Definitions containing haüy, rené just

We've found 250 definitions:

cartesian

Cartesian

of or relating to Rene Descartes or his works

— Princeton's WordNet

transonic

transonic

just below, or just above the speed of sound

— Wiktionary

nouthe

nouthe

Just; just now; at present; presently.

— Wiktionary

Just

Just

barely; merely; scarcely; only; by a very small space or time; as, he just missed the train; just too late

— Webster Dictionary

Cartesian

Cartesian

of or pertaining to the French philosopher Rene Descartes, or his philosophy

— Webster Dictionary

Same

Same

just mentioned, or just about to be mentioned

— Webster Dictionary

think of England

think of England

To tolerate or endure bad sex. Used in conjunction with "I just lie on my back and.." "I just go through the motions and..." etc.

— Wiktionary

crepuscular ray

crepuscular ray

A sunbeam seen just after sunset or just before sunrise, caused by a cloud below the horizon and dust particles in the air above the horizon.

— Wiktionary

zodiacal light

zodiacal light

a luminous tract in the sky; a reflection of sunlight from cosmic dust in the plane of the ecliptic; visible just before sunrise and just after sunset

— Princeton's WordNet

Reaumur

Reaumur

of or pertaining to Rene Antoine Ferchault de Reaumur; conformed to the scale adopted by Reaumur in graduating the thermometer he invented

— Webster Dictionary

whipsaw

whipsaw

to lose potential profit by buying shares just before the price falls, or by selling them just before the price rises

— Wiktionary

Decrement

Decrement

a name given by Hauy to the successive diminution of the layers of molecules, applied to the faces of the primitive form, by which he supposed the secondary forms to be produced

— Webster Dictionary

Just

Just

not transgressing the requirement of truth and propriety; conformed to the truth of things, to reason, or to a proper standard; exact; normal; reasonable; regular; due; as, a just statement; a just inference

— Webster Dictionary

Apportionment

Apportionment

the act of apportioning; a dividing into just proportions or shares; a division or shares; a division and assignment, to each proprietor, of his just portion of an undivided right or property

— Webster Dictionary

stratum granulosum

stratum granulosum

the layer of epidermis just under the stratum corneum or (on the palms and soles) just under the stratum lucidum; contains cells (with visible granules) that die and move to the surface

— Princeton's WordNet

This

This

as a demonstrative pronoun, this denotes something that is present or near in place or time, or something just mentioned, or that is just about to be mentioned

— Webster Dictionary

browband

browband

Part of a horse's bridle that runs from just under one ear, across the forehead, to just under the other ear, preventing the bridle from sliding down.

— Wiktionary

Right

Right

conformed to the constitution of man and the will of God, or to justice and equity; not deviating from the true and just; according with truth and duty; just; true

— Webster Dictionary

Anatase

Anatase

Anatase is one of the three mineral forms of titanium dioxide, the other two being brookite and rutile. It is always found as small, isolated and sharply developed crystals, and like rutile, a more commonly occurring modification of titanium dioxide, it crystallizes in the tetragonal system; but, although the degree of symmetry is the same for both, there is no relation between the interfacial angles of the two minerals, except in the prism-zone of 45° and 90°. The common pyramid of anatase, parallel to the faces of which there are perfect cleavages, has an angle over the polar edge of 82°9', the corresponding angle of rutile being 56°52½'. It was on account of this steeper pyramid of anatase that the mineral was named, by René Just Haüy in 1801, from the Greek anatasis, "extension", the vertical axis of the crystals being longer than in rutile. There are also important differences between the physical characters of anatase and rutile: the former is less hard and dense. Also, anatase is optically negative whereas rutile is positive, and its luster is even more strongly adamantine or metallic-adamantine than that of rutile.

— Freebase

René

René

René is a short novella by François-René de Chateaubriand, which first appeared in 1802. The work had an immense impact on early Romanticism, comparable to that of Goethe's The Sorrows of Young Werther. Like the German novel, it deals with a sensitive and passionate young man who finds himself at odds with contemporary society. René was first published as part of Chateaubriand's Génie du christianisme along with another novella, Atala, although it was in fact an excerpt from a long prose epic the author had composed between 1793 and 1799 called Les Natchez, which would not be made public until 1826. René enjoyed such immediate popularity that it was republished separately in 1805 along with Atala.

— Freebase

umpire

umpire

A match official on the ground deciding and enforcing the rules during play. As of 2007 the Australian Football League uses 3, or in the past 2 or just 1. The other officials, the goal umpires and boundary umpires, are normally not called just umpires alone.

— Wiktionary

Laumontite

Laumontite

Laumontite is a mineral, one of the zeolite group. Its molecular formula is Ca(AlSi2O6)2·4H2O, a hydrated calcium-aluminium silicate. Potassium or sodium may substitute for the calcium but only in very small amounts. It is monoclinic, space group C2/m. It forms prismatic crystals with a diamond-shaped cross-section and an angled termination. When pure, the color is colorless or white. Impurities may color it orange, brownish, gray, yellowish, pink, or reddish. It has perfect cleavage on [010] and [110] and its fracture is conchoidal. It is very brittle. The Mohs scale hardness is 3.5-4. It has a vitreous luster and a white streak. It is found in hydrothermal deposits left in calcareous rocks, often formed as a result of secondary mineralization. Host rock types include basalt, andesite, metamorphic rocks and granites. The identification of laumontite goes back to the early days of mineralogy. It was first named lomonite by R. Jameson in 1805, and laumonite by René Just Haüy in 1809. The current name was given by K.C. von Leonhard in 1821. It is named after Gillet de Laumont who collected samples from lead mines in Huelgoat, Brittany, making them the type locality.

— Freebase

outline map

outline map

A map which represents just sufficient geographic information to permit the correlation of additional data placed upon it.

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

Euclase

Euclase

Euclase is a beryllium aluminium hydroxide silicate mineral. It crystallizes in the monoclinic crystal system and is typically massive to fibrous as well as in slender prismatic crystals. It is related to beryl and other beryllium minerals. It is a product of the decomposition of beryl in pegmatites. Euclase crystals are noted for their blue color, ranging from very pale to dark blue. The mineral may also be colorless, white, or light green. Cleavage is perfect, parallel to the clinopinacoid, and this suggested to René Just Haüy the name euclase, from the Greek εὖ, easily, and κλάσις, fracture. The ready cleavage renders the stone fragile with a tendency to chip, and thus detracts from its use for personal ornament. When cut it resembles certain kinds of beryl and topaz, from which it may be distinguished by its specific gravity. Its hardness is rather less than that of topaz. It was first reported in 1792 from the Orenburg district in the southern Urals, Russia, where it is found with topaz and chrysoberyl in the gold-bearing gravels of the Sanarka. Its type locality is Ouro Prêto, Minas Gerais, Southeast Region, Brazil, where it occurs with topaz. It is met with as a rarity in the mica-schist of the Rauris in the Austrian Alps.

— Freebase

Directly

Directly

exactly; just

— Webster Dictionary

Right

Right

exactly; just

— Webster Dictionary

fair-and-square

fair-and-square

just and honest

— Princeton's WordNet

suggestion

trace, hint, suggestion

a just detectable amount

— Princeton's WordNet

trace

trace, hint, suggestion

a just detectable amount

— Princeton's WordNet

hint

trace, hint, suggestion

a just detectable amount

— Princeton's WordNet

jus

jus

(slang) just

— Wiktionary

kissing

kissing

Just touching.

— Wiktionary

directly

directly

exactly; just.

— Wiktionary

just a sec

just a sec

just a second

— Wiktionary

Nowthe

Nowthe

just now; at present

— Webster Dictionary

Fair-minded

Fair-minded

unprejudiced; just; judicial; honest

— Webster Dictionary

Fledgeling

Fledgeling

a young bird just fledged

— Webster Dictionary

wrongful

wrongful

not just or fair

— Princeton's WordNet

scarce

scarce

Scarcely, only just.

— Wiktionary

warrantable

warrantable

Justifiable, just, proper.

— Wiktionary

even

even

exactly, just, fully

— Wiktionary

hot

hot

Fresh; just released

— Wiktionary

Injurious

Injurious

not just; wrongful; iniquitous; culpable

— Webster Dictionary

Eanling

Eanling

a lamb just brought forth; a yeanling

— Webster Dictionary

After-dinner

After-dinner

the time just after dinner

— Webster Dictionary

Due

Due

right; just title or claim

— Webster Dictionary

on the button

precisely, exactly, on the nose, on the dot, on the button

just as it should be

— Princeton's WordNet

precisely

precisely, exactly, on the nose, on the dot, on the button

just as it should be

— Princeton's WordNet

on the dot

precisely, exactly, on the nose, on the dot, on the button

just as it should be

— Princeton's WordNet

small hours

small hours

the hours just after midnight

— Princeton's WordNet

new year

New Year

the calendar year just begun

— Princeton's WordNet

demand

demand, exact

claim as due or just

— Princeton's WordNet

exactly

precisely, exactly, on the nose, on the dot, on the button

just as it should be

— Princeton's WordNet

exact

demand, exact

claim as due or just

— Princeton's WordNet

on the nose

precisely, exactly, on the nose, on the dot, on the button

just as it should be

— Princeton's WordNet

JSYK

JSYK

just so you know

— Wiktionary

nobbut

nobbut

nothing but; only; just

— Wiktionary

JFGI

JFGI

just fucking Google it.

— Wiktionary

only

only

no more than; just

— Wiktionary

jist

jist

alternative form of just

— Wiktionary

subdermal

subdermal

just below the skin

— Wiktionary

equitable

equitable

Fair, just, or impartial.

— Wiktionary

rhadamanthine

rhadamanthine

Strictly and uncompromisingly just.

— Wiktionary

Causeless

Causeless

without just or sufficient reason; groundless

— Webster Dictionary

Square

Square

exactly suitable or correspondent; true; just

— Webster Dictionary

All

All

even; just. (Often a mere intensive adjunct.)

— Webster Dictionary

Giusto

Giusto

in just, correct, or suitable time

— Webster Dictionary

Uprighteously

Uprighteously

in an upright or just manner

— Webster Dictionary

involve

necessitate, ask, postulate, need, require, take, involve, call for, demand

require as useful, just, or proper

— Princeton's WordNet

call for

necessitate, ask, postulate, need, require, take, involve, call for, demand

require as useful, just, or proper

— Princeton's WordNet

simmer

simmer

temperature just below the boiling point

— Princeton's WordNet

require

necessitate, ask, postulate, need, require, take, involve, call for, demand

require as useful, just, or proper

— Princeton's WordNet

need

necessitate, ask, postulate, need, require, take, involve, call for, demand

require as useful, just, or proper

— Princeton's WordNet

subconscious

subconscious

just below the level of consciousness

— Princeton's WordNet

take

necessitate, ask, postulate, need, require, take, involve, call for, demand

require as useful, just, or proper

— Princeton's WordNet

demand

necessitate, ask, postulate, need, require, take, involve, call for, demand

require as useful, just, or proper

— Princeton's WordNet

postulate

necessitate, ask, postulate, need, require, take, involve, call for, demand

require as useful, just, or proper

— Princeton's WordNet

necessitate

necessitate, ask, postulate, need, require, take, involve, call for, demand

require as useful, just, or proper

— Princeton's WordNet

ask

necessitate, ask, postulate, need, require, take, involve, call for, demand

require as useful, just, or proper

— Princeton's WordNet

expert

expert

A player ranking just below master.

— Wiktionary

reasonable

reasonable

Just; fair; agreeable to reason.

— Wiktionary

nascent

nascent

Emerging; just coming into existence.

— Wiktionary

minus

minus

Ranking just below a designated rating.

— Wiktionary

hardly

hardly

Barely, only just, almost not.

— Wiktionary

unjust

unjust

Not fair, just or right.

— Wiktionary

sure enough

sure enough

Just as one would expect.

— Wiktionary

justness

justness

the state of being just

— Wiktionary

adjacent

adjacent

Just before, after, or facing.

— Wiktionary

Rightful

Rightful

righteous; upright; just; good; -- said of persons

— Webster Dictionary

Peeper

Peeper

a chicken just breaking the shell; a young bird

— Webster Dictionary

Whilere

Whilere

a little while ago; recently; just now; erewhile

— Webster Dictionary

Rightful

Rightful

consonant to justice; just; as, a rightful cause

— Webster Dictionary

Right

Right

that to which one has a just claim

— Webster Dictionary

Scarcely

Scarcely

with difficulty; hardly; scantly; barely; but just

— Webster Dictionary

Animals, Newborn

Animals, Newborn

Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

justice

justice, justness

the quality of being just or fair

— Princeton's WordNet

last-minute

last-minute

just before a deadline; at the last minute

— Princeton's WordNet

justness

justice, justness

the quality of being just or fair

— Princeton's WordNet

hip-length

hiplength, hip-length

extending to or just over the hips

— Princeton's WordNet

speak of the devil

speak of the devil

mention someone's name who just then appears

— Princeton's WordNet

marginal

bare(a), marginal

just barely adequate or within a lower limit

— Princeton's WordNet

hiplength

hiplength, hip-length

extending to or just over the hips

— Princeton's WordNet

last minute

last-minute

just before a deadline; at the last minute

— Princeton's WordNet

bare

bare(a), marginal

just barely adequate or within a lower limit

— Princeton's WordNet

anklet

anklet, anklets, bobbysock, bobbysocks

a sock that reaches just above the ankle

— Princeton's WordNet

fair-minded

fair-minded

of a person; just and impartial; not prejudiced

— Princeton's WordNet

bobbysock

anklet, anklets, bobbysock, bobbysocks

a sock that reaches just above the ankle

— Princeton's WordNet

bobbysocks

anklet, anklets, bobbysock, bobbysocks

a sock that reaches just above the ankle

— Princeton's WordNet

anklets

anklet, anklets, bobbysock, bobbysocks

a sock that reaches just above the ankle

— Princeton's WordNet

Crescent

Crescent

any one of three orders of knighthood; the first instituted by Charles I., king of Naples and Sicily, in 1268; the second by Rene of Anjou, in 1448; and the third by the Sultan Selim III., in 1801, to be conferred upon foreigners to whom Turkey might be indebted for valuable services

— Webster Dictionary

gangrel

gangrel

A child just beginning to walk, toddler.

— Wiktionary

just-so stories

just-so stories

Plural form of just-so story.

— Wiktionary

preocular

preocular

Just in front of the eyes.

— Wiktionary

uprighteously

uprighteously

in an uprighteous or just manner

— Wiktionary

justly

justly

In a just or fair manner; rightfully.

— Wiktionary

seasonable

seasonable

Ephemeral; lasting for just one season.

— Wiktionary

tarpaulin

tarpaulin

A sailor. Often abbreviated to just tar.

— Wiktionary

literally

literally

Used as a generic downtoner: just, merely.

— Wiktionary

Round

Round

complete and consistent; fair; just; -- applied to conduct

— Webster Dictionary

Conscionable

Conscionable

governed by, or according to, conscience; reasonable; just

— Webster Dictionary

Antoine César Becquerel

Antoine César Becquerel

Antoine César Becquerel was a French scientist and a pioneer in the study of electric and luminescent phenomena. He was born at Châtillon-sur-Loing. After passing through the École polytechnique he became engineer-officer in 1808, and saw active service with the imperial troops in Spain from 1810 to 1812, and again in France in 1814. He then resigned from the army and devoted the rest of his life to scientific investigation. In 1820, following the work of René Just Haüy, he found that pressure can induce electricity in every material, attributing the effect to surface interactions. In 1825 he invented a differential galvanometer for the accurate measurement of electrical resistance. In 1829 he invented a constant-current electrochemical cell, the forerunner of the Daniell cell. In 1839, working with his son A. E. Becquerel, he discovered the photoelectric effect on an electrode immersed in a conductive liquid. His earliest work was mineralogical in character, but he soon turned his attention to the study of electricity and especially of electrochemistry. In 1837 he became a Fellow of the Royal Society, and received its Copley Medal for his various memoirs on electricity, and particularly for those on the production of metallic sulphurets and sulphur by electrolysis. He was the first to prepare metallic elements from their ores by this method. It was hoped that this would lead to increased knowledge of the recomposition of crystallized bodies, and the processes which may have been employed by nature in the production of such bodies in the mineral kingdom.

— Freebase

previous

previous(a), old

just preceding something else in time or order

— Princeton's WordNet

raising hell

raising hell, hell raising

making trouble just for the fun of it

— Princeton's WordNet

echo

echo

a reply that repeats what has just been said

— Princeton's WordNet

subconscious mind

subconscious mind, subconscious

psychic activity just below the level of awareness

— Princeton's WordNet

subconscious

subconscious mind, subconscious

psychic activity just below the level of awareness

— Princeton's WordNet

threshold level

threshold level

the intensity level that is just barely perceptible

— Princeton's WordNet

hell raising

raising hell, hell raising

making trouble just for the fun of it

— Princeton's WordNet

old

previous(a), old

just preceding something else in time or order

— Princeton's WordNet

legitimate

legitimate

show or affirm to be just and legitimate

— Princeton's WordNet

saraphan

saraphan

A Russian girls' dress formerly worn by peasants, now used as a costume or as a dress for dolls. It is a long dress running from just below the armpits to the ankles, held up by wide straps over the shoulders and has a wide skirt. Usually it is decorated with a colorful vertical embroidered strip down the front and one or more horizontal rings just above the hemline.

— Wiktionary

rowdy

rowdy

rough and disorderly; riotous or just boisterous

— Wiktionary

subalpine

subalpine

At or just below the tree-line

— Wiktionary

gesundheit

gesundheit

said to someone who has just sneezed

— Wiktionary

dawntime

dawntime

The time when something is just beginning

— Wiktionary

equally

equally

In equal degree or extent; just as.

— Wiktionary

second-to-last

second-to-last

Occurring just before the final in a series.

— Wiktionary

bloop

bloop

To make a hit just beyond the infield.

— Wiktionary

utilitarian

utilitarian

practical and functional, not just for show.

— Wiktionary

tout court

tout court

Just, simply; without addition or qualification; alone.

— Wiktionary

griffin

griffin

A person who has just arrived from Europe.

— Wiktionary

what the doctor ordered

what the doctor ordered

Same as just what the doctor ordered

— Wiktionary

Justifiable

Justifiable

capable of being justified, or shown to be just

— Webster Dictionary

Dolphin

Dolphin

a permanent fender around a heavy boat just below the gunwale

— Webster Dictionary

sprouted

sprouted

(of growing vegetation) having just emerged from the ground

— Princeton's WordNet

complin

compline, complin

last of the seven canonical hours just before retiring

— Princeton's WordNet

compline

compline, complin

last of the seven canonical hours just before retiring

— Princeton's WordNet

picky

picky

Fussy; particular; demanding to have things just right.

— Wiktionary

solo concert

solo concert

A public musical performance given by just one person.

— Wiktionary

toehold

toehold

A foothold small enough to support just the toe.

— Wiktionary

actual

actual

Factual, real, not just apparent or even false

— Wiktionary

volley

volley

The flight of a ball just before it bounces

— Wiktionary

in defense

in defense

to back up what has just been said

— Wiktionary

half volley

half volley

A delivery that bounces just short of the blockhole

— Wiktionary

populist

populist

Put forward just because it would be popular

— Wiktionary

not a minute too soon

not a minute too soon

at the last possible moment; just in time

— Wiktionary

parrot

parrot

A parroter; a person who repeats what was just said.

— Wiktionary

Griffin

Griffin

an Anglo-Indian name for a person just arrived from Europe

— Webster Dictionary

Rhadamanthine

Rhadamanthine

of or pertaining to Rhadamanthus; rigorously just; as, a Rhadamanthine judgment

— Webster Dictionary

Anticor

Anticor

a dangerous inflammatory swelling of a horse's breast, just opposite the heart

— Webster Dictionary

wave front

wave front

all the points just reached by a wave as it propagates

— Princeton's WordNet

archdeacon

archdeacon

(Anglican Church) an ecclesiastical dignitary usually ranking just below a bishop

— Princeton's WordNet

injustice

injustice

unfairness; the state of not being fair or just

— Wiktionary

nonspecific

nonspecific

that does not just stain one type of tissue

— Wiktionary

dysphoric milk ejection reflex

dysphoric milk ejection reflex

A brief dysphoria just prior to the milk ejection reflex.

— Wiktionary

al dente

al dente

firm (used of pasta which is cooked just right)

— Wiktionary

single annulus

single annulus

Describes an annulus with just one layer of tissue.

— Wiktionary

fingercot

fingercot

A type of surgical glove that covers just one finger.

— Wiktionary

wraith

wraith

A ghost or specter, especially seen just after a person's death.

— Wiktionary

microskirt

microskirt

An extremely short skirt, ending just underneath the buttocks.

— Wiktionary

rightfully

rightfully

In accordance with what is right or just; fairly.

— Wiktionary

hayride

hayride

a ride in a vehicle full of hay - just for fun

— Wiktionary

phrasal preposition

phrasal preposition

A preposition composed of several words rather than just one.

— Wiktionary

now you mention it

now you mention it

(Used to precede another comment about something just mentioned)

— Wiktionary

touch cloth

touch cloth

To be just on the point of soiling oneself.

— Wiktionary

last-minute

last-minute

Just before too late, in the nick of time.

— Wiktionary

Incorruptible

Incorruptible

incapable of being bribed or morally corrupted; inflexibly just and upright

— Webster Dictionary

fledgeling

fledgling, fledgeling

young bird that has just fledged or become capable of flying

— Princeton's WordNet

fledgling

fledgling, fledgeling

young bird that has just fledged or become capable of flying

— Princeton's WordNet

knee-high

knee-high, knee-hi

a sock or stocking that reaches up to just below the knees

— Princeton's WordNet

phosphorus

morning star, daystar, Phosphorus, Lucifer

a planet (usually Venus) seen just before sunrise in the eastern sky

— Princeton's WordNet

morning star

morning star, daystar, Phosphorus, Lucifer

a planet (usually Venus) seen just before sunrise in the eastern sky

— Princeton's WordNet

monoxide

monoxide

an oxide containing just one atom of oxygen in the molecule

— Princeton's WordNet

lucifer

morning star, daystar, Phosphorus, Lucifer

a planet (usually Venus) seen just before sunrise in the eastern sky

— Princeton's WordNet

daystar

morning star, daystar, Phosphorus, Lucifer

a planet (usually Venus) seen just before sunrise in the eastern sky

— Princeton's WordNet

bract

bract

a modified leaf or leaflike part just below and protecting an inflorescence

— Princeton's WordNet

cackler

cackler

a hen that has just laid an egg and emits a shrill squawk

— Princeton's WordNet

banjo hit

banjo hit

A weakly hit fly ball which goes just over the infielders.

— Wiktionary

blooper

blooper

A fly ball that is weakly hit just over the infielders.

— Wiktionary

bless you

bless you

Said to someone who has just sneezed, as a polite remark.

— Wiktionary

marzipan layer

marzipan layer

all those just below the highest echelon in any sphere

— Wiktionary

populist

populist

A politician who advocates specific policies just because they are popular

— Wiktionary

merely

merely

Without any other reason etc.; only, just, and nothing more.

— Wiktionary

wet behind the ears

wet behind the ears

Inexperienced; not seasoned; new; just beginning; immature, especially in judgment.

— Wiktionary

booth

booth

An enclosure just big enough to accommodate one standing person.

— Wiktionary

aldotriose

aldotriose

Any aldose having three carbon atoms; in reality, just glyceraldehyde

— Wiktionary

all ones eggs in one basket

all ones eggs in one basket

The state of having invested heavily in just one area

— Wiktionary

bigoted

bigoted

Being a bigot; biased; strongly prejudiced; forming opinions without just cause.

— Wiktionary

counselor

counselor

A high ranking diplomat, usually just below an ambassador or minister.

— Wiktionary

Borough

Borough

The area, properly called Southwark, just south of London Bridge.

— Wiktionary

Some

Some

not much; a little; moderate; as, the censure was to some extent just

— Webster Dictionary

trinidad

Trinidad

an island in West Indies just off the northeastern coast of Venezuela

— Princeton's WordNet

hucklebuck

hucklebuck

a rhythmic dance from the time just prior to rock and roll

— Wiktionary

barebow

barebow

Unassisted, with just a bow and no additional aids such as sights.

— Wiktionary

knob

knob

A dollop, an amount just larger than a spoonful (usually referring to butter)

— Wiktionary

fledgling

fledgling

A young bird which has just developed its flight feathers (notably wings).

— Wiktionary

chamaephyte

chamaephyte

Any low perennial plant whose buds overwinter just above soil level

— Wiktionary

foul tick

foul tick

A foul ball which just brushes by the bat making a ticking sound.

— Wiktionary

Cartesianism

Cartesianism

Cartesianism is the name given to the philosophical doctrine of René Descartes.

— Freebase

Upright

Upright

morally erect; having rectitude; honest; just; as, a man upright in all his ways

— Webster Dictionary

deacon

deacon

a cleric ranking just below a priest in Christian churches; one of the Holy Orders

— Princeton's WordNet

growler

growler

a small iceberg or ice floe just large enough to be hazardous for shipping

— Princeton's WordNet

fort worth

Fort Worth

a city in northeastern Texas (just to the west of Dallas); a major industrial center

— Princeton's WordNet

small hours

small hours

The very early morning, just after midnight, when most people are asleep.

— Wiktionary

lifestyler

lifestyler

One who lives an alternative lifestyle all the time, not just occasionally.

— Wiktionary

garret

garret

An attic or semi-finished room just beneath the roof of a house.

— Wiktionary

no shit, Sherlock

no shit, Sherlock

A riposte to someone who has just said something obvious (see Sherlock Holmes).

— Wiktionary

chamerophyte

chamerophyte

Any herbaceous or woody plant whose buds overwinter just above soil level

— Wiktionary

wee hours

wee hours

The very early morning, just after midnight, when most people are asleep.

— Wiktionary

money talks

money talks

It is easier to accomplish goals using money instead of just talk.

— Wiktionary

beginner

beginner

Someone who is just starting at something, or has only recently started.

— Wiktionary

cumberground

cumberground

Totally worthless object or person; something that is just in the way.

— Wiktionary

bullshit

bullshit

An expression of disbelief or doubt at what one has just heard.

— Wiktionary

wee small hours

wee small hours

The very early morning, just after midnight, when most people are asleep.

— Wiktionary

Stripling

Stripling

a youth in the state of adolescence, or just passing from boyhood to manhood; a lad

— Webster Dictionary

tool

joyride, tool, tool around

ride in a car with no particular goal and just for the pleasure of it

— Princeton's WordNet

joyride

joyride, tool, tool around

ride in a car with no particular goal and just for the pleasure of it

— Princeton's WordNet

khimar

khimar

a headscarf worn by observant Muslim women that hangs down to just above the waist

— Princeton's WordNet

tool around

joyride, tool, tool around

ride in a car with no particular goal and just for the pleasure of it

— Princeton's WordNet

bridegroom

bridegroom

a man on his wedding day, just before it or small time after that

— Wiktionary

inchoate

inchoate

Recently started but not fully formed yet; just begun; only elementary or immature.

— Wiktionary

Twenty20

Twenty20

A fast form of cricket in which each side bats for just twenty overs

— Wiktionary

Equal

Equal

evenly balanced; not unduly inclining to either side; characterized by fairness; unbiased; impartial; equitable; just

— Webster Dictionary

Leucite

Leucite

Leucite is a rock-forming mineral composed of potassium and aluminium tectosilicate K[AlSi2O6]. Crystals have the form of cubic icositetrahedra but, as first observed by Sir David Brewster in 1821, they are not optically isotropic, and are therefore pseudo-cubic. Goniometric measurements made by Gerhard vom Rath in 1873 led him to refer the crystals to the tetragonal system. Optical investigations have since proved the crystals to be still more complex in character, and to consist of several orthorhombic or monoclinic individuals, which are optically biaxial and repeatedly twinned, giving rise to twin-lamellae and to striations on the faces. When the crystals are raised to a temperature of about 500 °C they become optically isotropic and the twin-lamellae and striations disappear, although they reappear when the crystals are cooled again. This pseudo-cubic character of leucite is very similar to that of the mineral boracite. The crystals are white or ash-grey in colour, hence the name suggested by A. G. Werner in 1701, from 'λευκος', ' white'. They are transparent and glassy when fresh, albeit with a noticeably subdued 'subvitreous' lustre due to the low refractive index, but readily alter to become waxy/greasy and then dull and opaque; they are brittle and break with a conchoidal fracture. The Mohs hardness is 5.5, and the specific gravity 2.47. Inclusions of other minerals, arranged in concentric zones, are frequently present in the crystals. On account of the color and form of the crystals the mineral was early known as white garnet. French authors in older literature may employ René Just Haüy's name amphigène, but 'leucite' is the only name for this mineral species that is recognised as official by the International Mineralogical Association.

— Freebase

stripling

stripling

A youth in the state of adolescence, or just passing from boyhood to manhood; a lad.

— Wiktionary

at a pinch

at a pinch

By the skin of oneu2019s teeth; only just; Deo volente; perhaps; if youu2019re lucky.

— Wiktionary

for the hell of it

for the hell of it

For no particular reason, just because it is fun, entertaining; or to relieve boredom.

— Wiktionary

flower box

flower box

A container in which flowers or plants are grown, usually affixed outside just below a window.

— Wiktionary

planter box

planter box

A flower box; an object that contains live flowers, usually affixed outside, just below a window.

— Wiktionary

raindrop

raindrop

A single droplet of rainwater that has just fallen or is falling from the sky.

— Wiktionary

do right by

do right by

To treat, deal with, or act toward (someone) in a morally just, socially honorable fashion.

— Wiktionary

LOL

LOL

Denotes light-heartedness or that the thing just said was not intended as serious

— Wiktionary

two pot screamer

two pot screamer

A person who becomes intoxicated or rowdy after drinking just a relatively small amount of alcohol.

— Wiktionary

sunshine

sunshine

Used to address someone who has just woken up and/or is very sleepy.

— Wiktionary

eye of a needle

eye of a needle

The small gap in a needle, with just enough space for a thread to pass through.

— Wiktionary

Enharmonically

Enharmonically

in the enharmonic style or system; in just intonation

— Webster Dictionary

Proportion

Proportion

to divide into equal or just shares; to apportion

— Webster Dictionary

Bridegroom

Bridegroom

a man newly married, or just about to be married

— Webster Dictionary

Avouch

Avouch

to maintain a just or true; to vouch for

— Webster Dictionary

Subarctic

Subarctic

approximately arctic; belonging to a region just without the arctic circle

— Webster Dictionary


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