Definitions containing jülich

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Roer

Roer

Roer is the name of a département of the First French Empire in present day Germany and the Netherlands. It was named after the river Rur, which flows through the département. It was formed in 1795, when the Southern Netherlands and the left bank of the Rhine were occupied by the French. The département de la Roer was formed from the duchies of Jülich and Cleves, the part of the Archbishopric of Cologne left of the Rhine, the free city of Aachen, the Prussian part of the duchy of Guelders and some smaller territories. In 1805 the city Wesel was added to the département. The capital was Aix-la-Chapelle. The département was subdivided in the following arrondissements and cantons: ⁕Aachen, cantons: Aachen, Burtscheid, Düren, Eschweiler, Froitzheim, Geilenkirchen, Gemünd, Heinsberg, Linnich, Monschau and Sittard. ⁕Cleves, cantons: Cleves, Geldern, Goch, Horst, Kalkar, Kranenburg, Wankum, Wesel and Xanten. ⁕Krefeld, cantons: Krefeld, Bracht, Erkelenz, Kempen, Moers, Neersen, Neuss, Odenkirchen, Rheinberg, Uerdingen, Viersen ⁕Cologne, cantons: Cologne, Bergheim, Brühl, Dormagen, Elsen, Jülich, Kerpen, Lechenich, Weiden and Zülpich. Its population in 1812 was 631,094.

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Venlo

Venlo

Venlo is a municipality and a city in the southeastern Netherlands, next to the German border. It is situated in the province of Limburg. In 2001, the municipalities of Belfeld and Tegelen were merged into the municipality of Venlo. Tegelen was originally part of the Duchy of Jülich centuries ago, whereas Venlo has a past in the Duchy of Guelders. On 1 January 2010, the municipality of Arcen en Velden, was merged into the municipality of Venlo.

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CLaMS

CLaMS

CLaMS is a modular chemistry transport model system developed at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany. CLaMS was first described by McKenna et al. and was expanded into three dimensions by Konopka et al.. CLaMS has been employed in recent European field campaigns THESEO, EUPLEX, TROCCINOX and SCOUT-O3 with a focus on simulating ozone depletion and water vapour transport. Major strengths of CLaMS in comparison to other CTMs are ⁕its applicability for reverse domain filling studies ⁕its anisotropic mixing scheme ⁕its integrability with arbitrary observational data ⁕its comprehensive chemistry scheme

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Inde

Inde

The Inde is a small river in Belgium and Germany, left tributary of the Rur. It has its source near Raeren in Eastern Belgium, runs through Aachen-Kornelimünster, Eschweiler and Inden, and flows into the river Rur near Jülich. Because of lignite opencast mining, it has been diverted in 2003 near to Inden-Lamersdorf. The brooks Omerbach, Otterbach, Saubach, Vichtbach and Wehebach flow into the Inde. Its name is of Celtic origin: Inda. The Inde has a counterpart, a "small Inde", in France: the Andelle, which is a 55 km long river in the French département Seine-Maritime and whose original name was Indella. The suffix -ella is an example for Celtic river names comparing for instance Mosella. For the name "Inde", the Indoeuropean stem *wed is supposed, like in words like Italian "onda" and French "onde". The river Inde acquired historical importance, when Emperor Louis the Pious founded the monastery of Kornelimünster at one of its old passages in 815.

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Rhine Province

Rhine Province

The Rhine Province, also known as Rhenish Prussia or synonymous to the Rhineland, was the westernmost province of the Kingdom of Prussia and the Free State of Prussia, within the German Reich, from 1822–1946. It was created from the provinces of the Lower Rhine and Jülich-Cleves-Berg. Its capital was Koblenz and in 1939 it had 8.0 million inhabitants. The Province of Hohenzollern was militarily associated with the Oberpräsident of the Rhine Province. The Rhine Province bounded on the north by the Netherlands, on the east by the Prussian provinces of Westphalia and Hesse-Nassau, and the grand duchy of Hesse-Darmstadt, on the southeast by the Palatinate, on the south and southwest by Lorraine, and on the west by Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands. The small district of Wetzlar in the midst of Hesse-Nassau and Hesse-Darmstadt also belonged to the Rhine Province, which, on the other hand, surrounded the Oldenburg principality of Birkenfeld. In 1911, the extent of the province was 10,423 km²; its extreme length, from north to south, was nearly 200 km, and its greatest breadth was just under 90 km. It included about 200 km of the course of the Rhine, which formed the eastern border of the province from Bingen to Koblenz, and then flows in a north-northwesterly direction inside the province, approximately following its eastern border.

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