Definitions containing i ching*

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I Ching

I Ching

The I Ching or "Yì Jīng", also known as the Classic of Changes, Book of Changes or Zhouyi, is one of the oldest of the Chinese classic texts. The book contains a divination system comparable to Western geomancy or the West African Ifá system; in Western cultures and modern East Asia, it is still widely used for this purpose. Traditionally, the I Ching and its hexagrams were thought to pre-date recorded history, and based on traditional Chinese accounts, its origins trace back to the 3rd to the 2nd millennium BC. Modern scholarship suggests that the earliest layers of the text may date from the end of the 2nd millennium BC, but place doubts on the mythological aspects in the traditional accounts. Some consider the I Ching the oldest extant book of divination, dating from 1,000 BC and before. The oldest manuscript that has been found, albeit incomplete, dates back to the Warring States Period. During the Warring States Period, the text was re-interpreted as a system of cosmology and philosophy that subsequently became intrinsic to Chinese culture. It centered on the ideas of the dynamic balance of opposites, the evolution of events as a process, and acceptance of the inevitability of change.

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Ching

Ching

The ching are small bowl-shaped finger cymbals of thick and heavy bronze, with a broad rim commonly used in Cambodia and Thailand. They are made of an alloy mixed with bronze. They measure about 2 inches in diameter and are joined together with a cord, which passes through a small hole at the apex of each one of them. Each cymbal of the pair is held in one hand and the two are struck together. The ching are the timekeepers of the ensemble. While cymbals, in general, are used for various occasions, the Khmer people use them purely in theater, dance, and music contexts. They produce open and closed sounds—chhing and chhepp—marked respectively by the signs and in transcriptions. To produce the open sound—chhing—the cymbal in the right hand hits the other in the left with an outward sliding motion, while the closed sound—chhepp—is produced by hitting both cymbals and holding them together; thus dampening the sound. The chhing and chhepp or open and closed sounds of the ching mark the unaccented and accented beats in the actual music making.

— Freebase

hexagram

hexagram

Any of the 64 sets of solid and broken lines used for divination in the I Ching.

— Wiktionary

Laozi

Laozi

Laozi was a philosopher of ancient China, best known as the author of the Tao Te Ching. His association with the Tào Té Chīng has led him to be traditionally considered the founder of philosophical Taoism. He is also revered as a deity in most religious forms of Taoist philosophy, which often refers to Laozi as Taishang Laojun, or "One of the Three Pure Ones". According to Chinese traditions, Laozi lived in the 6th century BCE. Some historians contend that he actually lived in the 5th–4th century BCE, concurrent with the Hundred Schools of Thought and Warring States period, while some others argue that Laozi is a synthesis of multiple historical figures or that he is a mythical figure. A central figure in Chinese culture, both nobility and common people claim Laozi in their lineage. He was honored as an ancestor of the Tang imperial family, and was granted the title Táishāng xuānyuán huángdì, meaning "Supreme Mysterious and Primordial Emperor". Throughout history, Laozi's work has been embraced by various anti-authoritarian movements.

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Courage

Courage

Courage is the ability to confront fear, pain, danger, uncertainty, or intimidation. Physical courage is courage in the face of physical pain, hardship, death, or threat of death, while moral courage is the ability to act rightly in the face of popular opposition, shame, scandal, or discouragement. In some traditions, fortitude holds approximately the same meaning as courage. In the Western tradition, notable thoughts on courage have come from philosophers such as Aristotle, Aquinas and Kierkegaard; in the Eastern tradition, some thoughts on courage were offered by the Tao Te Ching. More recently, courage has been explored by the discipline of psychology.

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Vertically Challenged

Vertically Challenged

Vertically Challenged is the debut EP from UK hip hop artist Lady Sovereign, only released in the U.S. and Australia, although it could be found in Virgin Megastore in Crawley, England. The EP features the UK hit single "Random" and a remix of her limited edition white-label single "Ch Ching". In the US, a limited edition was manufactured containing a bonus DVD. The limited edition was not released in Australia.

— Freebase

Tao

Tao

Tao or Dao is a Chinese concept signifying 'way', 'path', 'route', or sometimes more loosely, 'doctrine' or 'principle', or as a verb, speak. Within the context of traditional Chinese philosophy and religion, Tao is a metaphysical concept originating with Laozi that gave rise to a religion and philosophy referred to in English with the single term Taoism. The concept of Tao was shared with Confucianism, Chán and Zen Buddhism and more broadly throughout East Asian philosophy and religion in general. Within these contexts Tao signifies the primordial essence or fundamental nature of the universe. In the foundational text of Taoism, the Tao Te Ching, Laozi explains that Tao is not a 'name' for a 'thing' but the underlying natural order of the universe whose ultimate essence is difficult to circumscribe. Tao is thus "eternally nameless” and to be distinguished from the countless 'named' things which are considered to be its manifestations. In Taoism, Chinese Buddhism and Confucianism, the object of spiritual practice is to 'become one with the tao' or to harmonise one's will with Nature in order to achieve 'effortless action'. This involves meditative and moral practices. Important in this respect is the Taoist concept of De.

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Rhabdomancy

Rhabdomancy

Rhabdomancy is a type of divination by means of any rod, wand, staff, stick, arrow, or the like. One method of rhabdomancy was setting a number of staffs on end and observing where they fall, to divine the direction one should travel, or to find answers to certain questions. It has also been used for divination by arrows - otherwise known as belomancy. Less commonly it has been assigned to the I Ching, which uses small wooden rods, and also dowsing, which often uses a wooden stick. Rhabdomancy has been used in reference to a number of Biblical verses. St Jerome connected Hosea 4.12, which reads "My people ask counsel at their stocks, and their staff declareth unto them", to Ancient Greek rhabdomantic practices. Thomas Browne, in his Pseudodoxia Epidemica, notes that Ezekiel 21.21 describes the divination by arrows of Nebuchadnezzar II as rhabdomancy, though this can also be termed belomancy. Numbers 17 has also been attributed to rhabdomancy. W.F. Kirby, an English translator of the Kalevala, notes that in Runo 49, Väinämöinen uses rhabdomancy, or divination by rods, to learn where the sun and moon are hidden, but this interpretation is rejected by Aili Kolehmainen Johnson.

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Taoism

Taoism

Taoism is a philosophical and religious tradition that emphasizes living in harmony with the Tao. The term Tao means "way", "path" or "principle", and can also be found in Chinese philosophies and religions other than Taoism. In Taoism, however, Tao denotes something that is both the source and the driving force behind everything that exists. It is ultimately ineffable: "The Tao that can be told is not the eternal Tao." The keystone work of literature in Taoism is the Tao Te Ching, a concise and ambiguous book containing teachings attributed to Laozi. Together with the writings of Zhuangzi, these texts build the philosophical foundation of Taoism. This philosophical Taoism, individualistic by nature, is not institutionalized. Institutionalized forms, however, evolved over time in the shape of a number of different schools, often integrating beliefs and practices that even pre-dated the keystone texts – as, for example, the theories of the School of Naturalists, which synthesized the concepts of yin and yang and the Five Elements. Taoist schools traditionally feature reverence for Laozi, immortals or ancestors, along with a variety of divination and exorcism rituals, and practices for achieving ecstasy, longevity or immortality.

— Freebase

Belly of the Beast

Belly of the Beast

Belly of the Beast is a 2003 action film starring Steven Seagal, and directed by Hong Kong action choreographer Ching Siu-tung. Seagal plays an ex-CIA agent on a quest to find his kidnapped daughter.

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Oleandra

Oleandra

Oleandra is a genus of fern in family Oleandraceae. It contains the following species: ⁕Oleandra hainanensis, Ching

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Lastreopsis

Lastreopsis

Lastreopsis is a genus of ferns in the family Elaphoglossaceae. Species include: ⁕Lastreopsis subrecedens Ching 1938 ⁕Lastreopsis calantha Tindale 1957 – Shield-fern ⁕Lastreopsis effusa Tindale 1957 – False Shield-fern ⁕Lastreopsis decomposita Tindale 1957 ⁕Lastreopsis microsora Tindale 1957 ⁕Lastreopsis nephrodioides Tindale ⁕Lastreopsis walleri Tindale 1987

— Freebase

Yin and yang

Yin and yang

In Chinese philosophy, the concept of yin-yang, which is often called "yin and yang", is used to describe how seemingly opposite or contrary forces are interconnected and interdependent in the natural world; and, how they give rise to each other as they interrelate to one another. Many natural dualities are thought of as physical manifestations of the yin-yang concept. The concept lies at the origins of many branches of classical Chinese science and philosophy, as well as being a primary guideline of traditional Chinese medicine, and a central principle of different forms of Chinese martial arts and exercise, such as baguazhang, taijiquan, and qigong and of I Ching. Yin and yang are actually complementary, not opposing, forces, interacting to form a whole greater than either separate part; in effect, a dynamic system. Everything has both yin and yang aspects,. Either of the two major aspects may manifest more strongly in a particular object, depending on the criterion of the observation.

— Freebase

Wade–Giles

Wade–Giles

Wade–Giles, sometimes abbreviated Wade, is a romanization system for the Mandarin Chinese language. It developed from a system produced by Thomas Wade during the mid-19th century, and was given completed form with Herbert Giles' Chinese–English Dictionary of 1892. Wade–Giles was a common system of transcription in the English-speaking world for most of the 20th century, used in several standard reference books and in all books about China published in western countries before 1979. It replaced the Nanjing-based romanization systems that had been common until late in the 19th century. It has been entirely replaced by the pinyin system in mainland China. Outside mainland China, it has mostly been replaced by the pinyin system, but remains common in history books, particularly those before late 20th century. Additionally, its usage can still be seen in the common English names of certain individuals and locations such as Chiang Ching-kuo or Taipei.

— Freebase

Fortune-telling

Fortune-telling

Fortune-telling is the practice of predicting information about a person's life. The scope of fortune-telling is in principle identical with the practice of divination. The difference is that divination is the term used for predictions considered part of a religious ritual, invoking deities or spirits, while the term fortune-telling implies a less serious or formal setting, even one of popular culture, where belief in occult workings behind the prediction is less prominent than the concept of suggestion, spiritual or practical advisory or affirmation. Historically, fortune-telling grows out of folkloristic reception of Renaissance magic, specifically associated with Romani people. During the 19th and 20th century, methods of divination from non-Western cultures, such as the I Ching, were also adopted as methods of fortune-telling in western popular culture. An example of divination or fortune-telling as purely an item of pop culture, with little or no vestiges of belief in the occult, would be the Magic 8-Ball sold as a toy by Mattel, or Paul II, a cephalopod of the Sea Life Aquarium at Oberhausen used to predict the outcome of matches played by the German national football team.

— Freebase

The Prodigal Son

The Prodigal Son

The Prodigal Son, also released as "Pull No Punches," is a 1981 Hong Kong kung fu comedy film directed by Sammo Hung, starring Yuen Biao and Lam Ching-ying and featuring Hung in a supporting role. The film is based on the historical figures Leung Jan, Leung Yee-tai, and Wong Wah-bo. It features the martial art Wing Chun.

— Freebase

Querent

Querent

Querent as "one who seeks" is derived, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, from the Latin quærēns "seeker," the present participle of quærere "to seek, gain, ask." It is clear that Querent became used to denote "a person who questions an Oracle" because it is usually when you have a problem that requires Otherworldly advice that you would seek out the oracle in the first place. This oracle may simply be a divinatory technique, such as the I Ching, that is manipulated by the Querent themselves without recourse to any other human agency. Alternatively it may involve another person, someone perhaps seen as a "fortune teller" — particularly a Practitioner of Tarot reading or other form of Mediumship — from whom advice is sought. The kinds of questions asked by a Querent may vary widely according to their needs, and the methodology of the divination system. Some Querents seek general advice trusting that they will be told what is most pertinent to their present situation. Others will ask questions that are only slightly more direct such as, "Will I be rich?" and "What kind of person will I marry?" Still others seek specific advice. Although opinions are divided amongst Practitioners of various divinatory arts as to what constitutes a 'good' question: some say that questions in the form of "What would be likely to happen if I followed course of action X?" is potentially more useful to a Querent than "Should I follow course of action X?" Yes and no questions are not always best because of the finality they represent, besides usually most Querents are after far more than just Yes and No.

— Freebase

Chakravartin

Chakravartin

Chakravartin, is a term used in Indian religions for an ideal universal ruler, who rules ethically and benevolently over the entire world. Such a ruler's reign is called sarvabhauma. It is a bahuvrīhi, literally meaning "whose wheels are moving", in the sense of "whose chariot is rolling everywhere without obstruction". It can also be analyzed as an 'instrumental bahuvrīhi: "through whom the wheel is moving" in the meaning of "through whom the Dharmacakra is turning". In Buddhism and Jainism, three types of Chakravartins are distinguished: ⁕Cakravala Cakravartin: a ruler over all four continents postulated in ancient Indian cosmography ⁕Dvipa Cakravartin: a ruler over only one of four continents ⁕Pradesa Cakravartin: a ruler over only part of a continent. The first references to a cakravala cakravartin appear in monuments from the time of the Maurya Empire, dedicated to Chandragupta Maurya and his grandson Ashoka Maurya. It has not been generally used for any other historic figure. The cakravartin in Buddhism came to be considered the secular counterpart of a Buddha. In the Majjhima Nikaya, Gautama Buddha is quoted as stating that a woman can never be a chakravartin. Bhikkhuni Heng-Ching Shih states referring to women in Buddhism: "Women are said to have five obstacles, namely being incapable of becoming a Brahma King, 'Sakra', King 'Mara', Cakravartin or Buddha."

— Freebase

Straw Dogs

Straw Dogs

Straw Dogs is a 1971 psychological thriller directed by Sam Peckinpah and starring Dustin Hoffman and Susan George. The screenplay by Peckinpah and David Zelag Goodman is based upon Gordon M. Williams's 1969 novel The Siege of Trencher's Farm. The film's title derives from a discussion in the Tao Te Ching that likens the ancient Chinese ceremonial straw dog to forms without substance. The film is noted for its violent concluding sequences and a complicated rape scene that critics point to as an example of Peckinpah's debasement of women. Released theatrically the same year as A Clockwork Orange, The French Connection, and Dirty Harry, the film sparked heated controversy over the perceived increase of violence in cinema. The film premiered in U.S. cinemas on December 29, 1971. Although controversial in 1971, Straw Dogs is considered by many to be one of Peckinpah's greatest films. A remake directed by Rod Lurie was released on September 16, 2011.

— Freebase

Figurism

Figurism

Figurism was an intellectual movement of Jesuit missionaries at the end of the 17th and the beginning of the 18th century, whose participants viewed the I Ching as a prophetic book containing the mysteries of Christianity, and prioritized working with the Qing Emperor as a way of promoting Christianity in China.

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Old Chinese

Old Chinese

Old Chinese, also called Archaic Chinese in older works, refers to the form of Chinese spoken from the beginning of written records until the 3rd century BC. The earliest inscriptions are evidently part of the Chinese tradition, but are limited in scope and less than completely understood. Within historical Chinese phonology, the term refers to the language reflected by the rhymes of the Classic of Poetry and the phonetic components of Chinese characters, corresponding to the earlier half of the 1st millennium BC. Scholars are engaged in an on-going attempt to reconstruct the sounds of Old Chinese language by comparing this data with what is known of Middle Chinese: although they dispute many details, their recent reconstructions tend to agree on a basic structure. These reconstructions tend to agree that unlike later forms of the language, Old Chinese allowed consonant clusters at the beginning and end of the syllable, but lacked tones. The research indicates that tone distinctions of Middle Chinese reflect earlier final consonants, and also identifies simple derivational morphology. The latter part of the Old Chinese period saw a flowering of literature, including classical works such as the Analects of Confucius, the Mencius, and the Tao Te Ching. As a result, Old Chinese was preserved for the following two millennia in the form of Classical Chinese, a style of written Chinese emulating the grammar and vocabulary of those works.

— Freebase

Cyrtomium

Cyrtomium

Cyrtomium is a genus of about 15-20 species of ferns in the family Dryopteridaceae, native to Asia, Africa, and the Pacific Ocean islands. It is very closely related to the genus Polystichum, with recent research suggesting it should be included within it. ⁕Cyrtomium caryotideum C.Presl ⁕Cyrtomium falcatum C.Presl ⁕Cyrtomium fortunei J.Sm. ⁕Cyrtomium macrophyllum Tag. ⁕Cyrtomium micropterum Ching

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the X that can be Y is not the true X

the X that can be Y is not the true X

Yet another instance of hackerdom's peculiar attraction to mystical references — a common humorous way of making exclusive statements about a class of things. The template is from the Tao te Ching: “The Tao which can be spoken of is not the true Tao.” The implication is often that the X is a mystery accessible only to the enlightened. See the trampoline entry for an example, and compare has the X nature.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary


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