Definitions containing gérard, françois pascal simon, baron

We've found 250 definitions:

Vavasor

Vavasor

the vassal or tenant of a baron; one who held under a baron, and who also had tenants under him; one in dignity next to a baron; a title of dignity next to a baron

— Webster Dictionary

Concurrent Pascal

Concurrent Pascal

Concurrent Pascal was designed by Per Brinch Hansen for writing concurrent computing programs such as operating systems and real-time monitoring systems on shared memory computers. A separate language, Sequential Pascal, is used as the language for applications programs run by the operating systems written in Concurrent Pascal. Both languages are extensions of Niklaus Wirth's Pascal, and share a common threaded code interpreter. The following describes how Concurrent Pascal differs from Wirth's Pascal.

— Freebase

baroness

baroness

a noblewoman who holds the rank of baron or who is the wife or widow of a baron

— Princeton's WordNet

Barony

Barony

the fee or domain of a baron; the lordship, dignity, or rank of a baron

— Webster Dictionary

Gerry

Gerry

A diminutive of the male given names Gerald and Gerard.

— Wiktionary

Pascal

Pascal

The Pascal programming language.

— Wiktionary

Delphi

Delphi

A programming language based on PASCAL.

— Wiktionary

pascal compiler

Pascal compiler

a compiler for programs written in Pascal

— Princeton's WordNet

Pascal

Pascal

The French mathematician and physicist Blaise Pascal.

— Wiktionary

Goutwort

Goutwort

a coarse umbelliferous plant of Europe (Aegopodium Podagraria); -- called also bishop's weed, ashweed, and herb gerard

— Webster Dictionary

Garrett

Garrett

, transferred from the surname, or in Ireland directly from Gerard.

— Wiktionary

millipascal

millipascal

A unit equal to one thousandth of a pascal (symbol mPa).

— Wiktionary

Si

Si

A diminutive of the male given name Simon.

— Wiktionary

baronial

baronial

suitable for a baron

— Wiktionary

Sim

Sim

A male given name, diminutive of Simon and Simeon.

— Wiktionary

Lima/on

Lima/on

a curve of the fourth degree, invented by Pascal. Its polar equation is r = a cos / + b

— Webster Dictionary

Simmons

Simmons

A southern English patronymic surname from the given name Simon.

— Wiktionary

stanford-binet test

Stanford-Binet test

revision of the Binet-Simon Scale

— Princeton's WordNet

Androcles and the Lion

Androcles and the Lion

Androcles and the Lion is a 1952 RKO film produced by Gabriel Pascal from the George Bernard Shaw play. This was Pascal's last film, made two years after the death of Shaw, his long-standing friend and mentor, and two years before Pascal's own death.

— Freebase

Verulam

Verulam

Baron Verulam, Viscount St Albans

— Wiktionary

rix-baron

rix-baron

A baron of the German Empire.

— Wiktionary

Contrecoup

Contrecoup

Contrecoup is a 1997 short drama war film written by Guilherme Botelho and Pascal Magnin and directed by Pascal Magnin.

— Freebase

Simpson

Simpson

A Scottish and northern English patronymic surname derived from Sim, the short form of Simon.

— Wiktionary

Red Baron

Red Baron

An equivalent of the Red Baron, ace fighter pilot.

— Wiktionary

barony

barony

the domain of a baron

— Princeton's WordNet

thane

thane

a feudal lord or baron

— Princeton's WordNet

baronetcy

baronetcy

the title of a baron

— Princeton's WordNet

barony

barony

the estate of a baron

— Princeton's WordNet

viscount

viscount

A member of the peerage above a baron but below a count or earl.

— Wiktionary

pierre de fermat

Fermat, Pierre de Fermat

French mathematician who founded number theory; contributed (with Pascal) to the theory of probability (1601-1665)

— Princeton's WordNet

fermat

Fermat, Pierre de Fermat

French mathematician who founded number theory; contributed (with Pascal) to the theory of probability (1601-1665)

— Princeton's WordNet

JRT

JRT

JRT is an implementation of the Pascal programming language. It was available in the early 1980s on the CP/M operating system. At the end of the 1970s, the most popular Pascal implementation for microcomputers was UCSD Pascal, which many people considered overpriced at hundreds of dollars. The original basis for UCSD Pascal was the p-machine compiler from ETH Zurich the originators of Pascal. JRT was a Pascal interpreter, that compiled down to its own pseudo-code totally separate from UCSD Pascal p-code. It was written by Jim Russell Tyson who had the idea that if he dropped the price he'd sell more copies. He sold it cheaply, reducing the price from $295.00 to $29.95, and it was a wild success. Too wild as it turned out. Orders far surpassed JRT's ability to produce product and the company eventually filed for bankruptcy in November 1983 with many cancelled orders and unable to meet the still high demand. The product eventually continued through a version 4 priced at $69.95 and along with a Modula-2 at $99.95 may have been successful had not Turbo Pascal shown up for about the same price. Turbo Pascal was a true compiler with an IDE as well as a business model that allowed it to meet customer demand.

— Freebase

Simon says

Simon says

A children's game where players must carry out only those commands that are preceded by the utterance "Simon says".

— Wiktionary

Baronial

Baronial

pertaining to a baron or a barony

— Webster Dictionary

Baronage

Baronage

the dignity or rank of a baron

— Webster Dictionary

viscount

viscount

a British peer who ranks below an earl and above a baron

— Princeton's WordNet

Baronage

Baronage

the land which gives title to a baron

— Webster Dictionary

baroness

baroness

The female ruler of a barony. The male equivalent is baron.

— Wiktionary

nobleman

nobleman

A peer; an aristocrat; ranks range from baron to king to emperor.

— Wiktionary

baronial

baronial

belonging or relating to a baron or barons

— Wiktionary

Laplace

Laplace

Pierre-Simon Laplace, French mathematician 1749-1827, used attributively in the names of various mathematical concepts named after him (see "Derived terms" below)

— Wiktionary

barony

barony

A dominion ruled by a baron or baroness, often part of a larger kingdom or empire.

— Wiktionary

bolivia

Bolivia, Republic of Bolivia

a landlocked republic in central South America; Simon Bolivar founded Bolivia in 1825 after winning independence from Spain

— Princeton's WordNet

republic of bolivia

Bolivia, Republic of Bolivia

a landlocked republic in central South America; Simon Bolivar founded Bolivia in 1825 after winning independence from Spain

— Princeton's WordNet

Freiherr

Freiherr

"Freiherr", "Freifrau" and "Freiin" are designations used as titles of nobility in the German-speaking areas of the Holy Roman Empire, and in its various successor states, including Austria, Prussia, Bavaria, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, etc. Traditionally it denotes the second lowest rank within the nobility, standing above Ritter and below Graf. It corresponds to baron in rank; a Freiherr is sometimes also referred to as "Baron"; he is always addressed as "Herr Baron" or "Baron".

— Freebase

Simon the Zealot

Simon the Zealot

The apostle called Simon Zelotes, Simon the Zealot, in Luke 6:15 and Acts 1:13; and Simon Kananaios or Simon Cananeus, was one of the most obscure among the apostles of Jesus. Little is recorded of him aside from his name. A few pseudepigraphical writings were connected to him, and Jerome does not include him in De viris illustribus.

— Freebase

monod

Monod, Jacques Monod, Jacques Lucien Monod

French biochemist who (with Francois Jacob) explained how genes are activated and suggested the existence of messenger RNA (1910-1976)

— Princeton's WordNet

jacques lucien monod

Monod, Jacques Monod, Jacques Lucien Monod

French biochemist who (with Francois Jacob) explained how genes are activated and suggested the existence of messenger RNA (1910-1976)

— Princeton's WordNet

jacques monod

Monod, Jacques Monod, Jacques Lucien Monod

French biochemist who (with Francois Jacob) explained how genes are activated and suggested the existence of messenger RNA (1910-1976)

— Princeton's WordNet

Simonian

Simonian

one of the followers of Simon Magus; also, an adherent of certain heretical sects in the early Christian church

— Webster Dictionary

Visual Basic

Visual Basic

A programming language developed by Microsoft, broadly descended from BASIC and Pascal and later superseded by VB.NET, in which all programs have a graphical user interface.

— Wiktionary

Byron

Byron

George Gordon (Noel) Byron, 6th Baron Byron (January 22, 1788u2013April 19, 1824), a famous English poet and leading figure in romanticism.

— Wiktionary

Simon Marks, 1st Baron Marks of Broughton

Simon Marks, 1st Baron Marks of Broughton

Simon Marks, 1st Baron Marks of Broughton, was a British Jewish businessman. Marks was born in Leeds and educated at The Manchester Grammar School. In 1907 he inherited a number of "penny bazaars" from his father, Michael Marks, which had been established with Thomas Spencer. With the help of Israel Sieff, he built Marks & Spencer into an icon of British business. Marks was knighted in 1944 and in 1961 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Marks of Broughton, of Sunningdale in the Royal County of Berkshire. He died in December 1964, aged 76, and was succeeded in the barony by his only son Michael.

— Freebase

baronet

baronet, Bart

a member of the British order of honor; ranks below a baron but above a knight

— Princeton's WordNet

bart

baronet, Bart

a member of the British order of honor; ranks below a baron but above a knight

— Princeton's WordNet

adrian

Adrian, Edgar Douglas Adrian, Baron Adrian

English physiologist who conducted research into the function of neurons; 1st baron of Cambridge (1889-1997)

— Princeton's WordNet

edgar douglas adrian

Adrian, Edgar Douglas Adrian, Baron Adrian

English physiologist who conducted research into the function of neurons; 1st baron of Cambridge (1889-1997)

— Princeton's WordNet

baron adrian

Adrian, Edgar Douglas Adrian, Baron Adrian

English physiologist who conducted research into the function of neurons; 1st baron of Cambridge (1889-1997)

— Princeton's WordNet

François Certain Canrobert

François Certain Canrobert

François Certain de Canrobert, usually known as François Certain-Canrobert and later simply as Maréchal Canrobert, was a marshal of France.

— Freebase

jean-claude duvalier

Duvalier, Jean-Claude Duvalier, Baby Doc

son and successor of Francois Duvalier as president of Haiti; he was overthrown by a mass uprising in 1986 (born in 1951)

— Princeton's WordNet

baby doc

Duvalier, Jean-Claude Duvalier, Baby Doc

son and successor of Francois Duvalier as president of Haiti; he was overthrown by a mass uprising in 1986 (born in 1951)

— Princeton's WordNet

duvalier

Duvalier, Jean-Claude Duvalier, Baby Doc

son and successor of Francois Duvalier as president of Haiti; he was overthrown by a mass uprising in 1986 (born in 1951)

— Princeton's WordNet

rabelaisian

Rabelaisian

of or relating to or characteristic of Francois Rabelais or his works

— Princeton's WordNet

Tolt

Tolt

a writ by which a cause pending in a court baron was removed into a country court

— Webster Dictionary

henry iii

Henry III

son of King John and king of England from 1216 to 1272; his incompetence aroused baronial opposition led by Simon de Montfort (1207-1272)

— Princeton's WordNet

peer

peer

a nobleman (duke or marquis or earl or viscount or baron) who is a member of the British peerage

— Princeton's WordNet

Viscount Northcliffe

Viscount Northcliffe

Viscount Northcliffe, of St Peter in the County of Kent, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, It was created in 1918 for the press baron Alfred Harmsworth, 1st Baron Northcliffe. He had already been created a baronet in 1904 and Baron Northcliffe, of the Isle of Thanet in the County of Kent, in 1905. All these titles became extinct on his death in 1922. Lord Northcliffe was the elder brother of Harold Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Rothermere, Cecil Harmsworth, 1st Baron Harmsworth, Sir Leicester Harmsworth, 1st Baronet and Sir Hildebrand Harmsworth, 1st Baronet.

— Freebase

Pascal's Wager

Pascal's Wager

Pascal's Wager is an argument in apologetic philosophy which was devised by the seventeenth-century French philosopher, mathematician, and physicist, Blaise Pascal. It posits that humans all bet with their lives either that God exists or does not exist. Given the possibility that God actually does exist and assuming the infinite gain or loss associated with belief in God or with unbelief, a rational person should live as though God exists and seek to believe in God. If God does not actually exist, such a person will have only a finite loss. Pascal formulated the wager within a Christian framework. The wager was set out in section 233 of Pascal's posthumously published Pensées. Pensées, meaning thoughts, was the name given to the collection of unpublished notes which, after Pascal's death, were assembled to form an incomplete treatise on Christian apologetics. Historically, Pascal's Wager was groundbreaking because it charted new territory in probability theory, marked the first formal use of decision theory, and anticipated future philosophies such as existentialism, pragmatism, and voluntarism.

— Freebase

Port-royalist

Port-royalist

one of the dwellers in the Cistercian convent of Port Royal des Champs, near Paris, when it was the home of the Jansenists in the 17th century, among them being Arnauld, Pascal, and other famous scholars. Cf. Jansenist

— Webster Dictionary

Zohar

Zohar

a Jewish cabalistic book attributed by tradition to Rabbi Simon ben Yochi, who lived about the end of the 1st century, a. d. Modern critics believe it to be a compilation of the 13th century

— Webster Dictionary

Baroness

Baroness

a baron's wife; also, a lady who holds the baronial title in her own right; as, the Baroness Burdett-Coutts

— Webster Dictionary

Baron Verulam

Baron Verulam

The title Baron Verulam was created in two separate and unrelated instances: first as Baron Verulam, of Verulam, in the Peerage of England, then secondly as Baron Verulam, of Gorhambury in the County of Hertford in the Peerage of Great Britain. It was firstly created for the English philosopher and statesman Sir Francis Bacon, and secondly created for James Grimston, 3rd Viscount Grimston.

— Freebase

Court-baron

Court-baron

an inferior court of civil jurisdiction, attached to a manor, and held by the steward; a baron's court; -- now fallen into disuse

— Webster Dictionary

Zohar

Zohar

A Jewish cabalistic book attributed by tradition to Rabbi Simon ben Yochi, who lived about the end of the 1st century AD. Modern critics believe it to be a compilation of the 13th century.

— Wiktionary

colombia

Colombia, Republic of Colombia

a republic in northwestern South America with a coastline on the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea; achieved independence from Spain in 1821 under the leadership of Simon Bolivar; Spanish is the official language

— Princeton's WordNet

republic of colombia

Colombia, Republic of Colombia

a republic in northwestern South America with a coastline on the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea; achieved independence from Spain in 1821 under the leadership of Simon Bolivar; Spanish is the official language

— Princeton's WordNet

Pascal's law

Pascal's law

Pascal's law or the principle of transmission of fluid-pressure is a principle in fluid mechanics that states that pressure exerted anywhere in a confined incompressible fluid is transmitted equally in all directions throughout the fluid such that the pressure ratio remains the same. The law was established by French mathematician Blaise Pascal.

— Freebase

François Fénelon

François Fénelon

François de Salignac de la Mothe-Fénelon, more commonly known as François Fénelon, was a French Roman Catholic archbishop, theologian, poet and writer. He today is remembered mostly as the author of The Adventures of Telemachus, first published in 1699.

— Freebase

Baron

Baron

a husband; as, baron and feme, husband and wife

— Webster Dictionary

Blaise Pascal

Blaise Pascal

Blaise Pascal was a French mathematician, physicist, inventor, writer and Christian philosopher. He was a child prodigy who was educated by his father, a tax collector in Rouen. Pascal's earliest work was in the natural and applied sciences where he made important contributions to the study of fluids, and clarified the concepts of pressure and vacuum by generalizing the work of Evangelista Torricelli. Pascal also wrote in defense of the scientific method. In 1642, while still a teenager, he started some pioneering work on calculating machines. After three years of effort and fifty prototypes, he invented the mechanical calculator. He built 20 of these machines in the following ten years. Pascal was an important mathematician, helping create two major new areas of research: he wrote a significant treatise on the subject of projective geometry at the age of 16, and later corresponded with Pierre de Fermat on probability theory, strongly influencing the development of modern economics and social science. Following Galileo and Torricelli, in 1646 he refuted Aristotle's followers who insisted that nature abhors a vacuum. Pascal's results caused many disputes before being accepted.

— Freebase

Santorin

Santorin

Santorin is a German Drum 'n' Bass record label founded in 1999, and is dedicated to the more 'soulful' side of the genre, as described by label founder Simon Jarosch. Popular artist include: Simon V, Young Ax.

— Freebase

Viscount

Viscount

a nobleman of the fourth rank, next in order below an earl and next above a baron; also, his degree or title of nobility. See Peer, n., 3

— Webster Dictionary

Lord

Lord

A British aristocratic title used as a form of address for a marquess, earl or viscount; the usual style for a baron; a courtesy title for a younger son of a duke or marquess

— Wiktionary

John Gerard

John Gerard

John Gerard aka John Gerarde was a botanist and herbalist. He maintained a large herbal garden in London. His chief notability is as the author of a big – 1480 pages – and heavily illustrated Herball, or Generall Historie of Plantes. First published in 1597, it was the most widely circulated botany book in English in the 17th century. Except for the additions of a number of plants from his own garden and from North America, Gerard's Herbal is largely an English translation of Rembert Dodoens Herbal of 1554, itself also highly popular. Gerard's Herball is profusely illustrated with high-quality drawings of plants, with the printer's woodcuts for the drawings largely coming from Dodoens' book and from other Continental European sources. A couple of decades after Gerard's death, his Herbal was corrected and expanded, which strengthened the book's position in the 17th century. The botanical genus Gerardia is named in his honour.

— Freebase

Peer

Peer

a nobleman; a member of one of the five degrees of the British nobility, namely, duke, marquis, earl, viscount, baron; as, a peer of the realm

— Webster Dictionary

Simkin

Simkin

Simkin is a scripting language that can be embedded in Java or C++ applications. It can be stored in a variety of file formats, including XML. It was invented by Simon Whiteside. The language's name is based on Simon Whiteside's, 'Simkin' being a Victorian pet-name for 'Simon'. The ManuScript language used by plug-ins for the Sibelius notation program is based on Simkin.

— Freebase

Simon Magus

Simon Magus

Simon the Sorcerer or Simon the Magician, in Latin Simon Magus, was a Samaritan magus or religious figure and a convert to Christianity, baptised by Philip the Evangelist, whose later confrontation with Peter is recorded in Acts 8:9–24. The sin of simony, or paying for position and influence in the church, is named for Simon. The Apostolic Constitutions also accuses him of lawlessness. According to Recognitions, Simon's parents were named Antonius and Rachel. Surviving traditions about Simon appear in anti-heretical texts, such as those of Irenaeus, Justin Martyr, Hippolytus, and Epiphanius, where he is often regarded as the source of all heresies. Justin wrote that nearly all the Samaritans in his time were adherents of a certain Simon of Gitta, a village not far from Flavia Neapolis. Irenaeus held him as being one of the founders of Gnosticism and the sect of the Simonians. Hippolytus quotes from a work he attributes to Simon or his followers the Simonians, Apophasis Megale, or Great Declaration. According to the early church heresiologists Simon is also supposed to have written several lost treatises, two of which bear the titles The Four Quarters of the World and The Sermons of the Refuter.

— Freebase

Brethren of the Common Life

Brethren of the Common Life

a Dutch branch of the "Friends of God," founded at Deventer by Gerard Groote.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

François de Salignac de la Mothe-Fénelon

François de Salignac de la Mothe-Fénelon

François de Salignac de la Mothe Fénelon was a Sulpician missionary in New France. He was ten years older than his half-brother, François Fénelon, Archbishop of Cambrai. Little is known of François in his early years until he left for the missions of New France in 1667 as yet not an ordained priest. Bishop Laval took care of this matter, ordaining him in June, 1668. He and M. Trouvé left almost immediately to establish a mission for the Iroquois, at their request, near the Bay of Quinte on Lake Ontario..

— Freebase

Saint-Simonian

Saint-Simonian

a follower of the Count de St. Simon, who died in 1825, and who maintained that the principle of property held in common, and the just division of the fruits of common labor among the members of society, are the true remedy for the social evils which exist

— Webster Dictionary

Enfantin, Barthélemy Prosper

Enfantin, Barthélemy Prosper

a Socialist and journalist, born in Paris, adopted the views of Saint-Simon (q. v.); held subversive views on the marriage laws, which involved him in some trouble; wrote a useful and sensible book on Algerian colonisation, and several works, mainly interpretative of the theories of Saint-Simon (1796-1864).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Simon Says

Simon Says

Simon Says is a child's game for 3 or more players where 1 player takes the role of "Simon" and issues instructions to the other players, which should only be followed if prefaced with the phrase "Simon says", for example, "Simon says, jump in the air". Players are eliminated from the game by either following instructions that are not immediately preceded by the trigger phrase or by failing to follow an instruction which does include the phrase "Simon says". It is the ability to distinguish between valid and invalid commands, rather than physical ability, that usually matters in the game; in most cases, the action just needs to be attempted. The object for the player acting as Simon is to get all the other players out as quickly as possible; the winner of the game is usually the last player who has successfully followed all of the given commands. Occasionally however, 2 or more of the last players may all be eliminated by following a command without "Simon Says", thus resulting in Simon winning the game. The game is well embedded in popular culture, with numerous references in films, music and literature.

— Freebase

Optimedica

Optimedica

OptiMedica® Corporation is a medical device company dedicated to working with ophthalmologists to evolve standards of care which provide significant benefits to both physicians and patients. Located in Santa Clara California, the company was founded in January 2004 to develop a radically new technology for the treatment of ocular disease. Initially developed at Stanford University, and exclusively licensed to the OptiMedica Corporation, the PASCAL® Method of Photocoagulation is used to treat a variety of retinal conditions including diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and retinal vascular occlusive disease. The PASCAL Photocoagulator provides significantly improved performance for the physician and an enhanced therapeutic experience for the patient.

— Freebase

Pascal's triangle

Pascal's triangle

In mathematics, Pascal's triangle is a triangular array of the binomial coefficients. It is named after the French mathematician Blaise Pascal in much of the Western world, although other mathematicians studied it centuries before him in India, Greece, Iran, China, Germany, and Italy. The rows of Pascal's triangle are conventionally enumerated starting with row n = 0 at the top. The entries in each row are numbered from the left beginning with k = 0 and are usually staggered relative to the numbers in the adjacent rows. A simple construction of the triangle proceeds in the following manner. On row 0, write only the number 1. Then, to construct the elements of following rows, add the number above and to the left with the number above and to the right to find the new value. If either the number to the right or left is not present, substitute a zero in its place. For example, the first number in the first row is 0 + 1 = 1, whereas the numbers 1 and 3 in the third row are added to produce the number 4 in the fourth row. This construction is related to the binomial coefficients by Pascal's rule, which says that if then for any nonnegative integer n and any integer k between 0 and n.

— Freebase

Vitalic

Vitalic

Pascal Arbez better known by his stage name Vitalic is an electronic music artist. He was born in France.

— Freebase

Decal

Decal

A decal or transfer is a plastic, cloth, paper or ceramic substrate that has printed on it a pattern or image that can be moved to another surface upon contact, usually with the aid of heat or water. The word is short for decalcomania, which is the English version of the French word décalcomanie. The technique was invented by Simon François Ravenet, an engraver from France who later moved to England and perfected the process he called "decalquer"; it became widespread during the decal craze of the late 19th century.

— Freebase

Pensées

Pensées

The Pensées represented a defense of the Christian religion by Blaise Pascal, the renowned 17th century philosopher and mathematician. Pascal's religious conversion led him into a life of asceticism, and the Pensées was in many ways his life's work. The concept "Pascal's Wager" stems from a portion of this work. The Pensées is in fact a name given posthumously to his fragments, which he had been preparing for an Apology for the Christian Religion and which was never completed. Although the Pensées appears to consist of ideas and jottings, some of which are incomplete, it is believed that Pascal had, prior to his death in 1662, already planned out the order of the book and had begun the task of cutting and pasting his draft notes into a coherent form. His task incomplete, subsequent editors have disagreed on the order, if any, in which his writings should be read. Those responsible for his effects, failing to recognize the basic structure of the work, handed them over to be edited, and they were published in 1669. The first English translation was made in 1688 by John Walker. It was not until the beginning of the 20th century that scholars began to understand Pascal's intention. In the 1990s, decisive philological achievements were made, and the edition by Philippe Sellier of the book contains his "thoughts" in more or less the order he left them.

— Freebase

Robber baron

Robber baron

A robber baron or robber knight was an unscrupulous and despotic noble of the medieval period in Europe. The term has slightly different meanings in different countries. In modern U.S. parlance, the term is also used to describe unscrupulous industrialists. Robber baron behavior among the Germanic warrior class in medieval Europe indirectly led to the Catholic innovations of the Peace and Truce of God.

— Freebase

Pascal

Pascal

The pascal is the SI derived unit of pressure, internal pressure, stress, Young's modulus and tensile strength, named after the French mathematician, physicist, inventor, writer, and philosopher Blaise Pascal. It is a measure of force per unit area, defined as one newton per square meter. Common multiple units of the pascal are the hectopascal, kilopascal, megapascal, and gigapascal. On Earth, standard atmospheric pressure is 101,325 Pa. Meteorological barometric pressure reports typically report atmospheric pressure in hectopascals. The kilopascal is used in other applications such as inflation guidance markings on bicycle tires. One hectopascal corresponds to about 0.1% of atmospheric pressure slightly above sea level; one kilopascal is about 1% of atmospheric pressure. One hectopascal is equivalent to one millibar; one standard atmosphere is exactly equal to 101.325 kPa or 1013.25 hPa or 101325 Pa. The corresponding Imperial unit is pounds per square inch.

— Freebase

ST Dupont

ST Dupont

ST Dupont Paris is a brand name and manufacturer of lighters, collectible pens, handbags, perfumes, cigarette, and recently other gadgets using the trademark diamond-head pattern. The company has been producing luxury items since 1872 when founded by Simon Tissot Dupont. The founder of the brand, Simon Tissot-Dupont was born in Savoy in 1847. S.T. Dupont owes its initials to him.

— Freebase

Daniel Auber

Daniel Auber

Daniel François Esprit Auber was a French composer.

— Freebase

Paul Simon

Paul Simon

Paul Frederic Simon is an American musician and singer-songwriter. Simon's fame, influence, and commercial success began as part of the duo Simon & Garfunkel, formed in 1964 with musical partner Art Garfunkel. Simon wrote most of the pair's songs, including three that reached No. 1 on the U.S. singles charts: "The Sound of Silence", "Mrs. Robinson", and "Bridge Over Troubled Water". The duo split up in 1970 at the height of their popularity, and Simon began a successful solo career as a guitarist and singer-songwriter, recording three highly acclaimed albums over the next five years. In 1986, he released Graceland, an album inspired by South African township music. Simon also wrote and starred in the film One-Trick Pony and co-wrote the Broadway musical The Capeman with the poet Derek Walcott. Simon has earned 12 Grammys for his solo and collaborative work, including the Lifetime Achievement Award. In 2001, he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and in 2006 was selected as one of the "100 People Who Shaped the World" by Time magazine. Among many other honors, Simon was the first recipient of the Library of Congress's Gershwin Prize for Popular Song in 2007. In 1986 Simon was awarded an Honorary Doctor of Music degree from Berklee College of Music where he currently serves on the Board of Trustees.

— Freebase

Gerard

Gerard

Gerard is a Japanese progressive rock band. The current members are : ⁕Toshio Egawa : keyboards ⁕Kenichi Fujimoto : drums ⁕Atsushi Hasegawa : bass

— Freebase

St. Simonians

St. Simonians

. See St. Simon, Comte de.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Simon

Simon

Simon is an electronic game of memory skill invented by Ralph H. Baer and Howard J. Morrison, with software programming by Lenny Cope, and manufactured and distributed by Milton Bradley. Simon was launched in 1978 at Studio 54 in New York City and was an immediate success, becoming a pop culture symbol of the 1970s and 1980s.

— Freebase

Baron Adrian

Baron Adrian

Baron Adrian, of Cambridge in the County of Cambridge, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 27 January 1955 for the electrophysiologist and Nobel Prize recipient Edgar Adrian. He was succeeded by his only son, the second Baron. He was Professor of cell physiology at the University of Cambridge. He was childless and the title became extinct on his death in 1995.

— Freebase

John Braine

John Braine

John Gerard Braine was an English novelist. Braine is usually associated with the Angry Young Men movement.

— Freebase

Baronet

Baronet

a dignity or degree of honor next below a baron and above a knight, having precedency of all orders of knights except those of the Garter. It is the lowest degree of honor that is hereditary. The baronets are commoners

— Webster Dictionary

Brethren of the Common Life

Brethren of the Common Life

The Brethren of the Common Life was a Roman Catholic pietist religious community founded in the Netherlands in the 14th century by Gerard Groote, formerly a successful and worldly educator who had had a religious experience and preached a life of simple devotion to Jesus Christ. Without taking up irrevocable vows, the Brethren banded together in communities, giving up their worldly goods to live chaste and strictly regulated lives in common houses, devoting every waking hour to attending divine service, reading and preaching of sermons, labouring productively, and taking meals in common that were accompanied by the reading aloud of Scripture: "judged from the ascetic discipline and intention of this life, it had few features which distinguished it from life in a monastery", observes Hans Baron.

— Freebase

Napier's rods

Napier's rods

a set of rods, made of bone or other material, each divided into nine spaces, and containing the numbers of a column of the multiplication table; -- a contrivance of Baron Napier, the inventor of logarithms, for facilitating the operations of multiplication and division

— Webster Dictionary

François de Malherbe

François de Malherbe

François de Malherbe was a French poet, critic, and translator.

— Freebase

Pressure

Pressure

Pressure is the ratio of force to the area over which that force is distributed. Pressure is force per unit area applied in a direction perpendicular to the surface of an object. Gauge pressure is the pressure relative to the local atmospheric or ambient pressure. Pressure is measured in any unit of force divided by any unit of area. The SI unit of pressure is which is called the pascal after the seventeenth-century philosopher and scientist Blaise Pascal. A pressure of 1 Pa is small; it approximately equals the pressure exerted by a dollar bill resting flat on a table. Everyday pressures are often stated in kilopascals.

— Freebase

Nathalie...

Nathalie...

Nathalie... is a 2003 French drama film directed by Anne Fontaine, and starring Fanny Ardant, Emmanuelle Béart, and Gérard Depardieu.

— Freebase

Free Press

Free Press

Free Press was a book publishing imprint of Simon and Schuster. It was one of the best-known imprints specializing in serious nonfiction. In 2012, it ceased to exist as a distinct imprint entity and merged into Simon & Schuster, the company's flagship imprint, however some books would still be published using the Free Press imprimatur.

— Freebase

Signum

Signum

Signum is the name for two European producers, Pascal Minnaard and Ronald Hagen They are producers who create and remix mainly trance music.

— Freebase

Kering

Kering

Kering is a French multinational holding company which develops a worldwide brand portfolio distributed in 120 countries. The company was founded in 1963 by the businessman François Pinault and is now run by his son François-Henri Pinault. It is quoted on Euronext Paris and is a constituent of the CAC 40 index. On 22 March 2013, Pinault announced that the group would rename itself as Kering, and was approved by shareholders on 18 June 2013.

— Freebase

Anticipation

Anticipation

Anticipation is singer-songwriter Carly Simon's second studio album, released in 1971. It is best known for its title track, "Anticipation", which was a top-twenty chart hit in the U.S.; it was later used as the soundtrack for a television commercial for Heinz ketchup in the late 1970s. The song relates Simon's state of mind as she waits to go on a date with Cat Stevens.

— Freebase

Simon Fisher Turner

Simon Fisher Turner

Simon Fisher Turner is a film score composer and actor.

— Freebase

Microsystems

Microsystems

Microsystems was a personal computing magazine founded by Sol Libes and published from January 1980 to November 1984. Oriented toward the home and business personal computer user, it included an editorial page, letters from readers, technical articles, and advertisements. As a historical reference, it is notable for chronicling in detail the early days of the personal computer. Topics covered in its issues included: ⁕IEEE-696 / S-100 bus systems ⁕the CP/M operating systems from Digital Research: CP/M-80, CP/M Plus, CP/M-86, and MP/M ⁕the MS-DOS operating system from Microsoft ⁕implementations of the PL/I language: PL/I-80 and PL/I-86 from Digital Research ⁕the Turbo Pascal and UCSD Pascal languages ⁕the 8080, Z80, 8086, and 80286 microprocessors

— Freebase

Montyon Prizes

Montyon Prizes

Montyon Prizes are a series of prizes awarded annually by the Académie Française. They were endowed by the French benefactor Baron de Montyon. Prior to start of the French Revolution, the Baron de Montyon established a series of prizes to be given away by the Académie Française, the Académie des Sciences, and the Académie Nationale de Médecine. These were abolished by the National Convention, but were taken up again when Baron de Montyon returned to France in 1815. When he died, he bequeathed a large sum of money for the perpetual endowment of four annual prizes. The endowed prizes were as follows: ⁕Making an industrial process less unhealthy ⁕Perfecting of any technical improvement in a mechanical process ⁕Book which during the year rendered the greatest service to humanity ⁕The "prix de vertu" for the most courageous act on the part of a poor Frenchman These prizes were considered by some to be a forerunner of the Nobel Prize.

— Freebase

Domat, Jean

Domat, Jean

a learned French jurist and friend of Pascal, regarded laws and customs as the reflex of political history (1625-1696).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Louis XVII.

Louis XVII.

second son of the preceding, shut up in the Temple, was, after the execution of his mother, proclaimed king by the Emigrants, and handed over in his prison to the care of one Simon, a shoemaker, in service about the prison, to bring him up in the principles of Sansculottism; Simon taught him to drink, dance, and sing the carmagnole; he died in prison "amid squalor and darkness," his shirt not changed for six months (1785-1796).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Red Baron

Red Baron

Red Baron is a critically acclaimed video game for the PC, created by Damon Slye at Dynamix and published by Sierra Entertainment. It was released in 1990. As the name suggests, the game is a flying simulation set on the Western Front of World War I. The player can engage in single missions or career mode, flying for either the German Air Service or the Royal Flying Corps. In the course of the game the player might find himself either flying in the Red Baron's squadron Jasta 11, or encountering him as an enemy above the front.

— Freebase

Gerard P. Kuiper

Gerard P. Kuiper

Gerard Peter Kuiper, Netherlands; died December 24, 1973 in Mexico City, was a Netherlands-born American astronomer after whom the Kuiper belt was named.

— Freebase

stabs

stabs

stabs is a debugging data format for storing information about computer programs for use by symbolic and source-level debuggers. It "was apparently invented by Peter Kessler at the University of California, Berkeley" for use with a Pascal compiler.

— Freebase

thane

thane

in Anglo-Saxon England, a man holding lands from the king, or from a superior in rank. There were two orders, the king's thanes, who attended the kings in their courts and held lands immediately of them, and the ordinary thanes, who were lords of manors and who had particular jurisdiction within their limits. After the Norman Conquest, this title was no longer used, and baron took its place.

— Wiktionary

Grater

Grater

A grater is a kitchen utensil used to grate foods into fine pieces. It was invented by François Boullier in the 1540s.

— Freebase

Peter Simon Pallas

Peter Simon Pallas

Peter Simon Pallas was a German zoologist and botanist who worked in Russia.

— Freebase

RMS

RMS

RMS is a jazz fusion band formed in 1982. It consists of three well known and acclaimed British session musicians. Guitarist, Ray Russell, bass player, Mo Foster and drummer Simon Phillips. As of mid-2007 RMS have started touring the UK. Due to his commitments with Toto, Simon Phillips has been replaced with Gary Husband. They have performed a few small shows in the south of England with further shows planned throughout the UK in 2008.

— Freebase

Komputer

Komputer

Komputer is a London-based electronic band, composed of Simon Leonard and David Baker.

— Freebase

Grounding: The Last Days of Swissair

Grounding: The Last Days of Swissair

Grounding - Die letzten Tage der Swissair is a film about the collapse in 2001 of Swissair, Switzerland's national airline, by Michael Steiner and Tobias Fueter, presented in January 2006. Producers: Peter-Christian Fueter & Pascal Najadi.

— Freebase

Monsun

Monsun

Monsun was a bay Thoroughbred racehorse and stallion bred in Germany by Gestut Isarland and owned by Baron Georg von Ullmann.

— Freebase

Acol

Acol

Acol is the bridge bidding system that, according to The Official Encyclopedia of Bridge, is "standard in British tournament play and widely used in other parts of the world". It is named after the Acol Bridge Club, previously located on Acol Road in London NW6, where the system started to evolve in the late 1920s. According to Terence Reese, its main devisers were Maurice Harrison-Gray, Jack Marx and S. J. Simon. Marx himself, writing in the Contract Bridge Journal in December, 1952, said: "...the Acol system was pieced together by Skid Simon and myself the best part of 20 years ago." In another account, Marx and Simon... The first book on the system was written by Ben Cohen and Terence Reese. Skid Simon explained the principles that lay behind the system, and the system was further popularised in Britain by Iain Macleod. The Acol system is continually evolving but the underlying principle is to keep the bidding as natural as possible. It is common in the British Commonwealth but rarely played in the United States.

— Freebase

Homeward Bound

Homeward Bound

"Homeward Bound" is an American folk song written by Paul Simon, performed by Simon and Garfunkel, produced by Bob Johnston and recorded on December 14, 1965. The song debuted on the Billboard Hot 100 Chart on February 12, 1966, peaking at #5 and remained on the charts for 12 weeks. It describes Simon's longing to return home to his then girlfriend, Kathy Chitty, who was in London. It is uncertain exactly where the song was written: in an interview with Paul Zollo for SongTalk Magazine, Art Garfunkel says that Simon wrote the song in a railway station "around Manchester" while in an earlier interview for Playboy Magazine Simon stated that the railway station was in Liverpool. It is likely, however, that it was written at Widnes railway station during a long wait for a train, when traveling back from Widnes, where he had been playing; a commemorative plaque is displayed on the wall of the Liverpool-bound waiting room. A live version of the song takes the place on the studio version of the compilation Simon and Garfunkel's Greatest Hits, and its performance from the duo's legendary 1981 reunion concert appeared on the subsequent live album; Simon himself has performed the song with other artists such as George Harrison and Willie Nelson. Several artists have covered this song, including The Beau Brummels, Cher, Glen Campbell, Janie Fricke, Davey Graham, Jack Jones, Jack's Mannequin, Petula Clark, Cliff Richard, Ronan Keating, and The New Christy Minstrels.

— Freebase

Lady

Lady

a woman of social distinction or position. In England, a title prefixed to the name of any woman whose husband is not of lower rank than a baron, or whose father was a nobleman not lower than an earl. The wife of a baronet or knight has the title of Lady by courtesy, but not by right

— Webster Dictionary

Pascal Ohsé

Pascal Ohsé

Pascal Ohsé, known also by his stage name Soel, is a French jazz trumpeter. He is perhaps best known for his contributions to albums Boulevard and Tourist by St. Germain. In 2003 he released the album Memento under his stage name.

— Freebase

Ivan IV

Ivan IV

Ivan IV is an opera in five acts by Georges Bizet, with a libretto by Francois-Hippolyte Leroy and Henri Trianon.

— Freebase

Thane

Thane

a dignitary under the Anglo-Saxons and Danes in England. Of these there were two orders, the king's thanes, who attended the kings in their courts and held lands immediately of them, and the ordinary thanes, who were lords of manors and who had particular jurisdiction within their limits. After the Conquest, this title was disused, and baron took its place

— Webster Dictionary

Bossut, Charles

Bossut, Charles

French mathematician, born near Lyons, confrère of the Encyclopaedists; his chief work "L'Histoire Générale des Mathématiques"; edited Pascal's works (1730-1814).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Barons' War

Barons' War

a war in England of the barons against Henry III., headed by Simon de Montfort, and which lasted from 1258 to 1265.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Baron

Baron

Baron is a title of honour, often hereditary, and ranked as one of the lowest titles in the various nobiliary systems of Europe.

— Freebase

Gatecrasher

Gatecrasher

Gatecrasher is an international clubbing brand made famous by the "Gatecrasher" dance music events held at the "Gatecrasher One" nightclub in Sheffield, England, during the late 1990s and early 2000s. The event received numerous awards, including "Club Of The Year" at the Ericsson Muzik Magazine Dance Awards in 1998. The promoters for the brand are Simon Raine, Simon Oates and, until 2004, Scott Bond. As of 2011, there are three permanent Gatecrasher venues located in the United Kingdom cities of Birmingham, Watford and Nottingham.

— Freebase

Joseph François Dupleix

Joseph François Dupleix

Joseph-François, Marquis Dupleix was governor general of the French establishment in India, and the rival of Robert Clive.

— Freebase

Nereid

Nereid

Nereid is the third-largest moon of Neptune. It has a highly eccentric orbit. It was the second moon of Neptune to be discovered, by Gerard Kuiper in 1949.

— Freebase

High Tide

High Tide

High Tide was a band formed in 1969 by Tony Hill, Simon House, Peter Pavli and Roger Hadden.

— Freebase

Jean-François Berthelier

Jean-François Berthelier

Jean-François-Philibert Berthelier was a French actor and singer, who performed many light tenor roles in opéra-comique and opéra-bouffe.

— Freebase

Viscount

Viscount

A viscount or viscountess is a member of the European nobility whose comital title ranks usually, as in the British peerage, below an earl or a count and above a baron.

— Freebase

8vo

8vo

8vo is a London-based graphic design firm formed in 1985 by Simon Johnston, Mark Holt and Hamish Muir.

— Freebase

Dow

Dow

or Douw, Gerard, a distinguished Dutch genre-painter, born at Leyden; a pupil of Rembrandt; his works, which are very numerous, are the fruit of a devoted study of nature, and are remarkable for their delicacy and perfection of finish; examples of his works are found in all the great galleries of Europe (1613-1675).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Fireback

Fireback

Fireback is a Filipino low-budget action movie directed by Teddy Page and starring Richard Harrison, Bruce Baron, James Gaines, Ann Milhench, Gwendolyn Hung, Mike Monty, Ronnie Patterson, and Ruel Vernal.

— Freebase

Victor Horta

Victor Horta

Victor, Baron Horta was a Belgian architect and designer. John Julius Norwich described him as "undoubtedly the key European Art Nouveau architect." Indeed, Horta is one of the most important names in Art Nouveau architecture; the construction of his Hôtel Tassel in Brussels in 1892-3 means that he is sometimes credited as the first to introduce the style to architecture from the decorative arts. The French architect Hector Guimard was deeply influenced by Horta and further spread the "whiplash" style in France and abroad. In 1932 King Albert I of Belgium conferred on Horta the title of Baron for his services to architecture. Four of the buildings he designed have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

— Freebase

Pirates

Pirates

Pirates is a 1986 Franco-Tunisian adventure comedy film written by Gérard Brach, John Brownjohn, and Roman Polanski and directed by Polanski. It was screened out of competition at the 1986 Cannes Film Festival.

— Freebase

Champollion

Champollion

Champollion was a planned cometary rendezvous and landing spacecraft. It was named after Jean-François Champollion, a French Egyptologist known for translating the Rosetta stone.

— Freebase

Jean-Francois Millet

Jean-Francois Millet

Jean-Francois Millet is a fictional character in Mark Twain's play Is He Dead?, named after the famous French painter of the same name.

— Freebase

Homosex: Sixty Years of Gay Erotica

Homosex: Sixty Years of Gay Erotica

Homosex: Sixty Years of Gay Erotica is an edition of a book edited by Simon Sheppard.

— Freebase

Capnomor

Capnomor

Capnomor is a colorless and limpid oil with a peculiar odor, extracted by distillation from beechwood tar. It was discovered in the 1830s by the German chemist Baron Karl von Reichenbach.

— Freebase

Hotcakes

Hotcakes

Hotcakes is singer-songwriter Carly Simon's fourth studio album. Released in 1974, it became one of her biggest selling albums. The album featured the hits "Mockingbird", a duet with her then-husband James Taylor, and "Haven't Got Time for the Pain", as well as many other songs that reflected Simon's upbeat mood during her pregnancy with her first child. On the album cover, Simon sits in a gleamingly white kitchen, robustly pregnant, smiling brightly and wearing a somewhat bohemian white linen dress. The album went gold immediately and it stayed on the charts for eight months, yet it was initially overshadowed commercially by two other major albums released by Simon's own label, Elektra/Asylum, in the same month as Hotcakes, Joni Mitchell's Court and Spark and Bob Dylan's Planet Waves. These took the #2 and #1 spots, respectively, on the Billboard album chart while Hotcakes peaked at #3. Hotcakes went on to sell several hundred thousand more copies than Dylan's album and was listed in the Top 40 of Billboard's Year End Top albums for 1974, while Planet Waves did not make the Top 50.

— Freebase

Fabre d'Églantine

Fabre d'Églantine

Philippe François Nazaire Fabre d'Églantine, commonly known as Fabre d'Églantine, was a French actor, dramatist, poet, and politician of the French Revolution.

— Freebase

Lifeform

Lifeform

Lifeform is a fictional character, a comic book supervillain in the Marvel Comics Universe. Created by Mike Baron and Neil Hansen, the character first appears in Punisher Annual #3, Vol. 1.

— Freebase

Bulk modulus

Bulk modulus

The bulk modulus of a substance measures the substance's resistance to uniform compression. It is defined as the ratio of the infinitesimal pressure increase to the resulting relative decrease of the volume. Its base unit is the pascal.

— Freebase

Fermat, Pierre de

Fermat, Pierre de

a French mathematician, born near Montauban; made important discoveries in the properties of numbers, and with his friend Pascal invented a calculus of probabilities; was held in high esteem by Hallam, who ranks him next to Descartes (1601-1665).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Hot Under the Collar

Hot Under the Collar

Hot Under the Collar is a 2006 short comedy film written by Brent Katz and directed by Gregg Simon.

— Freebase

NFD

NFD

NFD are a London-based hybrid metal band formed by Peter "Bob" White and Simon Rippin and Tony Pettitt.

— Freebase

Nicole, Pierre

Nicole, Pierre

French divine and moralist, born at Chartres, a Port-Royalist (q. v.), friend of Arnauld and Pascal; was along with the former author of the famous "Port Royal Logic" (1625-1695).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Swietenia

Swietenia

Swietenia is a genus of trees in the chinaberry family, Meliaceae. It occurs natively in the Neotropics, from southern Florida, the Caribbean, Mexico and Central America south to Bolivia. The genus is named for Dutch-Austrian physician Gerard van Swieten.

— Freebase

Fromental Halévy

Fromental Halévy

Jacques-François-Fromental-Élie Halévy, usually known as Fromental Halévy, was a French composer. He is known today largely for his opera La Juive.

— Freebase

Information Processing Language

Information Processing Language

Information Processing Language is a programming language developed by Allen Newell, Cliff Shaw, and Herbert A. Simon at RAND Corporation and the Carnegie Institute of Technology around 1956. Newell had the role of language specifier-application programmer, Shaw was the system programmer, and Simon took the role of application programmer-user. The language includes features intended to support programs that could perform general problem solving, including lists, associations, schemas, dynamic memory allocation, data types, recursion, associative retrieval, functions as arguments, generators, and cooperative multitasking. IPL pioneered the concept of list processing, albeit in an assembly-language style.

— Freebase

Super Star

Super Star

Super Star is an Arabic television show based on the popular British show Pop Idol created by Simon Fuller's 19 Entertainment & developed by Fremantle Media.

— Freebase

SuperStar

SuperStar

Super Star is an Arabic television show based on the popular British show Pop Idol created by Simon Fuller's 19 Entertainment & developed by Fremantle Media.

— Freebase

Sanchez, Thomas

Sanchez, Thomas

a Spanish casuist, born at Cordova; author of a treatise on the "Sacrament of Marriage," rendered notorious from the sarcastic treatment it received at the hands of Pascal and Voltaire (1550-1610).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

JAL

JAL

JAL is a Pascal-like programming language and compiler that generates executable code for PIC microcontrollers. It is a free-format language with a compiler that runs on Linux, MS-Windows and MS-DOS. It is configurable and extendable through the use of libraries and can even be combined with PIC assembly language.

— Freebase

High Maintenance

High Maintenance

High Maintenance is a 2006 short comedy drama romance science fiction film written by Simon Biggs and directed by Phillip Van.

— Freebase

Fools

Fools

Fools is a comic fable by Neil Simon, set in the small village of Kulyenchikov, Ukraine, during the late 19th century.

— Freebase

Bagot

Bagot

Bagot was a federal electoral district in Quebec, Canada, that was represented in the Canadian House of Commons from 1867 to 1935. It was created by the British North America Act of 1867, and was amalgamated into the St. Hyacinthe—Bagot electoral district in 1933. Bagot initially consisted of part of the Township of Upton, the township of Acton and the parishes of Saint Hugues, Saint Simon, Sainte Rosalie, Saint Dominique, St. Helene, St. Liboire and Saint Pie. In 1892, it was redefined to consist of the town of Acton, the village of Upton, and the parishes of St. André d'Acton, St. Ephrem d'Upton, Ste. Hélène, St. Hugues, Ste. Rosalie, St. Simon, St. Théodore d'Acton, St. Marcel and St. Dominique, and those parts of the parishes of St. Nazaire and Ste. Christine that were included in the township of Acton. In 1903, it was redefined to consist of the town of Acton, the village of Upton, and the parishes of St. André d'Acton, St. Ephrem d'Upton, Ste. Hèlène, St. Hugues, St. Liboire, St. Pie, Ste. Rosalie, St. Simon, St. Théodore d'Acton, St. Dominique, St. Nazaire and Ste. Christine. In 1924, it was redefined to consist of the County of Bagot.

— Freebase

bondage and discipline language

bondage and discipline language

A language (such as Pascal, Ada, APL, or Prolog) that, though ostensibly general-purpose, is designed so as to enforce an author's theory of ‘right programming’ even though said theory is demonstrably inadequate for systems hacking or even vanilla general-purpose programming. Often abbreviated ‘B&D’; thus, one may speak of things “having the B&D nature”. See Pascal; oppose languages of choice.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

François Couperin

François Couperin

François Couperin was a French Baroque composer, organist and harpsichordist. He was known as Couperin le Grand to distinguish him from other members of the musically talented Couperin family.

— Freebase

HeTexted

HeTexted

HeTexted: Get advice about dating relationships.Launched in October 2012, with 1.3 million unique visitors.
HeTexted Inc is represented by William Morris Endeavor Agency. Book deals with Simon & Schuster and Random House. TV and film in negotiation.SheTexted.com coming soon…

— CrunchBase

Nobile

Nobile

Nobile or Nob. is an Italian title of nobility ranking between that of baron and knight. As with some other titles of nobility, such as baron or count, nobile is also used immediately before the family name, usually in the abbreviated form: Nob. The word “nobile” is derived from the Latin “nobilis”, meaning honourable. The heraldic coronet of a nobile is composed of a jewelled circlet of gold surmounted by five pearls, either on stems or set directly upon the rim. The armorial shield of a nobile is surmounted by a silver helm displayed in a ¾ side-view and surmounted by the coronet already described. A noble entitled to wear a coronet of noble status also customarily displays it above the shield in the full heraldic achievement associated with the particular title in question.

— Freebase

Simony

Simony

Simony is the act of paying for sacraments and consequently for holy offices or for positions in the hierarchy of a church, named after Simon Magus, who appears in the Acts of the Apostles 8:9-24. Simon Magus was said to have offered two disciples of Jesus, Peter and John, payment so that anyone on whom he would place his hands would receive the power of the Holy Spirit. This is the origin of the term simony; but it also extends to other forms of trafficking for money in "spiritual things". Simony was also one of the important issues during the Investiture Controversy.

— Freebase

Zetten

Zetten

Zetten is a village in the Overbetuwe municipality, Gelderland, Netherlands. The village is located in the Betuwe. This is also the base of the youth-clinic Ottho Gerard Heldringstichting, which was quite famous in the Netherlands.

— Freebase

Montfort, Simon de

Montfort, Simon de

son of a French count; came to England in 1230, where he inherited from his grandmother the earldom of Leicester; attached to Henry III., and married to the king's sister, he was sent to govern Gascony in 1248; returned in 1253, and passed over to the side of the barons, whom he ultimately led in the struggle against the king; after repeated unsuccessful attempts to make Henry observe the Provisions of Oxford, Simon took arms against him in 1263; the war was indecisive, and appeal being made to the arbitration of Louis the Good, Simon, dissatisfied with his award, renewed hostilities, defeated the king at Lewes, and taking him and his son prisoner, governed England for a year (1264-65); he sketched a constitution for the country, and summoned the most representative parliament that had yet met, but as he aimed at the welfare of not the barons only, but the common people as well, the barons began to distrust him, when Prince Edward, having escaped from captivity, joined them, and overthrew Simon at Evesham, where he was slain (1206?-1265).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Scottish feudal lordship

Scottish feudal lordship

A feudal lordship is a Scottish feudal title that is held in baroneum, which Latin term means that its holder, who is called a feudal lord, is also always a feudal baron. A feudal lordship is an ancient title of nobility in Scotland. The holder may or may not be a Lord of Regality, which meant that the holder was appointed by the Crown and had the power of "pit and gallows", meaning the power to authorise the death sentence. A Scottish feudal lord ranks above a Scottish feudal baron, but below a lord of parliament which is a title in the Peerage of Scotland, and below a feudal earldom, which is a feudal barony of still higher degree than a feudal lordship. There are far fewer feudal lordships than feudal baronies, whilst feudal earldoms are very rare. While feudal barons originally sat in parliament, all of the peerage, originally, was within the feudal system. Later, some of what used to be feudal lordships came to be known as peerages while others were sold, inherited by greater peers, or otherwise disqualified from the modern-day peerage. The feudal rights were gradually emasculated and, with the demise of the Scottish parliament in 1707, the right of feudal barons to sit in parliament ceased altogether, unless, that is, a feudal baron was also a Peer.

— Freebase

Entre Nous

Entre Nous

Entre Nous is a 1983 French biographical drama film directed by Diane Kurys, who shares the writing credits with Olivier Cohen. Set in the France of the mid twentieth century, the film stars Isabelle Huppert, Miou-Miou, Guy Marchand, Jean-Pierre Bacri and Christine Pascal. Coup de Foudre means "love at first sight".

— Freebase

Earl Grey

Earl Grey

Earl Grey is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1806 for General Charles Grey, 1st Baron Grey. He had already been created Baron Grey, of Howick in the County of Northumberland, in 1801, and was made Viscount Howick, in the County of Northumberland, at the same time as he was given the earldom. A member of the prominent Grey family of Northumberland, he was the third son of Sir Henry Grey, 1st Baronet, of Howick. Lord Grey was succeeded by his eldest son, Charles, 2nd Earl Grey. He was a prominent Whig politician and served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1830 to 1834, which tenure saw the passing of the Great Reform Act of 1832. In 1808 he also succeeded his uncle as third Baronet, of Howick.

— Freebase

Gerard Manley Hopkins

Gerard Manley Hopkins

Gerard Manley Hopkins was an English poet, Roman Catholic convert, and Jesuit priest, whose posthumous fame established him among the leading Victorian poets. His experimental explorations in prosody and his use of imagery established him as a daring innovator in a period of largely traditional verse.

— Freebase

At the Zoo

At the Zoo

"At the Zoo" was one of Simon's and Garfunkel's single releases in 1967. The song is one of Paul Simon's many tributes to his hometown of New York City. The narrative tells the story of a trip to the Central Park Zoo; when the singer reaches the zoo, he anthropomorphizes the animals in various amusing ways, with a resulting cynical eye towards human life. Such statements as "elephants are kindly, but they're dumb," "antelopes are missionaries" and "pigeons plot in secrecy" reflect more about man than they do about the menagerie. The song was licensed in advertisements for the Bronx Zoo and the San Francisco Zoo in the late 1970s.

— Freebase

Parisine

Parisine

Parisine is a typeface created by Jean-François Porchez. Distributed by Typofonderie. It is used in Paris Métro, tramways, buses and RER parts operated by the RATP in Île-de-France.

— Freebase

Timeslip

Timeslip

Timeslip is a British children's science fiction television series made by ATV for the ITV network and broadcast between 1970 and 1971. The series centres around two children, Simon Randall and Liz Skinner who discover the existence of a strange anomaly, known as the “Time Barrier”, that enables them to travel in time to different historical periods in alternate pasts and futures. The two children have contrasting personalities; whereas Simon is studious, Liz is something of a tomboy, and this often leads to conflict between the two. However, as the series progresses, their antagonism matures into a deep bond of friendship. The main theme of the series is concerned with the way mankind uses – and abuses – science and technology. It explores how the pursuit of scientific knowledge and advancement can lead to the depersonalisation of individuals and the abandonment of moral principles. A secondary theme – explored in the instances where Liz and Simon encounter potential future versions of themselves – concerns the extent to which an individual can change according to the situations encountered in his or her life.

— Freebase

René Magritte

René Magritte

René François Ghislain Magritte was a Belgian surrealist artist. He became well known for a number of witty and thought-provoking images that fell under the umbrella of surrealism. His work challenges observers' preconditioned perceptions of reality.

— Freebase

Alluaudite

Alluaudite

Alluaudite is a relatively common alkaline manganese iron phosphate mineral with formula Mn2+(Fe3+,Mn2+,Fe2+,Mg)2(PO4)3, of secondary origin, related with granitic pegmatites mainly. Named by Alexis Damour in 1847 after François Alluaud.

— Freebase

Geoeconomics

Geoeconomics

Broadly, geoeconomics is the study of the spatial, temporal, and political aspects of economies and resources. The formation of geoeconomics as a branch of geopolitics is often attributed to Edward Luttwak, an American economist and consultant, and Pascal Lorot, a French economist and political scientist.

— Freebase

Breton de los Herreros

Breton de los Herreros

Spanish poet and dramatist; wrote comedies and satires in an easy, flowing style (1800-1873).

Breteuil, Baron de

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Blow Dry

Blow Dry

Blow Dry is a 2001 comedy film directed by Paddy Breathnach, written by Simon Beaufoy and starring Alan Rickman, Natasha Richardson and Josh Hartnett.

— Freebase

Auguste Comte

Auguste Comte

Isidore Auguste Marie François Xavier Comte, better known as Auguste Comte, was a French philosopher. He was a founder of the discipline of sociology and of the doctrine of positivism. He is sometimes regarded as the first philosopher of science in the modern sense of the term. Strongly influenced by the utopian socialist Henri Saint-Simon, Comte developed the positive philosophy in an attempt to remedy the social malaise of the French Revolution, calling for a new social doctrine based on the sciences. Comte was a major influence on 19th-century thought, influencing the work of social thinkers such as Karl Marx, John Stuart Mill, and George Eliot. His concept of sociologie and social evolutionism, though now outdated, set the tone for early social theorists and anthropologists such as Harriet Martineau and Herbert Spencer, evolving into modern academic sociology presented by Émile Durkheim as practical and objective social research. Comte's social theories culminated in the "Religion of Humanity", which influenced the development of religious humanist and secular humanist organizations in the 19th century. Comte likewise coined the word altruisme.

— Freebase

801

801

801 were an English experimental rock band that were originally formed in 1976 for three live concerts by Phil Manzanera Brian Eno Bill MacCormick Francis Monkman Simon Phillips Lloyd Watson.

— Freebase

Charles Gounod

Charles Gounod

Charles-François Gounod was a French composer, most well known for his Ave Maria as well as his opera Faust. Another opera by Gounod is Roméo et Juliette.

— Freebase

Odic force

Odic force

The Odic force is the name given in the mid-19th century to a hypothetical vital energy or life force by Baron Carl von Reichenbach. Von Reichenbach coined the name from that of the Norse god Odin in 1845.

— Freebase

Metatextuality

Metatextuality

Metatextuality is a form of intertextual discourse in which one text makes critical commentary on another text. This concept is related to Gérard Genette's concept of transtextuality in which a text changes or expands on the content of another text.

— Freebase

Nexus

Nexus

Nexus is an American comic book series created by writer Mike Baron and penciler Steve Rude in 1981. The series is a combination of the superhero and science fiction genres, set 500 years in the future.

— Freebase

Pressure gradient

Pressure gradient

In atmospheric sciences, the pressure gradient is a physical quantity that describes which direction and at what rate the pressure changes the most rapidly around a particular location. The pressure gradient is a dimensional quantity expressed in units of pressure per unit length. The SI unit is pascal per meter.

— Freebase

Mechanical calculator

Mechanical calculator

A mechanical calculator, or calculating machine, was a mechanical device used to perform automatically the basic operations of arithmetic. Most mechanical calculators were comparable in size to small desktop computers and have been rendered obsolete by the advent of the electronic calculator. Blaise Pascal invented the mechanical calculator in 1642; it was called Pascal's Calculator or Pascaline and was the only working mechanical calculator in the 17th century. Thomas' arithmometer, the first commercially successful machine, was manufactured two hundred years later in 1851; it was the first mechanical calculator strong enough and reliable enough to be used daily in an office environment. For forty years the arithmometer was the only type of mechanical calculator available for sale. The comptometer, introduced in 1887, was the first machine to use a keyboard which consisted of columns of nine keys for each digit. The Dalton adding machine, manufactured from 1902, was the first to have a 10 key keyboard. Electric motors were used on some mechanical calculators from 1901. In 1961, a comptometer type machine, the Anita mk7 from Sumlock comptometer Ltd., became the first desktop mechanical calculator to receive an all electronic calculator engine, creating the link in between these two industries and marking the beginning of its decline. The production of mechanical calculators came to a stop in the middle of the 1970s closing an industry that had lasted for 120 years.

— Freebase

SISAL

SISAL

SISAL is a general-purpose single assignment functional programming language with strict semantics, implicit parallelism, and efficient array handling. SISAL outputs a dataflow graph in Intermediary Form 1. It was derived from VAL, and adds recursion and finite streams. It has a Pascal-like syntax and was designed to be a common high-level language for numerical programs on a variety of multiprocessors.

— Freebase

Counts of Clermont-Tonnerre

Counts of Clermont-Tonnerre

Clermont-Tonnerre is the name of a French family, members of which played some part in the history of France, especially in Dauphiné, from about 1100 to the French Revolution. Sibaud, lord of Clermont in Viennois, who first appears in 1080, was the founder of the family. His descendant, another Sibaud, commanded some troops which aided Pope Calixtus II in his struggle with the Antipope Gregory VIII; and in return for this service it is said that the pope allowed him to add certain emblems, two keys and a tiara to the arms of his family. A direct descendant, Ainard, called vicomte de Clermont, was granted the dignity of captain-general and first baron of Dauphiné by his suzerain Humbert, dauphin of Viennois, in 1340; and in 1547 Clermont was made a county for Antoine, who was governor of Dauphiné and the French king's lieutenant in Savoy. In 1572, Antoine's son Henri was created a duke, but as this was only a brevet title it did not descend to his son. Henri was killed before La Rochelle in 1573. In 1596 Henri's son, Charles Henri, count of Clermont, added Tonnerre to his heritage; but in 1648 this county was sold by his son and successor, François.

— Freebase

PTU

PTU

PTU, also known as PTU: Police Tactical Unit, is a 2003 Hong Kong crime thriller film produced and directed by Johnnie To, starring Simon Yam, Maggie Shiu, Lam Suet and Ruby Wong.

— Freebase

Hazed

Hazed

Hazed is the 14th book in The Hardy Boys Undercover Brothers series. It was first published in February 2007 by Aladdin Paperbacks an imprint of Simon & Schuster.

— Freebase

François

François

François is the French-language debut album by Desireless, released in 1989. The single "Voyage, voyage" was a chart topper in many European and Asian single charts and sold over five million copies.

— Freebase

Clermont Ferrand

Clermont Ferrand

the ancient capital of Auvergne and chief town of the dep. Puy-de-Dôme; the birthplace of Pascal, Gregory of Tours, and Dessaix, and where, in 1095, Pope Urban II. convoked a council and decided on the first Crusade; it has been the scene of seven Church Councils.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

François Mauriac

François Mauriac

François Charles Mauriac was a French author, member of the Académie française, and laureate of the Nobel Prize in Literature. He was awarded the Grand Cross of the Légion d'honneur in 1958.

— Freebase

Decalcomania

Decalcomania

Decalcomania, from the French décalcomanie, is a decorative technique by which engravings and prints may be transferred to pottery or other materials. It was invented in England about 1750 and imported into the United States at least as early as 1865. Its invention has been attributed to Simon François Ravenet, an engraver from France who later moved to England and perfected the process, which he called "decalquer". The first known use of the French term décalcomanie, in Mary Elizabeth Braddon's Eleanor's Victory, was followed by the English decalcomania in an 1865 trade show catalog; it was popularized during the ceramic transfer craze of the mid-1870s. Today the shortened version is "Decal". The surrealist Oscar Domínguez took up the technique in 1936, using gouache spread thinly on a sheet of paper or other surface, which is then pressed onto another surface such as a canvas. Dominguez used black gouache, though colours later made their appearance. German artist Max Ernst also practiced decalcomania, as did Hans Bellmer and Remedios Varo.

— Freebase

Bon Voyage

Bon Voyage

Bon Voyage is a French film directed by Jean-Paul Rappeneau, released 16 April 2003. The film was a critical success due in part to its tight interweaving of various genres, including spy, romance, World War II, and comedy. The film features the first reteaming of stars Isabelle Adjani and Gérard Depardieu since 1988's Camille Claudel.

— Freebase

The Wake

The Wake

The Wake are a British post-punk and later indie pop band, founded in Glasgow in 1981 by Gerard "Caesar" McInulty, Steven Allen and Joe Donnelly, who was later replaced by Bobby Gillespie, who was subsequently replaced by Alex Macpherson. Steven's sister Carolyn Allen soon joined, and remained in the band thereafter.

— Freebase

Run the Risk

Run the Risk

Run the Risk was a BBC1 children's show, which aired from the latter half of 1992 until the beginning of 1998. It was aired on Saturday mornings during Going Live, and later Live & Kicking, and was later repeated as its own individual show. It was presented by Peter Simon for the entire run alongside Shane Richie, John Eccleston and Bobby Davro, for part of the run. The games the teams had to do involved gunge and were similar to those performed on It's a Knockout. Run the Risk borrowed much from its predecessor, Double Dare, which was also hosted by Peter Simon. The sections between the games were written by Paul Duddridge..

— Freebase

Chéruel, Adolphe

Chéruel, Adolphe

French historian, born at Rouen; author of "History of France during the Minority of Louis XIV."; published the "Memoirs of Saint-Simon" (1809-1891).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Biba

Biba

Biba was a London fashion store of the 1960s and 1970s. It was started and primarily run by the Polish-born Barbara Hulanicki with help of her husband Stephen Fitz-Simon.

— Freebase

David, Félicien

David, Félicien

a French composer, born at Vaucluse; author, among other compositions, of the "Desert," a production which achieved an instant and complete triumph; was in his youth an ardent disciple of St. Simon (1810-1876).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Willy Clark

Willy Clark

Willy Clark is a fictional character from Neil Simon's play The Sunshine Boys. It was portrayed in the 1975 and 1996 films The Sunshine Boys.

— Freebase

Full Contact

Full Contact

Full Contact is a 1992 Hong Kong action and crime film produced and directed by Ringo Lam. The film stars Chow Yun-fat, Simon Yam, Anthony Wong, and Ann Bridgewater.

— Freebase

Acerbo Law

Acerbo Law

The Acerbo Law was an Italian electoral law proposed by Baron Giacomo Acerbo and passed by the Italian Parliament in November 1923. The purpose of it was to give Mussolini's fascist party a majority of deputies.

— Freebase

Hot air balloon

Hot air balloon

The hot air balloon is the oldest successful human-carrying flight technology. It is part of a class of aircraft known as balloon aircraft. On November 21, 1783, in Paris, France, the first untethered manned flight was performed by Jean-François Pilâtre de Rozier and François Laurent d'Arlandes in a hot air balloon created on December 14, 1782 by the Montgolfier brothers. Hot air balloons that can be propelled through the air rather than just being pushed along by the wind are known as airships or, more specifically, thermal airships. A hot air balloon consists of a bag called the envelope that is capable of containing heated air. Suspended beneath is a gondola or wicker basket, which carries passengers and a source of heat, in most cases an open flame. The heated air inside the envelope makes it buoyant since it has a lower density than the relatively cold air outside the envelope. As with all aircraft, hot air balloons cannot fly beyond the atmosphere. Unlike gas balloons, the envelope does not have to be sealed at the bottom since the air near the bottom of the envelope is at the same pressure as the air surrounding.

— Freebase

In the Pink

In the Pink

In the Pink is the fourth album by singer-songwriter Donna Lewis. It is co-produced by Lewis, Simon Duffy and Gerry Leonard.

— Freebase

Troubles

Troubles

Troubles is a UK-based ambient post-rock instrumental band formed in 2005. The members of the band are Joel Clifford, Sam Herlihy, Michael Hibbert, Simon Jones, Mike Siddell and Jon Winter.

— Freebase

Repulsion

Repulsion

Repulsion is a 1965 British psychological horror film directed by Roman Polanski, based on a scenario by Gérard Brach and Roman Polanski. It was Polanski's first English language film, and was shot in London, making it his first feature made outside Poland. The cast includes Catherine Deneuve, Ian Hendry, John Fraser and Yvonne Furneaux.

— Freebase

Flesh Color

Flesh Color

Flesh Color is a 35 mm film by François Weyergans. Weyergans is one of the forty members known as immortals of the French Academy. It features a band called Flesh Colour formed in 1976 in Brussels-Capital.

— Freebase

Albert François Lebrun

Albert François Lebrun

Albert François Lebrun was a French politician, President of France from 1932 to 1940. He was the last president of the Third Republic. He was a member of the center-right Democratic Republican Alliance.

— Freebase

Drift

Drift

Drift is a BBC Books original novel written by Simon A. Forward and based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. It features the Fourth Doctor and Leela.

— Freebase

Bethencourt

Bethencourt

a Norman baron, in 1425 discovered and conquered the Canaries, and held them as a fief of the crown of Castile.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Vano Language

Vano Language

Lovono is a nearly extinct language of the island of Vanikoro in the easternmost province of the Solomon Islands. As of 2012, it is only spoken by four speakers: it has been replaced by the island’s dominant language, Teanu. Some information on Lovono, as well as on the two other languages of the island, can be found in François.

— Freebase

Adela

Adela

Adela is a 2000 Argentine thriller film directed and written by Eduardo Mignogna. The film was based on the novel Le Coup de lune by Georges Simenon, adapted by François-Olivier Rousseau. The film starred Eulalia Ramón and Grégoire Colin.

— Freebase

Heliopolis

Heliopolis

Modern Heliopolis is an upscale district in Cairo, Egypt. The city was established in 1905 by the Heliopolis Oasis Company, headed by the Belgian industrialist Édouard Louis Joseph, Baron Empain, as well as Boghos Nubar, son of the Egyptian Prime Minister Nubar Pasha.

— Freebase

Holy Family

Holy Family

The Holy Family consists of the Child Jesus, the Virgin Mary, and Saint Joseph. Veneration of the Holy Family was formally begun in the 17th century by Blessed François de Laval, the first bishop of New France, who founded a Confraternity.

— Freebase

Bradwardine

Bradwardine

the name of a baron and his daughter, the heroine of "Waverley."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

De Sade

De Sade

De Sade is an American-German 1969 drama film starring Keir Dullea and Senta Berger. It is based on the life of Donatien Alphonse François, Marquis de Sade, named Louis Alphonse Donatien in the film.

— Freebase

Mentalization

Mentalization

Mentalization is a psychological concept that describes the ability to understand the mental state of oneself and others which underlies overt behaviour. Mentalization can be seen as a form of imaginative mental activity, which allows us to perceive and interpret human behaviour in terms of intentional mental states. While the Theory of Mind has been discussed in philosophy at least since Descartes, the concept of mentalization emerged in psychoanalytic literature in the late 1960s, and became empirically tested in 1983 when Heinz Wimmer and Josef Perner ran the first experiment to investigate when children can understand false belief, inspired by Daniel Dennett's interpretation of a Punch and Judy scene. The field diversified in the early 1990s when Simon Baron-Cohen and Uta Frith, building on the Wimmer and Perner study, and others merged it with research on the psychological and biological mechanisms underlying autism and schizophrenia. Concomitantly, Peter Fonagy and colleagues applied it to developmental psychopathology in the context of attachment relationships gone awry. More recently, several child mental health researchers such as Arietta Slade, John Grienenberger, Alicia Lieberman, Daniel Schechter, and Susan Coates have applied mentalization both to research on parenting and to clinical interventions with parents, infants, and young children.

— Freebase

Pliage

Pliage

Pliage is a style of painting in which the canvass is folded and tied before pigment is applied. The method was first developed in the early 1960s by Simon Hantaï.

— Freebase

Chasles, Michel

Chasles, Michel

an eminent French mathematician, and held one of the first in the century; on the faith of certain autographs, which were afterwards proved to be forgeries, he in 1867 astonished the world by ascribing to Pascal the great discoveries of Newton, but had to admit he was deceived (1793-1880).

Chasles, Philarète

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Atlit

Atlit

Atlit is a coastal town located south of Haifa, Israel. Originally an outpost of the Crusaders, it fell in 1291. The modern village was founded in 1903 under the auspices of Baron Edmond de Rothschild. The population today is 5,797. The Atlit detainee camp is nearby.

— Freebase

Bray

Bray

a Berkshire village, famous for Simon Aleyn, its vicar from 1540 to 1588, who, to retain his living, never scrupled to change his principles; he lived in the reigns of Charles II., James II., William III., Queen Anne, and George I.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

François Jacob

François Jacob

François Jacob was a French biologist who, together with Jacques Monod, originated the idea that control of enzyme levels in all cells occurs through regulation of transcription. He shared the 1965 Nobel Prize in Medicine with Jacques Monod and André Lwoff.

— Freebase

Eugène Dubois

Eugène Dubois

Marie Eugène François Thomas Dubois was a Dutch paleoanthropologist and geologist. He earned worldwide fame for his discovery of Pithecanthropus erectus, or "Java Man". Although hominid fossils had been found and studied before, Dubois was the first anthropologist to embark upon a purposeful search for them.

— Freebase

Proposals

Proposals

Proposals is a comedy-drama by Neil Simon, his 30th play. After running in Los Angeles and the Kennedy Center in 1997, the play opened on Broadway in 1997.

— Freebase

Arnauld, Antoine

Arnauld, Antoine

the "great Arnauld," a French theologian, doctor of the Sorbonne, an inveterate enemy of the Jesuits, defended Jansenism against the Bull of the Pope, became religious director of the nuns of Port Royal des Champs, associated here with a circle of kindred spirits, among others Pascal; expelled from the Sorbonne and banished the country, died at Brussels (1612-1694).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Simón Bolívar

Simón Bolívar

Simón José Antonio de la Santísima Trinidad Bolívar y Palacios Ponte y Blanco, commonly known as Simón Bolívar, was a Venezuelan military and political leader. Bolívar played a key role in Latin America's successful struggle for independence from the Spanish Empire, and is today considered one of the most influential politicians in the history of the Americas. Following the triumph over the Spanish monarchy, Bolívar participated in the foundation of the first union of independent nations in Hispanic-America, a republic, now known as Gran Colombia, of which he was president from 1819 to 1830. Bolívar remains regarded in Hispanic-America as a hero, visionary, revolutionary, and liberator. During his lifetime, he led Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia to independence, and helped lay the foundations for democratic ideology in much of Latin America.

— Freebase

ORBit

ORBit

ORBit is a CORBA 2.4 compliant Object Request Broker. It features mature C, C++ and Python bindings, and less developed bindings for Perl, Lisp, Pascal, Ruby, and Tcl. Most of the code is distributed under the LGPL license, although the IDL compiler and utilities use the GPL. ORBit was originally written to serve as middleware for the GNOME project, but has seen use outside of the project.

— Freebase

Adorno

Adorno

The Adorno family was a patrician family in Genoa, Italy, of the Ghibelline party, several of whom were Doges of the republic. The first of these, Gabriele Adorno, is also the tenor role in Giuseppe Verdi's opera Simon Boccanegra.

— Freebase

Simon Newcomb

Simon Newcomb

Simon Newcomb was a Canadian-American astronomer and mathematician. Though he had little conventional schooling, he made important contributions to timekeeping as well as writing on economics and statistics and authoring a science fiction novel.

— Freebase

1900

1900

1900 is a 1976 Italian epic film directed by Bernardo Bertolucci, starring Robert De Niro, Gérard Depardieu, Dominique Sanda, Donald Sutherland, Alida Valli, and Burt Lancaster. Set in Bertolucci's ancestral region of Emilia, the film chronicles the lives of two men during the political turmoils that took place in Italy in the first half of the 20th century. The film was screened at the 1976 Cannes Film Festival, but was not entered into the main competition.

— Freebase

Charles-François Galand

Charles-François Galand

Charles-François Galand was a French gunsmith who worked in Liege and Paris, France. He manufactured many revolvers for civilian and military use, including the Galand Revolver, the Tue Tue, and the tiny Le Novo. The Velo-dog, developed from the Tue Tue and the Novo, was designed by Charles-François' son René in 1904. The original Galand revolver was a double-action, open frame revolver patented in 1868. Military versions were produced in 9 mm while civilian versions were made in 12 mm. The gun is easily recognizable due to its long extraction lever, which stretches under the gun to form the trigger guard. Pulling the lever forward separates the barrel and cylinder from the rest of the gun. At the same time the extractor plate is blocked which catches any cartridges in the cylinder, thereby extracting them. The first model was manufactured both in Liege and in Birmingham, England by the British arms firm Braendlin and Sommerville, and is therefore sometimes referred to as the Galand-Sommerville. Sommerville shared the patent for the case extracting system with Galand. The Galand-Perrin is an identical model which uses the Perrin cartridge.

— Freebase

Pascal Verrot

Pascal Verrot

Pascal Verrot is a French-born orchestra conductor who holds the post of principal conductor of the Sendai Philharmonic and former musical director of Picardie Orchestra. Prior to that, he was music director of the Québec Symphony Orchestra, the oldest orchestra in Canada, from 1991 to 1997. Born in Lyon, France, in 1959, Mr. Verrot holds degrees both from the Sorbonne University in Paris and the Paris Conservatory where he studied for four years with Jean-Sébastien Béreau, winning first prize in the conducting competition. During that time, he made his debut as oboist and conductor of the wind ensemble Union Musicale of Villefranche sur Saône. He also studied for three years with the late Franco Ferrara at the Accademia Musicale Chigiana in Siena, Italy. Pascal Verrot made his international debuts in 1985, when he was prize winner at the Tokyo International Conducting Competition. Since then, his guest conducting appearances have included many performances in Japan, in France and in North-America. Mr. Verrot has conducted several North-American renowned ensembles that include the Boston Symphony, the Montreal Symphony, the Toronto Symphony, the Utah Symphony and most recently the Pacific Symphony. His native country of France has offered him numerous occasions to lead major orchestras.

— Freebase

Reyn

Reyn

In fluid dynamics, the Reyn is a British unit of dynamic viscosity. Named in honour of Osbourne Reynolds, for whom Reynolds number is also named One Reyn is:-2 Relation between Reyn and centipoise is approximately:6 In SI units, viscosity is expressed as newton-seconds per square meter, or pascal-seconds. The conversion factor between the two is the same for stress:

— Freebase

readeo

readeo

Readeo provides a service called BookChat that lets friends and family read stories together no matter how far apart they are.Using digital children™s books and streaming video chat, BookChatting allows users to see, hear, and interact with one another as they would if they were reading in person.Publisher partners include Simon & Schuster, Candlewick Press, Chronicle Books, and Blue Apple Books.

— CrunchBase


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