Definitions containing l nnrot, elias

We've found 58 definitions:

Vancouver

Vancouver

A mountain between Alaska and Canada in the Saint Elias Mountains.

— Wiktionary

Ashmolean

Ashmolean

Of or pertaining to Elias Ashmole (1617u20131692), celebrated English antiquary, politician, astrologer and alchemist, whose cabinet of curiosities became the basis of the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford.

— Wiktionary

logan

Logan, Mount Logan

a mountain peak in the St. Elias Range in the southwestern Yukon Territory in Canada (19,850 feet high)

— Princeton's WordNet

mount logan

Logan, Mount Logan

a mountain peak in the St. Elias Range in the southwestern Yukon Territory in Canada (19,850 feet high)

— Princeton's WordNet

Hicksite

Hicksite

a member or follower of the "liberal" party, headed by Elias Hicks, which, because of a change of views respecting the divinity of Christ and the Atonement, seceded from the conservative portion of the Society of Friends in the United States, in 1827

— Webster Dictionary

Elias Hicks

Elias Hicks

Elias Hicks was a traveling Quaker preacher from Long Island, New York. In his ministry he promoted doctrines that embroiled him and his followers in a controversy which caused the first major schism within the Religious Society of Friends. Elias Hicks was the older cousin of the painter Edward Hicks, also a Quaker preacher.

— Freebase

Elias Magnus Fries

Elias Magnus Fries

Elias Magnus Fries was a Swedish mycologist and botanist.

— Freebase

Elias Howe

Elias Howe

Elias Howe, Jr. was an American inventor and sewing machine pioneer.

— Freebase

Wrangell Mountains

Wrangell Mountains

The Wrangell Mountains are a high mountain range of eastern Alaska in the United States. Much of the range is included in Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park and Preserve. The Wrangell Mountains are almost entirely volcanic in origin, and they include the second and third highest volcanoes in the United States, Mount Blackburn and Mount Sanford. The range takes its name from Mount Wrangell, which is one of the largest andesite shield volcanoes in the world, and also the only presently active volcano in the range. The Wrangell Mountains comprise most of the Wrangell Volcanic Field, which also extends into the neighboring Saint Elias Mountains and the Yukon Territory in Canada. The Wrangell Mountains are just to the northwest of the Saint Elias Mountains and northeast of the Chugach Mountains, which are along the coast of the Gulf of Alaska. These ranges have the combined effect of blocking the inland areas from warmer moist air over the Pacific Ocean. The inland areas to the north of the Wrangell Mountains are therefore among the coldest areas of North America during the winter.

— Freebase

Comendador, Elías Piña

Comendador, Elías Piña

Comendador is the capital of the Elías Piña province of the Dominican Republic. It has a border crossing to the Haitian town Belladère.

— Freebase

Paros

Paros

one of the Cyclades, lying between Naxos and Siphanto, exports wine, figs, and wool; in a quarry near the summit of Mount St. Elias the famous Parian marble is still cut; the capital is Paroekia (2).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Elmo's Fire, St.

Elmo's Fire, St.

a popular name for the display of electric fire which sometimes plays about the masts of ships, steeples, &c., accompanied at times with a hissing noise; commoner in southern climates, known by other names, e. g. Fire of St. Clara, of St. Elias.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Elias Canetti

Elias Canetti

Elias Canetti was a Bulgarian modernist novelist, playwright, memoirist, and non-fiction writer. He wrote in German and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1981, "for writings marked by a broad outlook, a wealth of ideas and artistic power".

— Freebase

Mutinus

Mutinus

Mutinus is a genus of fungi in the family Phallaceae. The genus was first described by Elias Magnus Fries in 1849. According to the Dictionary of the Fungi, the widespread genus contains 12 species.

— Freebase

Mount Hubbard

Mount Hubbard

Mount Hubbard is one of the major mountains of the Saint Elias Range. It is located on the Alaska/Yukon border; the Canadian side is within Kluane National Park and Reserve, and the American side is part of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park. The mountain was named in 1890 by USGS geologist Israel Russell after Gardiner Greene Hubbard, first president of the National Geographic Society, which had co-sponsored Russell's expedition. Hubbard is the highest point of a large massif with three named summits; the other two are Mount Alverstone and Mount Kennedy. Alverstone and Hubbard form a corner of the U.S.-Canadian border: the border extends roughly south from these peaks toward the Alaska panhandle, and roughly west toward Mount Saint Elias, approximately 100 km away. The Hubbard Glacier separates Mount Hubbard from Mount Vancouver to the west, while the Lowell Glacier lies to the east of the peak. Mount Hubbard is the eighth highest peak in the United States, and the twelfth highest peak in Canada. It is also notable for its large rise above local terrain. For example, its west face rises 7,500 feet above the Alverstone Glacier in less than 2 miles, and the peak rises 11,000 feet above the Hubbard Glacier to the southwest in only 7 miles. Mount Hubbard is just over 20 miles from tidewater at Disenchantment Bay. However, despite its precipitous drops to the west, the eastern side provides a nontechnical route to the summit.

— Freebase

Nonpoint

Nonpoint

Nonpoint is an American metal band formed in 1997. The band currently consists of vocalist Elias Soriano, drummer Robb Rivera, guitarists Rasheed Thomas and Dave Lizzio, and bassist Adam Woloszyn. They are currently signed with Razor & Tie and released their latest album, a self-titled, on October 9, 2012.

— Freebase

Elias Lönnrot

Elias Lönnrot

Elias Lönnrot was a Finnish physician, philologist and collector of traditional Finnish oral poetry. He is best known for compiling Kalevala, the national epic of Finland, from national folk tales that he gathered during several expeditions in Finland, Russian Karelia, the Kola Peninsula and Baltic countries.

— Freebase

Hypocrea

Hypocrea

Hypocrea is a genus of fungi in the Hypocreaceae family. The widespread genus is estimated to contain 171 species that grow on rotten wood, and are often associated with other fungi. Anamorphic genera associated with Hypocrea include Acremonium, Gliocladium, Trichoderma, and Verticillium. Hypocrea was circumscribed by mycologist Elias Fries in 1825.

— Freebase

Elias James Corey

Elias James Corey

Elias James "E.J." Corey is an American organic chemist. In 1990 he won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his development of the theory and methodology of organic synthesis", specifically retrosynthetic analysis. Regarded by many as one of the greatest living chemists, he has developed numerous synthetic reagents, methodologies, and has advanced the science of organic synthesis considerably.

— Freebase

Qloo

Qloo

Qloo is a cultural discovery platform that empowers members to discover new things and places based on their existing taste in any area. Qloo serves personalized suggestions for: music, film, TV, dining, nightlife, fashion, books and travel. Qloo members can decide which aspects of their taste are most relevant every time they seek suggestions. For example, members can choose to discover fashion based on their taste in music, or find a film based on their taste in literature and travel. Qloo is a free, invitation-only service, accessible via desktop and mobile web. Founded by Alex Elias and Jay Alger in April 2012, The company is headquartered in New York, NY. Visit www.Qloo.com to request an invitation.

— CrunchBase

Gummite

Gummite

Gummite is a yellow amorphous mixture of uranium minerals, oxides, silicates and hydrates of uranium, derived from the alteration of uraninite. It is named for its gum-like consistence. The material was also known under various names, mostly because of different origins of the samples, including: eliasite from Elias – the name of a mine at Jáchymov, coracite – a variety from Lake Superior, pittinite, pechuran, urangummit and uranogummite.

— Freebase

Snow Bunting

Snow Bunting

The Snow Bunting, sometimes colloquially called a snowflake, is a passerine bird in the longspur family Calcariidae. It is an arctic specialist, with a circumpolar Arctic breeding range throughout the northern hemisphere. There are small isolated populations on a few high mountain tops south of the Arctic region, including the Cairngorms in central Scotland and the Saint Elias Mountains on the southern Alaska-Yukon border, and also Cape Breton Highlands.

— Freebase

Trametes

Trametes

Trametes is a genus of fungi that is distinguished by a pileate basidiocarp, di- to trimitic hyphal systems, smooth non-dextrinoid spores, and a hymenium usually without true hymenial cystidia. The genus has a widespread distribution and contains about fifty species. The genus was first described by Elias Magnus Fries in 1835. Trametes fungi are food for caterpillars of certain Lepidoptera, mainly fungus moths such as Triaxomera parasitella.

— Freebase

Kennecott

Kennecott

Kennecott, also known as Kennecott Mines or AHRS Site No. XMC-001, is an abandoned mining camp in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska that was the center of activity for several copper mines. It is located beside the Kennicott Glacier, northeast of Valdez, inside Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. The camp and mines are now a National Historic Landmark District administered by the National Park Service. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1986.

— Freebase

Novocaine

Novocaine

Novocaine is a 2001 black comedy thriller film written and directed by David Atkins and starring Steve Martin, Helena Bonham Carter, Laura Dern, Lynne Thigpen and Elias Koteas. It was shot in the Chicago, Illinois area, during a limited 32-day schedule. The film received extra publicity during production and as its release approached because of an off-the-screen romance between Martin and Carter. It had lukewarm reviews and low box-office receipts.

— Freebase

Coast Mountains

Coast Mountains

The Coast Mountains are a major mountain range, in the Pacific Coast Ranges, of western North America, extending from southwestern Yukon through the Alaska Panhandle and virtually all of the Coast of British Columbia. They are so-named because of their proximity to the sea coast, and are often referred to as the Coast Range. It includes volcanic and non-volcanic mountains and the huge icefields of the Pacific and Boundary Ranges, and the northern end of the notable volcanic system known as the Cascade Volcanoes. The Coast Mountains are part of a larger mountain system called the Pacific Coast Ranges or the Pacific Mountain System, which includes the Cascade Range, the Insular Mountains, the Oregon and California Coast Ranges and the Saint Elias and Chugach Mountains. The Coast Mountains are approximately 1,600 kilometres long and average 300 kilometres in width. Its southern and southeastern boundaries are surrounded by the Fraser River and the Interior Plateau while its far northwestern edge is delimited by the Kelsall and Tatshenshini Rivers at the north end of the Alaska Panhandle, beyond which are the Saint Elias Mountains, and by Champagne Pass in the Yukon Territory. Covered in dense temperate rainforest on its western exposures, the range rises to heavily glaciated peaks, including the largest temperate-latitude icefields in the world. It then tapers to the dry Interior Plateau on its eastern flanks, or to the subarctic boreal forest of the Skeena Mountains and Stikine Plateau.

— Freebase

Lactacystin

Lactacystin

Lactacystin is an organic compound naturally synthesized by bacteria of the genus Streptomyces first described in 1991. The first total synthesis of lactacystin was developed by Elias Corey in 1992. The molecule is most commonly used as in biochemistry and cell biology laboratories as a selective inhibitor of the proteasome. The molecule is a lactam, or cyclic amide. A number of syntheses of this molecule have been published and there are no less than 1,300 references to this natural product in the literature.

— Freebase

Kajaani

Kajaani

Kajaani is a town and municipality in Finland. It is the capital of the Kainuu region. It is located southeast of Oulujärvi, which drains to the Gulf of Bothnia along the Oulujoki. There are 38,005 inhabitants and city surface area is 2,264.01 square kilometres of which 428.94 km² is water. The population density is 20.71 inhabitants per square kilometre . The town is unilingually Finnish. Kajaani is in the center of the region of Kainuu. Folklorist Elias Lönnrot began his travels from here when collecting folklore in Karelia.

— Freebase

Yaqui River

Yaqui River

The Yaqui River is a river in the state of Sonora in northwestern Mexico. Being the largest river system in the state of Sonora, the Yaqui river is used for irrigation. Approximately 320 km in length, the Rio Yaqui flows south and southwest to empty into the Gulf of California. The Rio Yaqui originates in the Sierra Madre Occidental and flows into the Gulf of California near the city of [[Obregon. Its course is interrupted by several reservoirs like Plutarco Elías Calles, Lázaro Cárdenas, or Álvaro Obregón, which provides the water resource for the intensively irrigated region of Ciudad Obregón.

— Freebase

Helvellaceae

Helvellaceae

The Helvellaceae are a family of ascomycete fungi, the best known members of which are the elfin saddles of the genus Helvella. Originally erected by Elias Magnus Fries in 1823 as Elvellacei, it contained many genera. Several of these, such as Gyromitra and Discina, have been found to be more distantly related in a molecular study of ribosomal DNA by mycologist Kerry O'Donnell in 1997, leaving a much smaller core clade now redefined as Helvellaceae. Instead, this narrowly defined group is most closely related to the true truffles of the Tuberaceae. According to the Dictionary of the Fungi, the family contains six genera and 63 species.

— Freebase

I Cried

I Cried

"I Cried" is a popular song written by Michael Elias and Billy Duke. The best-selling version was done by Patti Page, reaching #13 on the Billboard charts in 1954. It was released by Mercury Records as catalog number 70416. The song was a two-sided hit, with the flip side "What a Dream" doing even better on the chart. It entered the chart on September 1, 1954 and stayed on for 3 weeks, peaking at #26 on the Billboard magazine Best Seller chart. Another version, by Tommy Leonetti, reached #30 the same year. The song reached #18 on the Cash Box best-selling record charts in that year.

— Freebase

Unia

Unia

Unia, released on May 25, 2007, is the fifth full-length studio album by the power metal band Sonata Arctica, following the album Reckoning Night. The first single from the album was "Paid in Full", released on April 27, 2007. This is also the last album that features Jani Liimatainen, who was later replaced by Elias Viljanen after the album was released. The album was mixed at Finnvox Studios, and mastered at Cutting Room Studios in Stockholm, Sweden. The album was also released as a limited edition noble book in 7" size, exclusively available via mailorder from Nuclear Blast records. The limited edition came with a differing track listing and bonus tracks "They Follow" and "Out in the Fields".

— Freebase

Kalevala

Kalevala

The Kalevala is a 19th-century work of epic poetry compiled by Elias Lönnrot from Finnish and Karelian oral folklore and mythology. It is regarded as the national epic of Finland and is one of the most significant works of Finnish literature. The Kalevala played an instrumental role in the development of the Finnish national identity, the intensification of Finland's language strife and the growing sense of nationality that ultimately led to Finland's independence from Russia in 1917. The first version of The Kalevala was published in 1835. The version most commonly known today was first published in 1849 and consists of 22,795 verses, divided into fifty songs. The title can be interpreted as "The land of Kaleva" or "Kalevia".

— Freebase

Begotten

Begotten

Begotten is a 1990 American experimental/horror film, written, produced and directed by E. Elias Merhige. The film deals with the story of Genesis, reimagining it. Merhige revealed during Q&A sessions that its primary inspiration was a near death experience he had when he was 19, after a car crash. Merhige also stated that he would like this film to be the first of a trilogy. He was experiencing difficulties getting proper funding, and at the time it was unknown if/when the two other films would be made. The second film of the unofficial trilogy, a 14-minute film entitled Din of Celestial Birds, deals with evolution. It premiered in 2006 on Turner Classic Movies, and was shot in similar visual fashion.

— Freebase

Stanhope, Lady Hester Lucy

Stanhope, Lady Hester Lucy

born at Chevening, Kent, the eldest daughter of the third Earl of Stanhope, and niece of William Pitt; a woman of unusual force of character and attractiveness; from 1803 to 1806 was, as the confidant and housekeeper of her uncle William Pitt, a leader of society; retired with a Government pension after Pitt's death, but impelled by her restless nature, led an unsettled life in Southern Europe, and finally settled in Syria in 1814, making her home in the old convent of Mar Elias, near Mount Lebanon, where, cut off from Western civilisation, for 25 years she exercised a remarkable influence over the rude tribes of the district; assumed the dress of a Mohammedan chief, and something of the religion of Islam, and in the end came to look upon herself as a sort of prophetess; interesting accounts of her strange life and character have been published by her English physician, Dr. Madden, and others (1776-1839).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Jooks

Jooks

Johan Forsby better known by his stage name Jooks is a Danish rapper signed to ArtPeople label. He started his career under the name MC Jo and gained fame through winning the DM i Rap rapping competition in 1997 in association with the rap band trio Rent mel made up of him as MC Jo, of Tegnedrengen and JernHenrik. Johan Forsby also used at the time the name Dr. Jooks MacFive, shortening it later to Jooks. Jooks cooperated with a number of renowned Danish rappers like L.O.C., Clemens, Jokeren, Niarn, Per Vers and rap band Suspekt. In 2008, he had some success with "Jackmove" and "Træk vejret" and in June 2009 released his debut solo album in June 2009 was called Privilegeret and was an immediate success with the single "Hun vil ha' en rapper" topped the Tracklisten, the official Danish Singles Chart. Jooks is married to Julia Lahme, and they have two children, Elias and Sofus.

— Freebase

Aino

Aino

Aino is a figure in the Finnish national epic Kalevala. It relates that she was the beautiful sister of Joukahainen. Her brother, having lost a singing contest to the storied Väinämöinen, promised Aino's "hands and feet" in marriage if Väinämöinen would save him from drowning in the swamp into which Joukahainen had been thrown. Aino's mother was pleased at the idea of marrying her daughter to such a famous and well born person, but Aino did not want to marry such an old man. Rather than submit to this fate, Aino drowned herself. However, she returned to taunt the grieving Väinämöinen as a salmon. The name Aino, meaning "only", was invented by Elias Lönnrot who composed the Kalevala. In the original poems she was mentioned as the "only daughter".

— Freebase

Irenarch of Rostov

Irenarch of Rostov

Saint Irenarch or Irenarchus the Recluse of Rostov is honoured in the Russian Orthodox Church. Irenarchus, Hermit of Rostov, was born into a peasant family in the village of Kondakovo in the Rostov district of Russia. In Baptism he received the name Elias. In his thirtieth year, he was tonsured a monk at the Rostov St.s Boris and Gleb Monastery. There he began fervently to labor at monastic tasks, he attended church services, and by night he prayed and slept on the ground. Once, taking pity on a vagrant who did not have shoes, St Irenarchus gave him his own boots, and from that time he began to go barefoot through the snow. Irenarchus was a mystic and visionary. After his death many physical, psychological, and spiritual healings were attributed to the touching of his relics. He is commemorated 13 January in the Eastern Orthodox Church. Irenarchus was a companion of John the Hairy.

— Freebase

Boletus

Boletus

Boletus is a genus of mushroom, comprising over 100 species. The genus Boletus was originally broadly defined and described by Elias Magnus Fries in 1821, essentially containing all fungi with pores. Since then, other genera have been defined gradually, such as Tylopilus by Petter Adolf Karsten in 1881, and old names such as Leccinum have been resurrected or redefined. Some mushrooms listed in older books as members of the genus have now been placed in separate genera. These include such as Boletus scaber, now Leccinum scabrum, Tylopilus felleus, Chalciporus piperatus and Suillus luteus. The name is derived from the Latin term bōlētus 'mushroom' from the Ancient Greek βωλιτης, ultimately from bōlos/βωλος 'lump' or 'clod'. However, the βωλιτης of Galen is thought to have been the much prized Amanita caesarea. In Lithuania and Poland Boletus is called "The King Of Mushrooms".

— Freebase

Marcescence

Marcescence

Marcescence is the retention of dead plant organs that normally are shed. It is most obvious in deciduous trees that retain leaves through the winter. Several trees normally have marcescent leaves such as oak, beech and hornbeam. Marcescent leaves of pin oak complete development of their abscission layer in the spring. The base of the petiole remains alive over the winter. Many other trees may have marcescent leaves in seasons where an early freeze kills the leaves before the abscission layer develops or completes development. Diseases or pests can also kill leaves before they can develop an abscission layer. The term "marcescent" is also used in mycology to describe a mushroom which can dry out, but later revive and continue to disperse spores. Genus Marasmius is well known for this feature, which was considered taxonomically important by Elias Magnus Fries in his 1838 classification of the fungi.

— Freebase

Isagoge

Isagoge

The Isagoge or "Introduction" to Aristotle's "Categories", written by Porphyry in Greek and translated into Latin by Boethius, was the standard textbook on logic for at least a millennium after his death. It was composed by Porphyry in Sicily during the years 268-270, and sent to Chrysaorium, according to all the ancient commentators Ammonius, Elias, and David. The work includes the highly influential hierarchical classification of genera and species from substance in general down to individuals, known as the Tree of Porphyry, and an introduction which mentions the problem of universals. Boethius' translation of the work, in Latin, became a standard medieval textbook in European schools and universities, setting the stage for medieval philosophical-theological developments of logic and the problem of universals. Many writers, such as Boethius himself, Averroes, Abelard, Scotus, wrote commentaries on the book. Other writers such as William of Ockham incorporated them into their textbooks on logic.

— Freebase

Elijah

Elijah

Elijah or Elias was a famous prophet and a wonder-worker in the northern kingdom of Israel during the reign of Ahab, according to the Biblical Books of Kings as well as the Qur'an. According to the Books of Kings, Elijah defended the worship of Yahweh over that of the Phoenician god Baal; he raised the dead, brought fire down from the sky, and was taken up in a whirlwind. In the Book of Malachi, Elijah's return is prophesied "before the coming of the great and terrible day of the Lord," making him a harbinger of the Messiah and the eschaton in various faiths that revere the Hebrew Bible. Derivative references to Elijah appear in the Talmud, Mishnah, the New Testament and the Qur'an. In Judaism, Elijah's name is invoked at the weekly Havdalah ritual that marks the end of Shabbat, and Elijah is invoked in other Jewish customs, among them the Passover seder and the Brit milah. He appears in numerous stories and references in the Haggadah and rabbinic literature, including the Babylonian Talmud.

— Freebase

Marasmius

Marasmius

Marasmius is a genus of mushrooms, in the family Marasmiaceae. It contains about 500 species of agarics, of which a few, such as Marasmius oreades, are edible. However, most members of this genus are small, unimpressive brown mushrooms. Their humble appearance contributes to their not being readily distinguishable to non-specialists, and they are therefore seldom collected by mushroom hunters. Several of the species are known to grow in the characteristic fairy ring pattern. The author of the genus was Elias Magnus Fries, who in 1838 classified white-spored agarics having a tough central stipe in this taxon if they were marcescent, i.e. they could dry out, but later revive when moistened. For Fries, marcescence was an important character for classification, which he used to separate this group from genus Collybia. The name Marasmius itself comes from a Greek word marasmos, meaning "drying out". Modern mycologists no longer consider the marcescence/putrescence distinction a reliable criterion for taxonomy, but Fries's definition of the genus is still roughly applicable.

— Freebase

Beaker

Beaker

Beaker is a pseudonym for David Strasser, a Christian songwriter and musician well known for his collaborations with artist Rich Mullins. He received his nickname as a young man, when friends said he looked like Beaker the Muppet. When Beaker was in the seventh grade, his youth pastor introduced him to his friend Rich Mullins, and the two soon became collaborators. Beaker co-wrote, performed, and toured with Rich Mullins for several years. The first song they wrote together was "Boy Like Me, Man Like You", a 1991 hit for Mullins. Beaker is also responsible for writing the modern praise chorus "Step By Step". He was also instrumental in co-founding the Kid Brothers of St. Frank with Rich Mullins, and well as co-writing a musical about Saint Francis of Assisi entitled Canticle of the Plains. In the mid-90s, Beaker dropped out of the spotlight to focus on family life. He and his wife Julie have three sons, Aidan, Avery, and Elias, and two daughters, Cora Shea and Isabel.

— Freebase

Slaughter

Slaughter

Slaughter is an American hard rock band formed in Las Vegas, Nevada by lead vocalist/rhythm guitarist Mark Slaughter and bassist Dana Strum. The band reached stardom in 1990 with their first album Stick It to Ya, which spawned several hit singles including "Up All Night", "Spend My Life", "Mad About You" and "Fly to the Angels". The album reached double platinum status in the United States. The band remains a steady act in national tours, mainly in the Rock Never Stops Tour which features several bands of the same era. Slaughter formed in Las Vegas, Nevada, in late-1988, out of the ashes of lead vocalist Mark Slaughter and bassist Dana Strum's previous band, Vinnie Vincent Invasion. Vinnie Vincent Invasion's record company Chrysalis Records, took the $4 million contract away from Vinnie Vincent for overexceeding his credit line with the label, and transferred the contract to former members Slaughter and Strum. By 1989, Slaughter and Strum completed the lineup by recruiting lead guitarist Tim Kelly and drummer Blas Elias.

— Freebase

Jyväskylä

Jyväskylä

Jyväskylä is a city and municipality in Central Finland in the western part of the Finnish Lakeland. It is the largest city in Central Finland and on the Finnish Lakeland. Jyväskylä is located on the northern coast of Lake Päijänne, 147 kilometres north-east of Tampere and 270 kilometres north of Helsinki. The hilly and forested terrain in Jyväskylä is surrounded by hundreds of lakes. Summers in Jyväskylä are warm and winters cold and snowy. Elias Lönnrot, the compiler of the Finnish national epic Kalevala, gave the city a nickname "Athens of Finland". This nickname is used to describe the major role of Jyväskylä as an education centre and the first place in the world to provide education in Finnish. The works of the most famous Finnish architect Alvar Aalto can be seen throughout the city. The city hosts Neste Oil Rally Finland, which is part of the World Rally Championship. It is also home of the annual Jyväskylä Arts Festival. As of 28 February 2013, Jyväskylä had a population of 133,687. The city has been one of the most rapidly growing cities in Finland since World War II. In 1940 there were only 8000 inhabitants in Jyväskylä. The Jyväskylä sub-region includes Jyväskylä, Hankasalmi, Laukaa, Muurame, Petäjävesi, Toivakka and Uurainen.

— Freebase

Ahti

Ahti

In Finnish mythology, Ahti or Ahto is a heroic character of oral poetic tradition. Sometimes given in folk poetry the epithet of Saarelainen or the Islander, he is described as a fierce sea-going warrior. In the poems, Ahti makes a double vow with his wife Kyllikki, binding him to stay at home and not to engage in raiding, and her to stay faithful. However, Kyllikki breaks their oath, sending Ahti on a voyage with his old war companions. In some versions of the poem, he subsequently falls in combat. Ahti Saarelainen was one of the heroic figures Elias Lönnrot artificially compounded with the character of Lemminkäinen when writing the Kalevala in the 19th century. The original poems in the Ahti cycle have been dated tentatively to the Iron Age based on their sea-going setting. Sometimes the name of Ahti is used of a god of the sea and of fishing, portrayed as a man with a handlebar moustache and beard of moss. He is the consort of Vellamo, and they dwell in the undersea palace of Ahtola. He probably possesses some fragments of Sampo, which was broken and then lost at sea after a battle. Also Vetehinen and Iku-Turso live underwater with Ahti.

— Freebase

Zerubbabel

Zerubbabel

Zerubbabel was a governor of the Persian Province of Judah and the grandson of Jehoiachin, penultimate king of Judah. Zerubbabel led the first group of Jews, numbering 42,360, who returned from the Babylonian Captivity in the first year of Cyrus, King of Persia. The date is generally thought to have been between 538 and 520 BC. Zerubbabel also laid the foundation of the Second Temple in Jerusalem soon after. In all of the accounts in the Hebrew Bible that mention Zerubbabel, he is always associated with the high priest who returned with him, Joshua son of Jozadak. Together, these two men led the first wave of Jewish returnees from exile and began to rebuild the Temple. John Kessler describes the region of Judah as a small province that contained land moving 25 km from Jerusalem and was independently ruled prior to the Persian rule. Zerubbabel was the governor of this province. King Darius I of Persia appointed Zerubbabel governor of the Province. It was after this appointment that Zerubbabel began to rebuild the Temple. Elias Bickerman speculates that one of the reasons that Zerubbabel was able to rebuild the Temple was because of “the widespread revolts at the beginning of the reign of Darius I in 522 BC, which preoccupied him to such a degree that Zerubbabel felt he could initiate the rebuilding of the temple without repercussions”.

— Freebase

Walt Disney

Walt Disney

Walter Elias "Walt" Disney was an American animator, film producer, director, screenwriter, voice actor, entrepreneur, entertainer, international icon, and philanthropist, well known for his influence in the field of entertainment during the 20th century. Along with his brother Roy O. Disney, he co-founded the Walt Disney Productions, which later became one of the best-known motion picture producers in the world. The corporation is now known as The Walt Disney Company and had an annual revenue of approximately US$36 billion in the 2010 financial year. Disney was particularly noted as a film producer and a popular showman, as well as an innovator in animation and theme park design. He and his staff created some of the world's most well-known fictional characters including Mickey Mouse, for whom Disney himself provided the original voice. During his lifetime he received four honorary Academy Awards and won 22 Academy Awards from a total of 59 nominations, including a record four in one year, giving him more awards and nominations than any other individual in history. Disney also won seven Emmy Awards and gave his name to the Disneyland and Walt Disney World Resort theme parks in the U.S., as well as the international resorts like Tokyo Disney Resort, Disneyland Paris, and Hong Kong Disneyland.

— Freebase

Executer

Executer

Executer is a Brazilian thrash metal band. They formed in the mid 80s in the city of Amparo, close to the metropolis of São Paulo. The founding line up was Juca on vocals and bass, Paulo and Elias on guitars, and Beba on drums. They recorded two demo tapes, well received on the times of tape trading between the bands and zines, and in 1990 they recorded and released their debut studio album, Rotten Authorities. The album's sound could be compared to Dark Angel and Whiplash. Despite being one of the more liked bands of the Brazilian thrash metal scene at the time, they split up soon after the release of Rotten Authorities, since they couldn't find another drummer after Beba left the band. During the rest of the 1990s, the band members played in many other bands. In 2000, the band reformed with the original line up, but with some differences in playing; Juca got only the vocal works and Paulo got the bass instead of guitars. With this line up, they released two more albums, Psychotic Mind in 2002 and Welcome To Your Hell in 2006. Their first album was also re-released. The band have been playing throughout Brazil, being opening acts for famous bands such as Exodus on their latest South American tour.

— Freebase

Glacier Bay Basin

Glacier Bay Basin

Glacier Bay Basin in southeastern Alaska, United States, encompasses the Glacier Bay and surrounding mountains and glaciers, which was first proclaimed a U.S. National Monument on February 25, 1925 and which was later, on December 2, 1980, enlarged and designated as the Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve under the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, covering an area of 3,283,000 acres. In 1986, UNESCO declared an area of 57,000 acres within a World Biosphere Reserve. This is the largest UNESCO protected biosphere in the world. In 1992, UNESCO included this area as a part of a World Heritage site, extending over an area of 24,300,000-acre which also included the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park, Kluane National Park and Tatshenshini-Alsek Park. Part of the National Park is also designated a Wilderness area covering 2,658,000 acres. Glacier Bay, the body of water, covers an area 1,375 square miles of glaciers and accounts for 27% of the Park area. It was a large single glacier of solid ice till early 18th century. It started retreating and evolved over the centuries into the largest protected water area park in the world. Glacier Bay, on the Gulf of Alaska, was known as the Grand Pacific Glacier about 4,000 feet thick and about 20 miles in width which has since then, over the last more than 200 years retreated by 65 miles to the head of the bay at Tarr Inlet, and in this process left separate 20 other glaciers in its trail. In 1890, the name “Glacier Bay” as such was given to the bay by Captain Lester A. Beardslee of the U.S. Navy. It was first proclaimed a U.S. National Monument on February 25, 1925 by President Calvin Coolidge.

— Freebase

Mycology

Mycology

Mycology is the branch of biology concerned with the study of fungi, including their genetic and biochemical properties, their taxonomy and their use to humans as a source for tinder, medicine, food and entheogens, as well as their dangers, such as poisoning or infection. From mycology arose the field of phytopathology, the study of plant diseases, and the two disciplines remain closely related because the vast majority of "plant" pathogens are fungi. A biologist who studies mycology is called a mycologist. Historically, mycology was a branch of botany because, although fungi are evolutionarily more closely related to animals than to plants, this was not recognized until a few decades ago. Pioneer mycologists included Elias Magnus Fries, Christian Hendrik Persoon, Anton de Bary and Lewis David von Schweinitz. Many fungi produce toxins, antibiotics and other secondary metabolites. For example the cosmopolitan genus Fusarium and their toxins associated with fatal outbreaks of alimentary toxic aleukia in humans were extensively studied by Abraham Joffe. Fungi are fundamental for life on earth in their roles as symbionts, e.g. in the form of mycorrhizae, insect symbionts and lichens. Many fungi are able to break down complex organic biomolecules such as lignin, the more durable component of wood, and pollutants such as xenobiotics, petroleum, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. By decomposing these molecules, fungi play a critical role in the global carbon cycle.

— Freebase

Big Boy Restaurants

Big Boy Restaurants

Big Boy Restaurants International LLC is a restaurant chain with its current headquarters in Warren, Michigan, in Greater Detroit. Big Boy was started as Bob's Pantry in 1936 by Bob Wian in Glendale, California, USA. The restaurant became known as "Bob's, Home of the Big Boy Hamburger" then as Bob's Big Boy. It became a local chain under that name and nationally under the Big Boy name, franchised by Robert C. Wian Enterprises. Marriott Corporation bought Big Boy in 1967. One of the larger franchise operators, Elias Brothers, purchased the chain from Marriott in 1987, moving the headquarters of the company to Warren, Michigan, and operating it until declaring bankruptcy in 2000. Following the bankruptcy, the chain was sold to investor Robert Liggett, Jr., who took over as Chief Executive Officer, renamed the company Big Boy Restaurants International and kept the headquarters in Warren. The company is the franchisor for 126 Big Boy restaurants in the United States. Immediately after Liggett's purchase, Liggett Restaurant Enterprises dba Big Boy Restaurants International negotiated an agreement with the other large franchise operator, Frisch's Restaurants transferring to Frisch's exclusive, perpetual ownership of Big Boy marks in Kentucky, Indiana, and most of Ohio and Tennessee, and transferring all other Frisch's territories to Liggett. Big Boy International and Frisch's now are co-registrants of the Big Boy name and trademark. Thus Frisch's is no longer a franchisee but a substantially equal owner which operates almost as many units as Liggett. Frisch's is the owner or franchisor of 118 Big Boy restaurants in the United States.

— Freebase

StubHub

StubHub

StubHub is an online marketplace owned by eBay, which provides services for buyers and sellers of tickets for sports, concerts, theater and other live entertainment events. It has grown from the largest secondary-market ticket marketplace in the United States into the world's largest ticket marketplace. While the company does not currently disclose its financials, it is said to process one sports or entertainment ticket every second and in 2012 had approximately 15 million unique visitors per month. The San Francisco-located company was founded in 2000 by Eric Baker and Jeff Fluhr, both former Stanford Business School students and investment bankers. The company's president is Chris Tsakalakis. Other executives include Raji Arasu, Noah Goldberg, Agay Gopal, Anne Robie, Danielle Maged, Ray Elias and Brigitte Ricou-Bellan. Founder Eric Baker left StubHub in 2004. StubHub was acquired by eBay in January 2007. ABC has stated that StubHub has "become the ticket scalper of the digital age, the ultimate middleman to shake up the way people interact to buy and sell tickets to almost any concert, theater performance or sporting event." StubHub has become a major sponsor in sports and entertainment. As of September 2013, StubHub has more than 120 partners, including Anschutz Entertainment Group, the O2, Staples Center, Major League Baseball Advanced Media, 28 Major League Baseball Clubs, ESPN, more than 35 NCAA premier colleges and universities, a number of NHL, NBA, and MLS teams, as well as some of the top music venues in the United States and Europe. Internationally, StubHub also has partnerships with several Barclay's Premier League teams and has partnered with Crown Talent and Media Group to become the official ticket seller for some of its artists including Jessie J. As of June 2013, it also holds the naming rights to StubHub Center in Carson, California.

— Freebase

Pancho Villa

Pancho Villa

José Doroteo Arango Arámbula – better known by his pseudonym Francisco Villa or his nickname Pancho Villa – was one of the most prominent Mexican Revolutionary generals. As commander of the División del Norte, he was the veritable caudillo of the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua which, given its size, mineral wealth, and proximity to the United States of America, provided him with extensive resources. Villa was also provisional Governor of Chihuahua in 1913 and 1914. Although he was prevented from being accepted into the "panteón" of national heroes until some 20 years after his death, today his memory is honored by Mexicans. In addition, numerous streets and neighborhoods in Mexico are named in his honor. Villa and his supporters seized hacienda land for distribution to peasants and soldiers. He robbed and commandeered trains, and, like the other revolutionary generals, printed fiat money to pay for his cause. Villa's men and supporters became known as Villistas during the revolution from 1910 to roughly 1920. Villa's dominance in northern Mexico was broken in 1915 through a series of defeats he suffered at Celaya and Agua Prieta at the hands of Álvaro Obregón and Plutarco Elías Calles. After Villa's famous raid on Columbus, New Mexico in 1916, U.S. Army General John J. Pershing tried unsuccessfully to capture Villa in a nine-month pursuit that ended when the United States entered into World War I and Pershing was called back. Villa retired in 1920 and was given a large estate which he turned into a "military colony" for his former soldiers. In 1923, he decided to re-involve himself in Mexican politics and as a result was assassinated, most likely on the orders of Obregón.

— Freebase

Scanian dialects

Scanian dialects

Scanian is a closely related group of dialects which formed part of the old Scandinavian dialect continuum, spoken mainly in the province Scania in southern Sweden. It is by most historical linguists considered to be an East-Danish dialect group, but due to the modern era influence from Standard Swedish in the region and because traditional dialectology in the Scandinavian countries normally have not considered isoglosses that cut across state borders, the Scanian dialects have normally been treated as a South-Swedish dialect group in Swedish dialect research. However, many of the early Scandinavian linguists, including Adolf Noreen and G. Sjöstedt, classified it as "South-Scandinavian", and some linguists, such as Elias Wessén, also considered Old Scanian a separate language, classified apart from both Old Danish and Old Swedish. Considering Old Danish, this was most probably due to the geographical factor, split into at least three languages with minor differencies, around the end of the 11th century. The continental Jutland, the Scanian provinces and the islands in between. By the time of 17th century Danish was the only language, even if dialectal differencies still existed. Sweden captured Eastern Denmark in 1658, Treaty of Roskilde, Bornholm went back to Denmark in 1660 after the Treaty of Copenhagen. During the Swedish king Charles XI a "swedification" process began, but was interrupted by temporary Danish recaptures. After 1712 the "swedification" process could continue without Danish disturbance. However 300 years later a large amount of Danish words have survived. Some of them are adapted into the Swedish language, but are only in use in Scanian. Also the pronunciation of Scanian still has common denominators, like diphthongs and the pronunciation of the continental "R".

— Freebase

Scanian dialect

Scanian dialect

Scanian is a closely related group of dialects which formed part of the old Scandinavian dialect continuum, spoken mainly in the province Scania in southern Sweden. It is by most historical linguists considered to be an East-Danish dialect group, but due to the modern era influence from Standard Swedish in the region and because traditional dialectology in the Scandinavian countries normally have not considered isoglosses that cut across state borders, the Scanian dialects have normally been treated as a South-Swedish dialect group in Swedish dialect research. However, many of the early Scandinavian linguists, including Adolf Noreen and G. Sjöstedt, classified it as "South-Scandinavian", and some linguists, such as Elias Wessén, also considered Old Scanian a separate language, classified apart from both Old Danish and Old Swedish. Considering Old Danish, this was most probably due to the geographical factor, split into at least three languages with minor differencies, around the end of the 11th century. The continental Jutland, the Scanian provinces and the islands in between. By the time of 17th century Danish was the only language, even if dialectal differencies still existed. Sweden gained Eastern Denmark in 1658, Treaty of Roskilde, Bornholm went back to Denmark in 1660 after the Treaty of Copenhagen. During the Swedish king Charles XI a "swedification" process began, but was interrupted by temporary Danish recaptures. The last peace treaty between Sweden and Denmark was written in Stockholm at 3 July 1720. Here did Sweden agree to Scanian rights of own law, own language, own culture and own right to property. And "own law" in combination with "own right to property" could be interpreted also as "own right to taxes". However Sweden has during the last 300 years not lived up to their promesis. And also after 1720 the "swedification" process continued. Still three centuries later a large amount of Danish words have survived the "swedification". Some of them are adapted into the Swedish language, but are only in use in Scanian. Some examples

— Freebase

Zero In On

Zero In On

Zero In On is a band that was founded in 2000, in Locarno, a small town in the South of Switzerland. Zero In On reached hot rotations on many European radio stations, particularly in Germany, Portugal and Belgium and on the Swiss national radio stations Rete Tre and Couleur3. Zero In On was nominated "Best Swiss Band" by the Zic Me Up Tour Contest in France. Elias Bertini, the leader, started to compose rock songs with Mattia Stefanini, the drummer. The musical influences of the two of them gave a way to a very particular style, a mix of pop and metal, classical and experimental music. In 2004, after the publication of their first album, The Oblivion Fair, the band started to play with Gian-Andrea Costa, the bass player. The debut album come out in Germany, Belgium, Luxembourg, Austria, Portugal, Mexico and in the USA. They also release two singles, the first one including Surrounding The Sea and To Mary and the second one Queen and Secrets in Glue. Zero In On reached hot rotations on many European radio stations, particularly in Germany, Portugal and Belgium and on the Swiss national radio stations Rete Tre and Couleur3. Zero In On's success was accompanied by the release of the video clip of the song Surrounding the Sea. In 2005, they also appeared in two compilations by Trock and by FNAC-CH. The French Label "Production Spéciales" selected the band's cover of The Beatles song While my guitar Gently Weeps" for a compilation dedicated to Beatles. They played on Orgy festival, Sid'Action Festival, Watermelon Festival and, in the same year they walked, as the first Swiss-Italian band, on the FMR stage of Paléo Festival in Nyon. The second album Pillow Talk reached hot rotations on Swiss and European radio stations. Zero In On presented the new songs also in Los Angeles, Brighton, Lyon and Paris. In 2008, the band was nominated "Best Swiss Band" by the Zic Me Up Tour Contest in France. In 2009, Zero In On recorded the 3rd album, Silly Lilly, which was introduced to Russian public in St-Petersburg in April 2010.

— Freebase


The Web's Largest Resource for

Definitions & Translations


A Member Of The STANDS4 Network