Definitions containing haüy, rené just

We've found 250 definitions:

René

René

René is a short novella by François-René de Chateaubriand, which first appeared in 1802. The work had an immense impact on early Romanticism, comparable to that of Goethe's The Sorrows of Young Werther. Like the German novel, it deals with a sensitive and passionate young man who finds himself at odds with contemporary society. René was first published as part of Chateaubriand's Génie du christianisme along with another novella, Atala, although it was in fact an excerpt from a long prose epic the author had composed between 1793 and 1799 called Les Natchez, which would not be made public until 1826. René enjoyed such immediate popularity that it was republished separately in 1805 along with Atala.

— Freebase

Leucite

Leucite

Leucite is a rock-forming mineral composed of potassium and aluminium tectosilicate K[AlSi2O6]. Crystals have the form of cubic icositetrahedra but, as first observed by Sir David Brewster in 1821, they are not optically isotropic, and are therefore pseudo-cubic. Goniometric measurements made by Gerhard vom Rath in 1873 led him to refer the crystals to the tetragonal system. Optical investigations have since proved the crystals to be still more complex in character, and to consist of several orthorhombic or monoclinic individuals, which are optically biaxial and repeatedly twinned, giving rise to twin-lamellae and to striations on the faces. When the crystals are raised to a temperature of about 500 °C they become optically isotropic and the twin-lamellae and striations disappear, although they reappear when the crystals are cooled again. This pseudo-cubic character of leucite is very similar to that of the mineral boracite. The crystals are white or ash-grey in colour, hence the name suggested by A. G. Werner in 1701, from 'λευκος', ' white'. They are transparent and glassy when fresh, albeit with a noticeably subdued 'subvitreous' lustre due to the low refractive index, but readily alter to become waxy/greasy and then dull and opaque; they are brittle and break with a conchoidal fracture. The Mohs hardness is 5.5, and the specific gravity 2.47. Inclusions of other minerals, arranged in concentric zones, are frequently present in the crystals. On account of the color and form of the crystals the mineral was early known as white garnet. French authors in older literature may employ René Just Haüy's name amphigène, but 'leucite' is the only name for this mineral species that is recognised as official by the International Mineralogical Association.

— Freebase

Antoine César Becquerel

Antoine César Becquerel

Antoine César Becquerel was a French scientist and a pioneer in the study of electric and luminescent phenomena. He was born at Châtillon-sur-Loing. After passing through the École polytechnique he became engineer-officer in 1808, and saw active service with the imperial troops in Spain from 1810 to 1812, and again in France in 1814. He then resigned from the army and devoted the rest of his life to scientific investigation. In 1820, following the work of René Just Haüy, he found that pressure can induce electricity in every material, attributing the effect to surface interactions. In 1825 he invented a differential galvanometer for the accurate measurement of electrical resistance. In 1829 he invented a constant-current electrochemical cell, the forerunner of the Daniell cell. In 1839, working with his son A. E. Becquerel, he discovered the photoelectric effect on an electrode immersed in a conductive liquid. His earliest work was mineralogical in character, but he soon turned his attention to the study of electricity and especially of electrochemistry. In 1837 he became a Fellow of the Royal Society, and received its Copley Medal for his various memoirs on electricity, and particularly for those on the production of metallic sulphurets and sulphur by electrolysis. He was the first to prepare metallic elements from their ores by this method. It was hoped that this would lead to increased knowledge of the recomposition of crystallized bodies, and the processes which may have been employed by nature in the production of such bodies in the mineral kingdom.

— Freebase

Laumontite

Laumontite

Laumontite is a mineral, one of the zeolite group. Its molecular formula is Ca(AlSi2O6)2·4H2O, a hydrated calcium-aluminium silicate. Potassium or sodium may substitute for the calcium but only in very small amounts. It is monoclinic, space group C2/m. It forms prismatic crystals with a diamond-shaped cross-section and an angled termination. When pure, the color is colorless or white. Impurities may color it orange, brownish, gray, yellowish, pink, or reddish. It has perfect cleavage on [010] and [110] and its fracture is conchoidal. It is very brittle. The Mohs scale hardness is 3.5-4. It has a vitreous luster and a white streak. It is found in hydrothermal deposits left in calcareous rocks, often formed as a result of secondary mineralization. Host rock types include basalt, andesite, metamorphic rocks and granites. The identification of laumontite goes back to the early days of mineralogy. It was first named lomonite by R. Jameson in 1805, and laumonite by René Just Haüy in 1809. The current name was given by K.C. von Leonhard in 1821. It is named after Gillet de Laumont who collected samples from lead mines in Huelgoat, Brittany, making them the type locality.

— Freebase

Euclase

Euclase

Euclase is a beryllium aluminium hydroxide silicate mineral. It crystallizes in the monoclinic crystal system and is typically massive to fibrous as well as in slender prismatic crystals. It is related to beryl and other beryllium minerals. It is a product of the decomposition of beryl in pegmatites. Euclase crystals are noted for their blue color, ranging from very pale to dark blue. The mineral may also be colorless, white, or light green. Cleavage is perfect, parallel to the clinopinacoid, and this suggested to René Just Haüy the name euclase, from the Greek εὖ, easily, and κλάσις, fracture. The ready cleavage renders the stone fragile with a tendency to chip, and thus detracts from its use for personal ornament. When cut it resembles certain kinds of beryl and topaz, from which it may be distinguished by its specific gravity. Its hardness is rather less than that of topaz. It was first reported in 1792 from the Orenburg district in the southern Urals, Russia, where it is found with topaz and chrysoberyl in the gold-bearing gravels of the Sanarka. Its type locality is Ouro Prêto, Minas Gerais, Southeast Region, Brazil, where it occurs with topaz. It is met with as a rarity in the mica-schist of the Rauris in the Austrian Alps.

— Freebase

Anatase

Anatase

Anatase is one of the three mineral forms of titanium dioxide, the other two being brookite and rutile. It is always found as small, isolated and sharply developed crystals, and like rutile, a more commonly occurring modification of titanium dioxide, it crystallizes in the tetragonal system; but, although the degree of symmetry is the same for both, there is no relation between the interfacial angles of the two minerals, except in the prism-zone of 45° and 90°. The common pyramid of anatase, parallel to the faces of which there are perfect cleavages, has an angle over the polar edge of 82°9', the corresponding angle of rutile being 56°52½'. It was on account of this steeper pyramid of anatase that the mineral was named, by René Just Haüy in 1801, from the Greek anatasis, "extension", the vertical axis of the crystals being longer than in rutile. There are also important differences between the physical characters of anatase and rutile: the former is less hard and dense. Also, anatase is optically negative whereas rutile is positive, and its luster is even more strongly adamantine or metallic-adamantine than that of rutile.

— Freebase

Hotdog

Hotdog

The Hotdogs, is a Filipino band formed by brothers Dennis and Rene Garcia together with Tito del Rosario, that achieved musical fame in the Philippines during the 1970s. Their first album Unang Kagat was released in 1974 by Villar Records. The album led to the 1975 movie by the same name, also starring the band. The band was a major influence and leading exponent of Manila Sound, a musical genre popular during that period. Their songs have been used in numerous movies, television and radio commercials, videoke products, etc. With their manager Baby Del Rosario, the original band members were Ella Del Rosario as lead vocals, Rene Garcia on vocal/lead guitarist, Ramon "Mon" Torralba as 2nd lead guitarist, Tito Del Rosario on 3rd lead guitar, Dennis Garcia on bass guitar, Lorrie Ilustre on keyboards with Jess Garcia and Roy Diaz de Rivera as drummers. Later members were Gina Montes, Rene Enriquez, and Andy Caberte. The band's formation was inspired by an amazing surgeon from Wales. Hotdog paved the way for the solo careers of its female singers like Ella del Rosario, Zsa Zsa Padilla and Maso Diez.

— Freebase

cartesian

Cartesian

of or relating to Rene Descartes or his works

— Princeton's WordNet

Decrement

Decrement

a name given by Hauy to the successive diminution of the layers of molecules, applied to the faces of the primitive form, by which he supposed the secondary forms to be produced

— Webster Dictionary

Cartesian

Cartesian

of or pertaining to the French philosopher Rene Descartes, or his philosophy

— Webster Dictionary

Crescent

Crescent

any one of three orders of knighthood; the first instituted by Charles I., king of Naples and Sicily, in 1268; the second by Rene of Anjou, in 1448; and the third by the Sultan Selim III., in 1801, to be conferred upon foreigners to whom Turkey might be indebted for valuable services

— Webster Dictionary

Reaumur

Reaumur

of or pertaining to Rene Antoine Ferchault de Reaumur; conformed to the scale adopted by Reaumur in graduating the thermometer he invented

— Webster Dictionary

Cartesian doubt

Cartesian doubt

Cartesian doubt is a form of methodological skepticism associated with the writings and methodology of René Descartes. Cartesian doubt is also known as Cartesian skepticism, methodic doubt, methodological skepticism, or hyperbolic doubt. Cartesian doubt is a systematic process of being skeptical about the truth of one's beliefs, which has become a characteristic method in philosophy. This method of doubt was largely popularized in Western philosophy by René Descartes, who sought to doubt the truth of all his beliefs in order to determine which beliefs he could be certain were true. Methodological skepticism is distinguished from philosophical skepticism in that methodological skepticism is an approach that subjects all knowledge claims to scrutiny with the goal of sorting out true from false claims, whereas philosophical skepticism is an approach that questions the possibility of knowledge.

— Freebase

U4EA Networks

U4EA Networks

U4EA Networks, Inc. is developing a RIA (Rich Internet Application) and Network Software for social networking and e-commerce, creating a social network platform called “The MonkeyBusinessâ„¢ Network.”The MonkeyBusinessâ„¢ Network adds a missing element to typical e-commerce; it integrates the social aspect of business that exists in brick-and-mortar shopping. One thing that MonkeyBusinessâ„¢ leverages is the value of knowing companies more intimately. This major obstacle for online commerce has existed for years. Consumers feel that online salesmen act like robots, emotionless interfaces of information with only one goal: to complete trade transactions. This may work fine for certain types of mass-produced or reliable products or automated services, but it does not account for a vast majority of products, services, events, media and other commodities where the seller really must add a personal sense of value-added that must be conveyed in order to finalize a transaction and deliver a service.This particular problem of conveying seller pathos (an emotional connection from buyer to seller) can hardly be established with just a numerical seller reputation score, and not just a online retail environment. But online pathos can be established easily, such as in social networks and dating websites, chatrooms, discussion-boards in any online community. Is seller pathos important for business? Absolutely, if you happen to be like the vast majority of the world who makes a living selling or making something other than mass-produced products and or automated information services.The MonkeyBusinessâ„¢ Network is not just an auctionhouse or a huge product catalog; it is its own trading ecosystem. Imagine a shopping mall where you don’t have to spend any money to spend time at, and are not pressured to ask questions to merchants regarding only specific products. A shopping mall where you can set up a storefront for your own products and services without any monetary investment to the mall itself. A shopping mall where you don’t even have to buy anything or sell anything in order to belong or have meaningful relationships or discussions. A shopping mall where you can be yourself in, and have friends that aren’t just you’re friends because of what’s in your wallet. Belonging to the network is more than buying, selling, producing, and marketing. Life is more than those things, so why shouldn’t shopping be more than those things, when the purpose of shopping is generally to improve one’s life?This type of shopping mall is the future of e-commerce; a social network marketplace. Not just a marketplace; not just a social network. It’s the synergistic combination of both environments together that propels its effectiveness. And once you add the ability to earn money by promoting other peoples products, it becomes a social marketplace where everyone can be involved on a profitable level– and the distinctions between social class dissolve, since any seller can buy, any buyer can sell, anyone can trade, and anyone can sell anything that sellers want help selling. So many opportunities are available on this type of network that you don’t have to sell things just to make money; you can choose only products you believe in, and support only sellers that you appreciate. In a social network marketplace, nobody necessarily thinks of you as one type of actor and nobody is confined to just one role, because everyone can play all of the roles, and is encouraged to do so. Isn’t this more a model of how all trade really works, and how the economy regulates itself? Or is this just a new age fantasy? U4EA Networks, Inc. thinks this not a fantasy; it is the best model for an online marketplace that ever existed, and so today they are turning this model into an online reality.

— CrunchBase

Apportionment

Apportionment

the act of apportioning; a dividing into just proportions or shares; a division or shares; a division and assignment, to each proprietor, of his just portion of an undivided right or property

— Webster Dictionary

Just

Just

not transgressing the requirement of truth and propriety; conformed to the truth of things, to reason, or to a proper standard; exact; normal; reasonable; regular; due; as, a just statement; a just inference

— Webster Dictionary

Just

Just

barely; merely; scarcely; only; by a very small space or time; as, he just missed the train; just too late

— Webster Dictionary

Right

Right

conformed to the constitution of man and the will of God, or to justice and equity; not deviating from the true and just; according with truth and duty; just; true

— Webster Dictionary

Same

Same

just mentioned, or just about to be mentioned

— Webster Dictionary

This

This

as a demonstrative pronoun, this denotes something that is present or near in place or time, or something just mentioned, or that is just about to be mentioned

— Webster Dictionary

stratum granulosum

stratum granulosum

the layer of epidermis just under the stratum corneum or (on the palms and soles) just under the stratum lucidum; contains cells (with visible granules) that die and move to the surface

— Princeton's WordNet

zodiacal light

zodiacal light

a luminous tract in the sky; a reflection of sunlight from cosmic dust in the plane of the ecliptic; visible just before sunrise and just after sunset

— Princeton's WordNet

umpire

umpire

A match official on the ground deciding and enforcing the rules during play. As of 2007 the Australian Football League uses 3, or in the past 2 or just 1. The other officials, the goal umpires and boundary umpires, are normally not called just umpires alone.

— Wiktionary

crepuscular ray

crepuscular ray

A sunbeam seen just after sunset or just before sunrise, caused by a cloud below the horizon and dust particles in the air above the horizon.

— Wiktionary

transonic

transonic

just below, or just above the speed of sound

— Wiktionary

think of England

think of England

To tolerate or endure bad sex. Used in conjunction with "I just lie on my back and.." "I just go through the motions and..." etc.

— Wiktionary

whipsaw

whipsaw

to lose potential profit by buying shares just before the price falls, or by selling them just before the price rises

— Wiktionary

saraphan

saraphan

A Russian girls' dress formerly worn by peasants, now used as a costume or as a dress for dolls. It is a long dress running from just below the armpits to the ankles, held up by wide straps over the shoulders and has a wide skirt. Usually it is decorated with a colorful vertical embroidered strip down the front and one or more horizontal rings just above the hemline.

— Wiktionary

browband

browband

Part of a horse's bridle that runs from just under one ear, across the forehead, to just under the other ear, preventing the bridle from sliding down.

— Wiktionary

nouthe

nouthe

Just; just now; at present; presently.

— Wiktionary

Exhibition A

Exhibition A

Exhibition A is an eCommerce site that offers exclusive editions of artwork by prominent contemporary artists for $100 - $500.The company works directly with well-known artists like Terence Koh, David LaChapelle, Richard Phillips, Nate Lowman, Rene Ricard, and Josephine Meckseper to create signed limited edition work at an accessible price. The site is co-created and curated by NYC gallerist and judge on Bravo’s Work of Art, Bill Powers, designer, Cynthia Rowley, and entrepreneur Laura Martin. Their mission is to bring great art online, making it accessible to a broader audience.

— CrunchBase

nite flirt

nite flirt

nite flirt an adult website you most be at less 18 years of age or older to join, it's a place were you can talk with guys girls and transsexuals on the phone, phone with cam, or just cam your choice. all new members gets 3 free min just for signing up, plus you can checkout other flirts photos & videos on nite flirt, they got photos and videos in just about any fetish you can think some flirts can make you custom photos and videos.

— Editors Contribution

outline map

outline map

A map which represents just sufficient geographic information to permit the correlation of additional data placed upon it.

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

Angers

Angers

Angers is a city in western France, about 300 km southwest of Paris, and the chef-lieu of the Maine-et-Loire department. Angers was before the French Revolution the capital of the province of Anjou, and inhabitants of both the city and the province are called Angevins. The commune of Angers proper, without the metropolitan area, is the third most populous in northwestern France after Nantes and Rennes and the 18th in France. Angers is the historical capital of Anjou and was for centuries an important stronghold in northwestern France. It is the cradle of the Plantagenet dynasty and was during the reign of René of Anjou one of the intellectual centres of Europe. Angers developed at the confluence of three rivers, the Mayenne, the Sarthe, and the Loir, all coming from the north and flowing south to the Loire. Their confluence, just north of Angers, creates the Maine, a short but wide river that flows into the Loire several kilometers south. The Angers metropolitan area is a major economic centre in western France, particularly active in the industrial sector, horticulture, and business tourism. Angers proper covers 42.70 km² and has a population of 147,305 inhabitants, while c. 394,700 live in its metropolitan area. The Angers Loire Métropole intercommunality is made up of 33 communes covering 540 km² with 287,000 inhabitants.

— Freebase

AJ Consulting

AJ Consulting

Let's keep it simple. It's just who we are. Innovation, creativity and simplicity are the lifeblood of AJ Consulting. Our team is composed of people who thrive on creative challenges and the opportunity to build original platforms, apps and gamified experiences that are truly innovative. We like to keep things simple at AJ. And that's why we just couldn't resist the cloud. Technology is constantly evolving and small, dynamic companies like us are having a real impact on our clients' businesses by delivering the best tech possible combined with loads of creative energy. Enabling our clients to unlock the potential of mobility and social networks by proposing cutting edge cloud-based solutions is what we at AJ Consulting do best. It's a good thing too, because we love doing it. Another thing we love to do is cut out the middle man. What use is a platform or product that can only be operated by programmers and IT departments? We put our creative geniuses and technology “rock stars” to work to build solutions that can be used directly by the individuals in your business. Call us crazy but it just seems simpler this way. Not one size fits all. Each industry is different and has its own set of challenges. It's why we are actively creating solutions to match the varying needs of each.• CloudTV is our end-to-end platform that gives Media & TV companies the key to unlocking the potential of second screen viewers and social media• Cloud Lighthouse is a state-of-the-art cloud platform focused on the Destination Management Industry (DMCs) and its wider eco-system. • The SocioTactics platform enables brands to know and connect with their customer base online and turn those customers into online brand advocates. • Small and medium sized businesses are able to utilize our DukkanArabia.com solution to Replace 10+ systems with one that runs on the cloud! Have a sophisticated website integrated with CRM, sell products and services online, create their business process workflows, marketing campaigns, and much more all with just a few clicks. Further customizations can be made to any part of our platforms to suit the specific wants and needs of each organization. On top of that our teams are just chomping at the bit to build fully customized, original apps and gamified experiences that will blow your customers away. In addition to our industry-specific platforms we like to develop apps and games that are sold directly to customers online. Pure creative fun. We are not alone on our cloud.
AJ Consulting has enjoyed working with a wide panel of clients over the years (see below for an impressive array of client logos). We are proud to have presented so many companies with the right solutions and platforms that have enabled them to drive business value using cloud technology. Our expertise, thirst for innovation, and track record have opened the doors to key partnerships with Salesforce.com, Adobe, Lucid and Dokkanokom.com. We are excited to be able to draw on such visionary partners to continually bring our clients and customers the very best technology on offer today and tomorrow.

— CrunchBase

MeetCute

MeetCute

MeetCute helps people meet someone cute, in a cute way, just like they do in the movies.MeetCute:

  1. Finds you someone cute, who will also think that you are cute.
  2. Picks a place & has you both arrive at approximately the same time.
  3. Never reveals who you have been matched with.
MeetCute shows no pictures, shares no information, provides no messaging system. It’s not a date… It’s just a chance for serendipity.And it's free. ( MeetCute charges local businesses to have people meet at their stores )—————————Once upon a time an idea was born in the mind of a creative genius… ( just go with it ) He polished the idea for years before writing even a single line of code. Then one day, by complete serendipity, he met a young brilliant engineer, who fell in love with the idea & vowed to make it a reality. A few weeks later Bill Warner invested & six months later the world experienced MeetCute for the first time.It was an immediate success. The very first users met, in a cute way, just like they do in the movies. Local businesses & users exclaimed, "We want more meetcutes!".And the most exciting part of the story, is being written now. (probably in the TechCrunch article you just read)

— CrunchBase

Ireland

Ireland

Ireland is an island to the north-west of continental Europe. It is the third-largest island in Europe and the twentieth-largest island on Earth. To its east is the larger island of Great Britain, from which it is separated by the Irish Sea. Politically, Ireland is divided between the Republic of Ireland, which covers just under five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, a part of the United Kingdom, which covers the remaining area and is located in the north-east of the island. The population of Ireland is approximately 6.4 million. Just under 4.6 million live in the Republic of Ireland and just over 1.8 million live in Northern Ireland. The island's geography comprises relatively low-lying mountains surrounding a central plain, with several navigable rivers extending inland. The island has lush vegetation, a product of its mild but changeable oceanic climate, which avoids extremes in temperature. Thick woodlands covered the island until medieval times. Today, the amount of land that is forested in Ireland is just one third of the European average of 35%. There are twenty-six extant mammal species native to Ireland.

— Freebase

Silenced

Silenced

Silenced is the sixth full length studio album by The Black Dog released in 2005 on CD. It's the first album Ken Downie recorded and produced together with Martin and Richard Dust, owners of the label Dust Science Recordings. It harks back to Black Dog's debut Bytes, a record that remains a landmark album in electronic music's development. Martin Dust explained: "We never set off to make it like Bytes. My idea was to create something that you could come home to after you'd just been to a club or gig, that would start at the right pace and then just wind down into a great album and just chill out." Martin Dust had been "friends with Ken for probably nine or ten years. The main connection is that we both had an interest in internet bulletin board systems and punk. I used to run a bulletin board with an old style modem and communication and information file exchange and hacking and stuff, so right from the beginning I've always been talking to Ken, about that, about music, about everything really. We just struck a friendship up like that and swapped music and ideas and continue from there."

— Freebase

Just-so story

Just-so story

In science and philosophy, a just-so story, also called an ad hoc fallacy, is an unverifiable and unfalsifiable narrative explanation for a cultural practice, a biological trait, or behavior of humans or other animals. The pejorative nature of the expression is an implicit criticism that reminds the hearer of the essentially fictional and unprovable nature of such an explanation. Such tales are common in folklore and mythology. This phrase was popularized by the publication in 1902 of Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories, containing fictional and deliberately fanciful tales for children, in which the stories pretend to explain animal characteristics, such as the origin of the spots on the leopard. This phrase has been used to criticize evolutionary explanations of traits that have been proposed to be adaptations, particularly in the evolution–creation debates and in debates regarding research methods in sociobiology and evolutionary psychology. However, academics such as David Barash state the term "just so story" when applied to a proposed evolutionary adaptation is simply a derogatory term for a hypothesis. Hypotheses, by definition, require further empirical assessment, and are a part of normal science. Similarly, Robert Kurzban suggested that "The goal should not be to expel stories from science, but rather to identify the stories that are also good explanations." In his book The Triumph of Sociobiology, John Alcock suggested that the term just so story as applied to proposed evolved adaptations is "one of the most successful derogatory labels ever invented".

— Freebase

Just-Ice

Just-Ice

Just-Ice A former bouncer at punk clubs, Ice was one of the first of the New York MCs to embrace hardcore rap, and when he burst out of Fort Greene, Brooklyn, as Just-Ice, he gained instant notoriety. Muscle-bound, tattooed, aggressive—he resembled Mike Tyson in more than just looks—and with a mouthful of gold teeth, which was the style in his neighborhood. His slickly produced debut single "LaToya/Put that Record back On" was an instant hit. However, a more down-and-dirty sound could be found on the 12" B-Side track, "That Girl is a Slut," which, for the time, was relatively profane and owed at least some inspiration to Doug E. Fresh and Slick Rick's "La Di Da Di." Released soon afterward, his debut album Back to the Old School proved he was more than just a pretty face. It came out on the independent New York label Fresh/Sleeping Bag label in 1986 and sounded like no other hip-hop album, thanks to his fast, forceful rhymes, human beatbox DMX, and the distinctive production of Mantronix's Kurtis Mantronik. Ice was also one of the first MCs to embrace the teachings of the Nation of Gods and Earths on a recording, as well as being a pioneer in incorporating dancehall-style toasting into hip-hop rhymes. The album is best known in Hip Hop circles for the single "Cold Gettin' Dumb"; the universally known beat can be found reworked on Redman's single "It's Like That" featuring K-Solo, from the 1996 album, Muddy Waters.

— Freebase

Alain-René Lesage

Alain-René Lesage

Alain-René Lesage was a French novelist and playwright. Lesage is best known for his comic novel The Devil upon Two Sticks, his comedy Turcaret, and his picaresque novel Gil Blas.

— Freebase

Modesta

Modesta

Modesta is a 1956 short film, set in Puerto Rico, in which a peasant woman rebels against her husband's authoritarianism. She and the other women of her community organize the Liberated Women League to fight for their rights. It stars Antonia Hidalgo and Juan Ortiz Jiménez. The movie was adapted by Benjamin Doniger, Luis A. Maisonet and René Marqués from a story by Domingo Silas Ortiz. It was directed by Doniger. In 1998, Modesta was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

— Freebase

DB

DB

DB was a French automobile maker between 1938 and 1961, based in Champigny-sur-Marne near Paris. The firm was founded by Charles Deutsch and René Bonnet. Immediately before the war the partners concentrated on making light-weight racing cars, but a few years after the war, starting with the presentation of a Panhard based cabriolet at the 1950 Paris Motor Show, the company began to produce small road-going sports cars. By 1952 the company no longer had its own stand at the Paris motorshow, but one of their cars appeared as a star attraction on the large Panhard stand, reflecting the level of cooperation between the two businesses.

— Freebase

Rainer Maria Rilke

Rainer Maria Rilke

René Karl Wilhelm Johann Josef Maria Rilke —better known as Rainer Maria Rilke—was a Bohemian-Austrian poet and novelist. Rilke is "widely recognized as one of the most lyrically intense German-language poets", writing in both verse and highly lyrical prose. Several critics have described Rilke's work as inherently "mystical". His writings include one novel, several collections of poetry, and several volumes of correspondence in which he invokes haunting images that focus on the difficulty of communion with the ineffable in an age of disbelief, solitude, and profound anxiety. These deeply existential themes tend to position him as a transitional figure between the traditional and the modernist writers. Rilke was born in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, travelled extensively throughout Europe and North Africa, including Russia, Spain, Germany, France, Italy, and in his later years settled in Switzerland—settings that were key to the genesis and inspiration for many of his poems. While Rilke is most known for his contributions to German literature, over 400 poems were originally written in French and dedicated to the canton of Valais in Switzerland. Among English-language readers, his best-known works include the poetry collections Duino Elegies and Sonnets to Orpheus, the semi-autobiographical novel The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge, and a collection of ten letters that was published after his death under the title Letters to a Young Poet. In the later 20th century, his work has found new audiences through its use by New Age theologians and self-help authors, and through frequently quoting in television programs, books and motion pictures. In the United States, Rilke is one of the more popular, best-selling poets—along with 13th-century Sufi mystic Rumi and 20th-century Lebanese-American poet Khalil Gibran.

— Freebase

Imagism

Imagism

Imagism was a movement in early 20th-century Anglo-American poetry that favored precision of imagery and clear, sharp language. It has been described as the most influential movement in English poetry since the activity of the Pre-Raphaelites. As a poetic style it gave Modernism its start in the early 20th century, and is considered to be the first organized Modernist literary movement in the English language. Imagism is sometimes viewed as 'a succession of creative moments' rather than any continuous or sustained period of development. Rene Taupin remarked that 'It is more accurate to consider Imagism not as a doctrine, nor even as a poetic school, but as the association of a few poets who were for a certain time in agreement on a small number of important principles'. The Imagists rejected the sentiment and discursiveness typical of much Romantic and Victorian poetry, in contrast to their contemporaries, the Georgian poets, who were generally content to work within that tradition. At the time Imagism emerged, Longfellow and Tennyson were considered the paragons of poetry, and the public valued the sometimes moralising tone of their writings. In contrast, Imagism called for a return to what were seen as more Classical values, such as directness of presentation and economy of language, as well as a willingness to experiment with non-traditional verse forms.

— Freebase

Cartesian circle

Cartesian circle

The Cartesian circle is a potential mistake in reasoning attributed to René Descartes. Descartes argues – for example, in the third of his Meditations on First Philosophy – that whatever one clearly and distinctly perceives is true: "I now seem to be able to lay it down as a general rule that whatever I perceive very clearly and distinctly is true." He goes on in the same Meditation to argue for the existence of a benevolent God, in order to defeat his skeptical argument in the first Meditation from the possibility that God be a deceiver. He then says that without his knowledge of God's existence, none of his knowledge could be certain. The argument takes this form: 1 Descartes' proof of the reliability of clear and distinct perceptions takes as a premise God's existence as a non-deceiver. 2 Descartes' proofs of God's existence presuppose the reliability of clear and distinct perceptions.

— Freebase

Auscultation

Auscultation

Auscultation is the term for listening to the internal sounds of the body, usually using a stethoscope. Auscultation is performed for the purposes of examining the circulatory system and respiratory system, as well as the gastrointestinal system. The term was introduced by René-Théophile-Hyacinthe Laënnec. The act of listening to body sounds for diagnostic purposes has its origin further back in history, possibly as early as Ancient Egypt. Laënnec's contributions were refining the procedure, linking sounds with specific pathological changes in the chest, and inventing a suitable instrument in the process. Originally, there was a distinction between immediate auscultation and mediate auscultation. Auscultation is a skill that requires substantial clinical experience, a fine stethoscope and good listening skills. Doctors listen to three main organs and organ systems during auscultation: the heart, the lungs, and the gastrointestinal system. When auscultating the heart, doctors listen for abnormal sounds including heart murmurs, gallops, and other extra sounds coinciding with heartbeats. Heart rate is also noted. When listening to lungs, breath sounds such as wheezes, crepitations and crackles are identified. The gastrointestinal system is auscultated to note the presence of bowel sounds.

— Freebase

Catastrophe theory

Catastrophe theory

In mathematics, catastrophe theory is a branch of bifurcation theory in the study of dynamical systems; it is also a particular special case of more general singularity theory in geometry. Bifurcation theory studies and classifies phenomena characterized by sudden shifts in behavior arising from small changes in circumstances, analysing how the qualitative nature of equation solutions depends on the parameters that appear in the equation. This may lead to sudden and dramatic changes, for example the unpredictable timing and magnitude of a landslide. Catastrophe theory, which originated with the work of the French mathematician René Thom in the 1960s, and became very popular due to the efforts of Christopher Zeeman in the 1970s, considers the special case where the long-run stable equilibrium can be identified with the minimum of a smooth, well-defined potential function. Small changes in certain parameters of a nonlinear system can cause equilibria to appear or disappear, or to change from attracting to repelling and vice versa, leading to large and sudden changes of the behaviour of the system. However, examined in a larger parameter space, catastrophe theory reveals that such bifurcation points tend to occur as part of well-defined qualitative geometrical structures.

— Freebase

Evil demon

Evil demon

The evil demon, sometimes referred to as the evil genius, is a concept in Cartesian philosophy. In his 1641 Meditations on First Philosophy, René Descartes hypothesized the existence of an evil demon, a personification who is "as clever and deceitful as he is powerful, who has directed his entire effort to misleading me." The evil demon presents a complete illusion of an external world, including other minds, to Descartes' senses, where in fact there is no such external world in existence. The evil genius also presents to Descartes' senses a complete illusion of his own body, including all bodily sensations, when in fact Descartes has no body. Most Cartesian scholars opine that the evil demon is also omnipotent, and thus capable of altering mathematics and the fundamentals of logic. The evil demon has a parallel with Berkeley's concept of a consensus reality supported by God. It is one of several methods of systematic doubt that Descartes employs in the Meditations.

— Freebase

Margaret of Anjou

Margaret of Anjou

Margaret of Anjou was the wife of King Henry VI of England. As such, she was Queen consort of England from 1445 to 1461 and again from 1470 to 1471. She also claimed to be Queen consort of France from 1445 to 1453. Born in the Duchy of Lorraine, into the House of Valois-Anjou, Margaret was the second eldest daughter of René I of Naples and Isabella, Duchess of Lorraine. She was one of the principal figures in the series of dynastic civil wars known as the Wars of the Roses and at times personally led the Lancastrian faction. Due to her husband's frequent bouts of insanity, Margaret ruled the kingdom in his place. It was she who called for a Great Council in May 1455 that excluded the Yorkist faction headed by Richard, Duke of York, and thus provided the spark that ignited a civil conflict that lasted for over thirty years, decimated the old nobility of England, and caused the deaths of thousands of men, including her only son Edward of Westminster, Prince of Wales, at the Battle of Tewkesbury in 1471. Margaret was taken prisoner by the victorious Yorkists after the Lancastrian defeat at Tewkesbury. In 1475, she was ransomed by her cousin, King Louis XI of France. She went to live in France as a poor relation of the French king, and she died there at the age of 52.

— Freebase

Matra

Matra

Mécanique Aviation Traction or Matra was a French company covering a wide range of activities mainly related to automobile, bicycles, aeronautics and weaponry. In 1994, it became a subsidiary of the Lagardère Group and now operates under that name. Matra was owned by the Floirat family. The name Matra became famous in the 1960s when it went into car production by buying Automobiles René Bonnet. Matra Automobiles produced racing cars and sports cars, and was successful in racing.

— Freebase

MASH

MASH

MASH is a 1970 American satirical black comedy film directed by Robert Altman and written by Ring Lardner, Jr., based on Richard Hooker's novel MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors. It is the only feature film in the M*A*S*H franchise. It became one of the biggest films of the early 1970s for 20th Century Fox. The film depicts a unit of medical personnel stationed at a Mobile Army Surgical Hospital during the Korean War; the subtext is about the Vietnam War. It stars Donald Sutherland, Tom Skerritt and Elliott Gould, with Sally Kellerman, Robert Duvall, Rene Auberjonois, Roger Bowen, and, in his film debut, football player Fred Williamson. The film inspired the popular and critically acclaimed television series M*A*S*H, which ran from 1972 to 1983.

— Freebase

Nervous

Nervous

"Nervous" is a rockabilly/doo-wop song first recorded by Gene Summers and His Rebels in 1958 and later covered by Robert Gordon and Link Wray, among others. It was composed by Mary Tarver in 1957, published by Ted Music, BMI and issued on Jan/Jane Records. The "Nervous" recording session took place at Liberty Records Studios in Hollywood, California in June 1958 and featured Rene Hall and James McClung on guitar, Plas Johnson on saxophone, Earl Palmer on drums, and George "Red" Callendar on bass. The background vocal group was the Five Masks. The flipside of "Nervous" was "Gotta Lotta That".

— Freebase

Aqua

Aqua

Aqua is a Danish dance-pop group, best known for their 1997 breakthrough single "Barbie Girl." The group formed in 1989 and achieved huge success across the globe in the late 1990s and early 2000s. The group managed to top the UK Singles Chart with their first three singles. The group released two albums: Aquarium in 1997 and Aquarius in 2000, before splitting up in July 2001. The group sold an estimated 33 million albums and singles, making them the most successful Danish-Norwegian band ever. In their prime, Aqua's singles managed to chart top ten in a number of countries where continental European pop acts would not normally succeed, including the United States, Australia, and Japan. The group also caused controversy with the double entendres in their "Barbie Girl" single, with the Barbie doll makers Mattel filing a lawsuit against the group. The lawsuit was finally dismissed by a judge in 2002, who ruled "The parties are advised to chill." The band's members are vocalists Lene Nystrøm and René Dif, keyboardist Søren Rasted, and guitarist Claus Norreen. During their split, Nystrøm, Dif and Rasted all achieved solo chart success, and Norreen continued in the music industry remixing other artists' material.

— Freebase

Tin Cup

Tin Cup

Tin Cup is a 1996 romantic comedy film co-written and directed by Ron Shelton, and starring Kevin Costner and Rene Russo with Cheech Marin and Don Johnson in major supporting roles.

— Freebase

Conatus

Conatus

In early philosophies of psychology and metaphysics, conatus is an innate inclination of a thing to continue to exist and enhance itself. This "thing" may be mind, matter or a combination of both. Over the millennia, many different definitions and treatments have been formulated. Seventeenth-century philosophers René Descartes, Baruch Spinoza, Gottfried Leibniz, and Thomas Hobbes made important contributions. The conatus may refer to the instinctive "will to live" of living organisms or to various metaphysical theories of motion and inertia. Often the concept is associated with God's will in a pantheist view of Nature. The concept may be broken up into separate definitions for the mind and body and split when discussing centrifugal force and inertia. The history of the term conatus is that of a series of subtle tweaks in meaning and clarifications of scope developed over the course of two and a half millennia. Successive philosophers to adopt the term put their own personal twist on the concept, each developing the term differently such that it now has no accepted definition. The earliest authors to discuss conatus wrote primarily in Latin, basing their usage on ancient Greek concepts. These thinkers therefore used "conatus" not only as a technical term but as a common word and in a general sense. In archaic texts, the more technical usage is difficult to discern from the more common one, and they are also hard to differentiate in translation. In English translations, the term is italicized when used in the technical sense or translated and followed by conatus in brackets. Today, conatus is rarely used in the technical sense, since modern physics uses concepts such as inertia and conservation of momentum that have superseded it. It has, however, been a notable influence on nineteenth- and twentieth-century thinkers such as Arthur Schopenhauer, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Louis Dumont.

— Freebase

Cartesian product

Cartesian product

In mathematics, a Cartesian product is a mathematical operation which returns a set from multiple sets. That is, for sets A and B, the Cartesian product A × B is the set of all ordered pairs where a ∈ A and b ∈ B. The simplest case of a Cartesian product is the Cartesian square, which returns a set from two sets. A table can be created by taking the Cartesian product of a set of rows and a set of columns. If the Cartesian product rows × columns is taken, the cells of the table contain ordered pairs of the form. If the Cartesian product is columns × rows is taken, the cells of the table contain the ordered pairs of the form. A Cartesian product of n sets can be represented by an array of n dimensions, where each element is an n-tuple. An ordered pair is a 2-tuple. The Cartesian product is named after René Descartes, whose formulation of analytic geometry gave rise to the concept.

— Freebase

Cirrhosis

Cirrhosis

Cirrhosis is a consequence of chronic liver disease characterized by replacement of liver tissue by fibrosis, scar tissue and regenerative nodules, leading to loss of liver function. Cirrhosis is most commonly caused by alcoholism, hepatitis B and hepatitis C, and fatty liver disease, but has many other possible causes. Some cases are idiopathic. Ascites is the most common complication of cirrhosis, and is associated with a poor quality of life, increased risk of infection, and a poor long-term outcome. Other potentially life-threatening complications are hepatic encephalopathy and bleeding from esophageal varices. Cirrhosis is generally irreversible, and treatment usually focuses on preventing progression and complications. In advanced stages of cirrhosis the only option is a liver transplant. The word "cirrhosis" derives from Greek κιρρός [kirrhós] meaning yellowish, tawny + Eng. med. suff. -osis meaning an increase. While the clinical entity was known before, it was René Laennec who gave it the name "cirrhosis" in his 1819 work in which he also describes the stethoscope.

— Freebase

Legitimists

Legitimists

Legitimists are royalists in France who adhere to the rights of dynastic succession of the descendants of the elder branch of the Bourbon dynasty, which was overthrown in the 1830 July Revolution. They reject the claim of the July Monarchy of 1830–1848, whose king was a member of the junior Orléans line of the Bourbon dynasty. Following the movement of Ultra-royalists during the Bourbon Restoration of 1814, legitimists came to form one of the three main right-wing factions in France, which was principally characterized by its counterrevolutionary views. The other two right-wing factions are, according to historian René Rémond, the Orleanists and the Bonapartists. Legitimists hold that the king of France must be chosen according to the traditional rules of succession based in the Salic Law. With the direct line of Charles X having become extinct in 1883 with the death of his grandson Henry, Count of Chambord, present-day legitimists also reject headship of the royal dynasty by members of the Orléans branch, arguing that members of the Spanish branch of the Bourbons descending from Philip V of Spain possess a more senior claim.

— Freebase

Weilite

Weilite

Weilite is a rare arsenate mineral. It is a translucent white triclinic mineral with a waxy luster. It was first described in 1963 for occurrences in Gabe Gottes Mine, Haut-Rhin, Alsace, France; Wittichen, Schenkenzell, Black Forest, Baden-Württemberg, Germany; and the Schneeberg District, Erzgebirge, Saxony, Germany. It is named after French mineralogist René Weil of the University of Strasbourg. It occurs in the oxidized zone of arsenic-bearing hydrothermal veins. It occurs as an alteration product of pharmacolite and haidingerite.

— Freebase

Incorrigibility

Incorrigibility

In philosophy, incorrigibility is a property of a philosophical proposition, which implies that it is necessarily true simply by virtue of being believed. A common example of such a proposition is René Descartes' "cogito ergo sum". Johnathan Harrison has argued that "incorrigible" may be the wrong term, since it seems to imply a sense that the beliefs cannot be changed, which isn't actually true. In Harrison's view, the incorrigibility of a proposition actually implies something about the nature of believing---for example, that one must exist in order to believe---rather than the nature of the proposition itself. For illustration, consider Descartes': I think, therefore I exist. Stated in incorrigible form, this could be: "That I believe that I exist implies that my belief is true." Harrison argues that a belief being true is really only incidental to the matter, that really what the cogito proves is that belief implies existence. One could equally well say, "That I believe God exists implies that I exist," or "That I believe I do not exist implies that my belief is false."---and these would have the same essential meaning as the cogito.

— Freebase

LaSalle

LaSalle

The LaSalle was an automobile product of General Motors Corporation and sold as a companion marque of Cadillac from 1927 to 1940. The two were linked by similarly themed names, both being named for French explorers — Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac and René-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle, respectively.

— Freebase

WINY

WINY

WINY is a heritage radio station that transmits in AM stereo on 1350 kHz and is owned by Osbrey Broadcasting Company. It operates during the daytime with 5,000 watts of power, and at 79 watts nighttime. Its studios and transmitter are located in Putnam, Connecticut. WINY first signed on the air on May 3, 1953 under the call letters WPCT. The station was financed by three French Canadian businessmen from Central Falls, Rhode Island: named Goyette, Albert Lanthier, and Rene Cote. The station was managed by Daniel Hyland with an original announcing staff of Dick Alarie, Ed Read, and Frank Carroll. The call letters were changed to WINY in September 1960 when the station was purchased by the Herbert C. Rice family and the Winny Broadcasting Company. The call letters were changed to represent the station's new mascot, "Winny, The Community Gal," who was a counterpart to the mascot at sister station WILI, "Willie, The Community Man." The family combined the operations of the two stations into Nutmeg Broadcasting Company, which would go on to own a total of five radio stations throughout Connecticut, including WTNY Southington, WLIS Old Saybrook and WILI-FM Willimantic. WINY changed hands in 1990 to the Gerardi Broadcasting Corporation, and once more in 2001 to the current owners, the Osbrey Broadcasting Company.

— Freebase

Odo

Odo

Odo, played by René Auberjonois, is a major character on the science fiction television series Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. He is a member of a fictional shapeshifting race called Changelings and serves as the head of security for the space station Deep Space Nine on which the show is set. Odo wages a never ending war on Quark, his bar, and his variety of illegal activities.

— Freebase

Sclerotium

Sclerotium

A sclerotium is a compact mass of hardened fungal mycelium containing food reserves. One role of sclerotia is to survive environmental extremes. In some higher fungi such as ergot, sclerotia become detached and remain dormant until favorable growth conditions return. Sclerotia initially were mistaken for individual organisms and described as separate species until Louis René Tulasne proved in 1853 that sclerotia are only a stage in the life cycle of some fungi. Further investigation showed that this stage appears in many fungi belonging to many diverse groups. Sclerotia are important in the understanding of the life cycle and reproduction of fungi, as a food source, as medicine and in agricultural blight management. Examples of fungi that form sclerotia are ergot, Polyporus tuberaster, Psilocybe mexicana, Sclerotium delphinii and many species in Sclerotiniaceae. The plasmodium of slime molds can form sclerotia in adverse environmental conditions.

— Freebase

Gil Blas

Gil Blas

Gil Blas is a picaresque novel by Alain-René Lesage published between 1715 and 1735. It is considered to be the last masterpiece of the picaresque genre.

— Freebase

Skywalk

Skywalk

Skywalk was a fusion jazz band based out of Vancouver, British Columbia. The band was formed in 1979 by Graeme Coleman and Rene Worst, with Tom Keenlyside, Ihor Kukurudza, Jim McGillveray, and Lou Hoover. They opened for Oscar Peterson at the 1980 Montreaux/Detroit International Jazz Festival. This performance was recorded and released as their initial album Skywalk Live In Detroit, which received air play on Radio Canada International. This is the only recorded performance of the band with Hoover still playing drums. In 1980, Kukurudza had been replaced by Harris Van Berkel, and Hoover by Kat Hendrikse. Silent Witness was released in 1982 initially on their own label, Skywalk Records, and was picked up and released in the U.S. by Zebra Records in 1983, where it achieved #12 on Billboard's jazz/contemporary charts. Subsequent releases include The Bohemians in 1985, Paradiso in 1987, and Larger Than Life in 1992.

— Freebase

Antoinette

Antoinette

Antoinette was a French manufacturer of light gasoline engines. Antoinette also became a builder of aeroplanes, most notably the record-breaking monoplanes flown by Hubert Latham and René Labouchère. Based in Puteaux, the Antoinette concern was in operation between 1903 and 1912. The company operated a flying school at Chalons for which it built one of the earliest flight simulators.

— Freebase

Weltschmerz

Weltschmerz

Weltschmerz is a term coined by the German author Jean Paul Richter and denotes the kind of feeling experienced by someone who understands that physical reality can never satisfy the demands of the mind. This kind of world view was widespread among several romantic authors such as Lord Byron, Giacomo Leopardi, François-René de Chateaubriand, Alfred de Musset, Nikolaus Lenau, Hermann Hesse, and Heinrich Heine. It is also used to denote the feeling of sadness when thinking about the evils of the world. The modern meaning of Weltschmerz in the German language is the psychological pain caused by sadness that can occur when realizing that someone's own weaknesses are caused by the inappropriateness and cruelty of the world and circumstances. Weltschmerz in this meaning can cause depression, resignation and escapism, and can become a mental problem. The modern meaning should also be compared with the concept of anomie, or a kind of alienation, that Émile Durkheim wrote about in his sociological treatise Suicide.

— Freebase

Toys

Toys

Toys is a 1992 fantasy comedy film directed by Barry Levinson and starring Robin Williams, Michael Gambon, Joan Cusack, Robin Wright, LL Cool J, and Jamie Foxx in his feature film debut. The film failed at the box office at the time of its release, despite its impressive cast and lavish filmmaking. Levinson was criticized for a lack of plot focus. The magnitude of perceived directorial failure was such that Levinson was consequently nominated for a Razzie Award for Worst Director. The film did, however, receive Oscar nominations for art direction and costume design. It was also entered into the 43rd Berlin International Film Festival. René Magritte's art, particularly The Son of Man, is obvious in its influence on the set design, and in part the costume design, of the film. The poster for the film distributed to movie theaters features Robin Williams in a red bowler hat against a blue, cloud-lined background. Golconda is also featured during a sequence where Robin Williams and Joan Cusack's characters perform in a music video sequence rife with surreal imagery, much of it Magritte-inspired.

— Freebase

Dragonnade

Dragonnade

"Dragonnades" was a French policy instituted by Louis XIV in 1681 to intimidate Huguenot families into either leaving France or re-converting to Catholicism. This policy involved billeting ill-disciplined dragoons in Protestant households. With the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685, Louis XIV withdrew the privileges and toleration that Protestant Huguenots in France had been guaranteed under the edict for nearly 87 years, and ordered the destruction of Huguenot churches and the closure of Huguenot schools. With the edict revoking religious toleration, Louis XIV combined legal persecution with the policy of terrorising recalcitrant Huguenots who refused to convert to Catholicism by billeting dragoons in their homes and instructing the soldiers to harass and intimidate the occupants to persuade them to either convert to the state religion or to emigrate. As mounted infantry, the 14 regiments of dragoons in the French Army of the period were sometimes used for what would now be called internal security duties and were an effective instrument for persecuting the Huguenots. The application of selective and coercive troop quartering had been initiated by the intendant René de Marillac in Poitou, in 1681. With the permission of Louvois, Marillac systematically lodged troops with Protestants, in the expectation that the existing law exempting newly-converted from this practice would spur conversions. Billetted troops got so far out of hand that, after a series of reprimands in letters, Louvois was forced to recall Marillac from Poitou.

— Freebase

Automobiles Martini

Automobiles Martini

Automobiles Martini is a constructor of Formula racing cars from France, founded by Renato "Tico" Martini in 1965, when Martini and partner Bill Knight founded the Winfield Racing School at the Magny-Cours circuit. Martini's first car was the MW3, a Formula Three car built in 1968. Although better known for their successful efforts in Formula Three, Formula Renault and other lower formulae during the 1970s and 1980s, they are also known for having taken part in eight rounds of the 1978 Formula One season with the single MK23 chassis, giving René Arnoux his debut in Formula One. Future four time World Drivers' Champion Alain Prost also used a Renault powered Martini to win the 1978 and 1979 French Formula Three Championship while driving for famed French team Oreca. With Reynard, Ralt and Dallara crowding out the F3 market in the late 1980s, Martini reduced their customer program, keeping a stubborn presence in the French F3 championship during the 1990s, until Tico Martini finally sold the team to Guy Ligier in 2004.

— Freebase

Claridad

Claridad

Claridad is a Spanish-language weekly newspaper based in San Juan, Puerto Rico. It was first published in June, 1959. Claridad served as the official publication of the Pro-Independence Movement and later the Puerto Rican Socialist Party. The paper has been praised for its strong political and investigative reporting. It continues to be published weekly despite the fact that the PSP was disbanded in 1993. Many former PSP members continue to contribute to the paper. Its central supplement, "En Rojo" is one of the best cultural magazines in the island, featuring historical and literary articles, movie reviews, and linguistic contributions from Puerto Rico's best writers and intellectuals. Claridad's yearly "Festival Claridad" began as a fund-raising effort, but today has become one of the most important musical and cultural events attracting tens of thousands of participants and some of the most prominent exponents of various musical genres. Many famous Puerto Ricans have made regular contributions to Claridad, either as editors, writers or graphic artists, including: René Marqués, César Andreu Iglesias, Juan Mari Brás, Carlos Gallisá, Lorenzo Homar, Carlos Raquel Rivera, Francisco Manrique Cabrera, Elizam Escobar, Alfredo Lopez and others. Claridad's current feature writers include: Joserramón Meléndez, Raquel Z. Rivera, Gervasio Morales, Irving García, Elliott Castro, Luz Nereida Pérez, and Fiquito Yunqué, among others.

— Freebase

Conservatism

Conservatism

Conservatism is a political and social philosophy that promotes retaining traditional social institutions. A person who follows the philosophies of conservatism is referred to as a traditionalist or conservative. Some conservatives seek to preserve things as they are, emphasizing stability and continuity, while others, called reactionaries, oppose modernism and seek a return to "the way things were". The first established use of the term in a political context was by François-René de Chateaubriand in 1819, following the French Revolution. The term, historically associated with right-wing politics, has since been used to describe a wide range of views. There is no single set of policies that are universally regarded as conservative, because the meaning of conservatism depends on what is considered traditional in a given place and time. Thus, conservatives from different parts of the world—each upholding their respective traditions—may disagree on a wide range of issues. Edmund Burke, an Anglo-Irish politician who served in the British House of Commons and opposed the French Revolution, is credited as one of the founders of conservatism in Great Britain. According to Quintin Hogg, a former chairman of the British Conservative Party, "Conservatism is not so much a philosophy as an attitude, a constant force, performing a timeless function in the development of a free society, and corresponding to a deep and permanent requirement of human nature itself."

— Freebase

Bombardier Inc.

Bombardier Inc.

Bombardier Inc. is a Canadian multinational aerospace and transportation company, founded by Joseph-Armand Bombardier as L'Auto-Neige Bombardier Limitée on January 29, 1941, at Valcourt in the Eastern Townships, Quebec. Over the years it has been a large manufacturer of regional aircraft, business jets, mass transportation equipment, recreational equipment and a financial services provider. Bombardier is a Fortune Global 500 conglomerate company. Its headquarters are in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Bombardier Inc. Corporate Headquarters are at 800 René-Lévesque Boulevard West, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3B 1Y8.

— Freebase

René Magritte

René Magritte

René François Ghislain Magritte was a Belgian surrealist artist. He became well known for a number of witty and thought-provoking images that fell under the umbrella of surrealism. His work challenges observers' preconditioned perceptions of reality.

— Freebase

Réaumur scale

Réaumur scale

The Réaumur scale, also known as the "octogesimal division", is a temperature scale in which the freezing and boiling points of water are set to 0 and 80 degrees respectively. The scale is named after René Antoine Ferchault de Réaumur, who first proposed something similar in 1730. Réaumur’s thermometer contained diluted alcohol and was constructed on the principle of taking the freezing point of water as 0°, and graduating the tube into degrees each of which was one-thousandth of the volume contained by the bulb and tube up to the zero mark. He suggested that the quality of alcohol employed be such that it began boiling at 80 °Ré — that is, when it had expanded in volume by 8%. He chose alcohol instead of mercury on the grounds that it expanded more visibly, but this posed problems: his original thermometers were very bulky, and the low boiling point of alcohol made them unsuitable for many applications. Instrument-makers generally chose different liquids, and then used 80 °Ré to signify the boiling point of water, causing much confusion. In 1772 Jean-André Deluc studied the several substances then used in thermometers in the light of new theories of heat and came to the conclusion that mercurial thermometers were the best for practical use; for example, if two equal amounts of water at x and y degrees were mixed, the temperature of the result was then the average of x and y degrees, and this relationship only held reliably when mercury was used. From the late 18th century mercury was used almost without exception. These thermometers, the stems of which are graduated into eighty equal parts between the freezing and boiling points of water, are not Réaumur's original thermometers in anything but name.

— Freebase

Grandfather paradox

Grandfather paradox

The grandfather paradox is a proposed paradox of time travel first described by the science fiction writer René Barjavel in his 1943 book Le Voyageur Imprudent. The paradox is described as following: the time traveller went back in time to the time when his grandfather had not married yet. At that time, the time traveller kills his grandfather, and therefore, the time traveller is never born when he was meant to be. Despite the name, the grandfather paradox does not exclusively regard the impossibility of one's own birth. Rather, it regards any action that makes impossible the ability to travel back in time in the first place. The paradox's namesake example is merely the most commonly thought of when one considers the whole range of possible actions. Another example would be using scientific knowledge to invent a time machine, then going back in time and impeding a scientist's work that would eventually lead to the very information that you used to invent the time machine. An equivalent paradox is known as autoinfanticide, going back in time and killing oneself as a baby. The grandfather paradox has been used to argue that backwards time travel must be impossible. However, a number of hypotheses have been postulated to avoid the paradox, such as the idea that the past is unchangeable, so the grandfather must have already survived the attempted killing; or the time traveller creates - or joins - an alternate timeline or parallel universe in which the traveller was never born.

— Freebase

The Adventures of Roderick Random

The Adventures of Roderick Random

The Adventures of Roderick Random is a picaresque novel by Tobias Smollett, first published in 1748. It is partially based on Smollett's experience as a naval-surgeon’s mate in the British Navy, especially during Battle of Cartagena de Indias in 1741. In the preface, Smollett acknowledges the connections of his novel to the two satirical picaresque works he translated into English: Cervantes’ Don Quixote and Alain-René Lesage’s Gil Blas

— Freebase

Go Deep

Go Deep

"Go Deep" is a song by American recording artist Janet Jackson from her sixth studio album, The Velvet Rope. Written by Jackson, James Harris III, Terry Lewis, and René Elizondo, Jr., the song was released as the album's fourth single in June and July 1998 in the United Kingdom and the United States respectively.

— Freebase

Vis viva

Vis viva

In the history of science, vis viva is an obsolete scientific theory that served as an elementary and limited early formulation of the principle of conservation of energy. It was the first [known] description of what we now call kinetic energy or of energy related to sensible motions. Proposed by Gottfried Leibniz over the period 1676–1689, the theory was controversial as it seemed to oppose the theory of conservation of momentum advocated by Sir Isaac Newton and René Descartes. The two theories are now understood to be complementary. The theory was eventually absorbed into the modern theory of energy though the term still survives in the context of celestial mechanics through the vis viva equation.

— Freebase

André Eglevsky

André Eglevsky

André Eglevsky was a Russian-born American ballet dancer and teacher. Eglevsky was born in Moscow, but was taken to live in France when he was eight, his mother having decided that his talent as a dancer demanded that he be properly trained. He studied ballet in Nice with Maria Nevelskaya, Lubov Egorova, Mathilde Kschessinska, Alexandre Volinine, Olga Preobrajenska, and Leon Woizikowski in Paris, Nicholas Legat in London, and the School of American Ballet in New York City. At the age of fourteen he joined Colonel W. de Basil's Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, and after six months was dancing leading roles in such ballets as Swan Lake, Les Sylphides, and Les Présages. In 1935 he joined Igor Youskevitch as the company's Premier Danseur, and a year later joined René Blum's Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. Eglevsky travelled to the United States in 1937, and was premier danseur in George Balanchine's American Ballet until 1938. He also danced at the Radio City Music Hall and in the Broadway musical Great Lady. After becoming an American citizen, in 1939 he rejoined the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, staying there until 1942. For the following four years he danced with the Ballet Theatre, as well as dancing as a guest star with Léonide Massine's Ballet Russe Highlights in 1944 and 1945. In the late 1930s he married the ballerina Leda Anchutina. His daughter, Marina Eglevsky, is also a ballerina.

— Freebase

Cartesian diver

Cartesian diver

A Cartesian diver or Cartesian devil is a classic science experiment, named for René Descartes, which demonstrates the principle of buoyancy and the ideal gas law. Descartes is said to have invented the toy.

— Freebase

René Antoine Ferchault de Réaumur

René Antoine Ferchault de Réaumur

René Antoine Ferchault de Réaumur was a French scientist who contributed to many different fields, especially the study of insects. He introduced the Réaumur temperature scale.

— Freebase

Hospitalism

Hospitalism

Hospitalism was a pediatric diagnosis used in the 1930s to describe infants who wasted away while in hospital. The symptoms could include retarded physical development, and disruption of perceptual-motor skills and language. It is now understood that this wasting disease was mostly caused by a lack of social contact between the infant and its caregivers. Infants in poorer hospitals were less subject to this disease since those hospitals could not afford incubators which meant that the hospital staff regularly held the infants. The term was used by the psychotherapist René Spitz in 1945, but its origins are older than this; it occurs in an editorial in Archives on Pediatrics as early as 1897. It appears under adjustment disorders at F43.2, in the World Health Organization's classification of diseases, ICD-10.

— Freebase

René Descartes

René Descartes

René Descartes was a French philosopher, mathematician, and writer who spent most of his adult life in the Dutch Republic. He has been dubbed the 'Father of Modern Philosophy', and much subsequent Western philosophy is a response to his writings, which are studied closely to this day. In particular, his Meditations on First Philosophy continues to be a standard text at most university philosophy departments. Descartes' influence in mathematics is equally apparent; the Cartesian coordinate system — allowing reference to a point in space as a set of numbers, and allowing algebraic equations to be expressed as geometric shapes in a two-dimensional coordinate system — was named after him. He is credited as the father of analytical geometry, the bridge between algebra and geometry, crucial to the discovery of infinitesimal calculus and analysis. Descartes was also one of the key figures in the Scientific Revolution and has been described as an example of genius. Descartes frequently sets his views apart from those of his predecessors. In the opening section of the Passions of the Soul, a treatise on the Early Modern version of what are now commonly called emotions, Descartes goes so far as to assert that he will write on this topic "as if no one had written on these matters before". Many elements of his philosophy have precedents in late Aristotelianism, the revived Stoicism of the 16th century, or in earlier philosophers like Augustine. In his natural philosophy, he differs from the schools on two major points: First, he rejects the analysis of corporeal substance into matter and form; second, he rejects any appeal to ends—divine or natural—in explaining natural phenomena. In his theology, he insists on the absolute freedom of God's act of creation.

— Freebase

Cartesianism

Cartesianism

Cartesianism is the name given to the philosophical doctrine of René Descartes.

— Freebase

Marmelade

Marmelade

Marmelade is a town and former duchy in the Artibonite Department of Haïti. It is the chief town of the Marmelade Arrondissement, which also includes the commune of Saint Michel de l'Attalaye. Marmelade is the home town of Président René Préval. During the years following his first tenure, Préval initiated rural development projects in Marmelade, including a manufacture of bamboo furniture.

— Freebase

Statue of Liberty

Statue of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in the middle of New York Harbor, in Manhattan, New York City. The statue, designed by Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi and dedicated on October 28, 1886, was a gift to the United States from the people of France. The statue is of a robed female figure representing Libertas, the Roman goddess of freedom, who bears a torch and a tabula ansata upon which is inscribed the date of the American Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776. A broken chain lies at her feet. The statue is an icon of freedom and of the United States: a welcoming signal to immigrants arriving from abroad. Bartholdi was inspired by French law professor and politician Édouard René de Laboulaye, who commented in 1865 that any monument raised to American independence would properly be a joint project of the French and American peoples. Due to the troubled political situation in France, work on the statue did not commence until the early 1870s. In 1875, Laboulaye proposed that the French finance the statue and the Americans provide the site and build the pedestal. Bartholdi completed the head and the torch-bearing arm before the statue was fully designed, and these pieces were exhibited for publicity at international expositions.

— Freebase

Medialuna

Medialuna

A medialuna is crescent-shaped corral used for rodeos, the official sport in Chile. They are generally 64–66 meters in diameter. Chilean rodeos are not quite the same sport famous in the American West; they involve two riders on horseback trying to herd a calf around a circular arena, attempting to pin him against several large cushions. The main medialuna in Chile is the Medialuna Monumental de Rancagua. Located in the city of Rancagua, it currently seats 12,000 spectators. It is the home of the annual National Championship of Chilean Rodeo. It hosted the 2006 Davis Cup matches of Chile against Slovakia and the 2009 Davis Cup against Austria. In Osorno, Chile, the medialuna is known as La Medialuna de Osorno. The Medialuna de Osorno was the first covered medialuna in Chile, and is considered one of the highest quality. Rodeos are organized by the Club Osorno René Soriano Bórquez. It boasts a 64-meter diameter arena, seating capacity of approximately 4,800, and an in-house cafeteria. In 2006, the medialuna was the qualifying arena for the Southern Region of the Campeonato Nacional de Rodeo, the nation-wide Rodeo competition. Rodeo is the second most popular sport in Chile after football it began in roughly the 16th century during the rule of Governor García Hurtado de Mendoza. At the time, the cattle in Chile were not well identified and it was not uncommon for the animals to get lost. To help prevent the loss, Governor Hurtado proclaimed that, in Santiago, every 24th and 25 July, the commemoration of Saint Jacob - patron saint of the city -, the cattle would be gathered in the Plaza de Armas de Santiago to be branded and selected. This is basically how Chilean rodeo began.

— Freebase

Auguste Rodin

Auguste Rodin

François-Auguste-René Rodin, known as Auguste Rodin, was a French sculptor. Although Rodin is generally considered the progenitor of modern sculpture, he did not set out to rebel against the past. He was schooled traditionally, took a craftsman-like approach to his work, and desired academic recognition, although he was never accepted into Paris's foremost school of art. Sculpturally, Rodin possessed a unique ability to model a complex, turbulent, deeply pocketed surface in clay. Many of his most notable sculptures were roundly criticized during his lifetime. They clashed with the predominant figure sculpture tradition, in which works were decorative, formulaic, or highly thematic. Rodin's most original work departed from traditional themes of mythology and allegory, modeled the human body with realism, and celebrated individual character and physicality. Rodin was sensitive to the controversy surrounding his work, but refused to change his style. Successive works brought increasing favor from the government and the artistic community. From the unexpected realism of his first major figure — inspired by his 1875 trip to Italy — to the unconventional memorials whose commissions he later sought, Rodin's reputation grew, such that he became the preeminent French sculptor of his time. By 1900, he was a world-renowned artist. Wealthy private clients sought Rodin's work after his World's Fair exhibit, and he kept company with a variety of high-profile intellectuals and artists. He married his lifelong companion, Rose Beuret, in the last year of both their lives. His sculptures suffered a decline in popularity after his death in 1917, but within a few decades, his legacy solidified. Rodin remains one of the few sculptors widely known outside the visual arts community.

— Freebase

Hilaire Belloc

Hilaire Belloc

Joseph Hilaire Pierre René Belloc was an Anglo-French writer and historian who became a naturalised British subject in 1902, but kept his French Citizenship. He was one of the most prolific writers in England during the early twentieth century. He was known as a writer, orator, poet, satirist, man of letters, and political activist. He is most notable for his Catholic faith, which had a strong impact on most of his works, and his writing collaboration with G. K. Chesterton. He was President of the Oxford Union and later MP for Salford from 1906 to 1910. He was a noted disputant, with a number of long-running feuds, but also widely regarded as a humane and sympathetic man. His most lasting legacy is probably his verse, which encompasses cautionary tales and religious poetry. Among his best-remembered poems are "Jim, who ran away from his nurse, and was eaten by a lion" and "Matilda, who told lies and was burnt to death".

— Freebase

Pneumomediastinum

Pneumomediastinum

Pneumomediastinum is a condition in which air is present in the mediastinum. First described in 1819 by René Laennec, the condition can result from physical trauma or other situations that lead to air escaping from the lungs, airways or bowel into the chest cavity.

— Freebase

Burgrave

Burgrave

A burgrave is the ruler of a castle or fortified town. The English form is derived through the French from the German Burggraf and Dutch Burggraaf, a rank above Baron but below Graf, or burch-graeve. ⁕The title is originally equivalent to that of castellan or châtelain, meaning keeper of a castle and/or fortified town. ⁕In Germany, owing to the peculiar conditions of the Holy Roman Empire, though the office of burgrave had become a sinecure by the end of the 13th century, the title, as borne by feudal nobles having the status of Reichsfürst, obtained a quasi-princely significance. There were four hereditary burgraviates ranking as principalities within the Holy Roman Empire: ⁕The Burgraviate of Antwerp: this was a title that was inherited by the Counts of Nassau, lords of Breda, who later inherited the title of Prince of Orange. The most famous holder was William the Silent, who used his influence over the city to control its government and use it a base of the Dutch Revolt. His predecessors in his family were Engelbrect, Henry and Rene. Another form of the title was "viscount of Antwerp".

— Freebase

Weeping Willow

Weeping Willow

"Weeping Willow" is the tenth episode of the sixth season of Law & Order: Criminal Intent. It originally aired on NBC in the United States on November 8, 2006. In the episode, a teenage vlogger nicknamed WeepingWillow17, played by guest star Michelle Trachtenberg, is apparently kidnapped during the filming of one of her Internet videos. Detectives Mike Logan and Megan Wheeler investigate the so-called "cyber-kidnapping", which they and the public speculate may be an elaborate Internet hoax. The episode and character was written by René Balcer, Stephanie Sengupta and Warren Leight, and directed by Tom DiCillo. The story and the WeepingWillow17 character were inspired by the lonelygirl15 video blogs on YouTube, which were originally believed the works of a real-life 15-year-old blogger, but were eventually discovered to be a professionally filmed hoax. The episode received generally positive reviews and, according to Nielsen ratings, was seen by 9.8 million households the week it aired, the most viewership for a Law & Order: Criminal Intent episode in six weeks.

— Freebase

Aramis

Aramis

René d'Herblay, alias Aramis is a fictional character in the novels The Three Musketeers, Twenty Years After and The Vicomte de Bragelonne by Alexandre Dumas, père. He and the other two musketeers Athos and Porthos are friends of the novels' protagonist, d'Artagnan. The fictional Aramis is loosely based on the historical musketeer Henri d'Aramitz.

— Freebase

Guy de Maupassant

Guy de Maupassant

Henri René Albert Guy de Maupassant was a popular 19th-century French writer, considered one of the fathers of the modern short story and one of the form's finest exponents. A protégé of Flaubert, Maupassant's stories are characterized by their economy of style and efficient, effortless dénouements. Many of the stories are set during the Franco-Prussian War of the 1870s and several describe the futility of war and the innocent civilians who, caught in the conflict, emerge changed. He authored some 300 short stories, six novels, three travel books, and one volume of verse. The story "Boule de Suif" is often accounted his masterpiece. His most unsettling horror story, "Le Horla", was about madness and suicide.

— Freebase

Vantasselite

Vantasselite

Vantasselite is a rare aluminium phosphate mineral with formula: Al4(PO4)3(OH)3 •9H2O. It crystallizes in the orthorhombic system and has a white color, a hardness of 2 to 2.5, a white streak and a pearly luster. It occurs in a quartzite quarry north of Bihain, Belgium It was first described in 1987 and named after Belgian mineralogist René Van Tassel.

— Freebase

Asterix

Asterix

Asterix or The Adventures of Asterix is a series of French comics written by René Goscinny and illustrated by Albert Uderzo. The series first appeared in the French comics magazine Pilote on 29 October 1959. As of 2012, 34 volumes have been released. The series follows the exploits of a village of indomitable Gauls as they resist Roman occupation. They do so by means of a magic potion, brewed by their druid, which gives the recipient superhuman strength. The protagonist, the titular character Asterix, along with his friend Obelix have various adventures. The "ix" suffix of both names echoes the names of real Gaulish chieftains such as Vercingetorix, Orgetorix, and Dumnorix. Many of the stories have them travel to foreign countries, though others are set in and around their village. For much of the history of the series, settings in Gaul and abroad alternated, with even-numbered volumes set abroad and odd-numbered volumes set in Gaul, mostly in the village. The Asterix series is one of the most popular Franco-Belgian comics in the world, with the series being translated into over 100 languages, and it is popular in most European countries.

— Freebase

Epoché

Epoché

Epoché is an ancient Greek term which, in its philosophical usage, describes the theoretical moment where all judgments about the existence of the external world, and consequently all action in the world, is suspended. One's own consciousness is subject to immanent critique so that when such belief is recovered, it will have a firmer grounding in consciousness. This concept was developed by the Greek skeptics and plays an implicit role in skeptical thought, as in René Descartes' epistemic principle of methodic doubt. The term was popularized in philosophy by Edmund Husserl. Husserl elaborates the notion of 'phenomenological epoché' or 'bracketing' in Ideas I. Through the systematic procedure of 'phenomenological reduction', one is thought to be able to suspend judgment regarding the general or naive philosophical belief in the existence of the external world, and thus examine phenomena as they are originally given to consciousness.

— Freebase

Superalloy

Superalloy

A superalloy, or high-performance alloy, is an alloy that exhibits excellent mechanical strength and resistance to creep at high temperatures; good surface stability; and corrosion and oxidation resistance. Superalloys typically have a matrix with an austenitic face-centered cubic crystal structure. A superalloy's base alloying element is usually nickel, cobalt, or nickel-iron. Superalloy development has relied heavily on both chemical and process innovations and has been driven primarily by the aerospace and power industries. Typical applications are in the aerospace, industrial gas turbine and marine turbine industries, e.g. for turbine blades for hot sections of jet engines, and bi-metallic engine valves for use in diesel and automotive applications. Examples of superalloys are Hastelloy, Inconel, Waspaloy, Rene alloys, Haynes alloys, Incoloy, MP98T, TMS alloys, and CMSX single crystal alloys. Superalloys are commonly used in parts of gas turbine engines that are subject to high temperatures and require high strength, excellent high temperature creep resistance, fatigue life, phase stability, and oxidation and corrosion resistance.

— Freebase

Trialism

Trialism

Trialism in philosophy was introduced by John Cottingham as an alternative interpretation of the mind-body dualism of Rene Descartes. Trialism keeps the two substances of mind and body, but introduces a third attribute, sensation, belonging to the union of mind and body. This allows animals, which do not have thought, to be regarded as having sensation and not as being mere automata. Christian trialism is the doctrine that humans have three separate essences, based on a literal interpretation of 1 Thessalonians 5:23 And the very God of peace sanctify you wholly; and I pray God your whole spirit and soul and body be preserved blameless unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. This doctrine holds the soul to belong to the union of the body and the spirit, which makes it roughly compatible with philosophical trialism. However, the evangelist Kenneth Copeland came under fire by critics such as Hank Hanegraff for extending trialism to each Person in the Trinity, for a total of nine essences.

— Freebase

Pilote

Pilote

Pilote was a French comics periodical published from 1959 to 1989. Showcasing most of the major French or Belgian comics talents of its day the magazine introduced major series such as Astérix, Barbe-Rouge, Blueberry, Achille Talon, and Valérian et Laureline. Major comics writers like René Goscinny, Jean-Michel Charlier, Greg, Pierre Christin and Jacques Lob were featured in the magazine, as were artists such as Jijé, Morris, Albert Uderzo, Jean Giraud, Enki Bilal, Jean-Claude Mézières, Jacques Tardi, Philippe Druillet, Marcel Gotlib, Alexis, and Annie Goetzinger. Pilote also published several international talents such as Hugo Pratt, Frank Bellamy and Robert Crumb.

— Freebase

Laënnec

Laënnec

Laënnec is a quarter of the 8th arrondissement of Lyon, in France. It is served by the eponymous station of the Line D of the Lyon Metro, which was opened on 11 December 1992 and had 132,316 passengers per month in 2006. Notable monuments of the quarter are the Grand Mosque of Lyon, located in the Boulevard Pinel, the Faculty of Medicine, the Faculty of Dentistry and the Maison des jeunes et de la culture. The quarter is named after French physician and medical writer René Laennec.

— Freebase

Jamie Ross

Jamie Ross

Jamie Ross is a fictional character on the TV drama Law & Order, created by Rene Balcer and portrayed by Carey Lowell from 1996 to 1998. She also appears in the short-lived Law & Order spin-off Law & Order: Trial By Jury, by which time the character has become a judge. She appeared in 52 episodes

— Freebase

Neosocialism

Neosocialism

Neosocialism was a political trend of socialism, represented in France during the 1930s and in Belgium, which included several revisionist tendencies in the French Section of the Workers' International. In the wake of the Great Depression, a group of right-wing members, led by Henri de Man in Belgium, founder of planisme, and in France Marcel Déat, Pierre Renaudel, René Belin, the "neo-Turks" of the Radical-Socialist Party, opposed themselves both to Marxism and to gradual reformism. Instead, influenced by Henri de Man's planisme, they promoted a "constructive revolution" headed by the state and technocrats, through economic planification. Such ideas also influenced the Non-Conformist Movement in the French right-wing. Marcel Déat published in 1930 Perspectives socialistes, a revisionist work closely influenced by Henri de Man's planisme. Along with over a hundred articles written in La Vie Socialiste, the review of the SFIO's right-wing, Perspective socialistes marked the shift of Déat from classical Socialism to Neo-Socialism. Déat replaced class struggle by collaboration of classes and national solidarity, advocated corporatism as a social organization model, replaced the notion of "Socialism" by "anti-Capitalism" and supported an authoritarian state which would plan the economy and from which parliamentarism would be repealed.

— Freebase

Fuck the Police

Fuck the Police

"Fuck The Police" is a single by the rapper/producer, Jay Dee. In the song, Jay Dee chastises corrupt policemen who conduct illegal searches and plant evidence on blacks. The 12" sleeve cover includes pictures of Mumia Abu-Jamal and Rodney King. Both men are known for their run-ins with the law. The song contains a sample of "Scrabble", by Rene Costy as well as "Dimension No. 9" by Jacques Delon and "Damn Right I Am Somebody" by Fred Wesley and The J.B.'s. The song was later added to the unreleased Pay Jay album.

— Freebase

Intocable

Intocable

Intocable is a Tejano/Norteño musical group from Zapata, Texas that was started by friends Ricky Muñoz and René Martínez in the early 90's. Within a couple years as a band, Intocable had already risen to the top of the Tejano and Norteño fields with a musical signature that had fused Tejano's robust conjunto and Norteño folk rhythms with a pop balladry. Currently, Intocable could very well be the most influential group in Tejano, and their tough Tejano/Norteño fusion has become the blueprint for dozens of Tex-Mex groups. The group's strengths, which include romantic hooky melodies, and tight instrumentation and vocal harmony is consistently being imitated by a list of other Tejano and Norteño groups. This list includes groups such as Imán, Duelo, Costumbre, Solido, Estruendo, Intenso, and Zinzero among others. Career accomplishments include four consecutive sold-out nights at Mexico City's prestigious Auditorio Nacional and the group's 2003 headlining appearance at Reliant Stadium in Houston, which drew a record 70,104 fans. They also played two sold-out dates at the 10,000-capacity Monterrey Arena in Monterrey, Mexico. It was an unusual accomplishment, given that Norteño groups typically play large dance halls and rarely arenas, unless it's an all day festival event. Intocable has also won at least eight of Univision's Premio Lo Nuestro awards, and received their first Grammy win in February 2005 at the 47th Annual Grammys and second at the 53rd annual Grammys for their album Classic.

— Freebase

Louis Hennepin

Louis Hennepin

Father Louis Hennepin, O.F.M. baptized Antoine, was a Catholic priest and missionary of the Franciscan Recollect order and an explorer of the interior of North America. Hennepin was born in Ath in the Spanish Netherlands. In 1659 Béthune, the town where he lived, was captured by the army of Louis XIV of France. At the request of Louis XIV the Récollets sent four missionaries to New France in May 1675, including Hennepin, accompanied by René Robert Cavelier, Sieur de la Salle. In 1678, Hennepin was ordered by his provincial superior to accompany La Salle on an expedition to explore the western part of New France. Hennepin was 39 when he departed in 1679 with La Salle from Quebec City to construct the 45-ton barque Le Griffon, sail through the Great Lakes, and explore the unknown West. Hennepin was with La Salle at the construction of Fort Crevecouer in January, 1680. In February, La Salle sent Hennepin and two others as an advance party to search for the Mississippi River. The party followed the Illinois River to its junction with the Mississippi. Shortly thereafter, Hennepin was captured by a Sioux war party and carried off for a time into what is now the state of Minnesota. In September, Hennepin and the others were given canoes and allowed to leave, eventually returning to Quebec. Hennepin returned to France and was never allowed by his order to return to North America.

— Freebase

DAMS

DAMS

Driot-Arnoux Motorsport is a racing team from France, involved in many areas of motorsport. DAMS was founded in 1988 by Jean-Paul Driot and former Formula One driver René Arnoux. It is headquartered near Le Mans, only 2 km from the Bugatti Circuit.

— Freebase

Black Sun Empire

Black Sun Empire

Black Sun Empire is a trio of Dutch disc jockeys and drum & bass music producers. The group consists of Rene Verdult and brothers Milan and Micha Heyboer. Based out of Utrecht, Netherlands, they started making Drum & Bass in 1995 when they turned to the likes of artists such as Photek, LTJ Bukem, and Ed Rush. After having a few releases on smaller record labels, they managed to get the attention of bigger producers like DJ Trace, currently known for his DSCI4 record label. They have four labels of their own: Black Sun Empire Recordings, oBSEssions, Shadows of the Empire and most recently Blackout Recordings. The group's name comes from the Black Sun Crime Syndicate, which appeared in the Star Wars novel Star Wars: Shadows of the Empire. While the trio's music is usually defined as darkstep or neurofunk, Black Sun Empire have more recently incorporated dubstep into their productions. One of their tracks was featured in the E³ 2006 trailer of the game EVE Online titled "No Other Destiny". Black Sun Empire released their latest album From The Shadows in fall 2012.

— Freebase

Charles-François Galand

Charles-François Galand

Charles-François Galand was a French gunsmith who worked in Liege and Paris, France. He manufactured many revolvers for civilian and military use, including the Galand Revolver, the Tue Tue, and the tiny Le Novo. The Velo-dog, developed from the Tue Tue and the Novo, was designed by Charles-François' son René in 1904. The original Galand revolver was a double-action, open frame revolver patented in 1868. Military versions were produced in 9 mm while civilian versions were made in 12 mm. The gun is easily recognizable due to its long extraction lever, which stretches under the gun to form the trigger guard. Pulling the lever forward separates the barrel and cylinder from the rest of the gun. At the same time the extractor plate is blocked which catches any cartridges in the cylinder, thereby extracting them. The first model was manufactured both in Liege and in Birmingham, England by the British arms firm Braendlin and Sommerville, and is therefore sometimes referred to as the Galand-Sommerville. Sommerville shared the patent for the case extracting system with Galand. The Galand-Perrin is an identical model which uses the Perrin cartridge.

— Freebase

Riva

Riva

Zki & Dobre, are a Dutch house music duo from Haarlem, Netherlands. They comprise Gaston Steenkist and René ter Horst. They have produced multiple dance hits under various group names since the early 1990s.

— Freebase

Hamlets

Hamlets

Hamlets is the name of an open source system for generating web-pages originally developed by René Pawlitzek at IBM. He defines a Hamlet as a servlet extension that reads XHTML template files containing presentation using SAX and dynamically adds content on the fly to those places in the template which are marked with special tags and IDs using a small set of callback functions. A template compiler can be used to accelerate Hamlets. Hamlets provide an easy-to-use, easy-to-understand, lightweight, small-footprint, servlet-based content creation framework that facilitates the development of Web-based applications. The Hamlets framework not only supports but also enforces the complete separation of content and presentation.

— Freebase

Basquiat

Basquiat

Basquiat is a 1996 biopic/drama film directed by fellow painter Julian Schnabel which is based on the life of American postmodernist/neo expressionist artist Jean-Michel Basquiat. Basquiat, born in Brooklyn, used his graffiti roots as a foundation to create collage-style paintings on canvas. Jeffrey Wright portrays Basquiat, and David Bowie plays Basquiat's friend and mentor Andy Warhol. Additional cast include Gary Oldman as a thinly-disguised Schnabel, Michael Wincott as the poet and art critic Rene Ricard; Dennis Hopper as Bruno Bischofberger; Parker Posey as gallery owner Mary Boone; Claire Forlani, Courtney Love, Tatum O'Neal and Benicio del Toro in supporting roles as "composite characters". The film was written by Schnabel and Michael Thomas Holman, who was also credited for story development, with story by Lech J. Majewski and John F. Bowe. Holman, a former member of theatrical rock group The Tubes, had first met Basquiat in 1979 and together that year they founded an experimental, industrial/electronica group called Gray.

— Freebase

Romantic hero

Romantic hero

The Romantic hero is a literary archetype referring to a character that rejects established norms and conventions, has been rejected by society, and has the self as the center of his or her own existence. The Romantic hero is often the protagonist in the literary work and there is a primary focus on the character's thoughts rather than his or her actions. Literary critic Northrop Frye noted that the Romantic hero is often "placed outside the structure of civilization and therefore represents the force of physical nature, amoral or ruthless, yet with a sense of power, and often leadership, that society has impoverished itself by rejecting". Other characteristics of the romantic hero include introspection, the triumph of the individual over the "restraints of theological and social conventions", wanderlust, melancholy, misanthropy, alienation, and isolation. However, another common trait of the Romantic hero is regret for his actions, and self-criticism, often leading to philanthropy, which stops the character from ending romantically. An example of this trait is Edmond Dantès in The Count of Monte Cristo. The Romantic hero first began appearing in literature during the Romantic period, in works by such authors as Byron, Keats, and Goethe, and is seen in part as a response to the French Revolution. As Napoleon, the "living model of a hero", became a disappointment to many, the typical notion of the hero as upholding social order began to be challenged. Classic literary examples of the romantic hero include Gwynplaine from Hugo's The Man who Laughs, Mr. Darcy from Pride and Prejudice, Byron's Don Juan, Chateaubriand's René[4], Tolstoy's Andrei Bolkonsky from War and Peace, Cooper's "Hawkeye" from The Leatherstocking Tales, and Raymond Chandler's Phillip Marlowe from his seven novels about the Los Angeles detective.

— Freebase

Chocolate Puma

Chocolate Puma

Zki & Dobre, are a Dutch house music duo from Haarlem, Netherlands. They comprise Gaston Steenkist and René ter Horst. They have produced multiple dance hits under various group names since the early 1990s.

— Freebase

Bersuit

Bersuit

Bersuit Vergarabat, formed formally in 1989, is an Argentine rock band. The previous name of the band was Henry y la Palangana. After two albums of underground transgressor rock, the band began to experiment with Latin American rhythms such as cumbia, chacarera, candombe and cuartetazo. The lyrics, though, remained acid and critical with regard to political and social problems. The current formation is Albertito Verenzuela, Daniel Suárez, Germán "Cóndor" Sbarbatti, Juan Carlos Subirá, Oscar Righi, René Isel "Pepe" Céspedes and Carlos Martín; previous members include Gustavo Cordera, Charly Bianco and Rubén Sadrinas. In honor of Buenos Aires' José Tiburcio Borda Psychiatric Hospital, the band often performs in clinical pajamas. Although there is no truth to the urban legend of Cordera spending some time in that institution, the band has demonstrated an affinity for everything related to madness and marginalization. In addition to finding success in the Buenos Aires' underground movement, and then nationwide, Bersuit Vergarabat has attracted fans from many countries in Latin America as well as Spain.

— Freebase

Ghost in the machine

Ghost in the machine

The "ghost in the machine" is British philosopher Gilbert Ryle's description of René Descartes' mind-body dualism. The phrase was introduced in Ryle's book The Concept of Mind to highlight the perceived absurdity of dualist systems like Descartes' where mental activity carries on in parallel to physical action, but where their means of interaction are unknown or, at best, speculative.

— Freebase

CHRC

CHRC

CHRC was a French language Canadian radio station located in Quebec City, Quebec. Known as Québec 800, the station had a news/talk/sports format. Owned and operated by the Quebec Remparts QMJHL franchise, it broadcast on 800 kHz with a power of 50,000 watts as a class B station from a site near the Chaudière River near Saint-Étienne-de-Lauzon in Lévis, using a very directional antenna with the same directional pattern day and night to protect various other stations on the same frequency, including CJAD in Montreal. The station's studios were located at Colisée Pepsi in Quebec City. It was previously part of the Radiomédia/Corus Québec network, which operated across Quebec. On August 9, 2007, Corus announced a deal to sell the station to a group of local businessmen, namely Michel Cadrin, Jacques Tanguay and Patrick Roy, owners of the Remparts. The new owners plan on converting the station to a primarily sports-based format. This application was approved by the CRTC on June 26, 2008. CHRC's alumni include former Premier of Quebec René Lévesque, who was a substitute announcer for CHRC during 1941 and 1942. CHRC announced it would cease operations at the end of the month of September 2012, at the same time discontinuing the last AM radio service from Quebec City. Sports broadcast rights are slated to be transferred to CJMF-FM. CHRC fell silent late in the evening of September 30, 2012. Before leaving the air at 6:06 p.m., the station's final words broadcast were farewell messages from their staff. Parties interested in acquiring 800 includes the Tietolman-Tétrault-Pancholy Media group and Bell Media Radio.

— Freebase

Celine Dion

Celine Dion

Céline Marie Claudette Dion, CC OQ ChLD is a Canadian singer. Born into a large family from Charlemagne, Quebec, Dion emerged as a teen star in the French-speaking world after her manager and future husband René Angélil mortgaged his home to finance her first record. In 1990, she released the English-language album Unison, establishing herself as a viable pop artist in North America and other English-speaking areas of the world. Dion first gained international recognition in the 1980s by winning both the 1982 Yamaha World Popular Song Festival and the 1988 Eurovision Song Contest where she represented Switzerland. Following a series of French albums in the early 1980s, she signed on to CBS Records Canada in 1986. During the 1990s, with the help of Angélil, she achieved worldwide fame after signing with Epic Records and releasing several English albums along with additional French albums, becoming one of the most successful artists in pop music history. However, in 1999 at the height of her success, Dion announced a hiatus from entertainment in order to start a family and spend time with her husband, who had been diagnosed with cancer.

— Freebase

Animals, Newborn

Animals, Newborn

Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Loiasis

Loiasis

A parasitic infection caused by the nematode Loa loa. The vector in the transmission of this infection is the horsefly (Tabanus) or the deerfly or mango fly (Chrysops). The larvae may be seen just beneath the skin or passing through the conjunctiva. Eye lesions are not uncommon. The disease is generally mild and painless.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Mastoiditis

Mastoiditis

Inflammation of the honeycomb-like MASTOID BONE in the skull just behind the ear. It is usually a complication of OTITIS MEDIA.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Microcomputers

Microcomputers

Small computers using LSI (large-scale integration) microprocessor chips as the CPU (central processing unit) and semiconductor memories for compact, inexpensive storage of program instructions and data. They are smaller and less expensive than minicomputers and are usually built into a dedicated system where they are optimized for a particular application. "Microprocessor" may refer to just the CPU or the entire microcomputer.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Overlearning

Overlearning

Learning in which practice proceeds beyond the point where the act can just be performed with the required degree of excellence.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Para-Aortic Bodies

Para-Aortic Bodies

Small masses of chromaffin cells found near the SYMPATHETIC GANGLIA along the ABDOMINAL AORTA, beginning cranial to the superior mesenteric artery (MESENTERIC ARTERY, SUPERIOR) or renal arteries and extending to the level of the aortic bifurcation or just beyond. They are also called the organs of Zuckerkandl and sometimes called aortic bodies (not to be confused with AORTIC BODIES in the THORAX). The para-aortic bodies are the dominant source of CATECHOLAMINES in the FETUS and normally regress after BIRTH.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Reticulocytes

Reticulocytes

Immature ERYTHROCYTES. In humans, these are ERYTHROID CELLS that have just undergone extrusion of their CELL NUCLEUS. They still contain some organelles that gradually decrease in number as the cells mature. RIBOSOMES are last to disappear. Certain staining techniques cause components of the ribosomes to precipitate into characteristic "reticulum" (not the same as the ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM), hence the name reticulocytes.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Vertical Dimension

Vertical Dimension

The length of the face determined by the distance of separation of jaws. Occlusal vertical dimension (OVD or VDO) or contact vertical dimension is the lower face height with the teeth in centric occlusion. Rest vertical dimension (VDR) is the lower face height measured from a chin point to a point just below the nose, with the mandible in rest position. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p250)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Microscopy, Scanning Tunneling

Microscopy, Scanning Tunneling

A type of scanning probe microscopy in which a very sharp conducting needle is swept just a few angstroms above the surface of a sample. The tiny tunneling current that flows between the sample and the needle tip is measured, and from this are produced three-dimensional topographs. Due to the poor electron conductivity of most biological samples, thin metal coatings are deposited on the sample.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Pelvic Floor

Pelvic Floor

Soft tissue formed mainly by the pelvic diaphragm, which is composed of the two levator ani and two coccygeus muscles. The pelvic diaphragm lies just below the pelvic aperture (outlet) and separates the pelvic cavity from the PERINEUM. It extends between the PUBIC BONE anteriorly and the COCCYX posteriorly.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Immediate-Early Proteins

Immediate-Early Proteins

Proteins that are coded by immediate-early genes, in the absence of de novo protein synthesis. The term was originally used exclusively for viral regulatory proteins that were synthesized just after viral integration into the host cell. It is also used to describe cellular proteins which are synthesized immediately after the resting cell is stimulated by extracellular signals.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Mercenaria

Mercenaria

A genus of hard-shelled clams in the family Veneridae, class BIVALVIA, commonly called quahogs. They are found just below the surface in the subtidal or lower intertidal coastal waters.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Transient Receptor Potential Channels

Transient Receptor Potential Channels

A broad group of eukaryotic six-transmembrane cation channels that are classified by sequence homology because their functional involvement with SENSATION is varied. They have only weak voltage sensitivity and ion selectivity. They are named after a DROSOPHILA mutant that displayed transient receptor potentials in response to light. A 25-amino-acid motif containing a TRP box (EWKFAR) just C-terminal to S6 is found in TRPC, TRPV and TRPM subgroups. ANKYRIN repeats are found in TRPC, TRPV & TRPN subgroups. Some are functionally associated with TYROSINE KINASE or TYPE C PHOSPHOLIPASES.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Scattering, Small Angle

Scattering, Small Angle

Scattering of a beam of electromagnetic or acoustic RADIATION, or particles, at small angles by particles or cavities whose dimensions are many times as large as the wavelength of the radiation or the de Broglie wavelength of the scattered particles. Also know as low angle scattering. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed) Small angle scattering (SAS) techniques, small angle neutron (SANS), X-ray (SAXS), and light (SALS, or just LS) scattering, are used to characterize objects on a nanoscale.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Ventricular Septum

Ventricular Septum

The muscular structure separating the right and the left lower chambers (HEART VENTRICLES) of the heart. The ventricular septum consists of a very small membranous portion just beneath the AORTIC VALVE, and a large thick muscular portion consisting of three sections including the inlet septum, the trabecular septum, and the outlet septum.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Periventricular Nodular Heterotopia

Periventricular Nodular Heterotopia

A disorder resulting from a defect in the pattern of neuronal migration in which ectopic collections of neurons lie along the lateral ventricles of the brain or just beneath, contiguously or in isolated patches.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Waist Circumference

Waist Circumference

The measurement around the body at the level of the ABDOMEN and just above the hip bone. The measurement is usually taken immediately after exhalation.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Accord

Accord

agreement, harmony, or just correspondence of things; as, the accord of light and shade in painting

— Webster Dictionary

Affirmable

Affirmable

capable of being affirmed, asserted, or declared; -- followed by of; as, an attribute affirmable of every just man

— Webster Dictionary

After-dinner

After-dinner

the time just after dinner

— Webster Dictionary

Agnomen

Agnomen

an additional name, or an epithet appended to a name; as, Aristides the Just

— Webster Dictionary

All

All

even; just. (Often a mere intensive adjunct.)

— Webster Dictionary

Anticor

Anticor

a dangerous inflammatory swelling of a horse's breast, just opposite the heart

— Webster Dictionary

Apportion

Apportion

to divide and assign in just proportion; to divide and distribute proportionally; to portion out; to allot; as, to apportion undivided rights; to apportion time among various employments

— Webster Dictionary

Appreciation

Appreciation

a just valuation or estimate of merit, worth, weight, etc.; recognition of excellence

— Webster Dictionary

Appreciative

Appreciative

having or showing a just or ready appreciation or perception; as, an appreciative audience

— Webster Dictionary

Apron

Apron

a piece of carved timber, just above the foremost end of the keel

— Webster Dictionary

Atrip

Atrip

just hove clear of the ground; -- said of the anchor

— Webster Dictionary

Attemper

Attemper

to mix in just proportion; to regulate; as, a mind well attempered with kindness and justice

— Webster Dictionary

Aurora

Aurora

the rising light of the morning; the dawn of day; the redness of the sky just before the sun rises

— Webster Dictionary

Avouch

Avouch

to maintain a just or true; to vouch for

— Webster Dictionary

Aweigh

Aweigh

just drawn out of the ground, and hanging perpendicularly; atrip; -- said of the anchor

— Webster Dictionary

Banns

Banns

notice of a proposed marriage, proclaimed in a church, or other place prescribed by law, in order that any person may object, if he knows of just cause why the marriage should not take place

— Webster Dictionary

Barely

Barely

but just; without any excess; with nothing to spare ( of quantity, time, etc.); hence, scarcely; hardly; as, there was barely enough for all; he barely escaped

— Webster Dictionary

Bay

Bay

a small body of water set off from the main body; as a compartment containing water for a wheel; the portion of a canal just outside of the gates of a lock, etc

— Webster Dictionary

Boultin

Boultin

a molding, the convexity of which is one fourth of a circle, being a member just below the abacus in the Tuscan and Roman Doric capital; a torus; an ovolo

— Webster Dictionary

Bridegroom

Bridegroom

a man newly married, or just about to be married

— Webster Dictionary

Burr

Burr

a broad iron ring on a tilting lance just below the gripe, to prevent the hand from slipping

— Webster Dictionary

Cadenza

Cadenza

a parenthetic flourish or flight of ornament in the course of a piece, commonly just before the final cadence

— Webster Dictionary

Candid

Candid

free from undue bias; disposed to think and judge according to truth and justice, or without partiality or prejudice; fair; just; impartial; as, a candid opinion

— Webster Dictionary

Causeless

Causeless

without just or sufficient reason; groundless

— Webster Dictionary

Chyme

Chyme

the pulpy mass of semi-digested food in the small intestines just after its passage from the stomach. It is separated in the intestines into chyle and excrement. See Chyle

— Webster Dictionary

Clavicle

Clavicle

the collar bone, which is joined at one end to the scapula, or shoulder blade, and at the other to the sternum, or breastbone. In man each clavicle is shaped like the letter /, and is situated just above the first rib on either side of the neck. In birds the two clavicles are united ventrally, forming the merrythought, or wishbone

— Webster Dictionary

Cocoon

Cocoon

an oblong case in which the silkworm lies in its chrysalis state. It is formed of threads of silk spun by the worm just before leaving the larval state. From these the silk of commerce is prepared

— Webster Dictionary

Cognovit

Cognovit

an instrument in writing whereby a defendant in an action acknowledges a plaintiff's demand to be just

— Webster Dictionary

Collationer

Collationer

one who examines the sheets of a book that has just been printed, to ascertain whether they are correctly printed, paged, etc

— Webster Dictionary

Conscionable

Conscionable

governed by, or according to, conscience; reasonable; just

— Webster Dictionary

Consequentially

Consequentially

with just deduction of consequence; with right connection of ideas; logically

— Webster Dictionary

Correct

Correct

set right, or made straight; hence, conformable to truth, rectitude, or propriety, or to a just standard; not faulty or imperfect; free from error; as, correct behavior; correct views

— Webster Dictionary

Curb

Curb

a swelling on the back part of the hind leg of a horse, just behind the lowest part of the hock joint, generally causing lameness

— Webster Dictionary

Dade

Dade

to walk unsteadily, as a child in leading strings, or just learning to walk; to move slowly

— Webster Dictionary

Directly

Directly

exactly; just

— Webster Dictionary

Dolphin

Dolphin

a permanent fender around a heavy boat just below the gunwale

— Webster Dictionary

Due

Due

right; just title or claim

— Webster Dictionary

Eanling

Eanling

a lamb just brought forth; a yeanling

— Webster Dictionary

Enharmonically

Enharmonically

in the enharmonic style or system; in just intonation

— Webster Dictionary

Epithet

Epithet

an adjective expressing some quality, attribute, or relation, that is properly or specially appropriate to a person or thing; as, a just man; a verdant lawn

— Webster Dictionary

Equal

Equal

bearing a suitable relation; of just proportion; having competent power, abilities, or means; adequate; as, he is not equal to the task

— Webster Dictionary

Equal

Equal

evenly balanced; not unduly inclining to either side; characterized by fairness; unbiased; impartial; equitable; just

— Webster Dictionary

Equilibrium

Equilibrium

a level position; a just poise or balance in respect to an object, so that it remains firm; equipoise; as, to preserve the equilibrium of the body

— Webster Dictionary

Equitable

Equitable

possessing or exhibiting equity; according to natural right or natural justice; marked by a due consideration for what is fair, unbiased, or impartial; just; as an equitable decision; an equitable distribution of an estate; equitable men

— Webster Dictionary

Equitableness

Equitableness

the quality of being equitable, just, or impartial; as, the equitableness of a judge, a decision, or distribution of property

— Webster Dictionary

Eurythmy

Eurythmy

just or harmonious proportion or movement, as in the composition of a poem, an edifice, a painting, or a statue

— Webster Dictionary

Even

Even

balanced; adjusted; fair; equitable; impartial; just to both side; owing nothing on either side; -- said of accounts, bargains, or persons indebted; as, our accounts are even; an even bargain

— Webster Dictionary

Even

Even

in an equal or precisely similar manner; equally; precisely; just; likewise; as well

— Webster Dictionary

Fair

Fair

characterized by frankness, honesty, impartiality, or candor; open; upright; free from suspicion or bias; equitable; just; -- said of persons, character, or conduct; as, a fair man; fair dealing; a fair statement

— Webster Dictionary

Fair-minded

Fair-minded

unprejudiced; just; judicial; honest

— Webster Dictionary

Flash

Flash

a reservoir and sluiceway beside a navigable stream, just above a shoal, so that the stream may pour in water as boats pass, and thus bear them over the shoal

— Webster Dictionary

Fledgeling

Fledgeling

a young bird just fledged

— Webster Dictionary

Foremilk

Foremilk

the milk secreted just before, or directly after, the birth of a child or of the young of an animal; colostrum

— Webster Dictionary

Giusto

Giusto

in just, correct, or suitable time

— Webster Dictionary

Griffin

Griffin

an Anglo-Indian name for a person just arrived from Europe

— Webster Dictionary

Haddock

Haddock

a marine food fish (Melanogrammus aeglefinus), allied to the cod, inhabiting the northern coasts of Europe and America. It has a dark lateral line and a black spot on each side of the body, just back of the gills. Galled also haddie, and dickie

— Webster Dictionary

Harmony

Harmony

the just adaptation of parts to each other, in any system or combination of things, or in things, or things intended to form a connected whole; such an agreement between the different parts of a design or composition as to produce unity of effect; as, the harmony of the universe

— Webster Dictionary

Have

Have

to bear, as young; as, she has just had a child

— Webster Dictionary

Hough

Hough

a piece cut by butchers, esp. in pork, from either the front or hind leg, just above the foot

— Webster Dictionary

Honest

Honest

characterized by integrity or fairness and straight/forwardness in conduct, thought, speech, etc.; upright; just; equitable; trustworthy; truthful; sincere; free from fraud, guile, or duplicity; not false; -- said of persons and acts, and of things to which a moral quality is imputed; as, an honest judge or merchant; an honest statement; an honest bargain; an honest business; an honest book; an honest confession

— Webster Dictionary

Honor

Honor

a nice sense of what is right, just, and true, with course of life correspondent thereto; strict conformity to the duty imposed by conscience, position, or privilege

— Webster Dictionary

Honorable

Honorable

proceeding from an upright and laudable cause, or directed to a just and proper end; not base; irreproachable; fair; as, an honorable motive

— Webster Dictionary

Immoderate

Immoderate

not moderate; exceeding just or usual and suitable bounds; excessive; extravagant; unreasonable; as, immoderate demands; immoderate grief; immoderate laughter

— Webster Dictionary

Impartial

Impartial

not partial; not favoring one more than another; treating all alike; unprejudiced; unbiased; disinterested; equitable; fair; just

— Webster Dictionary

Inchoate

Inchoate

recently, or just, begun; beginning; partially but not fully in existence or operation; existing in its elements; incomplete

— Webster Dictionary

Inconsequence

Inconsequence

the quality or state of being inconsequent; want of just or logical inference or argument; inconclusiveness

— Webster Dictionary

Incorruptible

Incorruptible

incapable of being bribed or morally corrupted; inflexibly just and upright

— Webster Dictionary

Inequitable

Inequitable

not equitable; not just

— Webster Dictionary

Iniquity

Iniquity

absence of, or deviation from, just dealing; want of rectitude or uprightness; gross injustice; unrighteousness; wickedness; as, the iniquity of bribery; the iniquity of an unjust judge

— Webster Dictionary

Injurious

Injurious

not just; wrongful; iniquitous; culpable

— Webster Dictionary

Jointworm

Jointworm

the larva of a small, hymenopterous fly (Eurytoma hordei), which is found in gall-like swellings on the stalks of wheat, usually at or just above the first joint. In some parts of America it does great damage to the crop

— Webster Dictionary

Jugulum

Jugulum

the lower throat, or that part of the neck just above the breast

— Webster Dictionary

Just

Just

rendering or disposed to render to each one his due; equitable; fair; impartial; as, just judge

— Webster Dictionary

Justice

Justice

the quality of being just; conformity to the principles of righteousness and rectitude in all things; strict performance of moral obligations; practical conformity to human or divine law; integrity in the dealings of men with each other; rectitude; equity; uprightness

— Webster Dictionary

Justice

Justice

the rendering to every one his due or right; just treatment; requital of desert; merited reward or punishment; that which is due to one's conduct or motives

— Webster Dictionary

Justifiable

Justifiable

capable of being justified, or shown to be just

— Webster Dictionary

Justification

Justification

the act of justifying or the state of being justified; a showing or proving to be just or conformable to law, justice, right, or duty; defense; vindication; support; as, arguments in justification of the prisoner's conduct; his disobedience admits justification

— Webster Dictionary

Justify

Justify

to prove or show to be just; to vindicate; to maintain or defend as conformable to law, right, justice, propriety, or duty

— Webster Dictionary

Justify

Justify

to pronounce free from guilt or blame; to declare or prove to have done that which is just, right, proper, etc.; to absolve; to exonerate; to clear

— Webster Dictionary

Justify

Justify

to treat as if righteous and just; to pardon; to exculpate; to absolve

— Webster Dictionary

Justly

Justly

in a just manner; in conformity to law, justice, or propriety; by right; honestly; fairly; accurately

— Webster Dictionary

Justness

Justness

the quality of being just; conformity to truth, propriety, accuracy, exactness, and the like; justice; reasonableness; fairness; equity; as, justness of proportions; the justness of a description or representation; the justness of a cause

— Webster Dictionary

Level

Level

well balanced; even; just; steady; impartial; as, a level head; a level understanding. [Colloq.]

— Webster Dictionary

Lie

Lie

to utter falsehood with an intention to deceive; to say or do that which is intended to deceive another, when he a right to know the truth, or when morality requires a just representation

— Webster Dictionary

Linguadental

Linguadental

formed or uttered by the joint use of the tongue and teeth, or rather that part of the gum just above the front teeth; dentolingual, as the letters d and t

— Webster Dictionary

Malice

Malice

any wicked or mischievous intention of the mind; a depraved inclination to mischief; an intention to vex, annoy, or injure another person, or to do a wrongful act without just cause or cause or excuse; a wanton disregard of the rights or safety of others; willfulness

— Webster Dictionary

Malicious

Malicious

with wicked or mischievous intentions or motives; wrongful and done intentionally without just cause or excuse; as, a malicious act

— Webster Dictionary

Moral

Moral

conformed to accepted rules of right; acting in conformity with such rules; virtuous; just; as, a moral man. Used sometimes in distinction from religious; as, a moral rather than a religious life

— Webster Dictionary

Narrowly

Narrowly

with a little margin or space; by a small distance; hence, closely; hardly; barely; only just; -- often with reference to an avoided danger or misfortune; as, he narrowly escaped

— Webster Dictionary

Nowthe

Nowthe

just now; at present

— Webster Dictionary

Pass

Pass

to cause to advance by stages of progress; to carry on with success through an ordeal, examination, or action; specifically, to give legal or official sanction to; to ratify; to enact; to approve as valid and just; as, he passed the bill through the committee; the senate passed the law

— Webster Dictionary

Peeper

Peeper

a chicken just breaking the shell; a young bird

— Webster Dictionary

Phylloxera

Phylloxera

the diseased condition of a vine caused by the insect just described

— Webster Dictionary

Pinfeather

Pinfeather

a feather not fully developed; esp., a rudimentary feather just emerging through the skin

— Webster Dictionary

Possess

Possess

to have the legal title to; to have a just right to; to be master of; to own; to have; as, to possess property, an estate, a book

— Webster Dictionary

Prejudice

Prejudice

an opinion or judgment formed without due examination; prejudgment; a leaning toward one side of a question from other considerations than those belonging to it; an unreasonable predilection for, or objection against, anything; especially, an opinion or leaning adverse to anything, without just grounds, or before sufficient knowledge

— Webster Dictionary

Preocular

Preocular

placed just in front of the eyes, as the antennae of certain insects

— Webster Dictionary

Preocular

Preocular

one of the scales just in front of the eye of a reptile or fish

— Webster Dictionary

Preterition

Preterition

a figure by which, in pretending to pass over anything, a summary mention of it is made; as, "I will not say, he is valiant, he is learned, he is just." Called also paraleipsis

— Webster Dictionary

Proportion

Proportion

to divide into equal or just shares; to apportion

— Webster Dictionary

Proventriulus

Proventriulus

the glandular stomach of birds, situated just above the crop

— Webster Dictionary

Punishment

Punishment

a penalty inflicted by a court of justice on a convicted offender as a just retribution, and incidentally for the purposes of reformation and prevention

— Webster Dictionary

Reason

Reason

a thought or a consideration offered in support of a determination or an opinion; a just ground for a conclusion or an action; that which is offered or accepted as an explanation; the efficient cause of an occurrence or a phenomenon; a motive for an action or a determination; proof, more or less decisive, for an opinion or a conclusion; principle; efficient cause; final cause; ground of argument

— Webster Dictionary

Reasonable

Reasonable

governed by reason; being under the influence of reason; thinking, speaking, or acting rationally, or according to the dictates of reason; agreeable to reason; just; rational; as, the measure must satisfy all reasonable men

— Webster Dictionary

Retribute

Retribute

to pay back; to give in return, as payment, reward, or punishment; to requite; as, to retribute one for his kindness; to retribute just punishment to a criminal

— Webster Dictionary

Rhadamanthine

Rhadamanthine

of or pertaining to Rhadamanthus; rigorously just; as, a Rhadamanthine judgment

— Webster Dictionary

Rhadamanthus

Rhadamanthus

one of the three judges of the infernal regions; figuratively, a strictly just judge

— Webster Dictionary

Right

Right

exactly; just

— Webster Dictionary

Right

Right

a just judgment or action; that which is true or proper; justice; uprightness; integrity

— Webster Dictionary

Right

Right

that to which one has a just claim

— Webster Dictionary

Righteous

Righteous

doing, or according with, that which is right; yielding to all their due; just; equitable; especially, free from wrong, guilt, or sin; holy; as, a righteous man or act; a righteous retribution

— Webster Dictionary

Rightful

Rightful

righteous; upright; just; good; -- said of persons

— Webster Dictionary


The Web's Largest Resource for

Definitions & Translations


A Member Of The STANDS4 Network