Definitions containing la bruyère, jean de

We've found 250 definitions:

Horoscope

Horoscope

the planisphere invented by Jean Paduanus

— Webster Dictionary

Jane

Jane

a kind of twilled cotton cloth. See Jean

— Webster Dictionary

Rousseau

Rousseau

Jean-Jacques Rousseau Swiss philosopher

— Wiktionary

jean

jean

Made of denim (as "jean jacket").

— Wiktionary

Moxie Jean

Moxie Jean

Moxie Jean is an upscale resale site that allows busy moms to buy and sell high-quality, brand-name kids' clothes. By providing a curated stylish selection of like-new kids’ clothes, Moxie Jean makes it easy to keep up with fast-growing little bodies, from Newborn to size 8. And with the free, postage-paid Moxie Jean Mailer Bag, it’s easier than ever to clean out the kids’ closets and get cash or credit toward the clothes they need next.Moxie Jean partners with charities such as the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago to hold “Clean Out Your Closet Fundraisers” where supporters can donate their credits to the patients served by the hospital. Moxie Jean, launched in July of this year and was founded by Chicago moms Sharon Schneider (CEO) and Sandra Pinter (COO).

— CrunchBase

Jeannie

Jeannie

A diminutive of the female given name Jean.

— Wiktionary

Jeanie

Jeanie

A diminutive of the female given name Jean.

— Wiktionary

emile

Emile

the boy whose upbringing was described by Jean-Jacques Rousseau

— Princeton's WordNet

Parisine

Parisine

A typeface developed for the Paris Metro by Jean-Franu00E7ois Porchez

— Wiktionary

Molieresque

Molieresque

Reminiscent of (Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, 1622u20131673), French playwright and actor.

— Wiktionary

Kerouacian

Kerouacian

Of or pertaining to Jean-Louis "Jack" Kerouac (1922-1969), American beat novelist and poet.

— Wiktionary

dungaree

dungaree

Heavy denim fabric, often blue; blue jean material.

— Wiktionary

Sartrean

Sartrean

Of or pertaining to Jean-Paul Sartre or his works

— Wiktionary

Jeanette

Jeanette

, a Scottish diminutive of Jean, or an anglicized form of Jeannette.

— Wiktionary

Godardian

Godardian

Of or pertaining to Jean-Luc Godard (born 1930) or his cinematic style.

— Wiktionary

assimilation

assimilation

in the theories of Jean Piaget: the application of a general schema to a particular instance

— Princeton's WordNet

rousseauan

Rousseauan

of or pertaining to or characteristic of French philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778)

— Princeton's WordNet

Pestalozzian

Pestalozzian

belonging to, or characteristic of, a system of elementary education which combined manual training with other instruction, advocated and practiced by Jean Henri Pestalozzi (1746-1827), a Swiss teacher

— Webster Dictionary

Arc de Triomphe

Arc de Triomphe

A monument in Paris, designed by Jean Chalgrin in 1806, started in 1808 and inaugurated in 1836.

— Wiktionary

piagetian

Piagetian

of or relating to or like or in the manner of Jean Piaget

— Princeton's WordNet

Rameau

Rameau

of French origin. Widely known as the surname of the French composer Jean-Philippe Rameau (1683-1764).

— Wiktionary

accommodation

accommodation

in the theories of Jean Piaget: the modification of internal representations in order to accommodate a changing knowledge of reality

— Princeton's WordNet

arthur honegger

Honegger, Arthur Honegger

Swiss composer (born in France) who was the founding member of a group in Paris that included Erik Satie and Darius Milhaud and Francis Poulenc and Jean Cocteau (1892-1955)

— Princeton's WordNet

honegger

Honegger, Arthur Honegger

Swiss composer (born in France) who was the founding member of a group in Paris that included Erik Satie and Darius Milhaud and Francis Poulenc and Jean Cocteau (1892-1955)

— Princeton's WordNet

Labadist

Labadist

a follower of Jean de Labadie, a religious teacher of the 17th century, who left the Roman Catholic Church and taught a kind of mysticism, and the obligation of community of property among Christians

— Webster Dictionary

La Bruyère

La Bruyère

La Bruyère is a Walloon municipality of Belgium located in the province of Namur. It consists of the former municipalities of Emines, Rhisnes, Villers-lez-Heest, Warisoulx, Bovesse, Meux and Saint-Denis-Bovesse. The village of Rhisnes is the administrative centre of the municipality.

— Freebase

Chien de Jean de Nivelle

Chien de Jean de Nivelle

Chien de Jean de Nivelle is an animal or a man who does not want to obey when called, as in the expression Here comes the dog of Jean de Nivelle, it flees when it is called. The origins of the expression are unknown. It is thought that this Jean de Nivelle refused to help his father, Jean de Montmorency, to support Louis XI in the war against the duke of Burgundy. Furious, his father disinherited him and Jean de Nivelle fled to Flanders, hoping to avoid further troubles.

— Freebase

Profil

Profil

Profil was a band that represented France in Eurovision Song Contest 1980 with the entry Hè Hé M'sieurs dames. The band members were: Martine Havet, Martine Bauer, Francis Rignault, Jean-Claude Corbel and Jean-Pierre Izbinski.

— Freebase

Positif

Positif

Positif was a 1984 album by Jean-Jacques Goldman, his third solo album sung in French. It was recorded at Studio Gang by Olivier do Espirito Santo and Jean-Pierre Janiaud. It was released by JRG/BMG Music Publishing. It was certified diamond in France for sales of 1,000,000 copies.

— Freebase

Jean-Claude

Jean-Claude

Jean-Claude is a fictional character in the Anita Blake: Vampire Hunter series of novels by Laurell K. Hamilton. Within the novels, Jean-Claude's role is as one of the primary love interests of the series heroine, Anita Blake. Jean-Claude is a French-born vampire who is over 400–600 years old. He was a favorite of Belle Morte for his eyes, and, like many vampires of Belle Morte's line, Jean-Claude was selected for his almost perfect mortal beauty. He arrived in St. Louis and, indeed, the United States itself to escape Belle Morte's court with the help of Augustine. Jean-Claude became the Master Vampire of St. Louis after Anita Blake killed Nikolaos. Together with Richard Zeeman, Jean-Claude is a member of Anita's first triumvirate. Jean-Claude's daytime lair is the sub-basement of the Circus of the Damned. As owner of the "JC Corporation," he also owns and runs Guilty Pleasures, The Laughing Corpse, and Danse Macabre, as well as other clubs.

— Freebase

Jean Cocteau

Jean Cocteau

Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau was a French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, playwright, artist and filmmaker. Cocteau is best known for his novel Les Enfants terribles, and the films Blood of a Poet, Les Parents terribles, Beauty and the Beast and Orpheus. His circle of associates, friends and lovers included Kenneth Anger, Pablo Picasso, Jean Hugo, Jean Marais, Henri Bernstein, Yul Brynner, Marlene Dietrich, Coco Chanel, Erik Satie, Igor Stravinsky, María Félix, Édith Piaf and Raymond Radiguet.

— Freebase

Divine Doctor

Divine Doctor

Jean de Ruysbroek, the mystic (1294-1381).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Redbeard

Redbeard

Redbeard is a series of Belgian comic books, originally published in French, created by writer Jean-Michel Charlier and artist Victor Hubinon. After their deaths the series was continued by other artists, including Jijé, Christian Gaty, Patrice Pellerin, Jean Ollivier, Christian Perrissin and Marc Bourgne.

— Freebase

Ecstatic Doctor

Ecstatic Doctor

Jean Ruysbroek, a schoolman given to mysticism (1294-1381).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

existentialism

existentialism

A twentieth-century philosophical movement emphasizing the uniqueness of each human existence in freely making its self-defining choices, with foundations in the thought of Su00F8ren Kierkegaard (1813-55) and Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900) and notably represented in the works of Karl Jaspers (1883-1969), Gabriel Marcel (1887-1973), Martin Heidegger (1889-1976), and Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-80).

— Wiktionary

Hans Arp

Hans Arp

Jean Arp / Hans Arp was a German-French, or Alsatian, sculptor, painter, poet and abstract artist in other media such as torn and pasted paper. When Arp spoke in German he referred to himself as "Hans", and when he spoke in French he referred to himself as "Jean". Many people believe that he was born Hans and later changed his name to Jean, but this is not the case.

— Freebase

Bosman ruling

Bosman ruling

Union Royale Belge des Sociétés de Football Association ASBL v Jean-Marc Bosman C-415/93 is a 1995 European Court of Justice decision concerning freedom of movement for workers, freedom of association, and direct effect of article 39 of the EC Treaty. The case was an important decision on the free movement of labour and had a profound effect on the transfers of football players within the European Union. The decision banned restrictions on foreign EU players within national leagues and allowed players in the EU to move to another club at the end of a contract without a transfer fee being paid. The ruling was made in a consolidation of three separate legal cases, all involving Belgian player Jean-Marc Bosman: ⁕Belgian Football Association v Jean-Marc Bosman ⁕R.F.C. de Liège v Jean-Marc Bosman and others ⁕UEFA v Jean-Marc Bosman

— Freebase

Androuet du Cerceau

Androuet du Cerceau

Androuet du Cerceau was a family of French architects and designers active in the 16th and early 17th century. ⁕Jacques I Androuet du Cerceau ⁕Jean Baptiste Androuet du Cerceau ⁕Jacques Androuet II du Cerceau ⁕Jean Androuet du Cerceau

— Freebase

Saint-Jean-de-Luz

Saint-Jean-de-Luz

Saint-Jean-de-Luz is a commune in the Pyrénées-Atlantiques department in south-western France. Saint-Jean-de-Luz is part of the Basque province of Labourd and of the Basque Eurocity Bayonne-San Sebastián.

— Freebase

Blondel de Nesle

Blondel de Nesle

Blondel de Nesle - either Jean I of Nesle or his son Jean II of Nesle - was a French trouvère. The name 'Blondel de Nesle' is attached to twenty-four or twenty-five courtly songs. He was identified in 1942, by Holger Dyggve, as Jean II of Nesle, who was nicknamed 'Blondel' for his long blond hair. He married at the time of his father's death in 1202, and that same year, went on the Fourth Crusade; he later fought in the Albigensian Crusade. However, in 1994, Yvan Lepage suggested that the poet may have been Jean I, father of Jean II, who was Lord of Nesle from 1180 to 1202; this Jean took part in the Third Crusade, which may explain the subsequent legend linking him with Richard I of England. If the works are correctly identified and dated, he was a significant influence on his European contemporaries, who made much use of his melodies.. His works are fairly conventional, and several have been recorded in modern times.

— Freebase

Blue Jean

Blue Jean

"Blue Jean" is a song from the album Tonight by David Bowie. One of only two tracks on the album to be written entirely by Bowie, it was released as a single ahead of the album. Loosely inspired by Eddie Cochran, the song was an uncomplicated composition, recalling earlier Bowie rockers such as "The Jean Genie," and is generally regarded as one of the better parts of a disappointing album. Following the huge commercial success of Bowie's previous album, Let's Dance, its singles and the Serious Moonlight Tour, "Blue Jean" was launched with massive promotion. Julien Temple was engaged to direct a 21-minute short film to promote the song, Blue Jean. The song performance segment from this was also used as a more conventional music video. "Blue Jean" was a hit in the UK and America, reaching No. 6 and No. 8, respectively. The song would remain in Bowie's live repertoire for the rest of his career, being performed on tours in 1987, 1990 and 2004.

— Freebase

Démodé

Démodé

Démodé is Jean-Jacques Goldman first solo album sung in French, set in 1981. It was recorded at the Studios Pathé in Paris and the Studio Vénus in Longueville. The album has also been released under the names A l'envers and Jean-Jacques Goldman. It was certified platinum in France for sales of 300,000 copies.

— Freebase

Pilote

Pilote

Pilote was a French comics periodical published from 1959 to 1989. Showcasing most of the major French or Belgian comics talents of its day the magazine introduced major series such as Astérix, Barbe-Rouge, Blueberry, Achille Talon, and Valérian et Laureline. Major comics writers like René Goscinny, Jean-Michel Charlier, Greg, Pierre Christin and Jacques Lob were featured in the magazine, as were artists such as Jijé, Morris, Albert Uderzo, Jean Giraud, Enki Bilal, Jean-Claude Mézières, Jacques Tardi, Philippe Druillet, Marcel Gotlib, Alexis, and Annie Goetzinger. Pilote also published several international talents such as Hugo Pratt, Frank Bellamy and Robert Crumb.

— Freebase

Miss Julie

Miss Julie

Miss Julie is a naturalistic play written in 1888 by August Strindberg dealing with class, love, lust, the battle of the sexes, and the interaction among them. Set on Midsummer's Eve on the estate of a Count in Sweden, the young woman of the title, attempting to escape an existence cramped by social mores and have a little fun, dances at the servants' annual midsummer party, where she is drawn to a senior servant, a footman named Jean, who is particularly well-traveled, well-mannered and well-read. The action takes place in the kitchen of Miss Julie's father's manor; here Jean's fiancée, a servant named Kristin, cooks and sometimes sleeps while Jean and Miss Julie talk. The plot is primarily concerned with power in its various forms. Miss Julie has power over Jean because she is upper-class. Jean has power over Miss Julie because he is male and uninhibited by aristocratic values. The count, Miss Julie's father, has power over both of them since he is a nobleman, an employer, and a father. On this night, behavior between Miss Julie and Jean which was previously a flirtatious contest for power rapidly escalates to a love relationship—or is it just lust?—that is fully consummated. Over the course of the play, Miss Julie and Jean battle for control, which swings back and forth between them until Jean convinces her that the only way to escape her predicament is to commit suicide.

— Freebase

Saratoga

Saratoga

Saratoga is a 1937 American romantic comedy film written by Anita Loos and directed by Jack Conway. The movie stars Clark Gable and Jean Harlow in their sixth and final film collaboration, and features Lionel Barrymore, Frank Morgan, Walter Pidgeon, Hattie McDaniel, and Margaret Hamilton. Jean Harlow died before filming was finished, and it was completed using stand-ins. Saratoga was MGM's biggest moneymaker of 1937.

— Freebase

Funeral Rites

Funeral Rites

Funeral Rites is a 1948 novel by Jean Genet. It is a story of love and betrayal across political divides, written this time for the narrator's lover, Jean Decarnin, killed by the Germans in WWII. The first edition was limited to 1,500 copies; in 1953 the text was revised by Gallimard, excising some possibly offensive passages, which became the basis for the 1953 English translation by Frechtman.

— Freebase

Minoritaire

Minoritaire

Minoritaire was a 1982 album by Jean-Jacques Goldman, his second solo album sung in French. It was certified platinum in France in 1983, another in 1991 and another in 2001, for a total sales of 900,000 copies. It was recorded at the Studio Gang by Olivier do Espirito Santo and Jean-Pierre Janiaud. It was released by NEF and produced by Marc Lumbroso.

— Freebase

The Words

The Words

The Words is Jean-Paul Sartre's 1963 autobiography.

— Freebase

A River

A River

A River is a sculpture created by Jean-Jacques Caffieri in 1759.

— Freebase

Ottawan

Ottawan

Ottawan is a French Eurodisco duo, led by Jean Patrick.

— Freebase

Collinson, Peter

Collinson, Peter

an English horticulturist, to whom we are indebted for the introduction into the country of many ornamental shrubs (1694-1768).

Collot d'Herbois, Jean Marie

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Bonsoir

Bonsoir

Bonsoir is a 1994 French film directed by Jean-Pierre Mocky.

— Freebase

Camillo Felgen

Camillo Felgen

Camillo Jean Nicolas Felgen was a Luxembourgian singer, lyricist, DJ, and television presenter.

— Freebase

Édouard Vuillard

Édouard Vuillard

Jean-Édouard Vuillard was a French painter and printmaker associated with the Nabis.

— Freebase

Cotta

Cotta

German publisher, born at Stuttgart; established in Tübingen; published the works of Goethe, Schiller, Jean Paul, Herder, and others of note among their contemporaries (1764-1832).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Won

Won

'Won' is Pacewon's debut solo album. Pacewon is a founding member of the rap group The Outsidaz and was on their first and only two albums. The album is produced by Wyclef Jean, of the rap group The Fugees, which Pacewon has worked with. The other producers are Jerry Duplessis and Ski. The album includes 21 songs and features seven guest stars. The featured rappers are Young Zee of the Outsidaz, Wyclef Jean of The Fugees, Azz Izz, Kurupt, Melanie Blatt, Richie Thumbs, and Rah Digga also of the Outsidaz.

— Freebase

Oedipus rex

Oedipus rex

Oedipus rex is an "Opera-oratorio after Sophocles" by Igor Stravinsky, scored for orchestra, speaker, soloists, and male chorus. The libretto, based on Sophocles's tragedy, was written by Jean Cocteau in French and then translated by Abbé Jean Daniélou into Latin. Oedipus rex was written towards the beginning of Stravinsky's neoclassical period. He had considered setting the work in Ancient Greek, but decided ultimately on Latin: in his words "a medium not dead but turned to stone."

— Freebase

Hof

Hof

a town of Bavaria, on the Saale, 40 m. NE. of Baireuth; has flourishing textile factories, breweries, and iron-works; is associated with the early struggles of Jean Paul Richter.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Prince Edward Island

Prince Edward Island

An island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence constituting a province of Canada in the eastern part of the country. It is very irregular in shape with many deep inlets. Its capital is Charlottetown. Discovered by the French in 1534 and originally named Ile Saint-Jean, it was renamed in 1799 in honor of Prince Edward, fourth son of George III and future father of Queen Victoria. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p981 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p433)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Djambi

Djambi

Djambi is a board game and a chess variant for four players, invented by Jean Anesto in 1975.

— Freebase

Dessalines

Dessalines

Dessalines is a town in the Artibonite Department of Haiti. It is named after Jean-Jacques Dessalines, a leader of the Haitian Revolution and the first ruler of independent Haiti. This Town is the First Black Capital in the World. In 1804 The First Black Free Country has born. And Marchand Dessalines, became the Capital of the new Country. Jean-Jacques Dessalines loved so much this town. Most of the fortifications are still in good condition.

— Freebase

Stratospheric

Stratospheric

Stratospheric is an instrumental guitar album, released by French guitarist Jean-Pierre Danel in 2000. Several songs from the album hit the web downloading charts, including three #1's. Stratospheric received the Award for the Best Album of the Year 2000 from the Instrumental Rock Guitar Hall Of Fame, and Jean-Pierre also received the Award for the Composer of the Year, for his track “Ballad For a Friend”. Re-released in 2011, it hits the downloading charts at #46 in France.

— Freebase

Droz

Droz

the name of a Swiss family of mechanicians, one of them, Jean Pierre, an engraver of medals (1746-1833); also of a French moralist and historian, author of "History of Louis XVI." (1773-1850).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Levana

Levana

the title of a book by Jean Paul on the education of children; title from the name of a Roman goddess, the protectress of foundlings.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Seychelles

Seychelles

A group of Indian Ocean Islands, east of Tanzania. Their capital is Victoria. They were first claimed by the French in 1744 but taken by the English in 1794 and made a dependency of MAURITIUS in 1810. They became a crown colony in 1903 and a republic within the Commonwealth in 1976. They were named for the French finance minister, Jean Moreau de Sechelles, but respelled by the English in 1794. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1102 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p496)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Carlos

Carlos

Carlos, born Yvan-Chrysostome Dolto, and sometimes called Jean-Christophe Doltovitch, was a French singer, entertainer and actor.

— Freebase

Science

Science

Science creates, scales and acquires successful digital businesses by bringing together ideas, talent, resources and financing through a centralized platform. The company focuses on developing new businesses, providing emerging startups with operational strategy and capital, and transforming later-stage Internet ventures with new talent and innovations.Science is backed by a group of top institutional and independent investors, which include: Rustic Canyon, White Star Capital, The Social+Capital Partnership, Tomorrow Ventures, Siemer Ventures, Philippe Camus, Jean-Marie Messier, Jonathan Miller and Dennis Phelps.

— CrunchBase

Kookai

Kookai

Kookai is a French fashion label founded in 1983 by Jean-Lou Tepper, Jacques Nataf and Philippe de Hesdin. It has a simple philosophy: "to supply young women with affordable apparel for their wardrobes". It has stores in Europe, Asia, America and Australia. Its clothing line is generally characterised by French fashion trends. Galleries Lafayette carried a large line of Kookai, Claudie Pierlot, Jean-Charles de Castelbajac, Lolita Bis by Lolita Lempicka, Plein Sud, P.J. Hohenscheid, and other European labels when it opened its first American store in Trump Tower, in September 1991.

— Freebase

Jean Giono

Jean Giono

Jean Giono was a French author who wrote works of fiction mostly set in the Provence region of France.

— Freebase

Rising Tide

Rising Tide

Rising Tide is a historical young-adult novel by Jean Thesman and a sequel to her novel A Sea So Far.

— Freebase

Fourier Analysis

Fourier Analysis

Analysis based on the mathematical function first formulated by Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier in 1807. The function, known as the Fourier transform, describes the sinusoidal pattern of any fluctuating pattern in the physical world in terms of its amplitude and its phase. It has broad applications in biomedicine, e.g., analysis of the x-ray crystallography data pivotal in identifying the double helical nature of DNA and in analysis of other molecules, including viruses, and the modified back-projection algorithm universally used in computerized tomography imaging, etc. (From Segen, The Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Jean Paul

Jean Paul

Jean Paul, born Johann Paul Friedrich Richter, was a German Romantic writer, best known for his humorous novels and stories.

— Freebase

Alençon, Counts and Dukes of

Alençon, Counts and Dukes of

a title borne by several members of the house of Valois—e. g. Charles of Valois, who fell at Crécy (1346); Jean IV., who fell at Agincourt (1415).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Coquerel, Athanase

Coquerel, Athanase

a Protestant pastor, son of preceding, born at Amsterdam; celebrated for his liberal and tolerant views, too much so for M. Guizot; edited Voltaire's letters on toleration; his chief work, "Jean Calas et sa Famille" (1820-1875).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Billie Jean

Billie Jean

"Billie Jean" is a song by American recording artist Michael Jackson. It is the second single from the singer's sixth solo album, Thriller. It was written and composed by Jackson and produced by him and Quincy Jones. There are contradictory claims to what the song's lyrics refer to. One suggests that they are derived from a real-life experience, in which a female fan claimed that Jackson had fathered one of her twins. However, Jackson himself stated that "Billie Jean" was based on groupies he had encountered. The song is well known for its distinctive bassline by guitarist David Williams, and Jackson's vocal hiccups. The song was mixed 91 times by audio engineer Bruce Swedien before it was finalized. The song became a worldwide commercial and critical success; it was one of the best-selling singles of 1983 and is one of the best-selling singles worldwide. The song topped both the US and UK charts simultaneously. In other countries, it topped the charts of Switzerland and reached the top ten in Austria, Italy, New Zealand, Norway and Sweden. "Billie Jean" was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America in 1989.

— Freebase

Louis Barthou

Louis Barthou

Jean Louis Barthou was a French politician of the Third Republic who served as Prime Minister of France for eight months in 1913.

— Freebase

No, No, No

No, No, No

"No, No, No" is an R&B song performed by American group Destiny's Child for their debut studio album Destiny's Child and the track was produced by Vincent Herbert, Rob Fusari and Wyclef Jean and received a positive reception from music critics. The original version and its remix featuring Wyclef Jean was released as the group's debut single in the fourth quarter of 1997 and reached No. 3 in the United States, where it was certified platinum. It was the first single for the group, worldwide. The remix is based around a sample of The Love Unlimited Orchestra's "Strange Games and Things."

— Freebase

Bai`reuth

Bai`reuth

the capital of Upper Franconia, in Bavaria, with a large theatre erected by the king for the performance of Wagner's musical compositions, and with a monument, simple but massive, as was fit, to the memory of Jean Paul, who died there.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Knock Off

Knock Off

Knock Off is a 1998 American action film directed by Tsui Hark, starring Jean-Claude Van Damme, Lela Rochon, Michael Fitzgerald Wong, Rob Schneider and Paul Sorvino.

— Freebase

Jean-François Berthelier

Jean-François Berthelier

Jean-François-Philibert Berthelier was a French actor and singer, who performed many light tenor roles in opéra-comique and opéra-bouffe.

— Freebase

Clerc

Clerc

or Leclerc, Jean, a French theologian of the Arminian school, born at Geneva; a prolific author; wrote commentaries on all the books of the Old Testament, on lines since followed by the Rationalist school or Neologians of Germany (1657-1736).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Duty Free

Duty Free

Duty Free is a British sitcom written by Eric Chappell and Jean Warr that aired on ITV from 1984 to 1986. It was made by Yorkshire Television.

— Freebase

Champollion

Champollion

Champollion was a planned cometary rendezvous and landing spacecraft. It was named after Jean-François Champollion, a French Egyptologist known for translating the Rosetta stone.

— Freebase

Jean-Francois Millet

Jean-Francois Millet

Jean-Francois Millet is a fictional character in Mark Twain's play Is He Dead?, named after the famous French painter of the same name.

— Freebase

Japanese slipper

Japanese slipper

A Japanese slipper is an IBA Official Cocktail made from Midori, Cointreau, and lemon juice. It was created in 1984 by Jean-Paul Bourguignon at Mietta's Restaurant in Melbourne.

— Freebase

ARB

ARB

ARB is a Japanese rock band formed in 1978. Its members are Ryo Ishibashi, Koya Naito, Ebi, and Keith. Jean-Jacques Burnel from The Stranglers was also a member for a short time.

— Freebase

Saint-Jean

Saint-Jean

Saint-Jean is a federal electoral district in Quebec, Canada, that has been represented in the House of Commons of Canada since 1968.

— Freebase

Grolier, Jean

Grolier, Jean

a famous bibliophile, whose library was dispersed in 1675; the bindings of the books being ornamented with geometric patterns, have given name to bindings in this style; they bore the inscription, "Io. Grolieri et Amicorum" (the property of Jean Grolier and his friends).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Contempt

Contempt

Contempt is a 1963 film directed by Jean-Luc Godard, based on the Italian novel Il disprezzo [A Ghost at Noon]. 1954. OCLC 360548. by Alberto Moravia. It stars Brigitte Bardot.

— Freebase

Two Brothers

Two Brothers

Two Brothers is a 2004 adventure family film directed by Jean-Jacques Annaud. It is about two tigers who are separated as cubs and then reunited years later.

— Freebase

Riffraff

Riffraff

Riffraff is a 1936 film starring Jean Harlow and Spencer Tracy. The movie was written by Frances Marion, Anita Loos, and H. W. Hannaford, and directed by J. Walter Ruben.

— Freebase

Mouchette

Mouchette

Mouchette is a 1967 French film directed by Robert Bresson, starring Nadine Nortier and Jean-Claude Guilbert. It is based on the novel by Georges Bernanos. It was entered into the 1967 Cannes Film Festival, winning the OCIC Award. Mouchette tells the story of a girl entering adolescence, the daughter of a bullying alcoholic father and ailing mother set in a rural French village. One stormy night Mouchette's world changes. It is a coming of age film which Bresson portrays in his own unique style. According to Bresson, "Mouchette offers evidence of misery and cruelty. She is found everywhere: wars, concentration camps, tortures, assassinations." The Criterion Collection DVD release includes a trailer for this film made by Jean-Luc Godard.

— Freebase

Girondist

Girondist

The Girondists were a political faction in France within the Legislative Assembly and the National Convention during the French Revolution. They campaigned for the end of the monarchy but then resisted the spiraling momentum of the Revolution. They came into conflict with The Mountain. This conflict eventually led to the fall of the Girondists and their mass execution, the beginning of the Reign of Terror. The Girondists were a group of loosely-affiliated individuals rather than an organized political party, and the name was at first informally applied because the most prominent exponents of their point of view were deputies to the States-general from the department of Gironde in southwest France. The famous painting Death of Marat depicts the revenge killing of radical journalist Jean-Paul Marat by Girondist sympathizer, Charlotte Corday. Some prominent Girondists were Jacques Pierre Brissot, Jean Marie Roland and his wife Madame Roland. They had an ally in American Founding Father Thomas Paine. Brissot and Madame Roland were executed with the guillotine and Jean Roland committed suicide when he learned what had transpired. Paine was arrested and imprisoned but narrowly escaped execution.

— Freebase

Cono Christian School

Cono Christian School

Cono, founded in 1951 near Walker, Iowa, by Max and Jean Belz, is a K-12 day and boarding school serving students from around the United States and the world. Boarding students are generally in middle and high school. This Christian boarding school began, and still exists as, a ministry of Bible Presbyterian Church. Max Belz was the pastor of the church at the time of the school's founding. He, Jean, and their eight children lived on the 1-acre of donated property where the church building was built. Today Cono has 200 acres, 25 of which are developed with academic, athletic and student and staff residential facilities. Class sizes are small and average six to eight students for a full academic program.

— Freebase

Labadists

Labadists

The Labadists were a 17th-century Protestant religious community movement founded by Jean de Labadie, a French pietist. The movement derived its name from that of its founder.

— Freebase

Visiting Hours

Visiting Hours

Visiting Hours is a 1982 slasher film starring Michael Ironside, Lee Grant, Linda Purl, William Shatner and Lenore Zann. It was directed by Jean-Claude Lord and written by Brian Taggert.

— Freebase

The Child

The Child

L'Enfant is a 2005 Belgian film directed by Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. The film was released under its French title in the US, and as The Child in the UK.

— Freebase

Get Ready

Get Ready

"Get Ready" is the first studio album by 2 Unlimited, a Eurodance project founded in 1991 by Belgian producers Jean-Paul DeCoster and Phil Wilde and fronted by Dutch rapper Ray Slijngaard and Dutch vocalist Anita Doth.

— Freebase

Bignonia

Bignonia

Bignonia is a genus of flowering plants in the catalpa family, Bignoniaceae. Its genus and family were named after Jean-Paul Bignon by his protégé Joseph Pitton de Tournefort in 1694.

— Freebase

Sibelius

Sibelius

Sibelius is a 2003 Finnish film biography of Jean Sibelius directed and written by Timo Koivusalo. It is the first full-length feature film about the famous composer.

— Freebase

Wampus

Wampus

Wampus is a French comic book character written by Franco Frescura and illustrated by Luciano Bernasconi for French publisher Editions Lug in 1969. Wampus is an alien monster with shapeshifting powers who has been sent by an evil cosmic intelligence, the Great Mind, to destroy Earth. He is discovered and pursued by French secret agent, Jean Sten. In the course of its original six issues, Wampus caused havoc in France, Germany, the USA, Japan, England and Spain. Wampus was originally published in six, digest-sized magazines. The series was then discontinued because of censorship problems. The final episode was eventually serialized in 1985 in Ombrax, another of Lug's magazines. The same concept was also reprised as L'Autre in the magazine Futura in 1973. Wampus returned in 2001, written by Jean-Marc Lofficier and still drawn by Bernasconi for a series of seven new episodes which completed the storyline begun in 1969, depicting the final confrontation between Jean Sten and his alien nemesis. The stories also featured a number of guest-stars from the Lug universe. Wampus is now part of Hexagon Comics which has published a collection of his adventures translated into English.

— Freebase

The Reprieve

The Reprieve

The Reprieve is a 1947 novel by Jean-Paul Sartre. It is the second part in the trilogy The Roads to Freedom. It concerns life in France during the eight days before the signing of the Munich Agreement and the subsequent takeover of Czechoslovakia in September 1938.

— Freebase

Georges Cuvier

Georges Cuvier

Jean Léopold Nicolas Frédéric Cuvier, known as Georges Cuvier, was a French naturalist and zoologist. Cuvier was a major figure in natural sciences research in the early 19th century, and was instrumental in establishing the fields of comparative anatomy and paleontology through his work in comparing living animals with fossils. He is well known for establishing extinction as a fact, being the most influential proponent of catastrophism in geology in the early 19th century, and opposing the evolutionary theories of Jean-Baptiste de Lamarck and Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire. His most famous work is Le Règne Animal. In 1819, he was created a peer for life in honor of his scientific contributions. Thereafter he was known as Baron Cuvier. He died in Paris, during an epidemic of cholera.

— Freebase

Parisine

Parisine

Parisine is a typeface created by Jean-François Porchez. Distributed by Typofonderie. It is used in Paris Métro, tramways, buses and RER parts operated by the RATP in Île-de-France.

— Freebase

Corbeau

Corbeau

Corbeau was a Quebec rock group, very popular at the end of the seventies. The group was formed in 1977 by the film-maker and lyricist Pierre Harel with Michel "Willie" Lamothe and Roger "Wézo" Belval. Donald Hince joined the group some time later, and Jean Millaire completed the make up of Corbeau after a short tenure with Offenbach. Harel was the lead-singer up until the arrival of Marjolaine "Marjo" Morin, whereupon they shared the role until the departure of Harel just before the launching of their first album in 1979. Corbeau broke up in 1984 after the departure of Marjo and Jean Millaire. In 2009 the original members re-united to record one track for Marjo's new album, Marjo et ses hommes. Corbeau re-recorded the track Demain.

— Freebase

Death Warrant

Death Warrant

Death Warrant is a 1990 action movie starring Jean-Claude Van Damme. The film was written by David S. Goyer while a student at USC, and was Goyer's first screenplay to be sold and produced commercially.

— Freebase

Förster, Ernst

Förster, Ernst

an art critic, brother of succeeding, author of a number of elaborate and important works bearing on the history of art in Germany and Italy; was the son-in-law of Jean Paul, whose works he edited, and to whose biography he made contributions of great value (1800-1885).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Francis Poulenc

Francis Poulenc

Francis Jean Marcel Poulenc was a French composer and a member of the French group Les Six. He composed art song, solo piano music, chamber music, oratorio, choral music, opera, ballet music, and orchestral music.

— Freebase

Jean Piaget

Jean Piaget

Jean Piaget was a Swiss developmental psychologist and philosopher known for his epistemological studies with children. His theory of cognitive development and epistemological view are together called "genetic epistemology". Piaget placed great importance on the education of children. As the Director of the International Bureau of Education, he declared in 1934 that "only education is capable of saving our societies from possible collapse, whether violent, or gradual." Piaget created the International Center for Genetic Epistemology in Geneva in 1955 and directed it until his death in 1980. The number of collaborations that its founding made possible, and their impact, ultimately led to the Center being referred to in the scholarly literature as "Piaget's factory." According to Ernst von Glasersfeld, Jean Piaget was "the great pioneer of the constructivist theory of knowing."

— Freebase

Kickboxer

Kickboxer

Kickboxer is a 1989 American martial arts sports drama film written, produced and directed by Mark DiSalle, and also directed by David Worth, and starring Jean-Claude Van Damme and former world kickboxing champion, Dennis Alexio.

— Freebase

As Luck Would Have It

As Luck Would Have It

As Luck Would Have It is a 2002 Swiss film. It was directed by Lorenzo Gabriele and stars Jean-Claude Brialy and Julien Bravo. It was based on an original script by Julie Gilbert.

— Freebase

Double Impact

Double Impact

Double Impact is a 1991 American action film written and directed by Sheldon Lettich and also written, produced by and starring Jean-Claude Van Damme in a double role as Chad and Alex Wagner.

— Freebase

Lire

Lire

Lire is a French literary magazine covering both French and foreign literature. It was founded in 1975 by Jean-Louis Servan-Schreiber and Bernard Pivot. Today "Lire" is owned by the company Express Roularta.

— Freebase

Grandville

Grandville

the pseudonym of Jean Ignace Isidore Gérard, a French caricaturist, born at Nancy; his fame was first established by the "Metamorphoses du Jour," a series of satirical sketches representing men with animal faces characteristic of them; his subsequent work embraced political cartoons and illustrations for "Gulliver's Travels," "Don Quixote," "Robinson Crusoe," La Fontaine's "Fables," &c. (1803-1847).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Faust

Faust

Faust are a German krautrock band. Formed in 1971 in Wümme, the group was originally composed of Werner "Zappi" Diermaier, Hans Joachim Irmler, Arnulf Meifert, Jean-Hervé Péron, Rudolf Sosna and Gunther Wüsthoff, working with record producer Uwe Nettelbeck and engineer Kurt Graupner.

— Freebase

Armored

Armored

Armored is a 2009 American crime thriller film directed by Nimród Antal, written by first-time screenwriter James V. Simpson, and starring Matt Dillon, Jean Reno, Laurence Fishburne, Amaury Nolasco, Milo Ventimiglia, Skeet Ulrich, and Columbus Short. It was released on December 4, 2009.

— Freebase

Polyad

Polyad

In mathematics, polyad is a concept of category theory introduced by Jean Bénabou in generalising monads. A polyad in a bicategory D is a bicategory morphism Φ from a locally punctual bicategory C to D, Φ : C → D. Monads are polyads Φ : C → D where C has only one object.

— Freebase

Polyphème

Polyphème

Polyphème is an opera composed by Jean Cras with a libretto by Albert Samain. It was written by Cras during World War I and was premiered in Paris in 1922, giving Cras a burst of notoriety in the French press.

— Freebase

Poncelet

Poncelet

The poncelet is an obsolete unit of power, once used in France and replaced by cheval vapeur. The unit was named after Jean-Victor Poncelet. One poncelet is defined as the power required to raise a hundred-kilogram mass at a velocity of one metre per second.

— Freebase

Fournier gangrene

Fournier gangrene

Fournier gangrene is a type of necrotizing infection or gangrene usually affecting the perineum. It was first described by Baurienne in 1764 and is named after a French venereologist, Jean Alfred Fournier following five cases he presented in clinical lectures in 1883.

— Freebase

Camisards

Camisards

Huguenots of the Cévennes, who took up arms by thousands in serious revolt against Louis XIV., in which others joined, under Jean Cavalier their chief, after, and in consequence of, the revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1685); so called because they wore a camiso (Fr. a chemise), a blouse over their armour; were partly persuaded and partly compelled into submission by Marshal Villars in 1704.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Marida

Marida

Marida is a titular see of the Roman Catholic Church. Its last bishop was Jean Hermil. It is in the ecclesiastical province of Osroene, under the metropolitan of Edessa. It likely represents the now-suppressed bishopric formerly seated at Mardin, Turkey.

— Freebase

Sanvitalia

Sanvitalia

The creeping zinnias are four or five species belonging to the family Asteraceae and native to Southwestern United States, Mexico, Central America, South America, Northwest China. The original descriptions of this genus was by Jean-Baptiste Lamarck using samples provided by "M. Gualteri".

— Freebase

Balls

Balls

Balls is the eighteenth album by Sparks released in 2000. "It's a Knockoff" was recorded for the movie Knock Off, starring Jean-Claude Van Damme, directed by the acclaimed Hong Kong based producer/director Tsui Hark. It is featured over the closing credits.

— Freebase

baud

baud

[simplified from its technical meaning] n. Bits per second. Hence kilobaud or Kbaud, thousands of bits per second. The technical meaning is level transitions per second; this coincides with bps only for two-level modulation with no framing or stop bits. Most hackers are aware of these nuances but blithely ignore them.Historical note: baud was originally a unit of telegraph signalling speed, set at one pulse per second. It was proposed at the November, 1926 conference of the Comité Consultatif International Des Communications Télégraphiques as an improvement on the then standard practice of referring to line speeds in terms of words per minute, and named for Jean Maurice Emile Baudot (1845-1903), a French engineer who did a lot of pioneering work in early teleprinters.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Bollandist

Bollandist

The Bollandists are an association of scholars, philologists, and historians who since the early seventeenth century have studied hagiography and the cult of the saints in Christianity. Their most important publication has been the Acta Sanctorum. They are named after Jean Bolland or Bollandus.

— Freebase

DAMS

DAMS

Driot-Arnoux Motorsport is a racing team from France, involved in many areas of motorsport. DAMS was founded in 1988 by Jean-Paul Driot and former Formula One driver René Arnoux. It is headquartered near Le Mans, only 2 km from the Bugatti Circuit.

— Freebase

Flodden, Battle of

Flodden, Battle of

fought on Flodden Hill, a low spur of the Cheviots, 6 m. S. of Coldstream, between James IV. of Scotland and the English under the Earl of Surrey on the 9th of September 1513, which resulted in the crushing defeat of the Scots, who lost their king and the flower of their nobility, an event celebrated in Jean Elliot's "Flowers of the Forest"; a spirited account is given in the sixth canto of Scott's "Marmion."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Cobalt 60

Cobalt 60

Cobalt 60 was a project featuring Jean-Luc de Meyer and Dominique Lallement. They were an electro-industrial/EBM group, though they frequently use guitars, an uncommon feature among artists of the genre. Cobalt 60 has also done music for the PC game Wing Commander: Prophecy.

— Freebase

Mouton

Mouton

Mouton is an unincorporated community in Lafayette Parish, Louisiana. The town is named after Jean Mouton and Marin Mouton, two local land owners who settled the area during the 1770s. It is located along West Pont Des Mouton Rd between LA Hwy 182 and I-49 .

— Freebase

Librettist

Librettist

A librettist is the author of a libretto (It.: small book), the text of a vocal work, particularly opera or oratorio. Among the notorious librettists have been Pietro Metastasio, Lorenzo Da Ponte, Eugene Scribe, Felice Romani, Francesco Maria Piave, Luigi Illica, Arrigo Boito, and Hugo von Hofmannsthal. Some composers wrote libretti for themselves or for other composers, for example Richard Wagner, Ruggiero Leoncavallo, Frederick Delius, Michael Tippet, Ralph Vaughan Williams, and Gian Carlo Menotti who wrote two libretti for Samuel Barber's operas; others adapted plays for their own use, most notably Claude Debussy, Richard Strauss and Alban Berg. There are also librettists among the famous writers: Bertolt Brecht, Jean Cocteau, Miguel de Cervantes, Gabriele D'Annunzio, Carlo Goldoni, Aleksandr Pushkin, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Voltaire, and Stefan Zweig. And here are some people one would not expect as librettists: Frederick II of Prussia (the Great), Catherine II of Russia, Pope Clement IX, and Franco Zeffirelli.

— Freebase

Colbertism

Colbertism

Colbertism is an economic and political doctrine of the seventeenth century, created by Jean-Baptiste Colbert, the French minister of finance under Louis XIV. Colbertism is a variant of mercantilism and is more a collection of economical practices than a true current of economic thought.

— Freebase

Becket

Becket

Becket or The Honor of God is a play written in French by Jean Anouilh. It is a depiction of the conflict between Thomas Becket and King Henry II of England leading to Becket's assassination in 1170. It contains many historical inaccuracies, which the author acknowledged.

— Freebase

Flo

Flo

Flo is an American sitcom which aired on CBS from 1980 to 1981. The series is a spin-off for Polly Holliday who portrayed the sassy and street-smart waitress Florence Jean "Flo" Castleberry on the sitcom Alice. Flo was cancelled at the end of its second season.

— Freebase

Institut de l'information scientifique et technique

Institut de l'information scientifique et technique

The Institut de l'information scientifique et technique, or INIST is the CNRS centre of documentation located in France. It has as mission to collect, treat and diffuse results of scientific and technical research. The INIST produces three bibliographic multilingual and multidisciplinary databases: PASCAL, FRANCIS, and DOGE. It is based at Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy, in a building designed by Jean Nouvel. In addition, INIST publishes a number of electronic journals.

— Freebase

James Parkinson

James Parkinson

James Parkinson FGS was an English apothecary surgeon, geologist, paleontologist, and political activist. He is most famous for his 1817 work, An Essay on the Shaking Palsy in which he was the first to describe "paralysis agitans", a condition that would later be renamed Parkinson's disease by Jean-Martin Charcot.

— Freebase

Entre Nous

Entre Nous

Entre Nous is a 1983 French biographical drama film directed by Diane Kurys, who shares the writing credits with Olivier Cohen. Set in the France of the mid twentieth century, the film stars Isabelle Huppert, Miou-Miou, Guy Marchand, Jean-Pierre Bacri and Christine Pascal. Coup de Foudre means "love at first sight".

— Freebase

Ratio test

Ratio test

In mathematics, the ratio test is a test for the convergence of a series, where each term is a real or complex number and is nonzero when n is large. The test was first published by Jean le Rond d'Alembert and is sometimes known as d'Alembert's ratio test.

— Freebase

Exi

Exi

The Exis were a youth movement in Hamburg, Germany, in the 1950s. The Exis took their name from the existentialist movement, and were influenced by its chief proponents, Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus. There are similar German nicknames for other movements, such as "Sozis" and the "Nazis".

— Freebase

Jean Racine

Jean Racine

Jean Racine, baptismal name Jean-Baptiste Racine, was a French dramatist, one of the three great playwrights of 17th-century France, and an important literary figure in the Western tradition. Racine was primarily a tragedian, producing such "examples of neoclassical perfection" as Phèdre, Andromaque, and Athalie, although he did write one comedy, Les Plaideurs, and a muted tragedy, Esther, for the young. Racine's plays displayed his mastery of the dodecasyllabic alexandrine; he is renowned for elegance, purity, speed, and fury, and for what Robert Lowell described as a "diamond-edge", and the "glory of its hard, electric rage". The linguistic effects of Racine's poetry are widely considered to be untranslatable, although many eminent poets have attempted to do so, including Lowell, Ted Hughes, and Derek Mahon into English, and Schiller into German. The latest attempt to translate Racine's plays into English earned a 2011 American Book Award for the poet Geoffrey Argent. Racine's dramaturgy is marked by his psychological insight, the prevailing passion of his characters, and the nakedness of both the plot and stage.

— Freebase

Cousins

Cousins

Cousins is a 1989 American romantic comedy film directed by Joel Schumacher and starring Ted Danson, Isabella Rossellini, Sean Young, William Petersen, Keith Coogan, Lloyd Bridges and Norma Aleandro. The film is an American remake of the 1975 French comedy Cousin, cousine, directed by Jean-Charles Tacchella.

— Freebase

Pentateuch

Pentateuch

the name given by Origen to the first five books of the Bible, which the Jews call the Law or Five-fifths of the Law, the composition of which has of late years been subjected to keen critical investigation, and the whole ascribed to documents of different dates and diverse authorship, to the rejection of the old traditional hypothesis that it was the work of Moses, first called in question by Spinoza, and shown to be untenable by Jean Astruc (q. v.).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Facticity

Facticity

Facticity has a multiplicity of meanings from "factuality" and "contingency" to the intractable conditions of human existence. The term is first used by Fichte and has a variety of meanings. It can refer to facts and factuality, as in nineteenth-century positivism, but comes to mean that which resists explanation and interpretation in Dilthey and Neo-Kantianism. The Neo-Kantians contrasted facticity with ideality, as does Jürgen Habermas in Between Facts and Norms. It is a term that takes on a more specialized meaning in 20th century continental philosophy, especially in phenomenology and existentialism, including Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Recent philosophers such as Giorgio Agamben, Jean-Luc Nancy, and François Raffoul have taken up the notion of facticity in new ways. Facticity plays a key part in Quentin Meillassoux's philosophical project to challenge the thought-world relationship of correlationism. It is defined by him as “the absence of reason for any reality; in other words, the impossibility of providing an ultimate ground for the existence of any being.”

— Freebase

Timebomb

Timebomb

Timebomb is a 1991 sci-fi action film written and directed by Avi Nesher. Starring Michael Biehn and Patsy Kensit. Producers originally wanted Jean-Claude Van Damme or Chuck Norris to play Kay, but Nesher saw Biehn as perfect for the role due to his performance in The Abyss. Biehn himself took a pay cut to show his dedication to the film.

— Freebase

Direct Cinema

Direct Cinema

Direct Cinema is a documentary genre that originated between 1958 and 1962 in North America, principally in the Canadian province of Quebec and the United States, and developed by Jean Rouch in France. Similar in many respects to the cinéma vérité genre, it was characterized initially by filmmakers' desire to directly capture reality and represent it truthfully, and to question the relationship of reality with cinema.

— Freebase

Bon Voyage

Bon Voyage

Bon Voyage is a French film directed by Jean-Paul Rappeneau, released 16 April 2003. The film was a critical success due in part to its tight interweaving of various genres, including spy, romance, World War II, and comedy. The film features the first reteaming of stars Isabelle Adjani and Gérard Depardieu since 1988's Camille Claudel.

— Freebase

Louis Agassiz

Louis Agassiz

Jean Louis Rodolphe Agassiz was a Swiss paleontologist, glaciologist, geologist and a prominent innovator in the study of Earth's natural history. He grew up in Switzerland and became a professor of natural history at University of Neuchâtel. Later, he accepted a professorship at Harvard University in the United States.

— Freebase

Squalodon

Squalodon

Squalodon is an extinct genus of whales, belonging to the family Squalodontidae. Named by Jean-Pierre Sylvestre de Grateloup in 1840, it was originally believed to be an iguanodontid dinosaur but has since been reclassified. The name Squalodon comes from Squalus, a genus of shark. As a result its name means "shark tooth."

— Freebase

Orange Blossom

Orange Blossom

Orange Blossom is a French band that plays a mix of electronic and world music. The band was formed in Nantes in 1993 with Pierre-Jean Chabot on violin and Jean-Christophe Waechter on percussions and vocals. In 1994, Éric joined the band and a first audio tape was recorded in September. In 1995 the band stabilized with the arrival of Carlos Robles Arenas on drums, djembé, and sampler, and the departure of Éric. Their first disc, Orange Blossom, came out in 1997 on the Prikosnovénie label, selling 15,000 copies. Before their second album came out, the group was influenced by ethnic and traditional music. They met and collaborated with several non-French artists, like Ivorian percussion group Yelemba D'Abidjan and Egyptian group Ganoub. They toured in Egypt, France, and Belgium. Vocalist Jay C. left the band in 2000 and created Prajña. In 2002, percussionist Mathias Vaguenez and vocalist Leïla Bounous joined the group. The album Everything Must Change came out in 2005 on the Bonsaï Music label. Carlos Robles Arenas is Mexican. Leïla Bounous is part Algerian, part Breton.

— Freebase

Querelle

Querelle

Querelle is a 1982 West German-French English-language drama film directed by Rainer Werner Fassbinder and starring Brad Davis, adapted from French author Jean Genet's 1947 novel Querelle de Brest. It marked Fassbinder's final film as a writer/director; it was posthumously released just months after the director died of a drug overdose in June 1982.

— Freebase

Second in Command

Second in Command

Second in Command is a 2006 action film directed by Simon Fellows, starring Jean-Claude Van Damme. It was released direct-to-video in the United States, Belgium, and Germany on May 2, 2006. It has been rated R by the MPAA for violence and some language. The film was made in Bucharest, Romania.

— Freebase

Revolutions

Revolutions

Revolutions is the sixth overall studio album by Jean Michel Jarre, first released in 1988. The album spans several genres, including symphonic industrial, Arabian inspired, light guitar pop and ethnic electro jazz. The album reached number #2 in the UK charts, Jarre's best chart position since Oxygène. The Destination Docklands concert in London coincided with the release of the album.

— Freebase

Jean Genet

Jean Genet

Jean Genet was a prominent and controversial French novelist, playwright, poet, essayist, and political activist. Early in his life he was a vagabond and petty criminal, but later took to writing. His major works include the novels Querelle of Brest, The Thief's Journal, and Our Lady of the Flowers, and the plays The Balcony, The Blacks, The Maids and The Screens.

— Freebase

Please Turn Over

Please Turn Over

Please Turn Over is a 1959 British comedy film written by Norman Hudis and directed by Gerald Thomas. It featured Ted Ray, Julia Lockwood, Jean Kent, Joan Sims, Leslie Phillips, Charles Hawtrey, Lionel Jeffries and Victor Maddern. An English village is thrown into chaos when the daughter of one of the residents publishes a book detailing the supposed secrets of the inhabitants. It was based on the play Book of the Month by Basil Thomas.

— Freebase

Baroque music

Baroque music

Baroque music is a style of Western art music composed from approximately 1600 to 1750. This era follows the Renaissance, and was followed in turn by the Classical era. The word "baroque" comes from the Portuguese word barroco, meaning misshapen pearl, a negative description of the ornate and heavily ornamented music of this period. Later, the name came to apply also to the architecture of the same period. Baroque music forms a major portion of the "classical music" canon, being widely studied, performed, and listened to. Composers of the Baroque era include Johann Sebastian Bach, George Frideric Handel, Alessandro Scarlatti, Domenico Scarlatti, Antonio Vivaldi, Georg Philipp Telemann, Jean-Baptiste Lully, Arcangelo Corelli, François Couperin, Denis Gaultier, Claudio Monteverdi, Jean-Philippe Rameau, Johann Pachelbel, and Henry Purcell. The Baroque period saw the creation of tonality. During the period, composers and performers used more elaborate musical ornamentation, made changes in musical notation, and developed new instrumental playing techniques. Baroque music expanded the size, range, and complexity of instrumental performance, and also established opera, cantata, oratorio, concerto, and sonata as musical genres. Many musical terms and concepts from this era are still in use today.

— Freebase

Agnès Sorel

Agnès Sorel

Agnès Sorel, known by the sobriquet Dame de beauté, was a favourite mistress of King Charles VII of France, by whom she bore three daughters. She is considered the first officially recognized royal mistress. She was the subject of several contemporary paintings and works of art, including Jean Fouquet's Virgin and Child Surrounded by Angels.

— Freebase

Floris

Floris

Floris is a 2004 Dutch film, directed by Jean van de Velde and starring Michiel Huisman as grandson of the original Floris from the 1969 TV series. The new side-kick is "Pi", played by popstar Birgit Schuurman. In the film some of the 1969 footage with Rutger Hauer and Bergman is included. Originally Hauer was asked to play the father of young Floris, but he declined. The film was shot in 2003.

— Freebase

Musical composition

Musical composition

Musical composition can refer to an original piece of music, the structure of a musical piece, or the process of creating a new piece of music. People who practice composition are called composers. Although today composition is considered to consist of the manipulation of each aspect of music, according to Jean Benjamin de Laborde:

— Freebase

Sledge Hammer!

Sledge Hammer!

Sledge Hammer! is an American satirical police sitcom produced by New World Television that ran for two seasons on ABC from 1986 to 1988. The series was created by Alan Spencer and stars David Rasche as Inspector Sledge Hammer, a preposterous caricature of the standard "cop on the edge" character. Al Jean and Mike Reiss, best known for their work on The Simpsons, wrote for the show and worked as story editors.

— Freebase

Bombshell

Bombshell

The term bombshell is a forerunner to the term "sex symbol" and originally used to describe popular female sex icons. Modern slang refers to a bombshell as an extremely sexually attractive woman. The Online Etymology Dictionary by Douglas Harper attests the usage of the term in this general meaning since 1942, although earlier Jean Harlow was so nicknamed. Bombshells are a special kind of sex symbol. Bombshells are popular icons recognized for their hourglass figures, their large breasts, sex appeal, and originally their blondness. After Jean Harlow, other icons of popular culture who have widely been referred to as a "Bombshell" include Marilyn Monroe, Rita Hayworth, Diana Dors, Jayne Mansfield, Mamie Van Doren, Jane Russell, Ava Gardner, Brigitte Bardot, Kim Novak, Sophia Loren, Ann-Margret, Raquel Welch, Ursula Andress, and, in more recent popular culture, Katy Perry, Kaley Cuoco, Miranda Kerr, Sofia Vergara, Megan Fox, Kate Upton, Anna Nicole Smith, Pamela Anderson, Monica Bellucci, Christina Aguilera, Britney Spears, Katie Price, Keeley Hazell, Pixie Lott, and Dita Von Teese. Diosa Costello was known as "the Original Latin Bombshell"

— Freebase

GAG line

GAG line

The GAG line, which as an acronym for Goal-A-Game, was a famous ice hockey line for the New York Rangers in the late 1960s and early 1970s, as these linemates averaged over 1 goal a game while playing together. It consisted of Jean Ratelle at center, Rod Gilbert on right wing and Vic Hadfield on the left side.

— Freebase

Alpine

Alpine

Alpine was a French manufacturer of racing and sports cars that used rear-mounted Renault engines. Jean Rédélé, the founder of Alpine, was originally a Dieppe garage proprietor, who began to achieve considerable competition success in one of the few French cars produced just after the Second World War. The company was bought in 1978 by Renault.

— Freebase

Air

Air

Air is a music duo from Versailles, France, consisting of Nicolas Godin and Jean-Benoît Dunckel. Air's debut EP, Premiers Symptômes, was followed by the critically acclaimed album Moon Safari, the re-release of Premiers Symptômes, The Virgin Suicides score, and subsequently albums 10 000 Hz Legend, Everybody Hertz, Talkie Walkie, Pocket Symphony, Love 2, and Le Voyage Dans La Lune.

— Freebase

Kathleen

Kathleen

Kathleen Sergerie, known professionally as Kathleen, is a Québécoise pop singer from Quebec, Canada who records only under her first name. She released several albums and scored hits on the Canadian charts in the early 1990s with songs such as "Où aller" and "Ça va bien!" Her 1993 album Ça va bien! was written and produced by Jean-Pierre Isaac.

— Freebase

Gondolier

Gondolier

"Gondolier" is a French language popular song. The music was written by Pete De Angelis, the words by Jean Broussolle. It was published in 1957. It was popularized by Dalida. The song was rendered into English as "With All My Heart," and became a hit for Jodie Sands in the United States and Petula Clark in the United Kingdom.

— Freebase

Bart

Bart

or Barth, Jean, a distinguished French seaman, born at Dunkirk, son of a fisherman, served under De Ruyter, entered the French service at 20, purchased a ship of two guns, was subsidised as a privateer, made numerous prizes; having had other ships placed under his command, was captured by the English, but escaped; defeated the Dutch admiral, De Vries; captured his squadron laden with corn, for which he was ennobled by Louis XIV.; he was one of the bravest of men and the most independent, unhampered by red-tapism of every kind (1651-1702).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Irving Babbitt

Irving Babbitt

Irving Babbitt was an American academic and literary critic, noted for his founding role in a movement that became known as the New Humanism, a significant influence on literary discussion and conservative thought in the period between 1910 to 1930. He was a cultural critic in the tradition of Matthew Arnold, and a consistent opponent of romanticism, as represented by the writings of Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Politically he can, without serious distortion, be called a follower of Aristotle and Edmund Burke. He was an advocate of classical humanism but also offered an ecumenical defense of religion. His humanism implied a broad knowledge of various moral and religious traditions. Babbitt’s humanism emphasized the need for self-discipline and control, and suppression of the impulses seeking liberation from all restraints. He warned that Jean Jacques Rousseau was the major corrupting influence on modern culture. He complained that Romanticism celebrated too much the individual instinct and uniqueness of personality by denying the universal aspects of human nature as depicted in classical pre-romantic literature. He also attacked naturalism, which was popular at the time because it depicted man as a reflex agent of natural forces, and stressed the dominance of the environment over human institutions.

— Freebase

Groxis

Groxis

Groxis was a tech company based in San Francisco, California that developed and marketed the web-based federated content access and visual search engine called Grokker. Groxis was founded by Jean-Michel Decombe, Paul Hawken, and R.J. Pittman in 2001, and ceased operations in March 2009. Jean-Michel Decombe was Chief Technology Officer until 2006. Ron Mexico served as interim Chief Technology Officer during a brief absence in November 2005. He conceived the vision and invented the concepts underlying Groxis' flagship product, Grokker, for which he obtained several patents, including 6,879,332, 6,888,554, 7,036,093, and 7,290,223. Paul Hawken was Executive Chairman until 2003. He raised the initial round of capital from angel investors. He assembled a team of advisors including Paul Saffo and John Seely Brown. R.J. Pittman was Chief Executive Officer until 2006. He raised capital from top-tier venture capitalists. He was responsible for all pathfinder customer wins and key partnerships. He also set overall product direction, leading the company and moving Grokker.com into the top 5000 most visited web sites on the Internet. Groxis partners and customers included Sun Microsystems, Stanford University, Fast Search & Transfer, EBSCO Information Services, the Internet Public Library, and Amgen, as well as Yahoo!, Google, and Amazon.

— Freebase

Drain Pipe

Drain Pipe

Jean F. Cochois aka The Timewriter is a house music producer. His trademark style can be characterised by its dense and atmospheric sound. UK Muzik magazine wrote: "This is real 21st century soul music, overflowing with magic". Under various pseudonyms he has been releasing 12" and artist albums on labels as Plastic City, Mole Listening Pearls, Elektrolux and American labels such as Wave Music, Driftwood, and Fiji. He amalgamates the deep soul of Motown with synthetic sound productions. While still at boarding school, he eagerly explored the field of composition and became familiar with diverse musical styles. He looked up to bands like Depeche Mode, Tears for Fears, Kraftwerk, Gary Numan, Thomas Dolby, Alan Parsons, Vangelis and Jean Michele Jarre. Motown artists like Bobby Womack, Marvin Gaye or The Four Tops are also among his heroes. Other important sources of inspiration are Roxy Music and Marillion. In some of his songs influence of Michael Stearns is noticeable but he never confirmed this. He has worked for artists such as Enigma, the ex-Kraftwerk member Wolfgang Flür, Mike Oldfield, Yello, Faithless and Boy George to name a few. As a highly sought after DJ, he travels the world and plays in places such as New York, London, Sweden, Spain and Russia. As resident DJ he played in Sven Väth's Cocoon Club and now holds a monthly residency in Budapest.

— Freebase

Jean-Philippe Rameau

Jean-Philippe Rameau

Jean-Philippe Rameau was one of the most important French composers and music theorists of the Baroque era. He replaced Jean-Baptiste Lully as the dominant composer of French opera and is also considered the leading French composer for the harpsichord of his time, alongside François Couperin. Little is known about Rameau's early years, and it was not until the 1720s that he won fame as a major theorist of music with his Treatise on Harmony. He was almost 50 before he embarked on the operatic career on which his reputation chiefly rests. His debut, Hippolyte et Aricie, caused a great stir and was fiercely attacked for its revolutionary use of harmony by the supporters of Lully's style of music. Nevertheless, Rameau's pre-eminence in the field of French opera was soon acknowledged, and he was later attacked as an "establishment" composer by those who favoured Italian opera during the controversy known as the Querelle des Bouffons in the 1750s. Rameau's music had gone out of fashion by the end of the 18th century, and it was not until the 20th that serious efforts were made to revive it. Today, he enjoys renewed appreciation with performances and recordings of his music ever more frequent.

— Freebase

gzip

gzip

gzip is a software application used for file compression and decompression. The program was created by Jean-Loup Gailly and Mark Adler as a free software replacement for the compress program used in early Unix systems, and intended for use by the GNU Project. Version 0.1 was first publicly released on 31 October 1992, and version 1.0 followed in February 1993.

— Freebase

Globish

Globish

Globish is a subset of the English language formalized by Jean-Paul Nerriere. It uses a subset of standard English grammar, and a list of 1500 English words. Nerriere claims it is "not a language" in and of itself, but rather it is the common ground that non-native English speakers adopt in the context of international business.

— Freebase

Chemical equation

Chemical equation

A chemical equation is the symbolic representation of a chemical reaction where the reactant entities are given on the left hand side and the product entities on the right hand side. The coefficients next to the symbols and formulae of entities are the absolute values of the stoichiometric numbers. The first chemical equation was diagrammed by Jean Beguin in 1615.

— Freebase

Glis

Glis

Glis is an Electronic / Industrial music project founded in 2001 by Shaun Frandsen of Seattle, WA. The band has experienced several lineup changes and guest appearances, with front man Shaun Frandsen acting as the primary producer, vocalist, songwriter, and instrumentalist. Notable guest, Jean-Luc De Meyer of Front 242, contributed vocals on two studio tracks for the Glis album "Nemesis" in 2005.

— Freebase

Pure laine

Pure laine

The French term pure laine literally meaning pure wool refers to the people having exclusively original ancestry of the French-Canadians. Another similar term is de souche. While most French-Canadians are able to trace their ancestry back to the original settlers of New France, a number are descended from mixed marriages between the French and Irish settlers. When these shared the same Roman Catholic faith, their unions were approved by the once-powerful Roman Catholic Church in Quebec. Another factor was the settlement of many English people in the region, many of whom were ultimately assimilated into the francophone culture. Recently, Quebec has also enjoyed the benefits of a policy of immigration from French-speaking countries, which has added to, and changed, French-Canadian culture. The use of pure laine is sometimes deprecated. Regardless, English-language commentators Brigitte Pellerin of the Ottawa Citizen and Jan Wong of The Globe and Mail have used the term. The mainstream French-language newspaper La Presse, however, still uses both the terms pure laine and de souche. Saint-Jean-Baptiste Society President Jean Dorion has declared "There is no obsession for racial purity in Quebec, definitely not. [...] The expression 'pure laine' is absolutely obsolete.".

— Freebase

Moreau

Moreau

Moreau is a town in Saratoga County, New York, United States. The population was 13,826 at the 2000 census. The town is located in the northeast part of the county, north of Saratoga Springs. Moreau is named after Jean Victor Moreau, a French general, who visited the area just before the town was formed. The town contains a village called South Glens Falls.

— Freebase

Barbarella

Barbarella

Barbarella is a 1968 French-Italian science fiction film based on Jean-Claude Forest's French Barbarella comics. The film stars Jane Fonda in the title role and was directed by Roger Vadim, who was Fonda's husband at the time. The film was not popular at its release, but received greater attention afterward with a 1977 re-release. It is regarded by some as a cult classic, and Jane Fonda's appearance in the film has become iconic.

— Freebase

Gardon

Gardon

The Gardon or Gard is a river in southern France. It is the namesake of the Gard département. Several of its tributaries are also called Gardon. The Gardon is 133 km long including its longest tributary "Gardon de Saint-Jean". It rises in the Cévennes range of mountains and ends into the Rhône River at Comps, north of Beaucaire, across from Vallabrègues.

— Freebase

Two Women

Two Women

Two Women is a 1960 Italian film directed by Vittorio De Sica. It tells the story of a woman trying to protect her young daughter from the horrors of war. The film stars Sophia Loren, Jean-Paul Belmondo, Eleonora Brown, Carlo Ninchi and Andrea Checchi. The film was adapted by De Sica and Cesare Zavattini from the novel of the same name written by Alberto Moravia.

— Freebase

Jean Giraudoux

Jean Giraudoux

Hippolyte Jean Giraudoux was a French novelist, essayist, diplomat and playwright. He is considered among the most important French dramatists of the period between World War I and World War II. His work is noted for its stylistic elegance and poetic fantasy. Giraudoux's dominant theme is the relationship between man and woman—or in some cases, between man and some unattainable ideal.

— Freebase

Marchand

Marchand

Marchand is a small unincorporated community in the state of Louisiana and within Ascension Parish. It is located on State Highway 75 that runs north and south on the east bank of the Mississippi River. Intersecting Bowden and Whitney Roads are located near the center of the community. The area is composed mainly of farm and ranch lands located between major petrochemical plants. It obtained its name because the community is located on land that once was part of the Jean Baptiste Marchand plantation.

— Freebase

Thomas Young

Thomas Young

Thomas Young was an English polymath. Young made notable scientific contributions to the fields of vision, light, solid mechanics, energy, physiology, language, musical harmony, and Egyptology. He "made a number of original and insightful innovations" in the decipherment of Egyptian hieroglyphs before Jean-François Champollion eventually expanded on his work. He was admired by, among others, William Herschel, Hermann von Helmholtz, James Clerk Maxwell, and Albert Einstein.

— Freebase

Comprimario

Comprimario

A Comprimario is a supporting role in an opera. Derived from the Italian "con primario", or "with the primary", the term refers to a performer who sings small role pieces. Many singers began their careers as comprimario singers; some have made a career out of singing such parts. Among these latter are singers such as Anthony Laciura, Jean Kraft, Nico Castel and Charles Anthony of the Metropolitan Opera.

— Freebase

Bad Weather

Bad Weather

"Bad Weather" is a song recorded and released as a single by Motown vocal group The Supremes in 1973. It was composed and produced by Stevie Wonder The song was then-lead singer Jean Terrell's last charted single as a member of the Supremes and the second and last time brief group member Lynda Laurence was featured on a Supremes single.

— Freebase

Fifteen

Fifteen

Fifteen was a punk rock band formed by Jeff Ott. Ott was the group's main songwriter and only consistent member. According to Ott, the band had a total of fifteen members by the time it finally disbanded in 2000: Jack Curran, Mikey Mischief, Mark Moreno, Jean Repetto, Lucky Dog, Chris Flanagan, John Ogle, Jesse Wickman, Joe Cable, John Quintos, Scott Pierce, Jim Prior, Lisa D., Vanessa Bain and himself.

— Freebase

Estelle

Estelle

Estelle is a census-designated place in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana, United States. The population was 15,880 at the 2000 census. It is part of the New Orleans–Metairie–Kenner Metropolitan Statistical Area. Estelle is south of Marrero, Louisiana; the urbanized areas of the communities meet, and some businesses in Estelle list their addresses as "Marrero". The Jean Lafitte National Park Barataria Preserve is adjacent to Estelle.

— Freebase

Lucile

Lucile

Lucile is an opéra comique, described as a comédie mêlée d'ariettes, in one act by the Belgian composer André Grétry, The French text was by Jean-François Marmontel, and the characters in the opera, though not the actual story, were derived from Marmontel's L'école des pères. The melody from "Où peut-on être mieux qu'au sein de sa famille?" was later reused in Vieuxtemp's Violin Concerto No. 5, Op.37.

— Freebase

Gustave Courbet

Gustave Courbet

Jean Désiré Gustave Courbet was a French painter who led the Realist movement in 19th-century French painting. The Realist movement bridged the Romantic movement with the Barbizon School and the Impressionists. Courbet occupies an important place in 19th century French painting as an innovator and as an artist willing to make bold social commentary in his work.

— Freebase

Hara-Kiri

Hara-Kiri

In 1960 France, Georges Bernier, Cavanna and Fred Aristidès created the monthly satirical magazine Hara-Kiri. Hara Kiri Hebdo, its weekly counterpart, was first published in 1969. Other collaborators included Melvin Van Peebles, Reiser, Roland Topor, Moebius, Wolinski, Gébé, Cabu, Delfeil de Ton, Fournier, Jean-Pierre Bouyxou and Bernhard Willem Holtrop. In 1966 it published Les Aventures de Jodelle, drawn by Guy Peellaert and written by Pierre Barbier.

— Freebase

Billie Jean King

Billie Jean King

Billie Jean King is an American former World No. 1 professional tennis player. King won 39 Grand Slam titles, including 12 singles, 16 women's doubles, and 11 mixed doubles titles. King won the singles title at the inaugural WTA Tour Championships. King often represented the United States in the Federation Cup and the Wightman Cup. She was a member of the victorious United States team in seven Federation Cups and nine Wightman Cups. For three years, King was the United States' captain in the Federation Cup. King is an advocate for sexual equality. She won the Battle of the Sexes tennis match against Bobby Riggs in 1973 and was the founder of the Women's Tennis Association, World TeamTennis, and the Women's Sports Foundation. King was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1987. The Fed Cup Award of Excellence was bestowed on King in 2010. In 1972, King was the joint winner, with John Wooden, of the Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year award and was one of the Time Persons of the Year in 1975. King has also received the Presidential Medal of Freedom and was given the Sunday Times Sportswoman of the year lifetime achievement award. King was inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame in 1990, and in 2006, the USTA National Tennis Center in New York City was renamed the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.

— Freebase

Jean-Marc Leclercq

Jean-Marc Leclercq

Jean-Marc Leclercq is a French singer and Esperantist from Toulouse. The former singer of the group Les Rosemary’s Babies who published two CDs with the French record production company Boucherie et Willins Production, he holds the Guinness Record for singing rock and traditional songs in over 22 languages. He also plays with two groups, as Jomo and the Libertarians, and occasionally with Jomo and the Mammoths.

— Freebase

Wave equation

Wave equation

The wave equation is an important second-order linear partial differential equation for the description of waves – as they occur in physics – such as sound waves, light waves and water waves. It arises in fields like acoustics, electromagnetics, and fluid dynamics. Historically, the problem of a vibrating string such as that of a musical instrument was studied by Jean le Rond d'Alembert, Leonhard Euler, Daniel Bernoulli, and Joseph-Louis Lagrange.

— Freebase

Guten Tag

Guten Tag

“Guten Tag” is a 2002 song by German band Wir sind Helden. It was first released on an EP of the same title in 2002 and one year later as the first single of their debut album Die Reklamation. It was composed by Jean-Michel Tourette, Judith Holofernes and Pola Roy while the lyrics were written by Holofernes. The title is German for good day.

— Freebase

Overdoor

Overdoor

An "overdoor" is a painting, bas-relief or decorative panel, generally in a horizontal format, that is set, typically within ornamental mouldings, over a door, or was originally intended for this purpose. The overdoor is usually architectural in form, but may take the form of a cartouche in Rococo settings, or it may be little more than a moulded shelf for the placement of ceramic vases, busts or curiosities. An overmantel serves a similar function above a fireplace mantel. From the end of the sixeenth century, at first in interiors such as the Palazzo Sampieri, Bologna, where Annibale Carracci provided overdoor paintings, they developed into a minor genre of their own, in which the trompe l'oeil representations of stone bas-reliefs, or vases of flowers, in which Jean-Baptiste Monnoyer specialized, were heightened by sotto in su perspective, in which the light was often painted to reproduce the light, diffused from below, that was entering the room from its windows. Overdoors of such flower pieces, allegorical subjects, and landscapes were favoured through the end of the eighteenth century. French, Dutch and Flemish animalier artists such as Jean-Baptiste Oudry and Jan Weenix were often commissioned to paint sets of overdoors with groups of live or dead game and dogs for country houses or hunting lodges.

— Freebase

Dromomania

Dromomania

Dromomania, also travelling fugue, is an uncontrollable psychological urge to wander. People with this condition spontaneously depart from their routine, travel long distances and take up different identities and occupations. Months may pass before they return to their former identities. The term comes from the Greek: dromos and mania. The most famous case was that of Jean-Albert Dadas, a Bordeaux gas-fitter. Dadas would suddenly set out on foot and reach cities as far away as Prague, Vienna or Moscow with no memory of his travels. A medical student, Philippe Tissie, wrote about Dadas in his doctoral dissertation in 1887. Jean-Martin Charcot presented a similar case he called automatisme ambulatoire - French for "ambulatory automatism" or "walking around without being in control of one's own actions." Only a handful of cases of such behaviour have been documented, nearly all in France in the late nineteenth century. On the other hand, dromomania in wider sense can be characteristic of other mental disorders, e.g. Borderline personality disorder. More generally, the term is sometimes used to describe people who have a strong emotional or even physical need to be constantly traveling and experiencing new places, often at the expense of their normal family, work, and social lives.

— Freebase

Boussingaultite

Boussingaultite

Boussingaultite is a rare sulfate mineral of the chemical formula: (NH4)2Mg(SO4)2·6. The formula of boussingaultite is that of Tutton's salts type. It was originally described from geothermal fields in Tuscany, Italy, where it occurs together with its iron analogue mohrite, but is more commonly found on burning coal dumps. The mineral possess monoclinic symmetry and forms clear, often rounded crystals. The mineral is named after the French chemist Jean-Baptiste Boussingault.

— Freebase

Jean Monnet

Jean Monnet

Jean Omer Marie Gabriel Monnet was a French political economist and diplomat. He is regarded by many as a chief architect of European unity and one of the founding fathers of the European Union. Never elected to public office, Monnet worked behind the scenes of American and European governments as a well-connected pragmatic internationalist. He was named patron of the 1980-1981 academic year at the College of Europe, in honour of his accomplishments.

— Freebase

Johnny Cage

Johnny Cage

Johnny Cage is a video game character from the Mortal Kombat series, introduced in the Mortal Kombat in 1992. The character, whose birth name is John Carlton, is a narcissistic martial arts film actor who provides the comic relief of the franchise. Created as a parody of the martial arts actor Jean-Claude Van Damme, Cage has been a staple of the series since, famous for his comedic signature moves.

— Freebase

Vinflunine

Vinflunine

Vinflunine is a novel fluorinated Vinca alkaloid undergoing research for the treatment of bladder cancer. It was originally discovered by the team of the Professor Jean-Claude Jacquesy, developed by Laboratoires Pierre Fabre and was licensed to Bristol-Myers Squibb for development in certain countries, including the United States. On November 23, 2007, Pierre Fabre and BMS announced that they are terminating their license agreement for the development of vinflunine.

— Freebase

Sombre

Sombre

Sombre is a 1998 French film directed by Philippe Grandrieux, starring Marc Barbé and Elina Löwensohn. The film was nominated for the Golden Leopard and won the C.I.C.A.E. Award - Special Mention at the Locarno International Film Festival. It deals with Jean, a serial killer who follows the Tour de France cycling race in his car and murders women along his way. Then he meets Claire, a psychologically troubled and confused woman who falls in love with him.

— Freebase

Blancpain

Blancpain

Blancpain SA designs, manufactures, distributes and sells luxury watches. Founded in 1735 by Jehan-Jaques Blancpain, Blancpain is headquartered in Biel, Switzerland and is now a wholly owned subsidiary of the Swatch Group. Blancpain has 35 stores and 396 retailers around the world. Blancpain went into bankruptcy and stopped production for a long period. The brand was revived by Jean-Claude Biver, an executive of Omega SA. Marc Hayek, the grandson of The Swatch Group's founder and chairman, Nicolas Hayek, is the current leader of Blancpain and has run the company since 2002.

— Freebase

Longchamp

Longchamp

Longchamp is a French luxury leather goods company founded in Paris in 1948 by Jean Cassegrain. The Longchamp House is still owned and managed by the family. The company is primarily known for its leather and canvas handbags, its travel items, and numerous fashion accessories. The brand is present all over the world through more than 236 boutiques and a total of more than 1,800 stores in some hundred countries.

— Freebase

Félibrige

Félibrige

The Félibrige is a literary and cultural association founded by Frédéric Mistral and other Provençal writers to defend and promote Occitan language and literature. It is presided over by a capolièr. It was founded on 21 May 1854 in Châteauneuf-de-Gadagne, by Frédéric Mistral, Joseph Roumanille, Théodore Aubanel, Jean Brunet, Paul Giéra, Anselme Mathieu and Alphonse Tavan. The word félibrige is derived from félibre, a Provençal word meaning pupil or follower.

— Freebase

Texas tortoise

Texas tortoise

The Texas Tortoise, is one of four species of tortoise that are native to North America. Its range extends from southern Texas southward into the Mexican states of Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas. The epithet berlandieri is in honor of the Belgian naturalist Jean Louis Berlandier, who worked for the Mexican government on one of the first biological surveys of Texas. As such, some sources refer to it as Berlandier's Tortoise.

— Freebase

Bambino

Bambino

Bambino was Dalida's first major hit, released as a single in 1956, and on the album Son Nom Est Dalida in 1957. It is a cover of the Italian song Guaglione, written and sung by Aurelio Fierro. The song was high on the French singles charts for months, scoring 45 weeks in the Top 10. It also appeared in OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies, in 2006, sung in Arabic by Jean Dujardin.

— Freebase

Jean Anouilh

Jean Anouilh

Jean Marie Lucien Pierre Anouilh was a French dramatist whose career spanned five decades. Though his work ranged from high drama to absurdist farce, Anouilh is best known for his 1943 play Antigone, an adaptation of Sophocles' classical drama, that was seen as an attack on Marshal Pétain's Vichy government. One of France's most prolific writers after World War II, much of Anouilh's work deals with themes of maintaining integrity in a world of moral compromise.

— Freebase

Léon: The Professional

Léon: The Professional

Léon: The Professional is a 1994 English-language French thriller film written and directed by Luc Besson. The film stars Jean Reno as the titular mob hitman; Gary Oldman as corrupt DEA agent Norman Stansfield; a young Natalie Portman, in her feature film debut, as Mathilda, a 12-year-old girl who is taken in by the hitman after her family is murdered; and Danny Aiello as Tony, the mobster who gives the hitman his assignments.

— Freebase

Sète

Sète

Sète is a commune in the Hérault department in the Languedoc-Roussillon region in southern France. Its inhabitants are called Sétois. Known as the Venice of Languedoc and the singular island, it is a port and a seaside resort on the Mediterranean with its own very strong cultural identity, traditions, cuisine and dialect. It is also the hometown of artists like Paul Valéry, Jean Vilar, Georges Brassens, Gregory Del Piero, Hervé Di Rosa, Manitas de Plata, and Robert Combas.

— Freebase

Gilda

Gilda

Gilda is a 1946 American black-and-white film noir directed by Charles Vidor and starring Rita Hayworth in her signature role as the ultimate femme fatale and Glenn Ford as a young thug. The film was noted for cinematographer Rudolph Mate's lush photography, costume designer Jean Louis' wardrobe for Hayworth, and choreographer Jack Cole's staging of "Put the Blame on Mame" and "Amado Mio", sung by Anita Ellis. In 2013 the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

— Freebase

Hardinge, Henry, Viscount

Hardinge, Henry, Viscount

a distinguished soldier and Governor-General of India, born at Wrotham, Kent; joined the army in 1798, and served through the Peninsular and Waterloo campaigns, but wounded at Ligny he was unable to take part in the final struggle with Napoleon; he now turned his attention to politics; was Secretary of War under Wellington, and subsequently twice Chief Secretary for Ireland; in 1844 he was appointed Governor-General of India, and later distinguished himself under Gough in the first Sikh War; a viscountship and pension followed in 1845, and seven years later he succeeded Wellington as Commander-in-Chief of the British army (1785-1856).

Hardouin, Jean

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Metanarrative

Metanarrative

A metanarrative is a grand narrative common to all. The term refers, in critical theory and particularly in postmodernism, to a comprehensive explanation, a narrative about narratives of historical meaning, experience or knowledge, which offers a society legitimation through the anticipated completion of a master idea. The term was brought into prominence by Jean-François Lyotard in 1979, with his claim that the postmodern was characterised precisely by a mistrust of the grand narratives which had formed an essential part of modernity.

— Freebase

Imposs

Imposs

S. Rimsky Salgado known by his stage name Imposs is a Canadian rapper of Haitian origin based in Quebec. Before becoming a solo artist, he was part of Muzion, one of the well-known hip hop bands of Quebec. He has collaborated on many occasions with Wyclef Jean during Muzion days and as a solo artist. He is also well known for dubbing the phrase "Real City" for Montreal. He is signed to the K.Pone.Inc music label.

— Freebase

Mons

Mons

Mons is a Walloon city and municipality located in the Belgian province of Hainaut, of which it is the capital. The Mons municipality includes the old communes of Cuesmes, Flénu, Ghlin, Hyon, Nimy, Obourg, Baudour, Jemappes, Ciply, Harmignies, Harveng, Havré, Maisières, Mesvin, Nouvelles, Saint-Denis, Saint-Symphorien, Spiennes, Villers-Saint-Ghislain, Casteau, Masnuy-Saint-Jean, and Ville-sur-Haine. Together with the Czech city of Plzeň, Mons was selected to be the European capital of culture in 2015.

— Freebase

Moonwalk

Moonwalk

The moonwalk is a dance technique that presents the illusion of the dancer being pulled backwards while attempting to walk forward. A popping move, it became popular around the world after Michael Jackson executed the dance move during a performance of "Billie Jean" on Motown 25: Yesterday, Today, Forever on March 25, 1983. This special was broadcast May 16th, 1983 It subsequently became his signature move, and is now one of the best-known dance techniques in the world.

— Freebase

Regrets

Regrets

"Regrets" is a 1991 song recorded by French singer-songwriter Mylène Farmer as duet with musician Jean-Louis Murat. The song was released on 29 July 1989 and was the second single from her third studio album L'Autre.... The music video was shot in a cemetery in Budapest, as the song deals with a love relationship between two people separated by the death of one of them. This ballad became a top three hit in France and was also successful in Belgium.

— Freebase

Charlesbourg

Charlesbourg

Charlesbourg is a provincial electoral district in the Capitale-Nationale region of Quebec, Canada that elects members to the National Assembly of Quebec. It consists of part of the Charlesbourg borough of Quebec City. It was created for the 1973 election from parts of Chauveau and Montmorency electoral districts. In the change from the 2001 to the 2011 electoral map, it lost very small amounts of territory to Jean-Lesage and Montmorency electoral districts.

— Freebase

Tickled Pink

Tickled Pink

Tickled Pink was an hour-long television special which aired multiple times during July, 2006, chronicled television shows that homosexuals have identified with over the years. The show featured such entertainers as Richard Andreoli, Kelsey Grammer, Sandra Bernhard, Diahann Carroll, Susan Saint James, Bruce Vilanch, Marc Cherry, Lynda Carter, Bob Mackie, Jean Smart, Jason Stuart, Frank DeCaro, Barbara Eden, Mike Gray, Carson Kressley, Rue McClanahan, Judy Gold, Thom Filicia, and Mario Cantone. Tickled Pink was produced for TV Land by Linda Ellerbee’s Lucky Duck Productions.

— Freebase

Horatio Nelson

Horatio Nelson

Horatio Nelson was a racehorse sired by Danehill, out of the Irish 1,000 Guineas and Epsom Oaks winner Imagine. His owners were John Magnier and David Nagle. The colt won four of his seven starts, including the Prix Jean-Luc Lagardère at Longchamp Racecourse in October 2005. He competed in the 2006 Epsom Derby but broke down during the race and was later euthanized. He sustained a fractured cannon bone, a sesamoid bone and a dislocated fetlock joint on his right fore leg.

— Freebase

Boccaccio

Boccaccio

Boccaccio, or the Prince of Palermo is an operetta in three acts by Franz von Suppé to a German libretto by Camillo Walzel and Richard Genée, based on the play by Jean-François-Antoine Bayard, Adolphe de Leuven, Léon Lévy Brunswick and Arthur de Beauplan, based in turn on the Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio. The opera was first performed at the Carltheater, Vienna, February 1, 1879. An English translation was done by Oscar Weil and Gustav Hinrichs ca. 1883.

— Freebase

Castres

Castres

Castres is a commune, and arrondissement capital in the Tarn department and Midi-Pyrénées region in southern France. It lies in the former French province of Languedoc. Castres is the fourth largest industrial centre of the predominantly rural Midi-Pyrénées région and the largest in that part of Languedoc lying between Toulouse and Montpellier. Castres is noted for being the birthplace of the famous socialist leader Jean Jaurès and home to the important Goya Museum of Spanish painting.

— Freebase

Fourier series

Fourier series

In mathematics, a Fourier series decomposes periodic functions or periodic signals into the sum of a set of simple oscillating functions, namely sines and cosines. The study of Fourier series is a branch of Fourier analysis. The Fourier series is named in honour of Jean-Baptiste Joseph Fourier, who made important contributions to the study of trigonometric series, after preliminary investigations by Leonhard Euler, Jean le Rond d'Alembert, and Daniel Bernoulli. Fourier introduced the series for the purpose of solving the heat equation in a metal plate, publishing his initial results in his 1807 Mémoire sur la propagation de la chaleur dans les corps solides, and publishing his Théorie analytique de la chaleur in 1822. Early ideas of decomposing a periodic function into the sum of simple oscillating functions date back to the 3rd century BC, when ancient astronomers proposed an empiric model of planetary motions, based on deferents and epicycles. The heat equation is a partial differential equation. Prior to Fourier's work, no solution to the heat equation was known in the general case, although particular solutions were known if the heat source behaved in a simple way, in particular, if the heat source was a sine or cosine wave. These simple solutions are now sometimes called eigensolutions. Fourier's idea was to model a complicated heat source as a superposition of simple sine and cosine waves, and to write the solution as a superposition of the corresponding eigensolutions. This superposition or linear combination is called the Fourier series.

— Freebase

Arthur Rimbaud

Arthur Rimbaud

Jean Nicolas Arthur Rimbaud was a French poet born in Charleville, Ardennes. As part of the decadent movement, he influenced modern literature, music, and arts, and prefigured surrealism. All of his poetry was written as a teenager; he gave up creative writing completely before he turned 20. His "genius, its flowering, explosion and sudden extinction, still astonishes". Rimbaud was known to have been a libertine and a restless soul. He travelled extensively on three continents before his death from cancer just after his 37th birthday.

— Freebase

Fidelio

Fidelio

Fidelio is a German opera with spoken dialogue in two acts by Ludwig van Beethoven. It is Beethoven's only opera. The German libretto is by Joseph Sonnleithner from the French of Jean-Nicolas Bouilly which had been used for the 1798 opera Léonore, ou L’amour conjugal by Pierre Gaveaux, and for the 1804 opera Leonora by Ferdinando Paer. The opera tells how Leonore, disguised as a prison guard named "Fidelio", rescues her husband Florestan from death in a political prison.

— Freebase

Jansenism

Jansenism

Jansenism was a Christian theological movement, primarily in France, that emphasized original sin, human depravity, the necessity of divine grace, and predestination. The movement originated from the posthumously published work of the Dutch theologian Cornelius Jansen, who died in 1638. It was first popularized by Jansen's friend Jean du Vergier, Abbé de Saint-Cyran, and after Saint-Cyran's death in 1643 was led by Antoine Arnauld. Through the 17th and into the 18th centuries, Jansenism was a distinct movement within the Catholic Church. The theological centre of the movement was the Parisian convent of Port-Royal, which was a haven for writers including Saint-Cyran, Arnauld, Pierre Nicole, Blaise Pascal, and Jean Racine. Jansenism was opposed by many in the Catholic hierarchy, especially the Jesuits. Although the Jansenists identified themselves only as rigorous followers of Augustinism, Jesuits coined the term "Jansenism" to identify them as having Calvinist affinities. The papal bull Cum occasione, issued by Pope Innocent X in 1653, condemned five cardinal doctrines of Jansenism as heresy — especially the relationship between human free will and efficacious grace, wherein the teachings of Augustine, as presented by the Jansenists, contradicted the teachings of the Jesuit School. Jansenist leaders endeavored to accommodate the pope's pronouncements while retaining their distinctives, and enjoyed a measure of peace in the late 17th century under Pope Clement IX. However, further controversy led to the bull Unigenitus, issued by Clement XI in 1713, which marked the end of Catholic toleration of Jansenist doctrine.

— Freebase

The Timewriter

The Timewriter

Jean F. Cochois aka The Timewriter is a house music producer. His trademark style can be characterised by its dense and atmospheric sound. UK Muzik magazine wrote: "This is real 21st century soul music, overflowing with magic". Under various pseudonyms he has been releasing 12" and artist albums on labels as Plastic City, Mole Listening Pearls, Elektrolux and American labels such as Wave Music, Driftwood, and Fiji. He amalgamates the deep soul of Motown with synthetic sound productions. While still at boarding school, he eagerly explored the field of composition and became familiar with diverse musical styles. He looked up to bands like Depeche Mode, Tears for Fears, Kraftwerk, Gary Numan, Thomas Dolby, Alan Parsons, Vangelis and Jean Michele Jarre. Motown artists like Bobby Womack, Marvin Gaye or The Four Tops are also among his heroes. Other important sources of inspiration are Roxy Music and Marillion. In some of his songs influence of Michael Stearns is noticeable but he never confirmed this. He has worked for artists such as Enigma, the ex-Kraftwerk member Wolfgang Flür, Mike Oldfield, Yello, Faithless and Boy George to name a few. As a highly sought after DJ, he travels the world and plays in places such as New York, London, Sweden, Spain and Russia. As resident DJ he played in Sven Väth's Cocoon Club and now holds a monthly residency in Budapest.

— Freebase

Amanita verna

Amanita verna

Amanita verna, commonly known as the fool's mushroom, Destroying angel or the mushroom fool, is a deadly poisonous basidiomycete fungus, one of many in the genus Amanita. Occurring in Europe in spring, A. verna associates with various deciduous and coniferous trees. The large fruiting bodies appear in summer and autumn; the caps, stipes and gills are all white in colour. Initially described by the French botanist Jean Baptiste François Pierre Bulliard, the fool's mushroom's specific epithet verna is derived from its springtime fruiting habit.

— Freebase

Clootz, Anacharsis

Clootz, Anacharsis

Baron Jean Baptiste de Clootz, a French Revolutionary, born at Clèves; "world-citizen"; his faith that "a world federation is possible, under all manner of customs, provided they hold men"; his pronomen Anacharsis suggested by his resemblance to an ancient Scythian prince who had like him a cosmopolitan spirit; was one of the founders of the worship of Reason, and styled himself the "orator of the human race"; distinguished himself at the great Federation, celebrated on the Champ de Mars, by entering the hall on the great Federation Day, June 19, 1790, "with the human species at his heels"; was guillotined under protest in the name of the human race (1755-1794).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Kolchose

Kolchose

The Kolchose is a group of Hip hop artists in the southern German city of Stuttgart. The group was founded in 1993 and includes the artists Freundeskreis, Massive Töne, Afrob, Breite Seite and Skillz en Masse, to name a few. The Kolchose Members Jean-Christophe "Schowi" Ritter and Johannes "Strachi" Strachwitz started the 0711Büro, out of which the company "0711 Entertainment" developed. The name "Kolchose" is derived from the German word for kolkhoz, a type of collective farm that was common in the Soviet Union.

— Freebase

Jean de Brébeuf

Jean de Brébeuf

Saint Jean de Brébeuf was a French Jesuit missionary who traveled to New France in 1625. There he worked primarily with the Huron for the rest of his life, except for a short time back in France in 1629-1630. He learned their language and culture. In 1649 Brébeuf and several other missionaries were captured when an Iroquois raid took over a Huron village. Together with Huron captives, the missionaries were ritually tortured and eight were killed, martyred on March 16, 1649. Brébeuf was beatified in 1925 and canonized as a saint in the Roman Catholic Church in 1930.

— Freebase

Autumn Leaves

Autumn Leaves

Autumn Leaves is a 1956 Columbia Pictures drama film starring Joan Crawford and Cliff Robertson in an older woman/younger man tale of mental illness. The screenplay was written by Jean Rouverol and Hugo Butler, though it was credited to Jack Jevne, Rouverol and Butler being blacklisted at the time of the film's release. The film was directed by Robert Aldrich and produced by William Goetz. Autumn Leaves won an international award for its director and has been released to VHS.

— Freebase

Papillons

Papillons

Papillons, Op. 2, is a suite of piano pieces written in 1831 by Robert Schumann. Meaning 'butterflies', Papillons is meant to represent a masked ball and was inspired by the novel Flegeljahre by Jean Paul. The suite begins with a six-measure introduction before launching into a variety of dance-like movements. Each movement is unrelated to the preceding ones, except for the finale, in which the theme of the first movement returns. This movement starts out by quoting the theme of the traditional Grossvater Tanz, which was always played at the end of a wedding or similar celebration. Repeated notes near the end of the piece suggest a clock striking, signifying the end of the ball.

— Freebase

Wyartite

Wyartite

Wyartite CaU5+(UO2)2O4·7H2O is a uranium bearing mineral named after Jean Wyart, mineralogist at the Sorbonne, Paris. Greenish black, black, black violet in color, translucent to opaque orthorhombic crystals presentantion. A hardness of 3 - 4 Mohs. Its other names are Ianthinite, Wyartit and Wyartita. It belongs to the uranium carbonate group of minerals. It is found next to rutherfordine in Shinkolobwe, Shaba, Zaire. Determination of the structure of wyartite provided the first evidence for a pentavalent uranium mineral. Like all uranium minerals it is radioactive.

— Freebase

Black Tuesday

Black Tuesday

Black Tuesday is a 1954 film noir starring Edward G. Robinson. It marks a return of Robinson playing evil gangster types like he did in early Warner Bros. films. The crime melodrama also stars Peter Graves in one of his early film roles and Jean Parker in one of her late ones. It was shot in black-and-white. The film was due to be released on DVD by VCI Entertainment after an announcement made in 2005. A quality copy has long been sought by collectors.

— Freebase

Heteronomy

Heteronomy

Heteronomy refers to action that is influenced by a force outside the individual. Immanuel Kant, drawing on Jean-Jacques Rousseau, considered such an action nonmoral. It is the counter-opposite of autonomy. Philosopher Cornelius Castoriadis contrasted heteronomy from autonomy in noting that while all societies create their own institutions, autonomous societies are those in which their members are aware of this fact, and explicitly self-institute. In contrast, the members of heteronomous societies attribute their imaginaries to some extra-social authority.

— Freebase

Thioperamide

Thioperamide

Thioperamide is a potent and selective histamine H3 antagonist that is capable of crossing the blood–brain barrier. Thioperamide was used by Jean-Charles Schwartz in his early experiments regarding the H3 receptor. Thioperamide was found to be an antagonist of histamine autoreceptors, which detect the presence of histamine. Thioperamide enhances the activity of histaminergic neurons by blocking autoreceptors, thus preventing the detection of histamine by neurons. This causes the neurons to release more histamine, thus increasing their activity.

— Freebase

Nicolas de Caritat, marquis de Condorcet

Nicolas de Caritat, marquis de Condorcet

Marie Jean Antoine Nicolas de Caritat, marquis de Condorcet, known as Nicolas de Condorcet, was a French philosopher, mathematician, and early political scientist whose Condorcet method in voting tally selects the candidate who would beat each of the other candidates in a run-off election. Unlike many of his contemporaries, he advocated a liberal economy, free and equal public education, constitutionalism, and equal rights for women and people of all races. His ideas and writings were said to embody the ideals of the Age of Enlightenment and rationalism, and remain influential to this day. He died a mysterious death in prison after a period of flight from French Revolutionary authorities.

— Freebase

Vaurien

Vaurien

The Vaurien is a dinghy designed by Jean-Jacques Herbulot in 1951, and presented in the Boat show in Paris in 1952. It was meant as a reasonable alternative for a boat with a crew of two, as much for its low cost, as for its simplicity to sail. The first units, sold in the mentioned Boat show, had a price equivalent to two bicycles of the time. It is a light, but robust, boat that soon found its place among beginners, especially in Europe and Africa.

— Freebase

Loco

Loco

Loco is a 1984 computer game developed by Antony Crowther and released by Alligata for the Commodore 64. In 1986 it was converted for the ZX Spectrum and Atari 8-bit family. The ZX Spectrum version was developed by Richard Stevenson, David Wright and Nigel Speight. The music for the game is a C64 remake of Jean Michel Jarre's Equinoxe 5 by Ben Daglish. Comparing screen shots and game descriptions, Loco appears to be a clone of the arcade game Super Locomotive, produced by Sega in 1982.

— Freebase

Kanak people

Kanak people

Kanak are the indigenous Melanesian inhabitants of New Caledonia, an overseas collectivity of France in the southwest Pacific. According to the 2009 census, they constitute 40.3% of the total population of New Caledonia. Though Melanesian settlement is recorded on Grande Terre's Presqu'île de Foué peninsula as far back as the Lapita culture, the origin of Kanak people is unclear. Ethnographic research has shown that Polynesian seafarers have intermarried with the Kanaks over the centuries. The Kanaks refer to the European inhabitants of New Caledonia as Caldoches. New Caledonia was annexed to France in 1853, and became an overseas territory of France in 1956. A political movement, restarted by the Kanaks in 1984, after an initial failed revolt in 1967, has strongly pursued total independence status from the French rule. The movement is supported by the United Nations resolution of December 1986. A 2014 referendum will decide whether or not the territory will achieve sovereign status. When the 1988 Matignon agreements were signed between the representatives of France and New Caledonia to decide on holding the referendum for independence, Jean-Marie Tjibaou, the Kanak leader of the independence movement, had mooted a proposal to set up an Agency for the Development of Kanak Culture. After Tjibaou's assassination in 1989, the French President François Mitterrand ordered that a cultural centre on the lines suggested by Tjibaou be set up in Nouméa, the capital of New Caledonia; it was to be the last of Mitterrand's Grands Projets. The Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre was formally established in May 1998.

— Freebase

Dupuis

Dupuis

Éditions Dupuis S.A. is a Belgian publisher of comic albums and magazines. Based in Marcinelle near Charleroi, Dupuis was founded in 1922 by Jean Dupuis, and is mostly famous for its comic albums and magazines. It is originally a French language publisher, but publishes many editions both in French and Dutch. Other language editions are mostly licensed to other publishers. Dupuis was for a long time a family business but was sold in the early 1980s and has since changed ownership a few times.

— Freebase

Diamond Jim

Diamond Jim

Diamond Jim is a 1935 biographical film based on the published biography Diamond Jim Brady by Parker Morell. It follows the life of legendary entrepreneur James Buchanan Brady, including his romance with entertainer Lillian Russell, and stars Edward Arnold, Jean Arthur, Cesar Romero and Binnie Barnes. The screenplay by Preston Sturges never lets the lurid facts of Brady's life get in the way of the story. Edward Arnold went on to play Diamond Jim Brady again five years later, opposite Alice Faye in Lillian Russell.

— Freebase

Incognito

Incognito

Incognito is a British band, as well as one of the members of the United Kingdom's acid jazz movement. Their debut album, Jazz Funk, was released in 1981, with 14 more albums following, the last of which, Surreal, was released in 2012. The band's frontman, composer, record producer, guitarist and singer is Jean-Paul 'Bluey' Maunick. Other notable band members include or have included the singers Jocelyn Brown, Maysa Leak, Tony Momrelle, Imaani, Vanessa Haynes, Mo Brandis, Natalie Williams, Carleen Anderson, Pamela Anderson Kelli Sae and Joy Malcom.

— Freebase

Helene

Helene

Helene is a moon of Saturn. It was discovered by Pierre Laques and Jean Lecacheux in 1980 from ground-based observations at Pic du Midi Observatory, and was designated S/1980 S 6. In 1988 it was officially named after Helen of Troy, who was the granddaughter of Cronus in Greek mythology. The moon is also designated Saturn XII, a number which it received in 1982, under the designation Dione B, because it is co-orbital with Dione and located in its leading Lagrangian point. It is one of four known trojan moons.

— Freebase

Access Point

Access Point

Access Point is a rocky point immediately southeast of Biscoe Point and 2 miles northwest of Cape Lancaster on the south side of Anvers Island, in the Palmer Archipelago. First charted by the French Antarctic Expedition under Jean-Baptiste Charcot, 1903–05. Surveyed in 1955 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey and so named because there is a landing place for boats on the northwest tip of the point which provides access to the inland parts of the island. This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Access Point".

— Freebase

Blood Feud

Blood Feud

"Blood Feud" is the twenty-second and final episode of The Simpsons' second season. It originally aired on the Fox network in the United States on July 11, 1991. In the episode, Mr. Burns falls ill and desperately needs a blood transfusion. Homer discovers Bart has Burns' rare blood type and urges his son to donate some, promising that they will be handsomely rewarded. However, after receiving the blood, all Burns does is send the family a card. Enraged, Homer writes an insulting reply, but Marge convinces him at the last minute not to send it, although Bart mails it anyway. The episode was written by George Meyer and directed by David Silverman. Executive producer Sam Simon and writers Al Jean and Mike Reiss came up with the idea for the episode. A co-worker had recently needed a blood transfusion and the writers thought it would be funny if Mr. Burns had one. Although Meyer was credited with writing the episode, Jean and Reiss re-wrote and polished the script. The episode includes the debut of the Olmec head Xtapolapocetl, which would become a common background prop in the Simpson home. "Blood Feud" was part of the season two production run, but was completed behind schedule. It was originally broadcast on July 11, 1991 as part of "premiere week", the Fox Network's attempt to expand the normal 30 week prime time season and gain new viewers for the fall. In its original broadcast, the episode finished 24th in ratings for the week with a Nielsen rating of 10.8.

— Freebase

Truffle

Truffle

A truffle is the fruiting body of a subterranean Ascomycete fungus, predominantly one of the many species of the genus Tuber. Some of the species are highly prized as a food. French gourmand Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin called truffles "the diamonds of the kitchen". Edible truffles are held in high esteem in Middle Eastern, French, Spanish, Italian and Greek cooking, as well as in international haute cuisine. Truffles are ectomycorrhizal fungi and are therefore usually found in close association with the roots of trees. Spore dispersal is accomplished through fungivores, animals that eat fungi.

— Freebase

Jean de La Fontaine

Jean de La Fontaine

Jean de La Fontaine was the most famous French fabulist and one of the most widely read French poets of the 17th century. He is known above all for his Fables, which provided a model for subsequent fabulists across Europe and numerous alternative versions in France, and in French regional languages. According to Flaubert, he was the only French poet to understand and master the texture of the French language before Hugo. A set of postage stamps celebrating La Fontaine and the Fables was issued by France in 1995.

— Freebase

Romeite

Romeite

Roméite is a calcium antimonate mineral with the formula (Ca,Fe,Mn,Na)2(Sb,Ti)2O6. Roméite is a honey-yellow mineral crystallizing in the hexoctahedral crystal system. It has a Mohs hardness of 5.5-6.0. It occurs in Algeria, Australia, Brazil, China, Europe, Japan, New Zealand, and the United States of America in metamorphic iron-manganese deposits and in hydrothermal antimony-bearing veins. Its type locality is Prabornaz Mine, Saint-Marcel, Aosta Valley, Italy. It was named after Jean-Baptiste L. Romé de l'Isle. Brugger, et al. used infrared spectroscopy to measure water content in Roméite crystals.

— Freebase

Feuillans

Feuillans

a reformed brotherhood of Cistercian monks, founded in 1577 by Jean de la Barrière, abbot of the Cistercian monastery at Feuillans, in Languedoc. The movement thus organised was a protest against the laxity which had crept into the Church, and probably received some stimulus from the Reformation, which was then in progress. The Feuillans settled in a convent in the Rue St. Honoré, Paris, which in after years became the meeting-place of a revolutionary club, which took the name of Feuillans; founded in 1790 by Lafayette, La Rochefoucauld, &c., and which consisted of members of the respectable property classes, whose views were more moderate than those of the Jacobins. They could not hold out against the flood of revolutionary violence, and on March 28, 1791, a mob burst into their place of meeting and dispersed them.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Diane de Poitiers

Diane de Poitiers

Diane de Poitiers was a French noblewoman and a prominent courtier at the courts of kings Francis I and his son, Henry II of France. She became notorious as the latter's favourite. It was in this capacity that she wielded much influence and power at the French Court, which continued until Henry was mortally wounded in a tournament accident, during which his lance wore her favour rather than his wife's. The subject of paintings by François Clouet as well other anonymous painters, Diane was also immortalised in a statue by Jean Goujon.

— Freebase


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