of the lateral wall and floor of the orbit, and parts of the temporal and infratemporal fossa. It presents a malar and a temporal surface; four processes, the frontosphenoidal, orbital, maxillary, and temporal; and four borders.

— Freebase

Anophthalmia

Anophthalmia

Anophthalmia, is the medical term for the absence of one or both eyes. Both the globe and the ocular tissue are missing from the orbit. The absence of the eye will cause a small bony orbit, a constricted mucosal socket, short eyelids, reduced palpebral fissure and malar prominence. Genetic mutations, chromosomal abnormalities, and prenatal environment can all cause anophthalmia. Anophthalmia is an extremely rare disease and is mostly rooted in genetic abnormalities. It can also be associated with other syndromes

— Freebase

Homocystinuria

Homocystinuria

Autosomal recessive inborn error of methionine metabolism usually caused by a deficiency of CYSTATHIONINE BETA-SYNTHASE and associated with elevations of homocysteine in plasma and urine. Clinical features include a tall slender habitus, SCOLIOSIS, arachnodactyly, MUSCLE WEAKNESS, genu varus, thin blond hair, malar flush, lens dislocations, an increased incidence of MENTAL RETARDATION, and a tendency to develop fibrosis of arteries, frequently complicated by CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENTS and MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p979)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Lake Nasser

Lake Nasser

Lake Nasser is a vast reservoir in southern Egypt, and northern Sudan, and is one of the largest man-made lakes in the world. Strictly, "Lake Nasser" refers only to the much larger portion of the lake that is in Egyptian territory, with the Sudanese preferring to call their smaller body of water Lake Nubia. The area of Sudan-administered Wadi Halfa Salient was largely flooded by Lake Nasser.

— Freebase

Kenya

Kenya

Kenya, officially the Republic of Kenya, is a sovereign state in East Africa. The capital and largest city is Nairobi. Kenya lies on the equator with the Indian Ocean to the south-east, Tanzania to the south, Uganda to the west, South Sudan to the north-west, Ethiopia to the north and Somalia to the north-east. Kenya covers 581,309 km² and has a population of about 44 million in July 2012. The country is named after Mount Kenya, the second highest mountain in Africa. Mount Kenya was originally referred to as "Mt. Kirinyaga" by the indigenous people. "Kirinyaga or Kerenyaga, meaning ‘mountain of whiteness’ because of its snow capped peak"; The name was subsequently changed to Mt. Kenya because of the inability of the British to pronounce "Kirinyaga" correctly. The country has a warm and humid climate along its Indian Ocean coastline, with wildlife-rich savannah grasslands inland towards the capital. Nairobi has a cool climate that gets colder approaching Mount Kenya, which has three permanently snow-capped peaks. Further inland there is a warm and humid climate around Lake Victoria, and temperate forested and hilly areas in the western region. The northeastern regions along the border with Somalia and Ethiopia are arid and semi-arid areas with near-desert landscapes. Lake Victoria, the world's second largest fresh-water lake and the world's largest tropical lake, is situated to the southwest and is shared with Uganda and Tanzania. Kenya is famous for its safaris and diverse wildlife reserves and national parks such as the East and West Tsavo National Park, the Maasai Mara, Lake Nakuru National Park, and Aberdares National Park. There are several world heritage sites such as Lamu, and world renowned beaches such as Kilifi where international yachting competitions are held each year.

— Freebase

Sabine Lake

Sabine Lake

Sabine Lake is a 90,000-acre salt water estuary on the Texas-Louisiana border. The lake, some 14 miles long and 7 miles wide, is formed by the confluence of the Neches River and Sabine River. Through its tidal outlet 5 miles long, Sabine Pass, Sabine Lake drains some 50,000 square miles of Texas and Louisiana into the Gulf of Mexico. The lake borders Jefferson County, Texas, Orange County, Texas, and Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The City of Port Arthur, Texas and City of Groves, Texas share coastline with the lake.

— Freebase

Great Bear Lake

Great Bear Lake

Great Bear Lake is the largest lake entirely within Canada, the fourth largest in North America, and the eighth largest in the world. The lake is in the Northwest Territories and is situated on the Arctic Circle between 65 and 67 degrees of northern latitude and between 118 and 123 degrees western longitude, 186 m above sea level. The name is believed to have originated with the First Nations living along the northern shores of the lake, who referred to themselves by Chipewyan words meaning “grizzly bear water people.” Grizzly Bear Mountain on the shore of the Lake comes from the Chipewyan, meaning, literally “bear large hill.”

— Freebase

Nea River

Nea River

The Nea River is an 80-kilometre long river which has runs through the municipalities of Tydal and Selbu in Sør-Trøndelag county, Norway and Åre Municipality in Sweden. The river Nea is a part of the Nea-Nidelvvassdraget watershed. Some of the main villages along the river include: Østby, Ås, Aunet, and Gressli in Tydal and Flora, Hyttbakken, Selbu, and Mebonden in Selbu. The river is first named Nean at the eastern end of the artificial lake Sylsjön, which lies in Åre Municipality and Berg Municipality, Sweden. Below the dam, the river flows for 6 kilometres, crossing the Swedish-Norwegian border where the name becomes Nea, before entering the lake Nesjøen. On the downstream side of the lake, the river continues through the smaller lake Vessingsjøen before continuing on its westward course. At the municipal center of Ås the river Tya joins it. After that, it follows the Tydalen valley and meets the river Rotla about 15 kilometres east of Mebonden where it ends when it flows into the lake Selbusjøen.

— Freebase

Lake Albano

Lake Albano

Lake Albano is a small volcanic crater lake in the Alban Hills of Lazio, at the foot of Monte Cavo, 20 kilometres southeast of Rome. Overlooking it is Castel Gandolfo, where the Pope has a palace. It was known to the Roman Empire as Albanus Lacus. In its vicinity stood Alba Longa. The lake is the deepest, about 170 m, in Lazio. It is about 3.5 km long by 2.3 km wide, formed by the overlapping union of two volcanic craters, an origin indicated by the ridge in its center, which rises to a depth of 70 m. Plutarch reports that in 406 BC the lake surged over the surrounding hills, despite there being no rain nor tributaries into the lake to explain it. The ensuing flood destroyed fields and vineyards, eventually pouring into the sea. It hosted the canoeing and rowing events of the 1960 Summer Olympic Games that were held at Rome. The lane marking system developed for these events is commonly referred to as the Albano buoy system.

— Freebase

City Centre

City Centre

City Centre is a shopping mall in Kolkata, India. It is located in the Salt Lake township of Kolkata. It is the twin mall of the Forum mall situated at the other part of the city. City Centre Salt Lake is Kolkata’s first integrated and unconventional hangout and shopping option. With approximately 42 thousand sq. metre. of commercial and entertainment spaces on five acres of land, City Centre Salt Lake attracts all crowds. Comprising the Mall, the Plaza Blocks, the Cineplex, the Tower, the Residency and the now legendary 'Kund', City Centre Salt Lake has acquired a loyal community. "The City Centre in Kolkata is a very special place...a microcosm of the whole metropolis, catering to multiple land-uses and diverse income profiles...a kaleidoscope of contrast, colour and energy. We have in the City Centre a wide range of different-sized residences, entertainment centres, offices and shops - varying from the smallest 'dukaans' to the most glamorous air-conditioned boutiques and large department stores. These multifarious activities, all arranged in a fine-grained mix, are generated by a complex system of spaces...from broad colonaded public arcades to narrow bazar 'galis' to large terraced plazas...culminating in the kund in the centre of the complex. Coffee shops and restaurants, strategically placed at pivotal locations, provide opportunities to rest under wide-spreading trees and observe the world around you...a marvelous tradition, which has always been essential to life in the great city of Kolkata" ... Charles Correa, celebrated Architect-visionary, Designer of City Centre Salt Lake

— Freebase

Salton Sea

Salton Sea

The Salton Sea is a shallow, saline, endorheic rift lake located directly on the San Andreas Fault, predominantly in California's Imperial and Coachella Valleys. The lake occupies the lowest elevations of the Salton Sink in the Colorado Desert of Imperial and Riverside counties in Southern California. Like Death Valley, it is below sea level. Currently, its surface is 226 ft below sea level. The deepest point of the sea is 5 ft higher than the lowest point of Death Valley. The sea is fed by the New, Whitewater, and Alamo rivers, as well as agricultural runoff, drainage systems, and creeks. The Sea was created by a flood in 1905, in which water from the Colorado River flowed into the area. While it varies in dimensions and area with fluctuations in agricultural runoff and rainfall, the Salton Sea averages 15 mi by 35 mi. With an average area of roughly 525 sq mi, the Salton Sea is the largest lake in California. Average annual inflow is 1,360,000 acre·ft, which is enough to maintain a maximum depth of 52 ft and a total volume of about 7,500,000 acre·ft. The lake's salinity, about 44 g/L, is greater than that of the waters of the Pacific Ocean, but less than that of the Great Salt Lake. The concentration increases by about 1 percent annually.

— Freebase

Monohydrocalcite

Monohydrocalcite

Monohydrocalcite is a mineral that is a hydrous form of calcium carbonate, CaCO3·H2O. It was formerly also known by the name hydrocalcite, which is now discredited by the IMA. It is a trigonal mineral which is white when pure. Monohydrocalcite is not a common rock-forming mineral, but is frequently associated with other calcium and magnesium carbonate minerals, such as calcite, aragonite, lansfordite, and nesquehonite. Monohydrocalcite has been observed in air conditioning systems, and in moonmilk deposits in caves, both probably formed from spray of carbonate rich fluids. It is well known in Robe on the Limestone Coast of South Australia as a component of beach sands of Lake Fellmongery and Lake Butler, where it is believed to be formed from algal spume. Other lacustrine deposits include Lake Issyk-Kul, Kyrgyzstan, Lake Kivu, Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Solar Lake, Sinai. It has been reported as a significant component of the decomposition of ikaite in the towers of the Ikka Fjord, West Greenland. It is also noted for its bizarre occurrences, which include inside the otoliths of the tiger shark, the bladder of a guinea pig, the calcareous corpuscles of a cestode parasite, and the final stages of decomposition of the putrefying flesh of the giant saguaro cactus. These occurrences suggest a biochemical origin is possible.

— Freebase

Lake Erie

Lake Erie

Lake Erie is the fourth largest lake of the five Great Lakes in North America, and the tenth largest globally or twelfth largest globally if measured in terms of surface area. It is the southernmost, shallowest, and smallest by volume of the Great Lakes and therefore also has the shortest average water residence time. It is bounded by Ontario to the north, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York to the south, and Michigan to the west. The lake is named after the Erie tribe of Native Americans who lived along its southern shore. The outflow from the lake provides hydroelectric power to Canada and the U.S. as it spins huge turbines at Niagara Falls. The lake's environmental health has been an ongoing concern for decades, with issues such as overfishing, pollution and more recently algal blooms and eutrophication generating headlines.

— Freebase

Prosit

Prosit

Prosit is an unincorporated community in Alborn Township, Saint Louis County, Minnesota, United States. The community is located 9 miles southeast of Meadowlands at the junction of Saint Louis County Highway 47 and West Shipley Road. Prosit is also located 9 miles west of Independence. The community of Alborn is nearby. Aerie Lake, Crooked Lake, Eier Lake, Maple Leaf Lake, and Round Lake are all in the vicinity.

— Freebase

West Jordan

West Jordan

West Jordan is a city in Salt Lake County, Utah, United States. West Jordan is a rapidly growing suburb of Salt Lake City and has a mixed economy. According to the 2010 Census, the city had a population of 103,712, placing it as the fourth most populous in the state. The city occupies the southwest end of the Salt Lake Valley at an elevation of 4,330 feet. Named after the nearby Jordan River, the limits of the city begin on the river's western bank and end in the eastern foothills of the Oquirrh Mountains, where Kennecott Copper Mine, the world's largest man-made excavation is located. Settled in the mid-19th century, the city has developed into its own regional center. As of 2012, the city has four major retail centers; with Jordan Landing being one of the largest mixed-use planned developments in the Intermountain West. Companies headquartered in West Jordan include Mountain America Credit Union, Lynco Sales & Service, SME Steel, and Cyprus Credit Union. The city has one major hospital, Jordan Valley Medical Center, and a campus of Salt Lake Community College, which is designed to become the main campus by 2020. City landmarks include Gardner Village, established in 1850, and South Valley Regional Airport, formerly known as "Salt Lake Airport #2." The airport serves general aviation operations as well as a base for the Utah Army National Guard for Apache and Black Hawk helicopters.

— Freebase

Quake Lake

Quake Lake

Quake Lake is a lake in southwestern Montana in the United States. It was created after an earthquake struck on August 17, 1959, killing 28 people. Today, Quake Lake is 190 feet deep and 6 miles long. US 287 follows the lake and offers glimpses of the effects of the earthquake and landslide and visitor center is just off the road. The lake is mostly within Gallatin National Forest.

— Freebase

Over Water

Over Water

Over Water is a small lake or tarn in the north of the English Lake District near the village of Longlands. Although only a fifteen-minute drive from Keswick it is quieter than many of the better-known lakes. Binsey, Great Cockup and Longlands Fell overlook the lake. Over Water was a small natural waterbody which was dammed in 1904 to increase its capacity. It now serves as a drinking water reservoir to supply the town of Wigton. The dam is at the northern end. Over Water supports a range of flora including water lillies and water lobelia. The name of the tarn has developed and changed over time. It was recorded as 'Orre Water' in 1687, which derives from the Old Norse which means 'the lake where blackcock or grouse are found' or 'Orri's lake' ...ON 'orri' is a bird of the grouse family, but hence also a nickname and pers.[onal] n.[ame]." There are many public footpaths offering access, with a 7.5-mile circular route beginning and ending at Over Water and taking in Ruthwaite, High Ireby, High Houses, Binsey and Binsey Lodge over a 950ft elevation being one of the more well-trodden routes..

— Freebase

Gatun Lake

Gatun Lake

Gatun Lake is a large artificial lake situated in the Republic of Panama; it forms a major part of the Panama Canal, carrying ships for 33 km of their transit across the Isthmus of Panama. The lake was created between 1907 and 1913 by the building of the Gatun Dam across the Chagres River. At the time it was created, Gatun Lake was the largest man-made lake in the world, and the dam was the largest dam on Earth.

— Freebase

Lake whitefish

Lake whitefish

The lake whitefish is a species of freshwater whitefish from North America. Lake whitefish are found throughout much of Canada and parts of the northern United States, including all of the Great Lakes. The lake whitefish is sometimes referred to as a "humpback" fish due to the small size of the head in relation to the length of the body. It is a valuable commercial fish, and also occasionally taken by sport fishermen. Smoked, refrigerated, vacuum-packed lake whitefish fillets are available in North American grocery stores. Other vernacular names used for this fish include Sault whitefish, gizzard fish, common whitefish, eastern whitefish, Great Lakes whitefish, humpback whitefish, inland whitefish and whitefish. The scientific genus name Coregonus means "angle eye" in Greek and the species name clupeaformis means "herring-shaped" in Latin. Alternative names include: Cree: Atihkamekw, Atekamek,Atikamek, Attikumèk; Danish: Helt; Dutch: Marene; English: Eastern whitefish, Common whitefish, Gizzard fish, Grand coregone, Great Humpback whitefish, Inland whitefish, Lakes whitefish, Lake whitefish, Sault whitefish, Whitefish; Finnish: Siika, Sillisiika; French: Corégone, Grande corégone; German : Felchen, Maräne; Greek: Koregonos; Italian: Coregone; Norwegian: Sik; Portuguese: Coregono; Spanish: Coregono; Swedish: Sik.

— Freebase

Lake Geneva

Lake Geneva

Lake Geneva or Lake Léman is a lake in Switzerland and France. It is one of the largest lakes in Western Europe. 59.53% 345.31 km² of it comes under the jurisdiction of Switzerland, and 40.47% 234.71 km² under France. The average surface elevation of 372 m above sea level is controlled by the Seujet Dam in Geneva. Lake Geneva, formed by a retreating glacier, has a crescent shape that narrows around Yvoire on the southern shore. It can thus be divided figuratively into the "Grand Lac" to the east and the "Petit Lac" to the west. The Chablais Alps border its southern shore, the western Bernese Alps lie over its eastern side. The high summits of Grand Combin and Mont Blanc are visible from some places. Compagnie Générale de Navigation sur le lac Léman operates boats on the lake.

— Freebase

Oulujärvi

Oulujärvi

Oulujärvi is a lake in Finland located in the Kainuu. With the area of 928 square kilometres it is the fifth largest lake in the country. The lake drained by the Oulu River, which flows northwestward from the lake to the Gulf of Bothnia. Its nickname is the "Kainuu sea", and it is surrounded by three municipalities: Vaala, Paltamo and Kajaani. About 40 percent of the lake is in the Vaala municipality.

— Freebase

Chicot County

Chicot County

Chicot County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of 2010, the population is 11,800. The county seat is Lake Village. Chicot County is Arkansas's tenth county, formed on October 25, 1823, and named after Point Chicot on the Mississippi River. It is part of the Arkansas Delta, historically important for cotton cultivation. Landmarks around the county include Lake Chicot, North America's largest oxbow lake and Arkansas's largest natural lake; the site of Charles Lindbergh's first night-time flight; and the legendary burial site of Hernando De Soto, near Lake Village.

— Freebase

Como Lake

Como Lake

Como Lake is a small lake in the city of Coquitlam, British Columbia. It forms the headwaters of the Como watershed and is an urban fishing and recreation area in the city of Coquitlam as well as the Lower Mainland. The lake is very popular with joggers and walkers, the trail around the lake being 1 km in length. There are small stocked rainbow trout, carp, and catfish living in the lake.

— Freebase

Winnipeg River

Winnipeg River

The Winnipeg River is a Canadian river which flows from Lake of the Woods in the province of Ontario to Lake Winnipeg in Manitoba. This river is 235 kilometres long from the Norman Dam in Kenora to its mouth at Lake Winnipeg. Its watershed is 106,500 square kilometres in area, mainly in Canada. About 29,000 square kilometres of this area is in northern Minnesota. The watershed stretches to the height of land about 100 kilometres west of Lake Superior. The Winnipeg River watershed was the southeastern-most portion of the land granted to the Hudson's Bay Company in 1670. The portion in Canada corresponds roughly to the land deeded to Canada in Treaty 3, signed by Her Majesty's treaty commissioners and the First Nation chiefs at Northwest Angle on the Lake of the Woods in 1873. The river's name means "murky water" in Cree. This river route was used by natives for thousands of years and became a major fur trade route for hundreds of years. It is the only major water route between what is now southern Manitoba and Ontario that allowed natives to easily canoe back and forth. The Red River route was much farther south and with a longer portage. La Vérendrye was one of the first explorers to establish fur trade forts near the native camps in the area. The Winnipeg River system through Whiteshell Provincial Park has many petroforms near the Whiteshell River forks where the two rivers meet. These petroforms are an ancient reminder of the importance of the area for native travel, trade, ceremonies, harvesting, and settlements.

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Kagera River

Kagera River

The Kagera River, also Akagera River, is an East African river, forming part of the upper headwaters of the Nile and carrying water from its most distant source. The section of river named Kagera begins in Burundi, flowing out from Lake Rweru. From the lake, it flows east along the Rwanda-Burundi and Rwanda-Tanzania borders to a confluence with the Ruvubu River. The waters of the Kagera are thus provided by two major tributaries, the Nyabarongo of Rwanda, which feeds Lake Rweru, and the Ruvubu of Burundi. It is unknown which of these two feeder rivers is the longer and hence the ultimate source of the Nile. From the confluence, the Kagera flows north along the Rwanda-Tanzania border, over Rusumo Falls and through Akagera National Park. It then takes a turn to the east, following the Tanzania-Uganda border and emptying into Lake Victoria in Uganda. The river has featured promimently in the histories of the countries it runs through, particularly Rwanda. In 1894, German Gustav Adolf von Götzen crossed the Kagera at Rusumo Falls, beginning the Rwandan colonial era; and in 1916, during World War I, the Belgians defeated the Germans, entering Rwanda by the same route. The river gained international notoriety in 1994 for carrying bodies from the Rwandan Genocide into Lake Victoria, causing a state of emergency to be declared in areas of Uganda, where these bodies eventually washed up.

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Lake Maggiore

Lake Maggiore

Lake Maggiore is a large lake located on the south side of the Alps. It is the second largest lake in Italy in the Lombardy region and largest lake of the canton of Ticino, Switzerland. Lake Maggiore is the most westerly of the three great prealpine lakes of Italy, it extends for about 70 km between Locarno and Arona. The climate is mild in both summer and winter, producing Mediterranean vegetation, with beautiful gardens growing rare and exotic plants. Well-known gardens include those of the Isola Madre, Isola Bella and the Isole di Brissago, that of the Villa Taranto in Verbania, and the Alpinia botanical garden above Stresa.

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Lake Powell

Lake Powell

Lake Powell is a reservoir on the Colorado River, straddling the border between Utah and Arizona. It is a major vacation spot that around 2 million people visit every year. It is the second largest man-made reservoir, by maximum water capacity, in the United States behind Lake Mead, storing 24,322,000 acre feet of water when full. Lake Powell was created by the flooding of Glen Canyon by the controversial Glen Canyon Dam, which also led to the creation of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, a popular summer destination. The reservoir is named for explorer John Wesley Powell, a one-armed American Civil War veteran who explored the river via three wooden boats in 1869. In 1972, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area was established. It is public land managed by the National Park Service, and available to the public for recreational purposes. It lies in parts of Garfield, Kane, and San Juan counties in southern Utah, and Coconino County in northern Arizona. The northern limits of the lake extend at least as far as the Hite Crossing Bridge. A map centered at the confluence of the Escalante River 37°17′22″N 110°52′20″W / 37.28944°N 110.87222°W with the Colorado River gives a good view of the extent of the lake

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Lake Skadar

Lake Skadar

Lake Skadar — also called Lake Scutari, Lake Shkodër and Lake Shkodra — lies on the border of Montenegro with Albania, the largest lake in the Balkan Peninsula. It is named after the city of Shkodra in northern Albania.

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Lake St Clair

Lake St Clair

Lake St Clair is a lake in the Central Highlands area of Tasmania, Australia. It forms part of the Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park. It has an area of approx 45 sq km², and a maximum depth of 200 m, making it Australia's deepest lake. The Tasmanian Government has moved to allow development in national parks and conservations areas. An 'In principle' permit has been granted for the establishment of an 'eco-friendly' resort at Pumphouse Point at Lake St Clair.

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Lake Urmia

Lake Urmia

Lake Urmia is a salt lake in northwestern Iran near Iran's border with Turkey. The lake is between the Iranian provinces of East Azerbaijan and West Azerbaijan, west of the southern portion of the similarly shaped Caspian Sea. It is the largest lake in the Middle East, and the third largest saltwater lake on earth, with a surface area of approximately 5,200 km², 140 km length, 55 km width, and 16 m depth. It is protected as a national park by the Iranian Department of Environment.

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Lake Van

Lake Van

Lake Van is the largest lake in Turkey, located in the far east of the country in Van district. It is a saline soda lake, receiving water from numerous small streams that descend from the surrounding mountains. Lake Van is one of the world's largest endorheic lakes. The original outlet from the basin was blocked by an ancient volcanic eruption. Although Lake Van is situated at an altitude of 1,640 m with harsh winters, it does not freeze due to its high salinity except occasionally the shallow northern section.

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Lake Zurich

Lake Zurich

Lake Zurich is a lake in Switzerland, extending southeast of the city of Zurich. It is also known as Lake Zürich and Lake of Zürich. It lies approximately at co-ordinates 47°15′N 8°41′E / 47.250°N 8.683°E. Zürichsee is strictly the name of the part of the lake downstream of the dam at Rapperswil, mostly located within the canton of Zurich. The part upstream of the Rapperswil dam is called Obersee, and is shared between the cantons of St. Gallen and Schwyz.

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Kiyi

Kiyi

The kiyi is a species of freshwater whitefish, a deepwater cisco, endemic to the Great Lakes of North America. It previously inhabited Lake Superior, Lake Michigan, Lake Huron and Lake Ontario, but is now believed to persist only in Lake Superior where it is common. The various deepwater ciscos are also called chubs. The kiyi is part of the large group of related northern ciscos known as the Coregonus artedi complex.

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detroit river

Detroit River

a short river flowing from Lake St. Clair to Lake Erie along the border between the United States and Canada; one the busiest inland waterways in the world

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eyre

Eyre, Lake Eyre

a shallow salt lake in south central Australia about 35 feet below sea level; the largest lake in the country and the lowest point on the continent

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ilmen

Lake Ilmen, Ilmen

a lake in northwestern Russia; drains through the Volkhov River into Lake Ladoga

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john hanning speke

Speke, John Speke, John Hanning Speke

English explorer who with Sir Richard Burton was the first European to explore Lake Tanganyika; he also discovered Lake Victoria and named it (1827-1864)

— Princeton's WordNet

john speke

Speke, John Speke, John Hanning Speke

English explorer who with Sir Richard Burton was the first European to explore Lake Tanganyika; he also discovered Lake Victoria and named it (1827-1864)

— Princeton's WordNet

ladoga

Lake Ladoga, Ladoga

a lake in northwestern Russia to the north of St. Petersburg; the largest lake in Europe; drains through the Neva River into the Gulf of Finland

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lake eyre

Eyre, Lake Eyre

a shallow salt lake in south central Australia about 35 feet below sea level; the largest lake in the country and the lowest point on the continent

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lake ilmen

Lake Ilmen, Ilmen

a lake in northwestern Russia; drains through the Volkhov River into Lake Ladoga

— Princeton's WordNet

lake ladoga

Lake Ladoga, Ladoga

a lake in northwestern Russia to the north of St. Petersburg; the largest lake in Europe; drains through the Neva River into the Gulf of Finland

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lake onega

Lake Onega, Onega

lake in northwestern Russia near the border with Finland; second largest lake in Europe

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lake tana

Lake Tana, Lake Tsana

a lake in northern Ethiopia; the largest lake in Ethiopia and the source of the Blue Nile

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lake tsana

Lake Tana, Lake Tsana

a lake in northern Ethiopia; the largest lake in Ethiopia and the source of the Blue Nile

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lake vanern

Lake Vanern, Vanern

a lake in southwestern Sweden; the largest lake in Sweden

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lake victoria

Lake Victoria, Victoria Nyanza

the largest lake in Africa and the 2nd largest fresh water lake in the world; a headwaters reservoir for the Nile River

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lower peninsula

Lower Peninsula

the part of northern Michigan between Lake Michigan and Lake Huron

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niagara

Niagara, Niagara River

a river flowing from Lake Erie into Lake Ontario; forms boundary between Ontario and New York

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niagara river

Niagara, Niagara River

a river flowing from Lake Erie into Lake Ontario; forms boundary between Ontario and New York

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onega

Lake Onega, Onega

lake in northwestern Russia near the border with Finland; second largest lake in Europe

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speke

Speke, John Speke, John Hanning Speke

English explorer who with Sir Richard Burton was the first European to explore Lake Tanganyika; he also discovered Lake Victoria and named it (1827-1864)

— Princeton's WordNet

upper peninsula

Upper Peninsula

the peninsula between Lake Superior and Lake Michigan that forms the northwestern part of Michigan

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vanern

Lake Vanern, Vanern

a lake in southwestern Sweden; the largest lake in Sweden

— Princeton's WordNet

victoria nyanza

Lake Victoria, Victoria Nyanza

the largest lake in Africa and the 2nd largest fresh water lake in the world; a headwaters reservoir for the Nile River

— Princeton's WordNet

Lake Miwok

Lake Miwok

The Lake Miwok were a branch of the Miwok, a Native American people of Northern California. The Lake Miwok lived in the Clear Lake basin of what is now called Lake County.

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Lake Kivu

Lake Kivu

Lake Kivu is one of the African Great Lakes. It lies on the border between the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Rwanda, and is in the Albertine Rift, the western branch of the East African Rift. Lake Kivu empties into the Ruzizi River, which flows southwards into Lake Tanganyika. The name comes from kivu which means "lake" in Bantu language, just like the words tanganyika or nyanza.

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Sebago Lake

Sebago Lake

Sebago Lake is the deepest and second largest lake in the U.S. state of Maine. The lake is 316 feet deep at its deepest point, with a mean depth of 101 feet, covers about 45 square miles in surface area, has a length of 12 miles and a shoreline length of 105 miles. The surface is around 270 feet above sea level, so the deep bottom is below the present sea level. It is located in Cumberland County, Maine, and bordered by the towns of Casco, Naples, Raymond, Sebago, Standish and Windham. The seasonally occupied town of Frye Island is on an island in the lake.

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Lake Huron

Lake Huron

Lake Huron is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. Hydrologically, it comprises the easterly portion of Lake Michigan–Huron, having the same surface elevation as its westerly counterpart, to which it is connected by the wide Straits of Mackinac. It is bounded on the east by the Canadian province of Ontario and on the west by the state of Michigan in the United States. The name of the lake is derived from early French explorers who named it for the Huron people inhabiting the region. The huronian glaciation was named due to evidence collected from Lake Huron region.

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Lassen Volcanic National Park

Lassen Volcanic National Park

Lassen Volcanic National Park is a United States National Park in northeastern California. The dominant feature of the park is Lassen Peak, the largest plug dome volcano in the world and the southern-most volcano in the Cascade Range. Lassen Volcanic National Park started as two separate national monuments designated by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1907: Cinder Cone National Monument and Lassen Peak National Monument. The source of heat for volcanism in the Lassen area is subduction off the Northern California coast of the Gorda Plate diving below the North American Plate. The area surrounding Lassen Peak is still active with boiling mud pots, stinking fumaroles, and churning hot springs. Lassen Volcanic National Park is one of the few areas in the world where all four types of volcano can be found. The park is accessible via State Routes SR 89 and SR 44. SR 89 passes north-south through the park, beginning at SR 36 to the south and ending at SR 44 to the north. SR 89 passes immediately adjacent the base of Lassen Peak. There are a total of five vehicle entrances to the park: the north and south entrances on SR 89, and unpaved roads entering at Drakesbad and Juniper Lake in the south, and Butte Lake in the northeast. The Park can also be accessed by trails leading in from Caribou Wilderness to the east, as well as the Pacific Crest Trail, and two smaller trails leading in from Willow Lake and Little Willow Lake to the south.

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IJsselmeer

IJsselmeer

IJsselmeer is a shallow artificial lake of 1100 km² in the central Netherlands bordering the provinces of Flevoland, North Holland and Friesland, with an average depth of 5 to 6 m. The IJsselmeer is the largest lake in Western Europe. The IJsselmeer is a freshwater lake fed through the Ketelmeer by the river IJssel, which gives it its name. It is mainly fed by water from the Rhine since the IJssel is a branch of it. The internal capitalization in the spelling is because IJ is a digraph in Dutch, possibly a ligature, and sometimes considered a single letter. The IJsselmeer was created in 1932 when an inland sea, the Zuiderzee, was closed by a 32 km dam, the Afsluitdijk. This was part of a major hydraulic engineering project known as the Zuiderzee Works, that years later led to the reclaiming of land from the IJsselmeer, thereby diminishing the size of the lake. In 1975 the IJsselmeer was further split in two by the completion of the Houtribdijk, now also called Markerwaarddijk because it was originally designed to border the Markerwaard; this dike runs from Enkhuizen southeast to Lelystad. This former southern part of the IJsselmeer is now the hydrologically separate Markermeer.

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Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin is a U.S. state located in the north-central United States, in the Midwest and Great Lakes regions. It is bordered by Minnesota to the west, Iowa to the southwest, Illinois to the south, Lake Michigan to the east, Michigan to the northeast, and Lake Superior to the north. Wisconsin is the 23rd state by total area and the 20th most populous. The state capital is Madison, and its largest city is Milwaukee which is located on the western shore of Lake Michigan. The state comprises 72 counties. Wisconsin's geography is diverse, with the Northern Highland and Western Upland along with a part of the Central Plain occupying the western part of the state and lowlands stretching to the shore of Lake Michigan. Wisconsin is second to Michigan in the length of its Great Lakes coastline. Wisconsin is known as "America's Dairyland" because it is one of the nation's leading dairy producers. Manufacturing and tourism are also major contributors to the state's economy.

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Murray

Murray

Murray is a city situated on the Wasatch Front in the core of Salt Lake Valley in the U.S. state of Utah. Named for territorial governor Eli Murray, it is the state's fourteenth largest city. According to the 2010 census, Murray has approximately 46,746 residents. Murray is close to Salt Lake City, West Valley City, Sandy and West Jordan, Utah. Once teeming with heavy industry, Murray’s industrial sector now has little trace and has been replaced by major mercantile sectors. Known for its central location in Salt Lake County, Murray has been called the Hub of Salt Lake County. Murray is unlike most of its neighboring communities as it operates its own police, fire, power, water, library, and parks and recreation departments and has its own school district. While maintaining many of its own services, Murray has one of the lowest city tax rates in the state. Thousands of people each year visit Murray City Park for organized sports and its wooded areas. Murray is home to the Intermountain Medical Center, a huge medical campus that is also Murray’s largest employer. Murray has been designated a Tree City USA since 1977.

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Izabal Department

Izabal Department

Izabal is one of the 22 departments of Guatemala. Its coastal areas form part of the homeland of the Garifuna people. Izabal is bordered to the north by Belize, to the north east by the Gulf of Honduras, and to the east by Honduras, and by the Guatemalan departments of Petén to the north west, Alta Verapaz to the west, and Zacapa to the south. The department of Izabal surrounds Lago Izabal, Guatemala's largest lake. The Spanish Colonial fort of San Felipe, now a Guatemalan national monument, overlooks the point where the lake flows into the Río Dulce. The small town of Izabal is on the south shore of the lake; before the construction of the ports of Livingston and Puerto Barrios in the 19th century this was Guatemala's main Caribbean Sea port and was the original seat of Izabal department; nowadays, however, Izabal town is a remote village that gets little traffic. From the area around Lake Izabal, the Department of Izabal stretches along the Río Dulce to the coast of the Caribbean Sea. The department of Izabal includes the ports of Puerto Barrios, Santo Tomás de Castilla, Livingston and Guatemala's free trade zone Zolic. Izabal also includes the Pre-Columbian Maya ruins of Quirigua.

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Dye

Dye

A dye is a colored substance that has an affinity to the substrate to which it is being applied. The dye is generally applied in an aqueous solution, and requires a mordant to improve the fastness of the dye on the fiber. Both dyes and pigments appear to be colored because they absorb some wavelengths of light more than others. In contrast with a dye, a pigment generally is insoluble, and has no affinity for the substrate. Some dyes can be precipitated with an inert salt to produce a lake pigment, and based on the salt used they could be aluminum lake, calcium lake or barium lake pigments. Dyed flax fibers have been found in the Republic of Georgia dated back in a prehistoric cave to 36,000 BP. Archaeological evidence shows that, particularly in India and Phoenicia, dyeing has been widely carried out for over 5,000 years. The dyes were obtained from animal, vegetable or mineral origin, with none to very little processing. By far the greatest source of dyes has been from the plant kingdom, notably roots, berries, bark, leaves and wood, but only a few have ever been used on a commercial scale.

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Lake Poets

Lake Poets

The Lake Poets are a group of English poets who all lived in the Lake District of England at the turn of the nineteenth century. As a group, they followed no single "school" of thought or literary practice then known, their works were uniformly disparaged by the Edinburgh Review. They are considered part of the Romantic Movement. The three main figures of what has become known as the Lakes School are William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Robert Southey. They were associated with several other poets and writers, including Dorothy Wordsworth, Charles Lloyd, Hartley Coleridge, John Wilson, and Thomas De Quincey. The beauty of the Lake District has also inspired many other poets over the years, beyond the core Lake Poets. These include James Payn, Bryan Procter, Felicia Hemans, Walter Scott and Norman Nicholson.

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Lake Ladoga

Lake Ladoga

Lake Ladoga is a freshwater lake located in the Republic of Karelia and Leningrad Oblast in northwestern Russia just outside the outskirts of Saint Petersburg. It is the largest lake in Europe, and the 14th largest freshwater lake by area in the world.

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Lake Ontario

Lake Ontario

Lake Ontario is one of the five Great Lakes of North America. It is bounded on the north and southwest by the Canadian province of Ontario, and on the south by the American state of New York. Ontario, Canada's most populous province, was named for the lake. In the Wyandot language, ontarío means “Lake of Shining Waters”. It is the last in the Great Lakes chain and serves as the outlet to the Atlantic Ocean via the St. Lawrence River. Lake Ontario is also the only one of the five Great Lakes not to share a coast with the state of Michigan.

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Great Salt Lake Desert

Great Salt Lake Desert

The Great Salt Lake Desert is a large dry lake in northern Utah between the Great Salt Lake and the Nevada border which is noted for white sand from evaporite Lake Bonneville salt deposits. Several small mountain ranges crisscross through and along the edges of the desert, such as the Cedar Mountains, Lakeside Mountains, Silver Island Mountains, Hogup Mountains, Grassy Mountains, and Newfoundland Mountains. On the western edge of the desert, just across the border with Nevada, stands Pilot Peak in the Pilot Range. The desert is cool during the winter and includes unusual plants adapted to the dry conditions. Most of the desert receives less than 8 inches of annual precipitation. The salt crust covering the desert reforms each year when the rain evaporates. The military's Utah Test and Training Range is in the northern portion of the desert. The lowest part of Juab County is located just south of the Dugway Proving Grounds, about 1.5 miles northwest of the northwest corner of the Fish Springs Range.

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Michigan

Michigan

Michigan is a state in the Great Lakes region of the Midwestern United States. The name Michigan is the French form of the Ojibwa word mishigamaa, meaning "large water" or "large lake". Michigan is the 9th most populous of the 50 United States, with the 11th most extensive total area. Its capital is Lansing, and the largest city is Detroit. Michigan was admitted into the Union on January 26, 1837, as the 26th state. Michigan has the longest freshwater coastline of any political subdivision in the world, being bounded by four of the five Great Lakes, plus Lake Saint Clair. Michigan is one of the leading U.S. states for recreational boating. The state has 64,980 inland lakes and ponds. A person in the state is never more than six miles from a natural water source or more than 85 miles from a Great Lakes shoreline. It is the largest state by total area east of the Mississippi River. Michigan is the only state to consist of two peninsulas. The Lower Peninsula, to which the name Michigan was originally applied, is often noted to be shaped like a mitten. The Upper Peninsula is separated from the Lower Peninsula by the Straits of Mackinac, a five-mile channel that joins Lake Huron to Lake Michigan. The two peninsulas are connected by the Mackinac Bridge. While sparsely populated, the Upper Peninsula is economically important due to its status as a tourist destination as well as its abundance of natural resources.

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City Center

City Center

City Center is a light rail station in Downtown Salt Lake City, Utah, United States serviced by the Blue Line and Green Line of the Utah Transit Authority's TRAX system. The Blue Line has service from the Salt Lake Intermodal Hub in Downtown Salt Lake City to Sandy, and soon to Draper. The Green Line provides service from the Salt Lake City International Airport to West Valley City.

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Kootenay Lake

Kootenay Lake

Kootenay Lake is a lake located in British Columbia, Canada and is part of the Kootenay River. The lake has been raised by the Corra Linn Dam and has a dike system at the southern end, which, along with industry in the 1950s-70s, has changed the ecosystem in and around the water. Kootenay Lake has a year round toll-free ferry that crosses between Kootenay Bay and Balfour, and is a popular summer tourist destination.

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Lake Superior

Lake Superior

Lake Superior is the largest of the Great Lakes of North America. The lake is bounded by Ontario and Minnesota to the north and west, and Wisconsin and Michigan to the south. It is generally considered the largest freshwater lake in the world by surface area. It is the world's third-largest freshwater lake by volume.

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Arctic char

Arctic char

Arctic char or Arctic charr is a cold-water fish in the Salmonidae family, native to Arctic, sub-Arctic and alpine lakes and coastal waters. It breeds in fresh water, and populations can be either landlocked or anadromous, migrating to the sea. No other freshwater fish is found as far north. For instance, it is the only species of fish in Lake Hazen, on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic. It is one of the rarest fish species in Britain, found only in deep, cold, glacial lakes, mostly in Scotland, and is at risk from acidification. It is also found in deep mountain lakes in England, Ireland and Wales such as the Lake District. In other parts of its range, such as Scandinavia, it is much more common, and is fished extensively. It is also common in the Alps, where it can be found in lakes up to an altitude of 2,600 m above sea level, and in Iceland. In Siberia, it is known as golets and it has been introduced in lakes where it sometimes threatens less hardy endemic species, such as the small-mouth char and the long-finned char in Elgygytgyn Lake. The Arctic char is closely related to both salmon and lake trout, and has many characteristics of both. Individual fish can weigh 20 lb or more with record-sized fish having been taken by angling in northern Canada, where it is known as iqaluk or tariungmiutaq in Inuktitut. Generally, whole market-sized fish are between 2 and 5 lb. The flesh colour can range from a bright red to a pale pink.

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Rivers

Rivers

Rivers is a town in the Canadian province of Manitoba located 40 kilometres northwest of Brandon. Rivers had a population of 1,193 people in the 2006 census. Rivers was named in 1908 after Sir Charles Rivers Wilson, Chairman of the Board of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. It is 473 metres above sea level, and is entirely encircled by the Rural Municipality of Daly in the Westman Region. Agriculture, Health and related businesses provide economics for the community and area. The local schools fall under the Rolling River School Division, with a Nursery School, Rivers Elementary school, and Rivers Collegiate Institute. New playground equipment was installed in 2010 at the Rivers Elementary School and is put to good use by the whole community. The high school is a "Pay It Forward" school and works on programs to do just that. For decades Rivers Collegiate has been praised for its outstanding sports programs, including volleyball, basketball, and baseball. Nearby is Lake Wahtopanah. This lake is a part of the Rivers Provincial Park and provides good fishing both summer and winter. There are many campsites to be rented and walking trails, miniature golf or a delicious ice cream help pass those summer vacation days. Depending on the season, you will see a variety of users on the lake from swimming, waterskiing, sailing, to snowmobiling and ice fishing. There are permanent cottages and homes on both sides of the lake. With its length of 13 km, there is room for everyone.

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Tonlé Sap

Tonlé Sap

The Tonlé Sap is a combined lake and river system of major importance to Cambodia. The Tonlé Sap is the largest freshwater lake in South East Asia and is an ecological hot spot that was designated as a UNESCO biosphere in 1997. The Tonlé Sap is unusual for two reasons: its flow changes direction twice a year, and the portion that forms the lake expands and shrinks dramatically with the seasons. From November to May, Cambodia's dry season, the Tonlé Sap drains into the Mekong River at Phnom Penh. However, when the year's heavy rains begin in June, the Tonlé Sap backs up to form an enormous lake.

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Pioneer Day

Pioneer Day

Pioneer Day is an official holiday celebrated on July 24 in the U.S. state of Utah, with some celebrations in regions of surrounding states originally settled by Mormon pioneers. It commemorates the entry of Brigham Young and the first group of Mormon pioneers into the Salt Lake Valley on July 24, 1847, where the Latter-day Saints settled after being forced from Nauvoo, Illinois, and other locations in the eastern United States. Parades, fireworks, rodeos, and other festivities help commemorate the event. Similar to July 4, most governmental offices and many businesses are closed on Pioneer Day. In addition to being an official holiday in Utah, Pioneer Day is considered a special occasion by many members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. On Pioneer Day, some Latter-day Saints walk portions of the Mormon Trail or reenact entering the Salt Lake Valley by handcart. Latter-day Saints throughout the United States and around the world may celebrate July 24 in remembrance of the LDS Churches' pioneer era, with songs, dances, potlucks, and pioneer related activities. While the holiday has strong links to the LDS Church, it is a celebration of everyone, regardless of faith and nationality, who emigrated to the Salt Lake Valley during the pioneer era, which is generally considered to have ended with the 1869 arrival of the transcontinental railroad. Notable non-LDS American pioneers from this period include Episcopal Bishop Daniel Tuttle, who was responsible for Utah's first non-Mormon schools and first public hospital in the late 1800s. The Intertribal Powwow at Liberty Park in Salt Lake City honors the rich cultural heritage and contributions of the area's American Indians, helping Utahns to gain a deeper understanding of the region's history.

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Oxbow lake

Oxbow lake

An oxbow lake is a U-shaped body of water formed when a wide meander from the main stem of a river is cut off to create a lake. This landform is called an oxbow lake for the distinctive curved shape, named after part of a yoke for oxen. In Australia, an oxbow lake is called a billabong, derived from Wiradjuri, an indigenous language. The word "oxbow" can also refer to a U-shaped bend in a river or stream, whether or not it is cut off from the main stream.

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Lake Chad

Lake Chad

Lake Chad is a historically large, shallow, endorheic lake in Africa, the size of which has varied over the centuries. According to the Global Resource Information Database of the United Nations Environment Programme, it shrank as much as 95% from about 1963 to 1998, but "the 2007 image shows significant improvement over previous years." Lake Chad is economically important, providing water to more than 30 million people living in the four countries surrounding it on the edge of the Sahara Desert. It is the largest lake in the Chad Basin.

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Ice yachting

Ice yachting

Ice yachting is the sport of sailing and racing iceboats, also called ice yachts. It is practiced in Austria, Germany, Great Britain, Poland, Norway and Sweden, to some extent, and is very popular in the Netherlands and on the Gulf of Finland, but its highest development is in the United States and Canada. The Dutch ice yacht is a flat-bottomed boat resting crossways upon a planking about three feet wide and sixteen long, to which are affixed four steel runners, one each at bow, stern and each end of the planking. The rudder is a fifth runner fixed to a tiller. Heavy mainsails and jibs are generally used and the boat is built more for safety than for speed. The iceboat of the Gulf of Finland is a V-shaped frame with a heavy plank running from bow to stern, in which the mast is stepped. The stern or steering runner is worked by a tiller or wheel. The sail is a large lug and the boom and gaff are attached to the mast by travelers. The passengers sit upon planks or rope netting. According to some the Russian boats were Faster then the Dutch built ice-yachts. In 1790, ice yachting was in vogue on the Hudson River, its headquarters being at Poughkeepsie, New York. The type was a square box on three runners, the two forward, ones being nailed to the box and the third acting as a rudder operated by a tiller. The sail was a flatheaded sprit. This primitive style was in general use until 1853, when triangular frames with boxes for the crew aft and jib and mainsail rig were introduced. A heavy, hard-riding type soon developed, with short gaffs, low sails, large jibs and booms extending far over the stern. It was over canvassed and the mast was stepped directly over the runner plank, bringing the centre of sail-balance so far aft that the boats were apt to run away, and the over-canvassing frequently caused the windward runner to swing up into the air to a dangerous height. The largest and fastest example of this type, which prevailed until 1879, was Commodore J. A. Roosevelt's first Icicle, which measured 69 ft. over all and carried 1,070 sq ft. of canvas. In 1879 Mr. H. Relyea built the Robert Scott, which had a single backbone and guy wires, and it became the model for all Hudson River ice-yachts. Masts were now stepped farther forward, jibs were shortened, booms cut down, and the center of sail-balance was brought more inboard and higher up, causing the centers of effort and resistance to come more in harmony. The shallow steering-box became elliptical. In 1881 occurred the first race for the American Challenge Pennant, which represents the championship of the Hudson river, the clubs that competed included the Hudson River, North Shrewsbury, Orange Lake, Newburgh and Carthage Ice Yacht Clubs. The races are usually sailed five times round a triangle of which each leg measures one mile, at least two of the legs being to windward. Ice yachts are divided into four classes, carrying respectively 600 sq ft. of canvas or more, between. 450 and 600, between 300 and 450, and less than 300 sq ft. Ice-yachting is very popular on the Great Lakes, both in the United States and Canada, the Kingston, Ontario Club having a fleet of over 25 sail. Other important centers of the sport are the Lake Geneva, Wisconsin area, with an average of twenty five saling days a season for the last five years, Lakes Minnetonka and White Bear in Minnesota, Lakes Winnebago and Pepin in Wisconsin, Bar Harbor Lake in Maine, the St. Lawrence River, Quinte Bay and Lake Champlain.²

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Crown Point

Crown Point

Crown Point is a city in and the county seat of Lake County, Indiana, United States. The population was 27,317 at the 2010 census. The city was incorporated in 1868. On October 31, 1834, Solon Robinson and his family became the first settlers to an area that later became Crown Point. Because of its location, Crown Point is known as the "Hub of Lake County". The city is surrounded by Merrillville to the north, Winfield to the east, Cedar Lake to the southwest, St. John to the west, and unincorporated Schererville to the northwest. The southern and southeastern parts of Crown Point border some unincorporated areas of Lake County.

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Nyasa

Nyasa

Nyasa, also spelled Nyassa or Niassa, is a common word for "lake" in the languages spoken around what is now known as Lake Malawi. In the colonial period that lake was called Lake Nyasa and Malawi was named Nyasaland.

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Golden Horseshoe

Golden Horseshoe

The Golden Horseshoe is a subregion of Southern Ontario, Canada which lies at the western end of Lake Ontario with outer boundaries stretching south to Lake Erie and north to Georgian Bay. The region is densely populated and industrialized. Most of it is also part of the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, Quebec City–Windsor Corridor and the Great Lakes Megalopolis. With a population of 8.76 million people in 2011, the Golden Horseshoe makes up over 26% of the population of Canada and contains more than 68% of Ontario's population, making it one of the largest population concentrations in North America. Although it is a geographically named sub-region of Southern Ontario, the Greater Golden Horseshoe is also used today to describe the metropolitan region that stretches across the area in totality, including smaller centres outside of the core region. The core of the region starts from Niagara Falls at the eastern end of the Niagara Peninsula and extends west, wrapping around the western end of Lake Ontario at Hamilton and then turning northeast to its anchor city Toronto, before finally terminating at Oshawa, just east of Toronto. The wider region spreads inland in all directions away from the Lake Ontario shoreline, southwest to Brantford, west to the Kitchener-Waterloo area, north to Barrie, and northeast to Peterborough. The whole region's area covers approximately 33,500 km², out of this, 7,300 km² or approximately 22% of the area is covered by the environmentally protected Greenbelt.

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Maurepas

Maurepas

Maurepas is an unincorporated community in the south/southwestern area of Livingston Parish, Louisiana, United States. It is also known as Head of Island to local residents. It is surrounded by Lake Maurepas, Bayou Pierre, the Amite River, Blind River, and Petite River. Another waterway located adjacent to Maurepas, is the Amite River Diversion Canal, which has quickly become a desirable residential area due to the water access. The area of Maurepas is located along the Livingston Parish/Ascension Parish line. There are multiple restaurants, boat launch facilities, and small stores which helps residents from having to travel a far distance to buy supplies. Lake Maurepas is located to the west of Lake Ponchartrain, Louisiana's largest lake. The area has one school, Maurepas High School, which ranges in grades from PK-12. There is also a small number of Churches in the area.

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Lake Mead

Lake Mead

Lake Mead is the largest reservoir in the United States in maximum water capacity. It is located on the Colorado River about 24 mi from the Strip southeast of Las Vegas, Nevada, in the states of Nevada and Arizona. Formed by the Hoover Dam, Lake Mead is 112 miles long when the lake is full, has 550 miles of shoreline, is around 500 feet at greatest depth, has 247 square miles of surface, and when filled to capacity, 28 million acre-feet of water. However, the lake has not reached this capacity in since 1983 due to increasing droughts.

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Eastside

Eastside

The Eastside is the collective term for the eastern suburbs of Seattle, Washington, United States. The name derives from the fact that these communities lie east of Seattle. There is no formal definition of the Eastside and the exact cities and towns that comprise the Eastside are a matter of dispute. The following cities are included in most definitions: Bellevue, Issaquah, Kirkland, Newcastle, Mercer Island and Redmond. Sammamish is most often grouped with these core cities, so that all of the cities and towns between Lake Washington and Lake Sammamish, as well as the Sammamish Plateau, are included within the Eastside. The incorporated neighborhoods west of Bellevue, collectively known as the Gold Coast, are usually considered part of the Eastside. These areas include Beaux Arts Village, Clyde Hill, Hunts Point, Medina, and Yarrow Point. The Northshore cities of Kenmore, Bothell, and Woodinville may be considered part of the Eastside, as each city contains portions that are east of the lake and south of its northernmost tip. Similarly, on the southeast tip of Lake Washington, Renton may also be included. The most expansive definitions of the Eastside can include one or more of the incorporated cities in the Snoqualmie Valley, including Duvall, Carnation, Fall City, North Bend, and Snoqualmie.

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Cape Sable

Cape Sable

Cape Sable, Florida, is the southernmost point of the US mainland and mainland Florida. It is located in southwestern Florida, in Monroe County, and is part of the Everglades National Park. The cape is a peninsula issuing from the southeastern part of the Florida mainland, running west and curving around to the north, reaching Ponce de Leon Bay, at the mouth of the Shark River. It forms the southern and western margins of Whitewater Bay. There are three prominent points on the cape, East Cape, which is the actual southernmost point of the Florida and United States mainland and the location of Lake Ingraham, the southernmost lake in the United States of America, Middle Cape, also known as Palm Point, and Northwest Cape. East Cape is at coordinates 25°07′02″N 81°05′17″W / 25.11722°N 81.08806°W. The cape has many lakes and some magnificent beaches. The cape is home to the Mangrove Diamondback Terrapin and the Florida Gopher Tortoise. Before Hurricane Donna reduced their range, more than 3,000 of the now-endangered Cape Sable Seaside Sparrows used the cape. Nearly the full length of the cape facing Florida Bay and the Gulf of Mexico is a fine sand beach extending inland less than 100 yards. Behind the beach in the eastern and middle parts of the cape is a marl prairie, extending from Flamingo to approximately Northwest Point. Inland from the marl prairie, and over all of the northern part of the cape behind the beaches, is a complex of marshes and mangrove covered land. The largest lake on the cape is Lake Ingraham, which is long and narrow, running just behind the beach from near East Cape to past Middle Cape.

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Aral Sea

Aral Sea

The Aral Sea was a lake lying between Kazakhstan in the north and Karakalpakstan, an autonomous region of Uzbekistan, in the south. The name roughly translates as "Sea of Islands", referring to about 1,534 islands that once dotted its waters; in Old Turkic aral means "island" and "thicket". However, the name 'Aral' derives from the Sanskrit word 'Arul' which means 'water'. Formerly one of the four largest lakes in the world with an area of 68,000 square kilometres, the Aral Sea has been steadily shrinking since the 1960s after the rivers that fed it were diverted by Soviet irrigation projects. By 2007, it had declined to 10% of its original size, splitting into four lakes – the North Aral Sea, the eastern and western basins of the once far larger South Aral Sea, and one smaller lake between the North and South Aral Seas. By 2009, the southeastern lake had disappeared and the southwestern lake had retreated to a thin strip at the extreme west of the former southern sea. The maximum depth of the North Aral Sea is 42 m.

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Schelly

Schelly

The schelly is a designation for four populations of freshwater whitefish in the English Lake District, Cumbria. The native populations of this fish inhabit the Brothers Water, Haweswater, Red Tarn and Ullswater, and occupy a total area of about 20 square kilometers. Apart from Haweswater, the populations appear stable. At Haweswater, the fishery officers are now culling all of the cormorants that visit the lake, in order to protect the endangered fish. An analysis of reservoir management data over a 30 year period has revealed that the decline of the schelly population is associated with increased water abstraction and reduced water levels. Entrapment during abstraction is not significant. Year class strength is probably determined by lake levels during the January-March spawning and incubation period whereas subsequent growth rate is influenced by lake levels during June-October. In Britain the schelly populations are usually considered as members of the widespread Eurasian whitefish species Coregonus lavaretus, or common whitefish, as with the Welsh gwyniad and Scottish powan. The schelly is however listed as a distinct species of Coregonus, C. stigmaticus, in FishBase and by the IUCN.

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Reindeer Lake

Reindeer Lake

Reindeer Lake is a lake in Western Canada located on the border between northeastern Saskatchewan and northwestern Manitoba, with the majority in Saskatchewan. The name of the lake appears to be a translation of the Algonquian name. It is the second-largest lake in Saskatchewan and the ninth largest in Canada.

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Lake Balaton

Lake Balaton

Lake Balaton, or The Balaton, is a freshwater lake in the Transdanubian region of Hungary. It is the largest lake in Central Europe, and one of its foremost tourist destinations. The Zala River provides the largest inflow of water to the lake, and the canalized Sió is the only outflow. The mountainous region of the northern shore is known both for its historic character and as a major wine region, while the flat southern shore is known for its resort towns. Balatonfüred and Hévíz developed early as resorts for the wealthy, but it was not until the late 19th century when landowners, with their vines destroyed by lice, began building summer homes to rent out to the burgeoning middle classes.

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Bregenz

Bregenz

Bregenz is the capital of Vorarlberg, the westernmost federal state of Austria. The city is located on the eastern shores of Lake Constance, the third-largest freshwater lake in Central Europe, between Switzerland in the west and Germany in the northwest. The city is situated on a plateau falling in a series of terraces to the lake at the foot of Pfänder mountain. It is a junction of the arterial roads from the Rhine valley to the German Alpine foothills, with cruise ship services on Lake Constance. Bregenz is twinned with Bangor in Northern Ireland, and various exchange trips take place between the two places. Another twin town is Acre in Israel. It is especially famous for the annual summer music festival Bregenzer Festspiele.

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Finger Lakes

Finger Lakes

The Finger Lakes are a pattern of lakes in the west-central section of Upstate New York in the United States. This region is defined as a bioregion. They are a popular tourist destination. The lakes are long and narrow, and are oriented roughly on a north-south axis. The two longest, Cayuga Lake and Seneca Lake, are among the deepest in America. Both are close to 40 miles from end to end, and never more than 3.5 miles wide. Cayuga is the longest and Seneca the largest in total area. Seneca is the deepest, followed by Cayuga, with their bottoms well below sea level. These largest lakes resemble the others in shape, which collectively reminded early map-makers of human fingers. Oneida Lake is generally not considered one of the Finger Lakes, but it is sometimes called the "thumb", while Seneca Lake is the middle finger.

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Lacrimal lake

Lacrimal lake

The lacrimal lake is the pool of tears in the lower conjunctival cul-de-sac, which drains into the opening of the tear drainage system. The volume of the lacrimal lake has been estimated to be between 7 and 10 µL. Although the lacrimal lake usually contains 7-10 µL of tears, the maximum fluid it can usually hold is 25-30 µL before tearing occurs. Aging usually causes the eyelids to become more loose which in turn enables the lacrimal lake to hold even more fluid. The lacrimal papilla is an elevation located on the medial canthus where the punctum is found.

— Freebase

Buttermere

Buttermere

Buttermere is a lake in the English Lake District in North West England. The adjacent village of Buttermere takes its name from the lake. Historically within the former county of Cumberland, the lake is now within the county of Cumbria. It is owned by the National Trust, forming part of their Buttermere and Ennerdale property.

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Thorny skate

Thorny skate

The thorny skate is a species of fish in Rajidae family. It mainly lives near the bottom of the coastline of North Atlantic Ocean in depths ranging from 20 to 1000 metres and temperatures from 1 to 10 degrees Celsius. It was also located in Lake Melville, near Goose Bay, Labrador. Rivers empty into the lake and the lake bottom is mostly made up of sand. Thorny skates have been caught in this lake in the 1980s by ice fishermen when outside temperatures were -30 degrees C.

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Lake trout

Lake trout

Lake trout is a freshwater char living mainly in lakes in northern North America. Other names for it include mackinaw, lake char, touladi, togue, and grey trout. In Lake Superior, it can also be variously known as siscowet, paperbelly and lean. The lake trout is prized both as a game fish and as a food fish.

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Seamer

Seamer

Seamer is a village and civil parish in the Scarborough district of North Yorkshire, England. Its name is first attested in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Semær, with later medieval attestations including Semare and Samara. The first element is Old English sǣ 'lake'; the spelling of the second element suggests variation between Old English mere 'sea' and Old Norse marr 'lake, sea, pool'. The dominant meaning of the name therefore seems to have been 'lake by the sea'. 'The reference was to a lake now drained in the area SW of the church at Seamer Carr TA 0281. According to the 2011 UK census, Seamer parish had a population of 4,335, an increase on the 2001 UK census figure of 3,774. It is served by a railway station which is on the Yorkshire Coast Line that runs between Hull and Scarborough. It is also served by the Scarborough branch of the North TransPennine service from York. It also has a school, and has several communal clubs held around the village The Star Carr Mesolithic archaeological site is located in the parish. In August 2010, the team announced that they had discovered the oldest known house in Britain, dated to 10,500 years before the present. The Star Carr house was comparable to an Iron Age roundhouse, about 3.5 metres wide and made of wood. It is believed to have been used for between 200–500 years after its construction.

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Lake Manchar

Lake Manchar

Lake Manchar is the largest freshwater lake in Pakistan and one of Asia's largest. It is located west of the Indus River, in Jamshoro District, Sindh. The area of the lake fluctuates with the seasons from as little as 350 km² to as much as 520 km². The lake collects water from numerous small streams in the Kirthar Mountains and empties into the Indus River.

— Freebase

Lake Albert

Lake Albert

Lake Albert – also Albert Nyanza and formerly Lake Mobutu Sese Seko – is one of the African Great Lakes. It is Africa's seventh-largest lake, and the world's twenty-seventh largest lake by volume.

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Lake George

Lake George

Lake George is a town in Warren County, New York, USA. The population was 3,578 at the 2000 census. The town is named after the lake, Lake George. Within the town is a village also named Lake George. The town is part of the Glens Falls Metropolitan Statistical Area.

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Lake Itasca

Lake Itasca

Lake Itasca is a small glacial lake, approximately 1.8 square miles in area, in the Headwaters area of north central Minnesota. The lake is located in southeastern Clearwater County within Itasca State Park and it has an average depth of 20–35 feet, and is 1,475 ft above sea level. The Ojibwe name for "Lake Itasca" was Omashkoozo-zaaga'igan; this was changed by Henry Schoolcraft to "Itasca", coined from a combination of the Latin words veritas and caput., though it is sometimes misinterpreted as "true head." It is one of several examples of pseudo-Indian place names created by Schoolcraft.

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Lake Izabal

Lake Izabal

Lago de Izabal, also known as the Golfo Dulce, is the largest lake in Guatemala with a surface area of 589.6 km² and a maximum depth is 18 m. The Polochic River is the largest river that drains into the lake. The lake which is only a metre above sea level drains into the Gulf of Honduras of the Caribbean Sea through the smaller Golfete Dulce which is at sea level and the navigable Rio Dulce. The well preserved colonial Castillo de San Felipe de Lara guarded this lake against pirate attacks, and there are some ancient sunken ships nearby. It is home to several species including the manatee, jaguar, spider monkey and howler monkey, and is a wonderful place for birdwatching.

— Freebase

Lake Malawi

Lake Malawi

Lake Malawi, is an African Great Lake and the southernmost lake in the East African Rift system, located between Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania. The third largest and second deepest lake in Africa, it is also the ninth largest in the world. It is reportedly the habitat of more species of fish than any other body of freshwater, including more than 1000 species of cichlids, and was officially declared a reserve by the Government of Mozambique on June 10, 2011.

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Lake Manitoba

Lake Manitoba

Lake Manitoba is Canada's thirteenth largest lake and the world's 33rd largest freshwater lake. It is in central North America, in the Canadian province of Manitoba, which is named after the lake. It is located about 75 km northwest of the province's capital, Winnipeg, at 51°0′N 98°45′W / 51.000°N 98.750°W.

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Lake Melville

Lake Melville

Lake Melville is a saltwater tidal extension of Hamilton Inlet on the Labrador coast in the Canadian province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Comprising 3,069 square kilometres, and stretching 140 kilometres inland to Happy Valley-Goose Bay, it forms part of the largest estuary in the province, primarily draining the Churchill River and Naskaupi River watersheds. Both Lake Melville and Hamilton Inlet are encircled by mountains, with primary settlements at Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Northwest River, and Sheshatshiu. A ferry service runs on Lake Melville and Hamilton Inlet, connecting a number communities including Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Rigolet and Cartwright. Lake Melville was named for Viscount Melville, a prominent British politician.

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Lake St. John

Lake St. John

Lake St. John was a federal electoral district in Quebec, Canada, that was represented in the Canadian House of Commons from 1925 to 1935. This riding was created in 1924 form parts of Chicoutimi—Saguenay riding. It consisted of the Counties of Lake St. John East and Lake St. John West. The electoral district was abolished in 1933 when it was amalgamated into Lake St-John—Roberval riding.

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Lake Wood

Lake Wood

Lake Wood is a reservoir on the Guadalupe River 4 miles west of the town of Gonzales in Gonzales County, Texas. The reservoir was formed in 1931 by the construction of a dam to provide hydroelectric power to the area. Management of the dam and lake was assumed by the Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority on May 1, 1963. Lake Wood also serves as a venue for outdoor recreation, including fishing and boating. Lake Wood is also known locally as H-5 Reservoir or Guadalupe Reservoir H-5.

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Lake Worth

Lake Worth

Lake Worth is a city in Palm Beach County, Florida, which takes its name from the body of water along its eastern border, originally called "Lake Worth", and now generally known as the Lake Worth Lagoon. The lake itself was named for General William J. Worth, who led U.S. forces during the last part of the Second Seminole War. As of 2010, the population estimated by the U.S. Census Bureau was 34,910. The city is part of the South Florida metropolitan area, which is home to approximately 5,564,000.

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Rien

Rien

Rien is a lake in the municipality of Røros in Sør-Trøndelag county, Norway. The 14.87-square-kilometre lake is located on the Glomma river, just north of the lake Aursunden. The village of Brekken lies about 6 kilometres south of the lake.

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Canandaigua Lake

Canandaigua Lake

Canandaigua Lake is the fourth largest of the Finger Lakes, in the U.S. state of New York. The city of Canandaigua is located at the northern shore of the lake and the village of Naples is just a few miles south of the southern end. Travelling west to east in the Finger Lakes region, it is the first of the major, or larger Finger Lakes. The name Canandaigua is derived from the Seneca name spelled variously Kanandarque, Ganondagan, Ga-nun-da-gwa, or in a modern transcription, tganǫdæ:gwęh, which means "the chosen spot", or "at the chosen town". Canandaigua Lake is 15.5 miles long, 1.5 miles wide, and has a shoreline of 35.9 miles. Near the northern end is Squaw Island. About fifty percent of the surrounding land is in forest, but most of the remainder is under agriculture. Of 35.9 miles of shoreline, 34.7 miles are private and 1.2 miles are public. Canandaigua Lake State Marine Park is located in the City of Canandaigua on the north end. It offers a boat launch for powerboats and fishing access from May to mid-October.

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Bellagio, Lombardy

Bellagio, Lombardy

Bellagio is a comune in the Province of Como in the Italian region Lombardy, located on Lake Como. It has long been famous for its setting at the intersection of the three branches of the Y-shaped lake, which is also known as Lario. Bellagio is situated at the tip of the peninsula separating the lake's two southern arms, with the Alps visible across the lake to the north.

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Regillus

Regillus

Regillus was an ancient lake of Latium, Italy, famous in the legendary history of Rome as the lake in the neighborhood of which occurred the battle which finally decided the hegemony of Rome in Latium. During the battle, so runs the story, the dictator Postumius vowed a temple to Castor and Pollux, who were specially venerated in Tusculum, the chief city of the Latins, who appeared during the battle, and brought the news of the victory to Rome, watering their horses at the spring of Juturna, close to which their temple in the Forum was erected. There can be little doubt that the lake actually existed. Of the various identifications proposed, the best is that of Prof. L. Pareti, who finds it in a now dry crater lake, drained by an emissarium, the date of which is uncertain, north of Frascati. Most of the other sites proposed are not, as Regillus should be, within the limits of the territory of Tusculum.

— Freebase

depth

depth

In maritime/hydrographic use, the vertical distance from the plane of the hydrographic datum to the bed of the sea, lake, or river.

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

bed

bed

the ground beneath an ocean, river, or lake

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

reservoir

reservoir

a lake that provides houses with a water supply

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

shore

shore

the land next to the ocean, a lake, a river, etc.

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary


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