Definitions containing gĂ rgei, arthur

We've found 250 definitions:

Excalibur

Excalibur

the name of King Arthur's mythical sword

— Webster Dictionary

lancelot

Lancelot, Sir Lancelot

(Arthurian legend) one of the knights of the Round Table; friend of King Arthur until (according to some versions of the legend) he became the lover of Arthur's wife Guinevere

— Princeton's WordNet

sir lancelot

Lancelot, Sir Lancelot

(Arthurian legend) one of the knights of the Round Table; friend of King Arthur until (according to some versions of the legend) he became the lover of Arthur's wife Guinevere

— Princeton's WordNet

Pigovian

Pigovian

related to Arthur Pigou.

— Wiktionary

Arty

Arty

A diminutive of the male given name Arthur.

— Wiktionary

Q

Q

The pseudonym of Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch

— Wiktionary

Art

Art

A diminutive of the male given name Arthur.

— Wiktionary

Artie

Artie

A diminutive of the male given name Arthur.

— Wiktionary

Arfie

Arfie

A short form of the male given name Arthur.

— Wiktionary

Guinevere

Guinevere

In Arthurian legend, the wife of King Arthur.

— Wiktionary

Morgan le Fay

Morgan le Fay

(in Arthurian legend) The half-sister of King Arthur

— Wiktionary

Excalibur

Excalibur

A legendary sword of King Arthur, attributed with magical properties.

— Wiktionary

Wellington

Wellington

Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, British soldier and statesman.

— Wiktionary

Mordred

Mordred

The illegitimate son of King Arthur, who ultimately killed him in battle.

— Wiktionary

Clarkean

Clarkean

Of or pertaining to Arthur C Clarke (1917-2008), British science fiction writer and futurist.

— Wiktionary

excalibur

Excalibur

the legendary sword of King Arthur

— Princeton's WordNet

Camelot

Camelot

The stronghold of King Arthur in the Arthurian legend.

— Wiktionary

knight of the round table

Knight of the Round Table

in the Arthurian legend, a knight of King Arthur's court

— Princeton's WordNet

round table

Round Table, King Arthur's Round Table

(legend) the circular table for King Arthur and his knights

— Princeton's WordNet

merlin

Merlin

(Arthurian legend) the magician who acted as King Arthur's advisor

— Princeton's WordNet

camlan

Camlan

(Arthurian legend) the battlefield where King Arthur was mortally wounded

— Princeton's WordNet

arthurian legend

Arthurian legend

the legend of King Arthur and his court at Camelot

— Princeton's WordNet

king arthur's round table

Round Table, King Arthur's Round Table

(legend) the circular table for King Arthur and his knights

— Princeton's WordNet

Chopsticks

Chopsticks

A simple waltz, written in 1877 by Arthur de Lulli, that serves as a two-finger exercise for beginner piano players.

— Wiktionary

Doylean

Doylean

Of or pertaining to Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), Scottish novelist and poet, or his writings.

— Wiktionary

morgan le fay

Morgan le Fay

(Arthurian legend) a wicked enchantress who was the half sister and enemy of King Arthur

— Princeton's WordNet

Logres

Logres

The name of King Arthur's realm in the Matter of Britain.

— Wiktionary

sir william gilbert

Gilbert, William Gilbert, William S. Gilbert, William Schwenk Gilbert, Sir William Gilbert

a librettist who was a collaborator with Sir Arthur Sullivan in a famous series of comic operettas (1836-1911)

— Princeton's WordNet

gilbert

Gilbert, William Gilbert, William S. Gilbert, William Schwenk Gilbert, Sir William Gilbert

a librettist who was a collaborator with Sir Arthur Sullivan in a famous series of comic operettas (1836-1911)

— Princeton's WordNet

william gilbert

Gilbert, William Gilbert, William S. Gilbert, William Schwenk Gilbert, Sir William Gilbert

a librettist who was a collaborator with Sir Arthur Sullivan in a famous series of comic operettas (1836-1911)

— Princeton's WordNet

william schwenk gilbert

Gilbert, William Gilbert, William S. Gilbert, William Schwenk Gilbert, Sir William Gilbert

a librettist who was a collaborator with Sir Arthur Sullivan in a famous series of comic operettas (1836-1911)

— Princeton's WordNet

william s. gilbert

Gilbert, William Gilbert, William S. Gilbert, William Schwenk Gilbert, Sir William Gilbert

a librettist who was a collaborator with Sir Arthur Sullivan in a famous series of comic operettas (1836-1911)

— Princeton's WordNet

Arthurian

Arthurian

Of or pertaining to the legend of Arthur, king of the Britons, and his court at Camelot.

— Wiktionary

sir thomas malory

Malory, Thomas Malory, Sir Thomas Malory

English writer who published a translation of romances about King Arthur taken from French and other sources (died in 1471)

— Princeton's WordNet

thomas malory

Malory, Thomas Malory, Sir Thomas Malory

English writer who published a translation of romances about King Arthur taken from French and other sources (died in 1471)

— Princeton's WordNet

malory

Malory, Thomas Malory, Sir Thomas Malory

English writer who published a translation of romances about King Arthur taken from French and other sources (died in 1471)

— Princeton's WordNet

Avalon

Avalon

(in Arturian legend) An island, represented as an earthly paradise in the western seas, to which King Arthur and other heroes were carried at death.

— Wiktionary

Sherlock Holmes

Sherlock Holmes

A series of novels by Arthur Conan Doyle about a male consulting detective with astute logical reasoning and professional forensic skills, and related media based on the books, such as movies.

— Wiktionary

arthurian

Arthurian

of or relating to King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table

— Princeton's WordNet

Guinness

Guinness

A brand of dark stout beer from Ireland, one of the most widely recognised brands of beer in the world, named for Arthur Guinness who first brewed it.

— Wiktionary

Cycle

Cycle

the circle of subjects connected with the exploits of the hero or heroes of some particular period which have served as a popular theme for poetry, as the legend of Arthur and the knights of the Round Table, and that of Charlemagne and his paladins

— Webster Dictionary

sir gawain

Gawain, Sir Gawain

(Arthurian legend) a nephew of Arthur and one of the knights of the Round Table

— Princeton's WordNet

gawain

Gawain, Sir Gawain

(Arthurian legend) a nephew of Arthur and one of the knights of the Round Table

— Princeton's WordNet

Port Arthur

Port Arthur

Port Arthur is a city in Jefferson County within the Beaumont–Port Arthur Metropolitan Statistical Area of the U.S. state of Texas. The population was 53,818 at the 2010 census.

— Freebase

camelot

Camelot

(Arthurian legend) the capital of King Arthur's kingdom; according to the legend, truth and goodness and beauty reigned there

— Princeton's WordNet

sino-japanese war

Chino-Japanese War, Sino-Japanese War

a war between China and Japan (1894 and 1895) over the control of the Korean Peninsula; China was overwhelmingly defeated at Port Arthur

— Princeton's WordNet

chino-japanese war

Chino-Japanese War, Sino-Japanese War

a war between China and Japan (1894 and 1895) over the control of the Korean Peninsula; China was overwhelmingly defeated at Port Arthur

— Princeton's WordNet

Guinevere

Guinevere

Guinevere was the legendary Queen consort of King Arthur. In tales and folklore, she was said to have had a love affair with Arthur's chief knight Sir Lancelot. This story first appears in Chrétien de Troyes' Lancelot, the Knight of the Cart, and reappears as a common motif in numerous cyclical Arthurian literature, starting with the Lancelot-Grail Cycle of the early 13th century and carrying through the Post-Vulgate Cycle and Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur. Guinevere and Lancelot's betrayal of Arthur was often considered as having led to the downfall of the kingdom.

— Freebase

Gareth

Gareth

Sir Gareth was a Knight of the Round Table in Arthurian Legend. He was the youngest son of Lot and of Morgause, King Arthur's half-sister, thus making him Arthur's nephew, as well as brother to Gawain, Agravain, Gaheris, and half-brother to Mordred. He is the subject of Book VII in Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur, which tells how he became a knight.

— Freebase

Mordred

Mordred

Mordred or Modred is a character in the Arthurian legend, known as a notorious traitor who fought King Arthur at the Battle of Camlann, where he was killed and Arthur fatally wounded. Tradition varies on his relationship to Arthur, but he is best known today as Arthur's illegitimate son by his half-sister Morgause. In earlier literature, he was considered the legitimate son of Morgause, also known as Anna, with her husband King Lot of Orkney. His brothers or half-brothers are Gawain, Agravain, Gaheris, and Gareth. The name is ultimately derived from Latin Moderātus.

— Freebase

siege perilous

Siege Perilous

the legendary seat at King Arthur's Round Table reserved for the knight who would find the Holy Grail; it was fatal for anyone else to sit in it

— Princeton's WordNet

Watson

Watson

Any character who performs as catalyst for the protagonist detective's mental processes in a mystery story; a consciousness that's privy to facts in the case without being in on the conclusions drawn from them until the proper time. After William L. DeAndrea, discussing Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

— Wiktionary

Romance

Romance

a species of fictitious writing, originally composed in meter in the Romance dialects, and afterward in prose, such as the tales of the court of Arthur, and of Amadis of Gaul; hence, any fictitious and wonderful tale; a sort of novel, especially one which treats of surprising adventures usually befalling a hero or a heroine; a tale of extravagant adventures, of love, and the like

— Webster Dictionary

guinevere

Guinevere, Guenevere

(Arthurian legend) wife of King Arthur; in some versions of the legend she became Lancelot's lover and that led to the end of the Knights of the Round Table

— Princeton's WordNet

guenevere

Guinevere, Guenevere

(Arthurian legend) wife of King Arthur; in some versions of the legend she became Lancelot's lover and that led to the end of the Knights of the Round Table

— Princeton's WordNet

King Arthur

King Arthur

King Arthur is a legendary British leader of the late 5th and early 6th centuries, who, according to medieval histories and romances, led the defence of Britain against Saxon invaders in the early 6th century. The details of Arthur's story are mainly composed of folklore and literary invention, and his historical existence is debated and disputed by modern historians. The sparse historical background of Arthur is gleaned from various sources, including the Annales Cambriae, the Historia Brittonum, and the writings of Gildas. Arthur's name also occurs in early poetic sources such as Y Gododdin. The legendary Arthur developed as a figure of international interest largely through the popularity of Geoffrey of Monmouth's fanciful and imaginative 12th-century Historia Regum Britanniae. Some Welsh and Breton tales and poems relating the story of Arthur date from earlier than this work; in these works, Arthur appears either as a great warrior defending Britain from human and supernatural enemies or as a magical figure of folklore, sometimes associated with the Welsh Otherworld, Annwn. How much of Geoffrey's Historia was adapted from such earlier sources, rather than invented by Geoffrey himself, is unknown.

— Freebase

Arthurite

Arthurite

Arthurite is a mixture of divalent copper and iron ions in combination with trivalent arsenate, phosphate and sulfate ions with hydrogen and oxygen. Initially discovered by Sir Arthur Russell in 1954 at Hingston Down Consols mine in Calstock, Cornwall, England, arthurite is formed as a resultant mineral in the oxidation region of some copper deposits by the variation of enargite or arsenopyrite. The chemical formula of Arthurite is CuFe23+(AsO4,PO4,SO4)2(O,OH)2‱4H2O. Arthurite is named after Arthur W. G. Kingsbury, a British mineralogist, and Arthur Russell, 6th Baronet of Swallowfield, and a collector of minerals.

— Freebase

Guinevere

Guinevere

the wife of King Arthur; the most beautiful of women, conceived a guilty passion for Lancelot, one of Arthur's knights, and married Modred, her husband's nephew, in the latter's absence on an expedition against the Romans, on hearing of which he returned, met Modred on the field of battle, whom he slew, fell mortally wounded himself, while she escaped to a nunnery. Tennyson gives a different version in his "Idylls."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Rescue Party

Rescue Party

"Rescue Party" is a short story by Arthur C. Clarke, first published in Astounding Science Fiction in May 1946. It was his first story that he sold, though not the first actually published. It was republished in Clarke’s second collection, Reach for Tomorrow, and also appears in The Collected Stories of Arthur C. Clarke.

— Freebase

Lancelot

Lancelot

Sir Lancelot du Lac was one of the Knights of the Round Table in the Arthurian legend. He was the most trusted of King Arthur's knights and played a part in many of Arthur's victories. Lancelot is best known for his love affair with Arthur's wife Guinevere and the role he played in the search for the Holy Grail. He is also known as the most loyal friend of Arthur's nephew, Sir Gawaine. His first appearance as a main character is in Chrétien de Troyes' Le Chevalier de la Charette, or "Lancelot, the Knight of the Cart," which was written in the 12th century. In the 13th century, he was the main focus in the lengthy Vulgate Cycle, where his exploits are recounted in the section known as the Prose Lancelot. Lancelot's life and adventures have been featured in several medieval romances, often with conflicting back-stories and chains of events.

— Freebase

Assaye`

Assaye`

a small town 46 m. NE. of Aurungabad, where Sir Arthur Wellesley gained a victory over the Mahrattas in 1803.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Arthur Marx

Arthur Marx

Arthur Julius Marx was an American author, a former nationally ranked amateur tennis player, and son of entertainer Groucho Marx, and his first wife, Ruth Johnson. He is named after Groucho's brother Arthur "Harpo" Marx. Marx spent his early years accompanying his father around vaudeville circuits in the United States and abroad. When he was 10, the family moved to Southern California, where the Marx Brothers continued their film careers.

— Freebase

Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.

Arthur Schlesinger, Jr.

Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. was a hitorian,social critic and writer.

— Freebase

Arthur E. Kennelly

Arthur E. Kennelly

Arthur Edwin Kennelly, was an Irish-American electrical engineer.

— Freebase

Arthur Symons

Arthur Symons

Arthur William Symons, was a British poet, critic and magazine editor.

— Freebase

Yvor Winters

Yvor Winters

Arthur Yvor Winters was an American poet and literary critic.

— Freebase

Avalon

Avalon

Avalon or Ynys Afallon in Welsh is a legendary island featured in the Arthurian legend. It first appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth's 1136 pseudohistorical account Historia Regum Britanniae as the place where King Arthur's sword Excalibur was forged and later where Arthur was taken to recover from his wounds after the Battle of Camlann. Avalon was associated from an early date with mystical practices and people such as Morgan le Fay.

— Freebase

Modred, Sir

Modred, Sir

a treacherous knight, the rebellious nephew of King Arthur, whose wife he seduced; was slain in battle, and buried in Avalon.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Gawain, Sir

Gawain, Sir

one of the Knights of the Round Table, King Arthur's nephew; celebrated for his courtesy and physical strength.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Camelot

Camelot

a place in Somerset, where, it is presumed, King Arthur held his court, and where entrenchments of an old town are still to be seen.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Morgan le Fay

Morgan le Fay

Morgan le Fay, alternatively known as Morgan le Faye, Morgane, Morgaine, Morgana and other names, is a powerful sorceress in the Arthurian legend. Early works featuring Morgan do not elaborate her character beyond her role as a fay or magician. She became much more prominent in the later cyclical prose works such as the Lancelot-Grail and the Post-Vulgate Cycle, in which she becomes an antagonist to King Arthur and Queen Guinevere. Morgan is said to be the daughter of Arthur's mother, the Lady Igraine, and her first husband, Gorlois, Duke of Cornwall, so that Arthur is her half-brother. She has at least two elder sisters, Elaine and Morgause, the latter of whom is the mother of Gawain, Gaheris, Gareth, Agravain, by King Lot and usually the traitor Mordred, by Arthur. In Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur and elsewhere, she is married, unhappily, to King Urien of Gore and Ywain is her son. The early accounts of Geoffrey of Monmouth and Gerald of Wales refer to Morgan in conjunction with the Isle of Apples to which the fatally wounded Arthur was carried. To the former, she was an enchantress, one of nine sisters; to the latter, she was the ruler and patroness of an area near Glastonbury and a close blood-relation of King Arthur. In the early romances of Chrétien de Troyes, she also figures as a healer. In later stories, Morgan becomes an adversary of the Round Table when Guinevere discovers her adultery with one of her husband's knights, though she eventually reconciles with her brother and even retains her original role, serving as one of the four enchantresses who carry him to Avalon after his final Battle of Camlann.

— Freebase

David George Hogarth

David George Hogarth

David George Hogarth was a British archaeologist and scholar associated with T. E. Lawrence and Arthur Evans.

— Freebase

ertugrul

ertugrul

it is a very old and respectful Turkic name, original form is artun-gra-el which means god`s noble seed, Arthur is short form of this name

— Editors Contribution

Artroeite

Artroeite

Artroeite is a mineral found in Arizona. It is named for the late American chemist Arthur Roe.

— Freebase

Thomas Malory

Thomas Malory

Sir Thomas Malory was an English writer, the author or compiler of Le Morte d'Arthur. Since the late nineteenth century he has generally been identified as Sir Thomas Malory of Newbold Revel in Warwickshire, a knight, land-owner and Member of Parliament. Previously, it was suggested by antiquary John Leland as well as John Bale that he was Welsh. Occasionally, other candidates are put forward for authorship of Le Morte d'Arthur, but the supporting evidence for their claim has been described as 'no more than circumstantial'.

— Freebase

Come

Come

Come are an American alternative rock band, formed in Boston by Thalia Zedek, Chris Brokaw, Arthur Johnson, and Sean O'Brien.

— Freebase

Jim Beard

Jim Beard

James Arthur Beard is an American jazz pianist and keyboardist, contemporary instrumental composer, arranger and record producer.

— Freebase

Arthur

Arthur

Arthur is a Canadian/American animated educational television series for children, created by Cookie Jar Group and WGBH for the Public Broadcasting Service. The show is set in the fictional American city of Elwood City, and revolves around the lives of 8-year-old Arthur Read, an anthropomorphic aardvark, his friends and family, and their daily interactions with each other. There is a strong emphasis on the educational value of books and libraries as well as relationships with friends and family members. The series is often noted for dealing with social and health-related issues that affect young children, such as the death of a pet, dyslexia, and more recently cancer, Asperger syndrome and Alzheimer's disease. The television series is based on the Arthur book series, which are written and illustrated by Marc Brown. WGBH Boston along with Cinar began production of the animated series in 1994, and aired its first episode on September 2, 1996. Since its debut, the show has broadcast 190 30-minute long episodes, and its 16th season premiered on October 15, 2012. With 190 episodes, Arthur is one of the longest-running TV shows on PBS Kids, behind only Sesame Street.

— Freebase

Galahad

Galahad

Sir Galahad, in Arthurian legend, is a knight of King Arthur's Round Table and one of the three achievers of the Holy Grail. He is the illegitimate son of Lancelot and Elaine of Corbenic, and is renowned for his gallantry and purity. Emerging quite late in the medieval Arthurian tradition, he is perhaps the knightly embodiment of Jesus in the Arthurian legends. Sir Galahad first appears in the Lancelot–Grail cycle, and his story is taken up in later works such as the Post-Vulgate Cycle and Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur.

— Freebase

Vigneron

Vigneron

Vigneron was a family of French bow makers. Notable members include Joseph Arthur Vigneron and Andre Vigneron.

— Freebase

Squirrels

Squirrels

Squirrels is a one-act play by David Mamet. The 1974 comedy is about Arthur, a middle-aged, egotistical hack writer who has been working on the opening line of a story involving a man's encounter with a squirrel for fifteen years, and Edmond, the young fledgling writer he has hired as a secretary/collaborator. They soon discover that Arthur's flamboyant redundancy clashes with Edmond's mediocre melodramatic style as they each develop increasingly ridiculous scenarios for the story. They are joined by Arthur's cleaning lady, also an aspiring writer, whose suggestions seem to be the most promising, but they too eventually bog down in banality. Mamet directed the first production of the play at the St. Nicholas Theater Company in Chicago, Illinois The British premiere was presented by The Mandrake Theatre Company at the Kings Head Theatre, London in 1993. Directed by Aaron Mullen. . In more recent years it has been staged by the Philadelphia Fringe Festival, Upstairs at the Gatehouse in North London, and the Blue House Theatre Company and Criterion Theatre in Santa Monica. The play was published in a paperback edition by Samuel French in 1982.

— Freebase

Kay, Sir

Kay, Sir

a rude and boastful Knight of the Round Table, foster-brother of King Arthur, who from his braggart ways often made himself the butt of the whole court.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Gilbert, William Schwenck

Gilbert, William Schwenck

barrister, notable as a play-writer and as the author of the librettos of a series of well-known popular comic operas set to music by Sir Arthur Sullivan; b. 1836.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Knights of the Round Table

Knights of the Round Table

King Arthur's knights, so called from the round table at which they sat, so that when seated there might seem no precedency, numbered popularly at twelve, though reckoned by some at forty.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Button Man

Button Man

Button Man is a comic strip created for the British comic 2000 AD, written by John Wagner and illustrated by Arthur Ranson.

— Freebase

Talavera de la Reina

Talavera de la Reina

a picturesque old Spanish town on the Tagus, situated amid vineyards, 75 m. SE. of Madrid; scene of a great victory under Sir Arthur Wellesley over a French army commanded by Joseph Bonaparte, Marshals Jourdan and Victor, 27th July 1809.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Komedia

Komedia

Komedia is an arts and entertainment company which operates venues in the United Kingdom at Brighton and Bath, and a management and production company Komedia Entertainment. Beyond hosting live comedy, the venues also host music, cabaret, theatre and shows for children, featuring local, national and international performers. The Brighton and Bath venues operate cinemas within their buildings in partnership with Picturehouse. Komedia also creates broadcast comedy and has most notably co-produced and hosted the live recordings of seven series of the Sony Award Winning Count Arthur Strong's Radio Show! for BBC Radio 4 and is a co-producer on BBC2's sitcom Count Arthur Strong.

— Freebase

Bomber Harris

Bomber Harris

Bomber Harris is a 1989 television drama based on the life of Arthur Harris. It was directed by Michael Darlow and written by Don Shaw.

— Freebase

Maurice Barrymore

Maurice Barrymore

Herbert Arthur Chamberlayne Blythe —stage name Maurice Barrymore — was a patriarch of the Barrymore acting family and great-grandfather of actress Drew Barrymore.

— Freebase

The More the Merrier

The More the Merrier

The More the Merrier is a 1943 American comedy film made by Columbia Pictures which makes fun of the housing shortage during World War II, especially in Washington, D.C.. The picture stars Jean Arthur, Joel McCrea and Charles Coburn. The movie was directed by George Stevens and written by Richard Flournoy, Lewis R. Foster, Garson Kanin, Frank Ross, and Robert Russell. Coburn won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor, while Arthur was nominated for Best Actress in a Leading Role. Other nominations included Best Director, Best Picture, Best Writing, Original Story and Best Writing, Screenplay. This film was remade in 1966 as Walk, Don't Run, with Cary Grant, Samantha Eggar and Jim Hutton.

— Freebase

Round Table, The

Round Table, The

the name given to the knighthood of King Arthur: a larger, from including as many as 150 knights; and a smaller, from including only 12 of the highest order.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Hubert de Burgh

Hubert de Burgh

Earl of Kent, chief justiciary of England under King John and Henry III.; had charge of Prince Arthur, but refused to put him to death; was present at Runnymede at the signing of Magna Charta; d. 1234.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Labor of Love

Labor of Love

Labor of Love is a 1998 Lifetime television film starring Marcia Gay Harden and David Marshall Grant. It was directed by Karen Arthur and written by Nina Shengold.

— Freebase

Arthur Tappan

Arthur Tappan

Arthur Tappan was an American abolitionist. He was the brother of Senator Benjamin Tappan, and abolitionist Lewis Tappan.

— Freebase

Estech

Estech

ESTECH is a privately held medical device manufacturing and distribution company located in San Ramon, California. The company was founded by Arthur and Raymond Bertolero in 1996 with an emphasis on least invasive products for cardiac surgery. ESTECH has worldwide distribution and has consistently attracted goal oriented professionals who represent the brightest minds in the medical device industry. The in-depth professional experience and tireless dedication of the ESTECH Team has allowed the company to achieve rapid and sustained success in this highly competitive environment. ESTECH is proud of each employee from every department and thanks them for their contribution and support.

— CrunchBase

Liebelei

Liebelei

Liebelei is a German film directed by Max OphĂŒls. The film, based on a play of the same name by Arthur Schnitzler, describes an ill-fated love affair.

— Freebase

Mycroft Holmes

Mycroft Holmes

Mycroft Holmes is a character in the stories written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. He is the elder brother of the famous detective Sherlock Holmes.

— Freebase

Dog Star

Dog Star

"Dog Star" is a 1961 science fiction short story by Arthur C. Clarke about an astronomer and his dog, Laika. The story was also published under the title "Moondog".

— Freebase

Severo Ochoa

Severo Ochoa

Severo Ochoa de Albornoz was a Spanish–American Doctor of Medicine and Biochemist, and joint winner of the 1959 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Arthur Kornberg.

— Freebase

Art Burns

Art Burns

Arthur Leon Burns is a retired discus thrower from the United States. He finished in fifth place at the 1984 Summer Olympics, just behind his medal winning compatriots Mac Wilkins and John Powell.

— Freebase

Critical Inquiry

Critical Inquiry

Critical Inquiry is a peer-reviewed academic journal in the humanities published by the University of Chicago Press. It was established in 1974 by Wayne Booth, Arthur Heiserman, and Sheldon Sacks, and the current editor-in-chief is W. J. T. Mitchell.

— Freebase

Philip II.

Philip II.

Philip-Augustus, king of France, shared the throne with his father, Louis VII., from 1179, and succeeded him as sole ruler in 1180; marrying Isabella of Hainault, he united the Capet and Carlovingian houses; his grand aim was to secure to himself some of the English possessions in France; his alliance with Richard of England in the third crusade ended in a quarrel; returning to France he broke his oath to Richard by bargaining with John for portions of the coveted territory; an exhausting war lasted till 1119; on Richard's death Philip supported Arthur against John in his claim to Anjou, Maine, and Touraine; after Arthur's murder, the capture of Château Gaillard in 1204 gave him possession of these three provinces with Normandy and part of Poitou; the victory of Bouvines 1214 secured his throne, and the rest of his reign was spent in internal reforms and the beautifying of Paris (1165-1223).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Arthur Ashe

Arthur Ashe

Arthur Robert Ashe, Jr. was an American World No. 1 professional tennis player. He won three Grand Slam titles, ranking him among the best tennis players from the United States. Ashe, an African American, was the first black player ever selected to the United States Davis Cup team and the only black man ever to win the singles title at Wimbledon, the US Open, and the Australian Open. He retired in 1980. He was ranked World No. 1 by Harry Hopman in 1968 and by Lance Tingay of The Daily Telegraph and World Tennis Magazine in 1975. In the ATP computer rankings, he peaked at No. 2 in May 1976. In the early 1980s, Ashe contracted HIV from a blood transfusion he received during heart bypass surgery. Ashe publicly announced his illness in April 1992 and began working to educate others about HIV and AIDS. He founded the Arthur Ashe Foundation for the Defeat of AIDS and the Arthur Ashe Institute for Urban Health before his death from AIDS-related pneumonia on February 6, 1993. On June 20, 1993, Ashe was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Bill Clinton.

— Freebase

Earthlight

Earthlight

Earthlight is a science fiction novel by British writer Arthur C. Clarke, published in 1955. It is an expansion to novel length of a short story that he had published four years earlier.

— Freebase

Maude

Maude

Maude is an American television sitcom that was originally broadcast on the CBS network from September 12, 1972 until April 22, 1978. Maude stars Bea Arthur as Maude Findlay, an outspoken, middle-aged, politically liberal woman living in suburban Tuckahoe, Westchester County, New York with her fourth husband, household appliance store owner Walter Findlay. Maude embraced the tenets of women's liberation, always voted for Democratic Party candidates, strongly supported legal abortion, and advocated for civil rights and racial and gender equality. However, her overbearing and sometimes domineering personality often got her into trouble when speaking out on these issues. The program was a spin-off of All in the Family, on which Beatrice Arthur had first played the character of Maude, Edith Bunker's cousin; like All in the Family, Maude was a sitcom with topical storylines created by producer Norman Lear. Unusual for a U.S. sitcom, several episodes featured only the characters of Maude and Walter, in what amounted to half-hour "two-hander" teleplays. Season 4's "The Analyst" was a solo episode for Bea Arthur, who delivered a soul-searching, episode-length monologue to an unseen psychiatrist.

— Freebase

Breaking Strain

Breaking Strain

"Breaking Strain," also known as "Thirty Seconds Thirty Days," is a short story by Arthur C. Clarke, first published in 1949. It was adapted into a movie in 1994 under the title Trapped in Space.

— Freebase

Enid

Enid

the daughter of Yniol and the wife of Geraint; one of the ladies of the court of King Arthur; celebrated for her steadfast conjugal affection, the story regarding whom is given in Tennyson's "Idylls of the King."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Pechili, Gulf of

Pechili, Gulf of

a great land-locked bay opening in the NW. of the Yellow Sea, receives the waters of the Hoang-ho, and on opposite tongues of land at the mouth of it stand Port Arthur and Wei-hai-Wei.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Bucktail

Bucktail

Bucktail is an unincorporated community in Arthur County, Nebraska, United States. Its elevation is 3,497 feet, and it is located at 41°33â€Č54″N 101°25â€Č50″Wï»ż / ï»ż41.56500°N 101.43056°W.

— Freebase

Camelot

Camelot

Camelot is a castle and court associated with the legendary King Arthur. Absent in the early Arthurian material, Camelot first appeared in 12th-century French romances and eventually came to be described as the fantastic capital of Arthur's realm and a symbol of the Arthurian world. The stories locate it somewhere in Great Britain and sometimes associate it with real cities, though more usually its precise location is not revealed. Most scholars regard it as being entirely fictional, its geography being perfect for romance writers; Arthurian scholar Norris J. Lacy commented that "Camelot, located no where in particular, can be anywhere". Nevertheless arguments about the location of the "real Camelot" have occurred since the 15th century and continue to rage today in popular works and for tourism purposes.

— Freebase

Arthur Compton

Arthur Compton

Arthur Holly Compton was an American physicist and Nobel laureate in physics for his discovery of the Compton effect. He served as Chancellor of Washington University in St. Louis from 1945 to 1953.

— Freebase

Frank Cooper

Frank Cooper

Frank Arthur Cooper was Premier of Queensland from 1942 to 1946 for the Australian Labor Party. He was born on 16 July 1872 at Blayney, New South Wales and died at Kedron, Queensland.

— Freebase

Judex

Judex

Judex is the title of a 1916 silent French movie serial concerning the adventures of Judex, who is a pulp hero, similar to The Shadow, created by Louis Feuillade and Arthur BernĂšde.

— Freebase

Görgei, Arthur

Görgei, Arthur

a Hungarian patriot; at the age of 27 entered the army, and designed to devote himself to the study of chemistry and the administration of his estate; but on the outbreak of the Revolution in 1848 he joined the revolutionists; crushed the Croatians at Ozora; at the head of a patriot army faced the Austrians under Windischgrätz on the western frontier, and despite a temporary repulse, succeeded in asserting the supremacy of the Hungarian cause in a series of victories; Russian assistance accorded to Austria, however, changed the fortune of war; Kossuth resigned, and Görgei became dictator; but hopeless of success, he immediately negotiated a peace with the Russians; in 1851 he published a vindication of his policy and surrender, and in 1885 was exonerated by his compatriots from the charges of treachery brought against him by Kossuth; b. 1818.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Sorell

Sorell

Sorell is a town in Tasmania, Australia, south-east of Hobart. It is located on the Tasman Highway at the junction with the Arthur Highway. At the 2006 census, Sorell had a population of 1,546, and at the 2011 census, a population of 2,476. Sorell was name after William Sorell, the third Lieutenant-Governor of Van Diemen's Land. Historically, it was known as a major town on the route from Hobart to Port Arthur on the Tasman Peninsula. It was the centre of an agricultural area and an important market town. It is now a dormitary town of Hobart. In 1872 the Sorell Causeway was opened, from the Cambridge direction, across Pitt Water and Orielton Lagoon to Sorell, stopping at Midway Point in the middle. This shortened the route considerably from the original road via Richmond. Sorell Post Office opened on 1 June 1832. ⁕There is also a mountain in the West Coast Range with the same name. ⁕Port Sorell is located on the mid north coast of Tasmania. The local newspaper of Sorell is Myroundabout. Sorell is also the municipal capital of the greater Sorell community. Some 13,500 people live there and over 500,000 people traverse the municipality visiting the popular Port Arthur penal settlement, or racing east to the East Coast.

— Freebase

History Lesson

History Lesson

"History Lesson" is a short story by Arthur C. Clarke, first published in 1949. The two-part story speculates on the cooling of the Sun as a doomsday scenario for Earth and an evolutionary advent for Venus.

— Freebase

Synectics

Synectics

Synectics is a problem solving methodology that stimulates thought processes of which the subject may be unaware. This method was developed by George M. Prince and William J.J. Gordon, originating in the Arthur D. Little Invention Design Unit in the 1950s.

— Freebase

Ruber

Ruber

Sir Ruber is a fictional character and the main antagonist of the Warner Bros film Quest for Camelot, voiced by Gary Oldman. He is cunning and exceptionally strong, able to kill a dragon with nothing but his bare hands. As stated in the beginning of the film, Ruber was once a trusted knight of King Arthur and a member of the Knights of the Round Table. However, following the ten-year rule of peace and justice in Camelot, Ruber grew obsessive with power. During a meeting, he attempts to take advantage of his rank by desiring riches, to which Arthur refuses to allow. Ruber then takes up a stand by nominating himself for the throne of Camelot. One of Arthur's loyal Knights, Sir Lionel, berates him for it, swearing that no one will serve a false king. This drove Ruber into a murderous rage, wanting to kill Arthur with a mace, but the brave Lionel defended the king at the cost of his life, right before Ruber turn to attack Arthur. However, using Excalibur, Arthur beats Ruber back. Ruber then flees away from Camelot in exile, vowing revenge that one day he will claim Excalibur and all of Camelot to himself. Following his ten years in exile, Ruber has gathered a swarm of barbaric followers to support his cause to take over Camelot. As the tenth year passed by, Ruber formulated a plan involving to steal Excalibur and use land carriages to infiltrate into Camelot to exact his revenge. As started, he attacked the lands of Lionel's widow Lady Juliana to take hold of her land wagons, and forced her to tag along with his plan by threatening to kill her daughter Kayley. Ruber also has his pet griffin to steal Excalibur from Camelot, although the theft is bungled and the sword is dropped into the Forbidden Forest, thanks to the intervention of Ayden, the pet silver-winged falcon of the legendary wizard Merlin. During the ransacking of Lady Juliana's village, Ruber uses a potion he bought from some witches to transform his followers into an army of "iron men with hands of steel" and prepares to ride to Camelot. However, upon learning of the Excalibur's current location from the Griffin and seeing Kayley escaping into the Forbidden Forest to search for it, Ruber orders the Griffin and several of his men to follow her. During much of the film, Ruber and his posse chase Kayley, only to fall into some trouble with the forest's natural inhabitants.

— Freebase

Pinero, Arthur Wing

Pinero, Arthur Wing

dramatic author, born in London; bred to law, took to the stage and the writing of plays, of which he has produced a goodly number; collaborated with Sir Arthur Sullivan and Mr. Comyns Carr in a romantic musical drama entitled "The Beauty Stone"; b. 1855.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Bizarre

Bizarre

Rufus Arthur Johnson, better known by his stage name Bizarre, is an American rapper, best known for his work with Detroit-based hip hop group D12. His songs frequently contain subject matter that often creates shock value, such as rape and drugs.

— Freebase

Bony

Bony

Detective Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte is a half Aboriginal, half-white detective character created by Arthur Upfield. Bony appeared in dozens of Upfield's novels from the late 1920s until the author's death in 1964.

— Freebase

J.A.C.

J.A.C.

J.A.C. is an album by the Austrian band Tosca, which was released in 2005 on Studio !K7. The album is named after Joshua, Arthur, and Conrad, the sons of Richard Dorfmeister and Ruper Huber, respectively.

— Freebase

Malory, Sir Thomas

Malory, Sir Thomas

flourished in the 15th century; was the author of "Morte d'Arthur," being a translation in prose of a labyrinthine selection of Arthurian legends, which was finished in the ninth year of Edward IV., and printed fifteen years after by Caxton "with all care."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Thicket

Thicket

Thicket is an unincorporated community in northwestern Hardin County, Texas, United States. It is part of the Beaumont–Port Arthur Metropolitan Statistical Area. The West Hardin County Consolidated Independent School District serves area students.

— Freebase

Hutchinsonite

Hutchinsonite

Hutchinsonite is a sulfosalt mineral of thallium, arsenic and lead with formula (Tl,Pb)2As5S9. Hutchinsonite is a rare hydrothermal mineral. It was first discovered in Binnental, Switzerland in 1904 and named after Cambridge mineralogist Arthur Hutchinson, F.R.S..

— Freebase

Traveller's Joy

Traveller's Joy

Traveller's Joy is a 1949 British comedy film directed by Ralph Thomas and starring Googie Withers, John McCallum and Maurice Denham. Based on a play by Arthur MacRae, it was the last film released by the original Gainsborough Pictures.

— Freebase

Beaumont

Beaumont

Beaumont is a city in and county seat of Jefferson County, Texas, United States, within the Beaumont–Port Arthur Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city's population was 118,296 at the 2010 census making it the twenty-fourth most populous city in the state of Texas. With Port Arthur and Orange, it forms the Golden Triangle, a major industrial area on the Gulf Coast. Lamar University with its 15,000 students is located in Beaumont. The city's daily newspaper is The Beaumont Enterprise, while The Examiner is published weekly. Gulf States Utilities had its headquarters in Beaumont until its absorption by Entergy Corporation in 1993. GSU's Edison Plaza headquarters is still the tallest building in Beaumont. Since 1907, Beaumont has been home of the South Texas State Fair. In 2004, the venue for the Fair changed to Ford Park, a new, larger facility on the west end of Beaumont.

— Freebase

Monmouth, Geoffrey

Monmouth, Geoffrey

a Welsh priest of the 12th century, compiler of what he called a "History of the Early Kings of Britain," from that of Brut, through the story of King Arthur and others, such as King Lear, down to that of Cadwallo, a Welsh king, who died in 689.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Elaine

Elaine

a lady of the court of King Arthur in love with Lancelot, and whose story is related by Malory in his "History" and by Tennyson in his "Idylls of the King."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Leo Baekeland

Leo Baekeland

Leo Henricus Arthur Baekeland was a Belgium born, American chemist. He invented Velox photographic paper in 1893 and Bakelite in 1907. His invention of Bakelite, an inexpensive, nonflammable, versatile, and popular plastic, marked the beginning of the modern plastics industry.

— Freebase

INBORN!

INBORN!

INBORN! is an electro-rock band issued from Luxembourg. Since their creation in 2002, the band has been composed of Arthur Glass, Ben Thommes, Jeff Braun, Max Thommes, Jan Kerscher and Claude Meisch. The band has so far released two albums and one EP.

— Freebase

Groves

Groves

Groves is a city in Jefferson County, Texas, United States. The population was 15,733 at the 2000 census. A July 1, 2008 U.S. Census Bureau estimate placed the population at 14,393. It is part of the Beaumont–Port Arthur Metropolitan Statistical Area.

— Freebase

Beyond Reasonable Doubt

Beyond Reasonable Doubt

Beyond Reasonable Doubt is a 1980 New Zealand docu-drama feature film about the conviction of Arthur Allan Thomas, later pardoned, for the murder of Harvey and Jeanette Crewe in 1970. It stars David Hemmings as Inspector Bruce Hutton. John Hargreaves and Terence Cooper also appear.

— Freebase

Gongman

Gongman

The Gongman is a company trademark for the Rank Organisation. It was used as the introduction to all Rank films, many of which were created at their Pinewood Studios. The Gongman logo was first used on films distributed by General Film Distributors, which was established in 1935 by the British producer C. M. Woolf and J. Arthur Rank; it was C.M. Woolf's secretary who devised the man-with-a-gong trademark. When the Rank Organisation was established in 1937, with General Film Distributors as one of its cornerstones, that logo was adopted for the whole organisation. The Gongman film logo sequence depicts a man striking a huge gong with a deep resonant sound. The gongs used in the films were props made of plaster or papier-mùché, with the sound of the gong done by James Blades on a Chinese instrument called a tam tam. During the sequence, the text "General Film Distributors", " J. Arthur Rank Film Distributors", "J. Arthur Rank presents" or "'The Rank Organisation" appeared over the gong. Athletes who played the Gongman in the film sequence over the years, included boxer Bombardier Billy Wells and wrestler Ken Richmond. Also, George Francis Moss Snr played the Gongman. In 2012, to celebrate the Gongman's 75th anniversary, The Rank Group, the gaming company that in 1996 acquired the remaining business interests of Rank Organisation as well as the rights to its logo and name, announced a nationwide competition to find a new Gongman or woman for the 21st century.

— Freebase

Excalibur

Excalibur

the magic sword of King Arthur, which only he could unsheathe and wield. When he was about to die he requested a knight to throw it into a lake close by, who with some reluctance threw it, when a hand reached out to seize it, flourished it round three times, and then drew it under the water for good.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Percival

Percival

Percival or Perceval is one of King Arthur's legendary Knights of the Round Table. In Welsh literature his story is allotted to the historical Peredur. He is most famous for his involvement in the quest for the grail.

— Freebase

Poésies

Poésies

The poems of Arthur Rimbaud were written between approx. 1869 and 1873. Les étrennes des orphelins is the first known poem of Rimbaud. Three poems were sent by him to the poet Théodore de Banville in a letter dated May, 24 1870. Probably the most well known poem is Le bateau ivre.

— Freebase

Inner Tube

Inner Tube

Doug lies to Carrie about having to work late so he can play mud football and get out of going to her seminar. Now sick from his night of football in the rain, Doug starts watching TV and begins to drift off to sleep... The Honeymooners Doug dreams that he is Ralph and Deacon is Ed and they scheme to get Doug out of the house to go bowling. Wheel of Fortune Doug dreams that he, Arthur and Carrie are contestants on The Wheel of Fortune, where the puzzle being "Doug Heffernan is a big fat liar." Brian's Song Doug dreams he is in Brian's Song as Brian Piccolo and Deacon is Gale Sayers. The Young and the Restless Doug dreams that he, Arthur and Carrie are on The Young and the Restless, where Carrie and Jack Abbott kiss. Doug, finally full of guilt, goes to tell Carrie the truth of what happened and she doesn't react exactly the way she thought she would.

— Freebase

Molecular beam epitaxy

Molecular beam epitaxy

Molecular beam epitaxy is one of several methods of depositing single crystals. It was invented in the late 1960s at Bell Telephone Laboratories by J. R. Arthur and Alfred Y. Cho. MBE is widely used in the manufacture of semiconductor devices, including transistors for cellular phones and WiFi.

— Freebase

Infused Industries

Infused Industries

Infused Industries, Inc. is a Social Commerce solutions provider.Infused Industries, Inc. is located in Raleigh, NC. The company was founded by Michael Bender (CEO), Brian Cary (CTO), Arthur Tew (COO), and Andy Cary (CMO).The flagship product is called Infused Commerce, which functions in two key spaces, Facebook and across an advertiser’s affiliate network.Facebook: Infused Commerce provides shopping capabilities to retailers’ Facebook Pages. The store is located under a “Shop” tab and allows fans to browse inventory, develop a shopping cart and checkout without leaving the Facebook page.Affiliate Network: Infused Commerce provides affiliates transaction capable banner advertisements. Consumers interact directly with the ad and are able to browse inventory, develop a shopping cart and checkout directly through the ad, without leaving the host site.

— CrunchBase

Heading Home

Heading Home

Heading Home is a 1920 American silent film directed by Lawrence C. Windom. It attempts to create a mythology surrounding the life of baseball player Babe Ruth. The screenplay was written by Arthur "Bugs" Baer from a story by Earle Browne. Besides Ruth, it stars Ruth Taylor, William Sheer and Margaret Seddon.

— Freebase

Bedivere

Bedivere

In Arthurian legend, Sir Bedivere is the Knight of the Round Table who returns Excalibur to the Lady of the Lake. He serves as King Arthur's marshal and is frequently associated with Sir Kay. Sir Lucan is his brother; Sir Griflet is his cousin.

— Freebase

Callcott, John Wall

Callcott, John Wall

an eminent musical composer, born at Kensington; was a pupil of Händel's, and is celebrated for his glee compositions (1766-1821). Sir Augustus Wall, landscape painter, brother; was knighted for his eminent skill as an artist (1779-1841). Lady Maria, wife of Sir Augustus, author of "Little Arthur's History of England" (1779-1842).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Teachers

Teachers

Teachers is a 1984 comedy-drama film starring Nick Nolte, JoBeth Williams, Ralph Macchio, and Judd Hirsch, written by W. R. McKinney and directed by Arthur Hiller. The movie was shot in Columbus, Ohio, mostly at the former Central High School. The building is now home to the COSI Columbus museum.

— Freebase

Arthur Honegger

Arthur Honegger

Arthur Honegger was a Swiss composer, who was born in France and lived a large part of his life in Paris. He was a member of Les Six. His most frequently performed work is probably the orchestral work Pacific 231, which was inspired by the sound of a steam locomotive.

— Freebase

Geraint

Geraint

Geraint is a character from Welsh folklore and Arthurian legend, a king of Dumnonia and a valiant warrior. He may have lived during or shortly prior to the reign of the historical Arthur, but some scholars doubt he ever existed. The name is a Welsh form of the Latin Gerontius.

— Freebase

Bartitsu

Bartitsu

Bartitsu is an eclectic martial art and self-defence method originally developed in England during the years 1898–1902. In 1901 it was immortalised by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, author of the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories. Although dormant throughout most of the 20th century, bartitsu has been experiencing a revival since 2002.

— Freebase

Aldermanite

Aldermanite

Aldermanite is a rare hydrated phosphate mineral with formula Mg5Al12(PO4)8(OH)22·32H2O. It's named after Arthur Richard Alderman, Professor of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Adelaide. Its type locality is Moculta Phosphate Quarry, Angaston, Barossa Valley, North Mount Lofty Ranges, Mount Lofty Ranges, South Australia, Australia.

— Freebase

Gawain

Gawain

Gawain is King Arthur's nephew and a Knight of the Round Table in the Arthurian legend. Under the name Gwalchmei, he appears very early in the legend's development, being mentioned in some of the earliest Welsh Arthurian sources. He is one of a select number of Round Table members to be referred to as one of the greatest knights, most notably in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. He is almost always portrayed as the son of Arthur's sister Morgause and King Lot of Orkney and Lothian, and his brothers are Agravain, Gaheris, Gareth, and Mordred. He was well known to be the most trustworthy friend of Sir Lancelot. In some works he has sisters as well. According to some legends, he would have been the true and rightful heir to the throne of Camelot, after the reign of King Arthur. Gawain is often portrayed as a formidable, courteous, and also a compassionate warrior, fiercely loyal to his king and family. He is a friend to young knights, a defender of the poor, and as "the Maidens' Knight", a defender of women as well. In some works, his strength waxes and wanes with the sun; in the most common form of this motif, his might triples by noon, but fades as the sun sets. His knowledge of herbs makes him a great healer, and he is credited with at least three children: Florence, Lovell, and Gingalain, the last of which is also called Libeaus Desconus or Le Bel Inconnu, the Fair Unknown. Gawain appears in English, French and Celtic literature as well as in Italy where he appears in the architecture of the north portal in the cathedral of Modena, constructed in 1184.

— Freebase

Abhuman

Abhuman

Abhuman, distinguished from inhuman, is a term used by William Hope Hodgson in his novel The Night Land and his Carnacki stories. Similar concepts, although not the term itself, also appear in the works of Arthur Conan Doyle, Rudyard Kipling, and Bram Stoker among other notable modernist American and British authors.

— Freebase

Arthur Holmes

Arthur Holmes

Arthur Holmes was a British geologist who made two major contributions to the understanding of geology. He pioneered the use of radioactive dating of minerals and was the first earth scientist to grasp the mechanical and thermal implications of mantle convection, which led eventually to the acceptance of plate tectonics.

— Freebase

Anjou

Anjou

Anjou is a former county, duchy and province centred on the city of Angers in the lower Loire Valley of western France. Its traditional Latin name was Andegavia. Anjou was united with the English Crown from 1151-1199, when Henry II, and, in turn, his son Richard the Lionheart, inherited the county, and thus themselves became Counts of Anjou. At its peak, the Angevin Empire then spread from Ulster to the Pyrenees. But Richard had no legitimate issue, so in 1199 Anjou passed to his nephew, Arthur of Brittany, while the Crown of England passed to Henry II’s fifth son and Richard’s youngest brother, John. Count Arthur was taken prisoner by John in 1203, and disappeared in suspicious circumstances. In 1204, the county as a whole was in turn seized by France. Its status was elevated to that of a duchy for Prince Louis, the second son of John II of France, and remained as such until the Revolution. Today, Anjou corresponds largely to the present-day dĂ©partement of Maine-et-Loire.

— Freebase

Daraf

Daraf

The daraf is the unit of electrical elastance, the voltage across a capacitor after accepting an electric charge of 1 coulomb; it is the reciprocal of the farad. Proposed by Arthur Edwin Kennelly in 1936 as a backwards spelling of farad, the term daraf is not recognized by the SI.

— Freebase

Minder

Minder

Minder is a British comedy-drama about the London criminal underworld. Initially produced by Verity Lambert, it was made by Euston Films, a subsidiary of Thames Television and shown on ITV. The show ran for ten series between 29 October 1979 and 10 March 1994, and starred Dennis Waterman as Terry McCann, an honest and likable bodyguard and George Cole as Arthur Daley, a socially ambitious, but highly unscrupulous importer-exporter, wholesaler, used-car salesman, and anything else from which there was money to be made whether inside the law or not. The show was largely responsible for putting the word minder, meaning personal bodyguard, into the UK and Australian popular lexicon. The characters often drank at the local members-only Winchester Club, where owner and barman Dave acted, often unwillingly, as a message machine for Arthur, and turned a blind eye to his shady deals. The series was notable for using a range of leading British actors, as well as many up-and-coming performers before they hit the big time; at its peak was one of ITV's biggest ratings winners. In 2008, it was announced that Minder would go into production for broadcast in 2009 for a new version, although none of the original cast would appear in the new episodes. The new show focused on Arthur's nephew, Archie, played by Shane Richie. The series began broadcast on 4 February 2009. In 2010, it was announced that no further episodes would be made following lukewarm reception to the first series.

— Freebase

Hippies

Hippies

Hippies is a six-part British television comedy series broadcast from 12 November to 17 December 1999. It was created by Arthur Mathews and Graham Linehan, the writing partnership most famous for Father Ted, but the scripts were written by Mathews alone. It starred Simon Pegg, Sally Phillips, Julian Rhind-Tutt and Darren Boyd.

— Freebase

Wei-hai-wei

Wei-hai-wei

a city in a deep bay on the Shantung promontory, China, 40 m. E. of Chefoo, and nearly opposite Port Arthur, which is situated on the northern side of the entrance to the Gulf of Pechili; was leased to Great Britain in 1898, along with the islands in the bay and a belt of land along the coast; its harbour is well sheltered, and accommodates a large number of vessels.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Rickardite

Rickardite

Rickardite is a copper telluride mineral or Cu3-x Te2. It was first described for an occurrence in the Good Hope Mine, Vulcan district, Gunnison County, Colorado, USA, and named for mining engineer Thomas Arthur Rickard. It is a low temperature hydrothermal mineral that occurs associated with vulcanite, native tellurium, cameronite, petzite, sylvanite, berthierite, pyrite, arsenopyrite and bornite.

— Freebase

Bicycle seat

Bicycle seat

A bicycle seat, unlike a bicycle saddle, is designed to support the rider's buttocks and back, usually in a semi-reclined position. Arthur Garford is credited with inventing the padded bicycle seat in 1892, and they are now usually found on recumbent bicycles. Bicycle seats come in three main styles; mesh, hardshell and combination

— Freebase

Arthur Rubinstein

Arthur Rubinstein

Arthur Rubinstein, KBE was a Polish-American classical pianist who received international acclaim for his performances of the music written by a variety of composers; many regard him as the greatest Chopin interpreter of his time. He is widely considered one of the greatest pianists of the twentieth century. He played in public for eight decades.

— Freebase

Magnetic Battery

Magnetic Battery

The Magnetic Battery, Fort War or The Forts, as it is commonly referred, is a former Australian Royal Navy artillery battery in the hinterland of Horseshoe. Florence and Arthur Bays on Magnetic Island. Built in 1942/1943, the battery operated from July 1943 until the end of World War II. The remains of the facility are now maintained by Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service as part of the Magnetic Island National Park and are open to visitors year round. During its operation the battery consisted of a two searchlights in Horseshoe and Florence Bays, a radar screen in the hinterland of Arthur Bay, a permanent living encampment and a Command Post, Observation Post and two Gun Emplacements overlooking Cleveland Bay. While the majority of the buildings no longer remain, the fortified concrete command post, observation post, munitions bunker and gun emplacements still remain along with the foundations of many of the buildings within the living encampment. These remains form part of the Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service's The Forts Walk, a popular 3.8 km environmental and heritage walk for visitors to Magnetic Island.

— Freebase

Langmuir

Langmuir

Langmuir is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that was established in 1985 and is published by the American Chemical Society. It covers research in the areas of surface and colloid chemistry. The title honors Irving Langmuir, winner of the 1932 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. The founding editor-in-chief was Arthur W. Adamson.

— Freebase

Palooka

Palooka

Palooka is a 1934 comedy film directed by Benjamin Stoloff starring Jimmy Durante and based on the comic strip by Ham Fisher. The movie was adapted by Jack Jevne, Arthur Kober, Gertrude Purcell, Murray Roth and Ben Ryan from the comic strip. The film is also known as The Great Schnozzle in the United Kingdom.

— Freebase

Francis

Francis

Francis is a 1950 black-and-white comedy film that launched the Francis the Talking Mule series. It stars Donald O'Connor as an American soldier who gets into trouble when he insists an Army mule named Francis can speak. The distinctive voice of Francis was provided by Chill Wills. It was directed by Arthur Lubin.

— Freebase

Banter

Banter

Banter is a radio programme that is broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in the UK, starring Andrew Collins and Richard Herring. The pilot and the first 2 series were broadcast from August 2005 to November 2006, and a third series was broadcast in April and May 2008. There have been 19 half-hour episodes so far. The programme normally takes the form of invited guests naming their "top threes" in a given category. Banter was devised by Tim Barber, Director of Leeds based Marketing Agency Lightfish and is produced for Radio 4 by Avalon. Apart from Collins and Herring, the other guests for each episode were: Pilot - Lucy Porter, Russell Howard, Will Smith. Series 1 ⁕Episode 1 - Will Smith, Russell Howard, Jenny Eclair ⁕Episode 2 - Will Smith, Simon Day, Lynn Ferguson ⁕Episode 3 - Russell Howard, Arthur Smith, Natalie Haynes ⁕Episode 4 - Russell Howard, Sue Perkins, Chris Addison ⁕Episode 5 - Will Smith, Lynn Ferguson, Dave Gorman ⁕Episode 6 - Will Smith, Russell Howard, Jenny Éclair Series 2 ⁕Episode 1 - Russell Howard, Lucy Porter, Arthur Smith ⁕Episode 2 - Rob Deering, Lynn Ferguson, Russell Howard ⁕Episode 3 - Barry Cryer, Sue Perkins, Will Smith ⁕Episode 4 - Russell Howard, Lee Mack, Julia Morris

— Freebase

Merlin

Merlin

a legendary Welsh prophet and magician, child of a wizard and a princess, who lived in the 5th century, and was subsequently a prominent personage at King Arthur's' court; prophecies attributed to him existed as far back as the 14th century; Tennyson represents him as bewitched by Vivian; legend also tells of a Clydesdale Merlin of the 6th century; his prophecies, published in 1615, include the former; both legends are based on Armorican materials.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Catherine of Aragon

Catherine of Aragon

Catherine of Aragon was Queen of England as the first wife of King Henry VIII and previously Princess of Wales as the wife of Prince Arthur. In 1507, she also held the position of ambassador for the Spanish Court in England, becoming the first female ambassador in European history. For six months, she served as regent of England while Henry VIII was in France. During that time the English won the Battle of Flodden, an event in which Catherine played an important part. She was considered one of the more pious women of her time. The daughter of Queen Isabella I of Castile and King Ferdinand II of Aragon, Catherine was three years old when she was betrothed to Prince Arthur, heir apparent to the English throne. They married in 1501, but Arthur died five months later. Catherine subsequently married Arthur's younger brother, the recently succeeded Henry VIII, in 1509. By 1525, Henry VIII was infatuated with his mistress Anne Boleyn and dissatisfied that his marriage to Catherine had produced no surviving sons, leaving their daughter, the future Mary I of England, as heiress presumptive at a time when there was no established precedent for a woman on the throne. He sought to have their marriage annulled, setting in motion a chain of events that led to England's break with the Roman Catholic Church. When Pope Clement VII refused to annul the marriage, Henry defied him by assuming supremacy over religious matters. In 1533 their marriage was declared invalid and Henry married Anne on the judgment of clergy in England, without reference to the Pope. Catherine refused to accept Henry as Supreme Head of the Church of England and considered herself the King's rightful wife and queen, attracting much popular sympathy. Despite this, she was acknowledged only as Dowager Princess of Wales by Henry. After being banished from court, she lived out the remainder of her life at Kimbolton Castle, and died there on 7 January 1536. Catherine's English subjects held her in high esteem, thus her death set off tremendous mourning among the English people.

— Freebase

Aikinite

Aikinite

Aikinite is a sulfide mineral of lead, copper and bismuth with formula PbCuBiS3. It forms black to grey or reddish brown acicular orthorhombic crystals with a Mohs hardness of 2 to 2.5 and a specific gravity of 6.1 to 6.8. It was originally found in 1843 in the Beryozovskoye deposit, Ural Mountains. It is named after Arthur Aikin, an English geologist.

— Freebase

Merlin

Merlin

Merlin is a legendary figure best known as the wizard featured in the Arthurian legend. The standard depiction of the character first appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae, written c. 1136, and is based on an amalgamation of previous historical and legendary figures. Geoffrey combined existing stories of Myrddin Wyllt, a North Brythonic prophet and madman with no connection to King Arthur, with tales of the Romano-British war leader Ambrosius Aurelianus to form the composite figure he called Merlin Ambrosius. Geoffrey's rendering of the character was immediately popular, especially in Wales. Later writers expanded the account to produce a fuller image of the wizard. Merlin's traditional biography casts him as a cambion: born of a mortal woman, sired by an incubus, the non-human wellspring from whom he inherits his supernatural powers and abilities. The name of Merlin's mother is not usually stated but is given as Adhan in the oldest version of the Prose Brut. Merlin matures to an ascendant sagehood and engineers the birth of Arthur through magic and intrigue. Later authors have Merlin serve as the king's advisor until he is bewitched and imprisoned by the Lady of the Lake.

— Freebase

The Thing

The Thing

"The Thing" is a hit novelty song by Charles Randolph Grean which received much airplay in 1950. The song was recorded by Phil Harris on October 13, 1950 and released by RCA Victor Records as catalog number 20-3968. The record first reached the Billboard charts on November 17, 1950. It lasted 14 weeks on the chart, peaking at No. 1. Other versions were recorded by Arthur Godfrey, Danny Kaye, Kidsongs, Ray Charles, Teresa Brewer and Australian orchestra leader Les Welch. The Arthur Godfrey recording was made in November, 1950 and released by Columbia Records as catalog number 39068. The Danny Kaye recording was made on December 1, 1950 and released by Decca Records as catalog number 27350. The Ray Charles recording was made on July 13, 1963 and released by ABC-Paramount Records in the album "Have A Smile With Me", as catalog number ABC 495 / ABCS 495. The Teresa Brewer recording was made in October 1950, and released by London Records as catalog number 873. The Les Welch recording was made in January 1951 and released by Pacific Records, an Australian company, as catalog number 10-0051.

— Freebase

Stalwart

Stalwart

The "Stalwarts" were a faction of the United States Republican Party toward the end of the 19th century. Led by U.S. Senator Roscoe Conkling—also known as "Lord Roscoe"—Stalwarts were sometimes called Conklingites. Other notable Stalwarts include Chester A. Arthur and Thomas C. Platt, who were in favor of Ulysses S. Grant, the eighteenth President of the United States, running for a third term. They were the "traditional" Republicans who opposed Rutherford B. Hayes' civil service reform. They were pitted against the "Half-Breeds" for control of the Republican Party. The only real issue between Stalwarts and Half-Breeds was patronage. The Half-Breeds worked to get civil service reform, and finally created the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act. Stalwarts favored traditional machine politics. During the Republican national convention in 1880, the Half-Breeds advocated the candidacy of James Blaine of Maine for President. A stalemate ensued between Half-Breeds and Stalwarts, and a compromise was struck by the Half-Breeds and supporters of John Sherman to nominate James Garfield, with Chester Arthur, former Collector for the Port of New York, as his running mate to satisfy the Stalwarts and ensure their support for the general election.

— Freebase

Yellowstone

Yellowstone

Yellowstone is a 63-minute American film set in Yellowstone National Park, directed by Arthur Lubin and released by Universal Studios. The film, starring Judith Barrett, Henry Hunter, Ralph Morgan, Alan Hale, Raymond Hatton, and Andy Devine, combines murder mystery, romance, and natural setting. The famous historic building Old Faithful Inn is featured in the film.

— Freebase

Anglican Church

Anglican Church

The Anglican Church of the Resurrection is a church located in central Bucharest, Romania, near Grădina Icoanei, at the intersection of Xenopol street and Arthur Verona street. The church is built with red bricks and it has English language service every Sunday between 10 and 11 AM, a small English fiction library and a Sunday School.

— Freebase

Machinal

Machinal

Machinal is a play written by American playwright and journalist Sophie Treadwell, inspired by the real life case of convicted and executed murderess Ruth Snyder. Its 1928 Broadway premiĂšre, directed by Arthur Hopkins, is considered one of the highpoints of Expressionist theatre on the American stage. It was included in Burns Mantle's The Best Plays of 1928-1929.

— Freebase

Alfred Harmsworth

Alfred Harmsworth

Alfred Charles William Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Northcliffe was a British newspaper and publishing magnate. His company Amalgamated Press employed Arthur Mee and John Hammerton, and the Amalgamated Press subsidiary the Educational Book Company published the Harmsworth Self-Educator, The Children's EncyclopĂŠdia, and Harmsworth's Universal Encyclopaedia. During his lifetime, he exercised vast influence over British popular opinion.

— Freebase

Russo-Japanese War

Russo-Japanese War

The Russo-Japanese War was "the first great war of the 20th century." It grew out of rival imperial ambitions of the Russian Empire and the Empire of Japan over Manchuria and Korea. The major theatres of operations were Southern Manchuria, specifically the area around the Liaodong Peninsula and Mukden; and the seas around Korea, Japan, and the Yellow Sea. Russia sought a warm water port on the Pacific Ocean, for their navy as well as for maritime trade. Vladivostok was only operational during the summer season, but Port Arthur would be operational all year. From the end of the First Sino-Japanese War and 1903, negotiations between Russia and Japan had proved impractical. Japan offered to recognize Russian dominance in Manchuria in exchange for recognition of Korea as a Japanese sphere of influence. Russia refused this, so Japan chose war to counter the Russian aggression in Asia. After discussions broke down in 1904, the Japanese Navy attacked the Russian eastern fleet at Port Arthur, a naval base in the Liaotung province leased to Russia by China, which led to war. The Russians were poorly organized and the Japanese defeated them in a series of battles on land and at sea.

— Freebase

Up the River

Up the River

Up the River is a prison comedy film starring Preston Foster and Arthur Treacher and featuring Bill "Bojangles" Robinson. The movie was directed by Alfred L. Werker and is a remake of a 1930 film with the same title directed by John Ford and starring Spencer Tracy and Humphrey Bogart in the roles subsequently played by Foster and Tony Martin.

— Freebase

The Bibelot

The Bibelot

The Bibelot was a yearly literary anthology published by Thomas Bird Mosher between 1895 and 1914. The Bibelot featured the lesser known works of writers such as Algernon Charles Swinburne, William Morris, Arthur Symons, D. G. Rossetti, Austin Dobson, J. A. Symonds, Robert Louis Stevenson, Oscar Wilde, and Fiona MacLeod. In 1925 a limited edition, 21 volume "Testimonial Edition" was printed by William H. Wise & Co..

— Freebase

Jennie

Jennie

Jennie is a musical with a book by Arnold Schulman, music by Arthur Schwartz, and lyrics by Howard Dietz, and starred Mary Martin. The plot focuses on actors and married couple Jennie Malone and James O'Connor, who tour the country in popular melodramas. Much of the action consists of elaborate spoofs of the type of entertainment offered to audiences in the early 20th century.

— Freebase

Geoffrey of Monmouth

Geoffrey of Monmouth

Geoffrey of Monmouth was a cleric and one of the major figures in the development of British historiography and the popularity of tales of King Arthur. He is best known for his chronicle Historia Regum Britanniae, which was widely popular in its day and was credited, uncritically, well into the 16th century, being translated into various other languages from its original Latin.

— Freebase

Seamanite

Seamanite

Seamanite, named for discoverer Arthur E. Seaman, is a rare manganese boron phosphate mineral with formula Mn3[B(OH)4](OH)2. The yellow to pink mineral occurs as small, needle-shaped crystals. It was first discovered in 1917 from a mine in Iron County, Michigan, United States and identified in 1930. As of 2012, seamanite is known from four sites in Michigan and South Australia.

— Freebase

Rufus Arthur Johnson

Rufus Arthur Johnson

Rufus Arthur Johnson, better known by his stage name Bizarre, is an American rapper, best known for his work with Detroit, Michigan-based hip hop group D12. His songs frequently contain subject matter that often creates shock value, such as rape and drugs. In February 2012, Bizarre officially announced that he had split from D12 and started his own group, The Weirdo Movement.

— Freebase

Death of a Salesman

Death of a Salesman

Death of a Salesman is a 1949 play written by American playwright Arthur Miller. It was the recipient of the 1949 Pulitzer Prize for Drama and Tony Award for Best Play. The play premiered on Broadway in February 1949, running for 742 performances, and has been revived on Broadway four times, winning three Tony Awards for Best Revival.

— Freebase

Boney

Boney

Boney is an Australian television series produced by Fauna Productions during 1971 and 1972, featuring James Laurenson in the title role of Detective Inspector Napoleon Bonaparte. Two series, each of thirteen episodes were filmed. The series is centred on Bonaparte, a half-Australian Aboriginal character, created by Arthur Upfield, who wrote twenty nine novels about him from 1929 until his death in 1964.

— Freebase

Tintagel

Tintagel

Tintagel or Trevena is a civil parish and village situated on the Atlantic coast of Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. The population of the parish is 1,820 people, and the area of the parish is 4,281 acres. The village and nearby Tintagel Castle are associated with the legends surrounding King Arthur and the knights of the Round Table. The village has, in recent times, become attractive to day-trippers, and tourists from many parts of the world, and is one of the most-visited places in Britain.

— Freebase

Heraklion

Heraklion

Heraklion, or Heraclion also Iraklion is the largest city and the administrative capital of the island of Crete, Greece. It is the 4th largest city in Greece. Heraklion is the capital of Heraklion regional unit. The ruins of Knossos, which were excavated and restored by Arthur Evans, are nearby. The Heraklion International Airport is named after Nikos Kazantzakis.

— Freebase

Wellington boot

Wellington boot

The Wellington boot is a type of boot based upon leather Hessian boots. They were worn and popularised by Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. This novel "Wellington" boot became a staple of hunting and outdoor wear for the British aristocracy in the early 19th century. Wellington boots are also known as rubber boots, wellies, wellingtons, topboots, billy-boots, gumboots, gumbies, gummies, rainboots, and Alaskan Sneakers.

— Freebase

Arthur Mitchell

Arthur Mitchell

Arthur Mitchell is an African-American dancer and choreographer who created a training school and the first African-American classical ballet company, Dance Theatre of Harlem. Among other awards, Mitchell has been recognized as a MacArthur Fellow, inducted into the National Museum of Dance's Mr. & Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt Whitney Hall of Fame, and has received the United States National Medal of Arts and a Fletcher Foundation fellowship.

— Freebase

Lady of the Lake

Lady of the Lake

The Lady of the Lake, Lady of Avalon, is the title name of the ruler of Avalon in the Arthurian legend. There are several related characters in the role which include giving King Arthur his sword Excalibur, enchanting Merlin, and raising Lancelot after the death of his father. Different writers and copyists give her name variously as Nimue, Viviane, Elaine, Niniane, Nivian, Nyneve, Evienne and other variations.

— Freebase

Thick as Thieves

Thick as Thieves

Thick as Thieves is a 1998 film based on the novel of the same name by Patrick Quinn and adapted for the screen by Scott Sanders and Arthur Krystal, with Sanders directing. The film stars Alec Baldwin, Andre Braugher, Michael Jai White, Bruce Greenwood and Rebecca De Mornay. The film follows an escalating vendetta between professional Chicago thief Mackin and rising Detroit hood Pointy Williams after an attempted double cross.

— Freebase

John Knowles Paine

John Knowles Paine

John Knowles Paine, was the first American-born composer to achieve fame for large-scale orchestral music. The senior member of a group of other composers collectively known as the Boston Six, Paine was one of those responsible for the first significant body of concert music by composers from the United States. The other five were Amy Beach, Arthur Foote, Edward MacDowell, George Chadwick, and Horatio Parker.

— Freebase

Voyage

Voyage

Voyage is a 1996 hard science fiction novel by British author Stephen Baxter. The book depicts a manned mission to Mars as it might have been in another timeline, one where John F. Kennedy survived the assassination attempt on him in 1963. Voyage won a Sidewise Award for Alternate History, and was nominated for the Arthur C. Clarke Award in 1997. It has since been made into a radio serial for BBC Radio 4.

— Freebase

Chinese Exclusion Act

Chinese Exclusion Act

The Chinese Exclusion Act was a United States federal law signed by President Chester A. Arthur on May 6, 1882. It was one of the most significant restrictions on free immigration in U.S. history, prohibiting all immigration of Chinese laborers. The act followed revisions made in 1880 to the U.S.-China Burlingame Treaty of 1868, revisions that allowed the U.S. to suspend Chinese immigration. The act was initially intended to last for 10 years, but was renewed in 1892 and made permanent in 1902. It was finally repealed by the Magnuson Act on December 17, 1943.

— Freebase

Fit as a Fiddle (And Ready for Love)

Fit as a Fiddle (And Ready for Love)

"Fit as a Fiddle (And Ready for Love)" is a popular song. It was written by Arthur Freed, Al Hoffman, and Al Goodhart and published in 1932. It was a hit single that year for Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians. The song became a well-known standard and has been recorded by many artists, including Annette Hanshaw. In 1952 it achieved particular fame after being featured in the classic film Singin' in the Rain.

— Freebase

Cradle

Cradle

Cradle is a 1988 science fiction novel by Arthur C. Clarke and Gentry Lee. The major premise of Cradle is contact between a few humans from the Miami area in 1994 and the super robots of a damaged space ship submerged off the Florida coast. Telecommunication advances such as videotelephones and highly efficient underwater scanning equipment used in the story bridge from the everyday, real-life aspects of the setting toward the near future, bespeaking technological progress.

— Freebase

Transience

Transience

"Transience" is a short story by Arthur C. Clarke. Probably the most interesting aspect of this story is its opening part - reluctant exploration of the surrounding world by a little child in a way that reminds of the first story in 2001: A Space Odyssey. The story is told through the medium of three children playing at about the same physical location on Earth, but across vast gulfs of time. It is collected in The Other Side of the Sky.

— Freebase

Men Only

Men Only

Men Only is a British soft-core pornographic magazine published by Paul Raymond Publications since 1971. However, the title goes back to 1935 when it was founded by C. Arthur Pearson Ltd as a pocket magazine. It set out its editorial stall in the first issue: 'We don't want women readers. We won't have women readers...' It sought 'bright articles on current male topics'. Humour was at the heart of the title, though from the start it carried fiction, wide-ranging articles and plates of 'art' nudes. Covers were initially text-only, then carried caricatures of famous people and photographs in the late 1950s. It published colour illustrations of models by artists such as Dickens and Vargas, on a page labelled 'Let’s Join the Ladies'. When Pearson closed the Strand Magazine in 1950, it was castigated by The Economist for concentrating its resources on London Opinion and Men Only. Men Only had coloured frontispieces and rather trivial main pages. Another pocket title, Lilliput, was better known but Men Only took over London Opinion and then Lilliput in 1960. All these titles were affected by the growth of television; C. Arthur Pearson was taken over by Newnes, which became part of International Publishing Corporation in the mid-1960s. It also lost readers to titles such as Haymarket's Man About Town and Playboy. In response, Men Only adopted a larger format and more pin-ups but was still mainly in black and white with a colour pin-up centre spread. It was sold on to City Magazines.

— Freebase

Sinoatrial node

Sinoatrial node

The sinoatrial node is the impulse-generating tissue located in the right atrium of the heart, and thus the generator of normal sinus rhythm. It is a group of cells positioned on the wall of the right atrium, near the entrance of the superior vena cava. These cells are specialized cardiomyocytes. Though they possess some contractile filaments, they do not contract robustly. The SAN was first described in 1907 by Arthur Keith and Martin Flack.

— Freebase

Melita

Melita

Melita is a town located in the southwestern corner of the Canadian province of Manitoba. It is surrounded by the Rural Municipality of Arthur and occupies a bend of the Souris River. The population, as of the 2011 census, is 1,069. It sits at the junction of Highways 3 and 83, approx. 320 km southwest of Winnipeg. Melita is known as the "Grasslands Bird Capital of Manitoba" and is located in Manitoba's banana belt.

— Freebase

Excalibur

Excalibur

Excalibur is the legendary sword of King Arthur, sometimes attributed with magical powers or associated with the rightful sovereignty of Great Britain. Sometimes Excalibur and the Sword in the Stone are said to be the same weapon, but in most versions they are considered separate. The sword was associated with the Arthurian legend very early. In Welsh, the sword is called Caledfwlch; in Cornish, the sword is called Calesvol.

— Freebase

Tetralogy of Fallot

Tetralogy of Fallot

Tetralogy of Fallot is a congenital heart defect which is classically understood to involve four anatomical abnormalities of the heart. It is the most common cyanotic heart defect, and the most common cause of blue baby syndrome. It was described in 1672 by Niels Stensen, in 1773 by Edward Sandifort, and in 1888 by the French physician Étienne-Louis Arthur Fallot, after whom it is named.

— Freebase

Superiority

Superiority

"Superiority" is a science fiction short story by Arthur C. Clarke, first published in 1951. It depicts an arms race, and shows how the side which is more technologically advanced can be defeated, despite its apparent superiority, because of its own organizational flaws and its willingness to discard old technology without having fully perfected the new. The story was at one point required reading for an industrial design course at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

— Freebase

The Big Six

The Big Six

The Big Six is the ninth book of Arthur Ransome's Swallows and Amazons series of children's books, published in 1940. The book returns Dick and Dorothea Callum, known as the Ds, to the Norfolk Broads where they renew their friendship with the members of the Coot Club. This book is more of a detective story as the Ds and Coot Club try to unravel a mystery that threatens the Death and Glories freedom to sail the river.

— Freebase

Glide Path

Glide Path

Glide Path is a novel by Arthur C. Clarke, published in 1963. Clarke's only non-science fiction novel, it is set during World War II, and tells a fictionalized version of the development of the radar-based ground-controlled approach aircraft landing system, and includes a character modeled on Luis Alvarez, who developed this system. It is based on Clarke's own wartime service with the Royal Air Force, during which he worked on the GCA project.

— Freebase

Arthur Conan Doyle

Arthur Conan Doyle

Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle DL was a Scottish physician and writer who is most noted for his fictional stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered milestones in the field of crime fiction. He is also known for writing the fictional adventures of a second character he invented, Professor Challenger. He was a prolific writer whose other works include fantasy and science fiction stories, plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction, and historical novels.

— Freebase

Arthur Fiedler

Arthur Fiedler

Arthur Fiedler was a long-time conductor of the Boston Pops Orchestra, a symphony orchestra that specializes in popular and light classical music. With a combination of musicianship and showmanship, he made the Boston Pops one of the best-known orchestras in the country. Some people criticized him for over-popularizing music, particularly when adapting popular songs or edited portions of the classical repertoire, but Fiedler kept performances informal and sometimes self-mocking to attract more customers.

— Freebase

Front Back

Front Back

"Front Back" is the first promo and official single released from T.I.'s fourth album, King. It featured Port Arthur's own UGK. It had small attention and has helped promote the album. The song is the remake of UGK's 1994 single "Front, Back, Side to Side" from their album Super Tight. Pimp C gave T.I. his first verse. The song has featured in the trailer of the film ATL.

— Freebase

Safir

Safir

Sir Safir is a Knight of the Round Table and the youngest son of the Saracen king Esclabor in the Arthurian legend. Both his brothers, Segwarides and Palamedes, also belong to the Round Table. He is a courageous and loyal knight and was, in his time, a fairly popular character, showing up in the Prose Tristan and Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur. His name is included on the Winchester Round Table. Safir appears in many works of Arthurian literature, usually alongside his brother Palamedes. In one incident, Safir is disguised as Sir Ector de Maris and fights with Sir Helior le Preuse. He defeats him and wins Sir Espinogres' lady. Vowing to defend the lady's honor, Sir Palamedes arrives on the scene, and locks sword with Safir, not realizing it is his brother. After fighting for an hour, both are impressed with each other's prowess and skill, and decide to ask the other's identity. Safir is devastated to find that he was fighting with his own brother and asks Palamedes for forgiveness. Together, they return the lady to Sir Espinogres. Though he is a younger brother, Safir converted to Christianity some time before Palamedes. When the affair between Lancelot and Guinevere is exposed, Safir and Palamedes join Lancelot's side in the ensuing civil war between Lancelot and King Arthur. When they are banished to Lancelot's homeland in Gaul, Safir is made Duke of Landok while Palamedes becomes Duke of Provence.

— Freebase

Wheels

Wheels

Wheels is a novel by Arthur Hailey, concerning the automobile industry and the day-to-day pressures involved in its operation. The plot lines follow many of the topical issues of the day, including race relations, corporate politics, and business ethics. The auto company of the novel is a little-disguised Ford Motor Company and some of the characters are recognizable to company insiders. The novel was made into a TV mini series in 1978 starring Rock Hudson and Lee Remick.

— Freebase

Black Man

Black Man

Black Man is a 2007 science fiction novel by the English author Richard Morgan. It won the 2008 Arthur C Clarke Award. It is not part of the Takeshi Kovacs universe by the same author. However, there are enough references to shared historical events, such as the colonization of Mars and the use of cryosleep to facilitate space travel, to argue that, Black Man can be seen as a very early prequel to the Takeshi Kovacs novels.

— Freebase

Bors

Bors

Bors circa 540s-580s, is the name of two knights in the Arthurian legend, one the father and one the son. Bors the Elder is the King of Gaunnes or Gaul during the early period of King Arthur's reign, and is King Ban of Benoic's brother. Gaunnes is the Fredemundian dynastic kingdom of Neustria from the Netherlands, Normandy, Brittany, and western France. Bors the Younger later becomes one of the best Knights of the Round Table, and even achieves the Holy Grail.

— Freebase

Antinatalism

Antinatalism

Antinatalism is a philosophical position that assigns a negative value to birth, standing in opposition to natalism. It has been advanced by figures such as Arthur Schopenhauer, Slavoj ĆœiĆŸek, Emil Cioran, Matti HĂ€yry, Peter Wessel Zapffe, Doug Stanhope, Thomas Ligotti and David Benatar. Similar ideas can be seen in a fragment of Aristotle's Eudemus as "the wisdom of Silenus" and were discussed by Schopenhauer and Nietzsche. Groups that encourage antinatalism, or pursue antinatalist policies include the Voluntary Human Extinction Movement.

— Freebase

Sweethearts

Sweethearts

Sweethearts is a comic play billed as a "dramatic contrast" in two acts by W. S. Gilbert. The play tells a sentimental and ironic story of the differing recollections of a man and a woman about their last meeting together before being separated and reunited after 30 years. It was first produced on 7 November 1874 at the Prince of Wales's Theatre in London, running for 132 performances until 13 April 1875. It enjoyed many revivals, thereafter, into the 1920s. The first professional production of Sweethearts in Britain in recent memory was given in the spring of 2007 at the Finborough Theatre in London, along with Arthur Sullivan's The Zoo.

— Freebase

Boccaccio

Boccaccio

Boccaccio, or the Prince of Palermo is an operetta in three acts by Franz von Suppé to a German libretto by Camillo Walzel and Richard Genée, based on the play by Jean-François-Antoine Bayard, Adolphe de Leuven, Léon Lévy Brunswick and Arthur de Beauplan, based in turn on the Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio. The opera was first performed at the Carltheater, Vienna, February 1, 1879. An English translation was done by Oscar Weil and Gustav Hinrichs ca. 1883.

— Freebase

Duke of Wellington

Duke of Wellington

Duke of Wellington is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It derived from Wellington in Somerset, and was created for Arthur Wellesley, the noted Anglo-Irish career British Army officer and statesman. Unqualified references to "the" Duke of Wellington almost always refer to him. He is most famous for, together with Gebhard Leberecht von BlĂŒcher, defeating Napoleon Bonaparte at Waterloo in Brabant. The Wellesley family is, in origin, an Anglo-Irish aristocratic dynasty.

— Freebase

Jamie Campbell Bower

Jamie Campbell Bower

James Metcalfe "Jamie" Campbell Bower is an English actor, singer and former model. Bower is best known for his role as Anthony Hope in Tim Burton's Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, his role as Caius in The Twilight Saga, his role as King Arthur in the Starz original series Camelot and as the young Gellert Grindelwald in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1. He will portray Jace Wayland in the upcoming The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones.

— Freebase

Turn of the Tide

Turn of the Tide

Turn of the Tide is a 1935 British drama film directed by Norman Walker and starring John Garrick, Geraldine Fitzgerald and Wilfrid Lawson. It was the first feature film made by J. Arthur Rank. It is set in a North Yorkshire fishing village, and relates the rivalry between two fishing families. The actors included John Garrick, Geraldine Fitzgerald, Wilfrid Lawson speak in the local accent. The work is based on the novel Three Fevers by Leo Walmsley.

— Freebase

Arthur Rimbaud

Arthur Rimbaud

Jean Nicolas Arthur Rimbaud was a French poet born in Charleville, Ardennes. As part of the decadent movement, he influenced modern literature, music, and arts, and prefigured surrealism. All of his poetry was written as a teenager; he gave up creative writing completely before he turned 20. His "genius, its flowering, explosion and sudden extinction, still astonishes". Rimbaud was known to have been a libertine and a restless soul. He travelled extensively on three continents before his death from cancer just after his 37th birthday.

— Freebase

Turacin

Turacin

Turacin is a naturally occurring red pigment that is 6% copper complexed to uroporphyrin 111. Arthur Herbert Church discovered turacin in 1869. It is found only in the bird family Musophagidae, the turacos. Other birds derive their red coloration from carotenoids or phaeomelanins. It is often assumed that this coloration will wash out when the birds are bathing or after heavy rains, but this is true only if the water used for bathing happens to be very alkaline.

— Freebase

Kumara

Kumara

Kumara is a town on the West Coast of the South Island of New Zealand. It is located 30 kilometres south of Greymouth, close to the western end of State Highway 73, which leads across Arthur's Pass to Christchurch. The Taramakau River flows past to the north. The population was 318 in the 2006 Census, a decrease of 6 from 2001. The name may come from the Māori language Kohe mara, which is the blossom of the tātarāmoa, or bush lawyer. The Coast to Coast annual multisport race starts at Kumara.

— Freebase

Lapstone

Lapstone

Lapstone is a small village on the eastern escarpment of the Blue Mountains in New South Wales, Australia. Lapstone is located 62 kilometres west of Sydney in the local government area of the City of Blue Mountains and is part of the federal electorate of Macquarie. The village consists mostly of stand-alone housing and has a few public facilities. At the 2006 census, Lapstone had a population of 854 people. Lapstone was originally bought and developed by Mr Arthur J Hand, an Alderman of the Blue Mountains City Council.

— Freebase

Geoffrey of Monmouth

Geoffrey of Monmouth

a celebrated chronicler and ecclesiastic of the 12th century, born in Monmouth, where he was educated in a Benedictine monastery; in 1152 he was made bishop of St. Asaph; his Latin "Chronicon sive Historia Britonum" contains a circumstantial account of British history compiled from Gildas, Nennius, and other early chroniclers, interwoven with current legends and pieced together with additions from his own fertile imagination, the whole professing to be a translation of a chronicle found in Brittany; this remarkable history is the source of the stories of King Lear, Cymbeline, Merlin, and of Arthur and his knights as they have since taken shape in English literature; d. about 1154.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Mathemagician

Mathemagician

A mathemagician is a mathematician who is also a magician. The name "mathemagician" was probably first applied to Martin Gardner, but has since been used to describe many mathematician/magicians, including Arthur T. Benjamin, Persi Diaconis, and Raymond Smullyan. Diaconis has suggested that the reason so many mathematicians are magicians is that "inventing a magic trick and inventing a theorem are very similar activities." A great number of self-working mentalism tricks are actually mathemagic. Max Maven often utilizes this type of magic in his performance.

— Freebase

Dandy–Walker syndrome

Dandy–Walker syndrome

Dandy–Walker syndrome, or Dandy–Walker complex, is a congenital brain malformation involving the cerebellum and the fluid filled spaces around it. A key feature of this syndrome is the partial or even complete absence of the part of the brain located between the two cerebellar hemispheres. The Dandy–Walker complex is a genetically sporadic disorder that occurs one in every 30,000 live births. Prenatal diagnosis and prognosis of outcomes associated with Dandy-Walker can be difficult. It is named for Walter Dandy and Arthur Earl Walker.

— Freebase

John

John

king of England from 1199 to 1216, was clever and vivacious, but the most vicious, profane, false, short-sighted, tyrannical, and unscrupulous of English monarchs; the son of Henry II., he married Hawisa of Gloucester, and succeeded his brother Richard I., being Richard's nominee, and the tacitly elect of the people; his nephew, Arthur, claimed the French dominions, and was supported by the French king, Philip; in 1200 he divorced Hawisa, and married Isabel of Angoulême, a child-heiress; this provoked the French barons; in the war that ensued Arthur was captured, and subsequently murdered either by John himself or by his orders; Philip invaded Normandy, and with the fall of the Château-Gaillard in 1204, most of the French possessions were lost to the English crown; then followed John's quarrel with Pope Innocent III. over the election of an archbishop of Canterbury; the Pope consecrated Stephen Langton; John refused to receive him; in 1208 the kingdom was placed under an interdict, and next year the king was excommunicated; John on his side confiscated Church property, exiled the bishops, exacted homage of William of Scotland, and put down risings in Ireland and Wales; but a bull, deposing him and absolving his vassals from allegiance, forced him to submit, and he resigned his crown to the Pope's envoy in 1213; this exaction on Innocent's part initiated the opposition to Rome which culminated in the English Reformation; the rest of the reign was a struggle between the king, relying on his suzerain the Pope, and the people, barons, and clergy, for the first time on one side; war broke out; the king was forced to sign Magna Charta at Runnymede in 1215, but the Pope annulled the Charter; the barons appealed for help to the Dauphin, and were prosecuting the war when John died at Newark (1167-1216).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Ethisterone

Ethisterone

Ethisterone is a progestogen hormone. The first orally active progestin, ethisterone, the 17α-ethynyl analog of testosterone, was synthesized in 1938 by Hans Herloff Inhoffen, Willy Logemann, Walter Hohlweg, and Arthur Serini at Schering AG in Berlin and marketed in Germany in 1939 as Proluton C and by Schering in the U.S. in 1945 as Pranone. Ethisterone was also marketed in the U.S. from the 1950s into the 1960s under a variety of trade names by other pharmaceutical companies that had been members of the pre-World War II European hormone cartel.

— Freebase

Giantess

Giantess

A giantess is a female giant. The term may refer either a mythical being resembling a woman of superhuman size and strength or a human woman of exceptional stature, often the result of some medical or genetic abnormality. In Lewis Carroll's story Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, there are several scenes where the heroine Alice grows to gigantic size by means of eating something. Similarly Arthur C. Clarke's story Cosmic Casanova describes an astronaut's revulsion at discovering that an extraterrestrial female he adored on a video screen is in fact thirty feet tall.

— Freebase

Coalescent

Coalescent

Coalescent is a science-fiction novel by Stephen Baxter. It is part one of the Destiny's Children series, and is the first in the reading order for the Xeelee series. The story is set in two main time periods: modern Britain, when George Poole finds that he has a previously unknown sister and follows a trail to a mysterious and ancient organisation in Rome; and the time of Regina, a girl growing up during the ending of Roman rule in Britain, around AD 400. Coalescent was nominated for the Arthur C. Clarke Award in 2004.

— Freebase

Belem

Belem

Belem is a three-masted barque from France. She was originally a cargo ship, transporting sugar from the West Indies, cocoa, and coffee from Brazil and French Guiana to Nantes, France. By chance she escaped the eruption of the Mount Pelée in Saint-Pierre de la Martinique on 8 May 1902. All Saint Pierre roads were full of vessels, no place to anchor the ship. Captain Julien Chauvelon angrily decided to anchor some miles further on in a beach - sheltered from the exploding volcano. She was sold in 1914 to Hugh Grosvenor, 2nd Duke of Westminster, who converted her to his private luxurious pleasure yacht, complete with two auxiliary Bolinder Diesel engines 300 HP each. In 1922 she became the property of the beer baron Sir Arthur Ernest Guinness, who renamed her the FantÎme II and revised the rig from a square rigger. Hon. A.E. Guinness was Rear Commodore of the Royal St. George Yacht Club, in Kingstown, Ireland from 1921-1939. He was Vice Commodore from 1940- 1948. Hon. A.E. Guinness took the Fùntome II on a great cruise in 1923 with his daughters Aileen, Maureen, and Oonagh. They sailed the seven seas in making a travel round the world via the Panama and Suez Canals including a visit to Spitsbergen. During her approach to Yokohama harbour while sailing the Pacific Ocean the barque managed to escape another catastrophe - an earthquake which destroyed the harbour and parts of Yokohama city. Hon. Arthur E. Guinness died in 1949. The 'Fantome' was moored in the roads of Cowes, Isle of Wight.

— Freebase

Significand

Significand

The significand is part of a number in scientific notation or a floating-point number, consisting of its significant digits. Depending on the interpretation of the exponent, the significand may represent an integer or a fraction. The word mantissa seems to have been introduced by Arthur Burks in 1946 writing for the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, although this use of the word is discouraged by the IEEE floating-point standard committee as well as some professionals such as the inventor of floating point notation William Kahan.

— Freebase

Diamond Jim

Diamond Jim

Diamond Jim is a 1935 biographical film based on the published biography Diamond Jim Brady by Parker Morell. It follows the life of legendary entrepreneur James Buchanan Brady, including his romance with entertainer Lillian Russell, and stars Edward Arnold, Jean Arthur, Cesar Romero and Binnie Barnes. The screenplay by Preston Sturges never lets the lurid facts of Brady's life get in the way of the story. Edward Arnold went on to play Diamond Jim Brady again five years later, opposite Alice Faye in Lillian Russell.

— Freebase

Gasogene

Gasogene

The gasogene was a late Victorian device for producing carbonated water. It consisted of two linked glass globes surrounded by a wicker or wire protective mesh because they tended to explode. The lower contained water or other drink to be made sparkling, the upper a mixture of tartaric acid and sodium bicarbonate that reacted to produce carbon dioxide. The produced gas pushes the liquid in the lower container up a tube and out of the device. The gasogene features as a cryptic residential fixture at 221B Baker Street in Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes stories.

— Freebase

Baritsu

Baritsu

Baritsu is the name given to a form of martial art described by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in the Sherlock Holmes story "The Adventure of the Empty House", the first of The Return of Sherlock Holmes, to explain how Holmes had managed to avoid falling into the Reichenbach Falls with Professor Moriarty as described in the story "The Final Problem", first published in Strand Magazine in December 1893. It is almost certainly a misspelling of the real martial art of bartitsu, which existed in Britain around the time Doyle's novels were written.

— Freebase

Cayley table

Cayley table

A Cayley table, after the 19th century British mathematician Arthur Cayley, describes the structure of a finite group by arranging all the possible products of all the group's elements in a square table reminiscent of an addition or multiplication table. Many properties of a group — such as whether or not it is abelian, which elements are inverses of which elements, and the size and contents of the group's center — can be easily deduced by examining its Cayley table. A simple example of a Cayley table is the one for the group {1, −1} under ordinary multiplication:

— Freebase

Love Story

Love Story

Love Story is a 1970 romantic drama film written by Erich Segal, who also authored the best-selling novel of the same name. It was directed by Arthur Hiller and starred Ryan O'Neal and Ali MacGraw. A tragedy, the film is considered one of the most romantic of all time by the American Film Institute. It was followed by a sequel, Oliver's Story, starring O'Neal with Candice Bergen. Love Story also features John Marley and Ray Milland. It included the film debut of Tommy Lee Jones in a minor role.

— Freebase

Arthur Laffer

Arthur Laffer

Arthur Betz Laffer is an American economist who first gained prominence during the Reagan administration as a member of Reagan's Economic Policy Advisory Board. Laffer is best known for the Laffer curve, an illustration of the theory that there exists some tax rate between 0% and 100% that will result in maximum tax revenue for governments. He is the author and co-author of many books and newspaper articles, including Supply Side Economics: Financial Decision-Making for the 80s. Laffer is Policy Co-Chairman of the Free Enterprise Fund.

— Freebase

Eudaf Hen

Eudaf Hen

Eudaf Hen or Octavius is a figure of Welsh tradition. He is remembered as a King of the Britons and the father of Elen Luyddog and Conan Meriadoc in sources such as the Welsh prose tale The Dream of Macsen and Geoffrey of Monmouth's Latin chronicle Historia Regum Britanniae. He also figures into Welsh genealogies. The name Octavius in Geoffrey of Monmouth Historia is a corruption and faux-Latinization of Old Welsh/Breton Outham. According to the medieval Welsh genealogy from Mostyn MS. 117, Eudaf was a direct ancestor of King Arthur.

— Freebase

John Gielgud

John Gielgud

Sir Arthur John Gielgud, OM, CH was an English actor, director, and producer. A descendant of the renowned Terry acting family, he achieved early international acclaim for his youthful, emotionally expressive Hamlet, which broke box office records on Broadway in 1937. He was known for his beautiful speaking of verse and particularly for his warm and expressive voice, which his colleague Sir Alec Guinness likened to "a silver trumpet muffled in silk". Gielgud is one of the few entertainers who have won an Oscar, Emmy, Grammy, and Tony Award.

— Freebase

Indeterminism

Indeterminism

Indeterminism is the concept that events are not caused, or not caused deterministically by prior events. It is the opposite of determinism and related to chance. It is highly relevant to the philosophical problem of free will, particularly in the form of metaphysical libertarianism. In science, Indeterminism has been promoted by the French biologist Jacques Monod's essay "Chance and necessity". It is also asserted by Werner Heisenberg, Sir Arthur Eddington, Max Born and Murray Gell-Mann. The physicist-chemist Ilya Prigogine argued for indeterminism in complex systems.

— Freebase

Temptation

Temptation

"Temptation" is a popular song, published in 1933, with music written by Nacio Herb Brown and lyrics by Arthur Freed. The song was used in the film Singin' in the Rain and later in the 1983 musical based on the film, and is prominently featured in Valerio Zurlini's Violent Summer. The song was introduced by Bing Crosby in the 1933 film Going Hollywood. Crosby recorded the song with Lennie Hayton's orchestra on October 22, 1933. He recorded it again with John Scott Trotter's Orchestra on March 3, 1945.

— Freebase

Invictus

Invictus

"Invictus" is a short Victorian poem by the English poet William Ernest Henley. It was first published in 1875 in a book called Book of Verses, where it was number four in several poems called Life and Death. It originally had no title. Early printings contained only the dedication To R. T. H. B.—a reference to Robert Thomas Hamilton Bruce, a successful Scottish flour merchant and baker who was also a literary patron. The title "Invictus" was added by editor Arthur Quiller-Couch when the poem was included in The Oxford Book of English Verse .

— Freebase

Agression

Agression

Agression was an American rock band from Silver Strand Beach, Oxnard, California. Agression was one of the founding bands of the Nardcore scene and an early proponent of the skate punk genre. The band fused skate culture with the punk scene- featuring a song about skateboarding and a Glen E. Friedman photo of Arthur Lake skating a pool on their first and most popular album, "Don't Be Mistaken". The band was known for its fast-paced, aggressive songs such as "Slammin' at the Club", "Money Machine", "Intense Energy", "Never Alone", "Go to War", and "Locals Only".

— Freebase

JobSerf

JobSerf

JobSerf, Inc. is an employment service and job search outsourcing company. It was founded in 2004 by three Dallas executives; Jay Martin, Phil Miller and David Micek. Jay Martin is a former Strategy and Supply Chain Consultant who worked for Arthur D.Little, IBM and Pepsico. Phil Miller is a Dallas-based Financial Executive and former CFO. David Micek has been a CEO of multiple companies, and was also the President of internet leader AltaVista. In 2004, JobSerf was the first company to demonstrate the feasibility of job search outsourcing, and the pioneer in the job search outsourcing industry.

— Freebase

Nine

Nine

Nine is a musical with a book by Arthur Kopit, music and lyrics by Maury Yeston. The story is based on Federico Fellini's semi-autobiographical film 8œ. It focuses on film director Guido Contini, who is dreading his imminent 40th birthday and facing a midlife crisis, which is blocking his creative impulses and entangling him in a web of romantic difficulties in early-1960s Venice. The original Broadway production opened in 1982 and ran for 729 performances, starring Raul Julia. The musical won five Tony Awards, including best musical, and has enjoyed a number of revivals.

— Freebase

Strain gauge

Strain gauge

A strain gauge is a device used to measure the strain of an object. Invented by Edward E. Simmons and Arthur C. Ruge in 1938, the most common type of strain gauge consists of an insulating flexible backing which supports a metallic foil pattern. The gauge is attached to the object by a suitable adhesive, such as cyanoacrylate. As the object is deformed, the foil is deformed, causing its electrical resistance to change. This resistance change, usually measured using a Wheatstone bridge, is related to the strain by the quantity known as the gauge factor.

— Freebase

Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park

Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park

The Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park is the name of the union of the Waterton Lakes National Park in Canada and the Glacier National Park in the United States. Both parks are declared Biosphere Reserves by UNESCO and their union as a World Heritage Site. The union of the parks was achieved through the efforts of Rotary International members from Alberta and Montana, on June 18, 1932. The dedication address was given by Sir Charles Arthur Mander, 2nd Baronet. Visitors should note that the two parks are administered separately and have separate entrance fees.

— Freebase

Shane

Shane

Shane is a 1953 American Western film from Paramount. It was produced and directed by George Stevens from a screenplay by A. B. Guthrie, Jr., based on the 1949 novel of the same name by Jack Schaefer. Its Oscar-winning cinematography was by Loyal Griggs. The film stars Alan Ladd, Jean Arthur and Van Heflin, and features Brandon deWilde, Elisha Cook, Jr., Jack Palance and Ben Johnson. Shane was listed #45 in the 2007 edition of AFI's 100 Years
100 Movies list and #3 on AFI's 10 Top 10 in the category Western.

— Freebase

Pretty Boy Floyd

Pretty Boy Floyd

Charles Arthur "Pretty Boy" Floyd was an American bank robber. He operated in the Midwest and West South Central States, and his criminal exploits gained heavy press coverage in the 1930s. Like most other prominent outlaws of that era, he was killed by policemen. While speculation remains among which officers were actually there, local or the FBI, known accounts prove that local officers Robert "Pete" Pyle and George Curran were present for not only the killing, but also the embalming. He remains a familiar figure in American popular culture, sometimes seen as notorious, but at other times viewed as a tragic figure, partly a victim of hard times.

— Freebase

Aeroelasticity

Aeroelasticity

Aeroelasticity is the science which studies the interactions among inertial, elastic, and aerodynamic forces. It was defined by Arthur Roderick Collar in 1947 as "the study of the mutual interaction that takes place within the triangle of the inertial, elastic, and aerodynamic forces acting on structural members exposed to an airstream, and the influence of this study on design." In more simple terms, it is the same set of conditions causing a flag to flutter in a stiff breeze or a reed to tremble in fast-flowing water. Flutter may occur in any fluid medium.

— Freebase

Pins and Needles

Pins and Needles

Pins and Needles is a musical revue with a book by Arthur Arent, Marc Blitzstein, Emmanuel Eisenberg, Charles Friedman, David Gregory, Joseph Schrank, Arnold B. Horwitt, John Latouche, and Harold Rome and music and lyrics by Harold Rome. The title Pins and Needles was created by Max Danish, long-time editor of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union's newspaper Justice. It ran on Broadway from 1937 to 1940, was revived in 1978, and produced again in London in 2010 to positive reviews. The revue was also performed in 1938 in the White House for Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt.

— Freebase

Catharine of Aragon

Catharine of Aragon

fourth daughter of Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain, and wife of Henry VIII., her brother-in-law as widow of Arthur, from whom, and at whose instance, after 18 years of married life, and after giving birth to five children, she was divorced on the plea that, as she had been his brother's wife before, it was not lawful for him to have her; after her divorce she remained in the country, led an austere religious life, and died broken-hearted. The refusal of the Pope to sanction this divorce led to the final rupture of the English Church from the Church of Rome, and the emancipation of the nation from priestly tyranny (1483-1536).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia


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