Definitions containing gérard, étienne maurice, comte

We've found 250 definitions:

Maurician

Maurician

Of, or relating to other people called Maurice, for example Maurice of Nassau, Saint Maurice etc.

— Wiktionary

Gerry

Gerry

A diminutive of the male given names Gerald and Gerard.

— Wiktionary

Comtist

Comtist

a disciple of Comte; a positivist

— Webster Dictionary

Goutwort

Goutwort

a coarse umbelliferous plant of Europe (Aegopodium Podagraria); -- called also bishop's weed, ashweed, and herb gerard

— Webster Dictionary

Garrett

Garrett

, transferred from the surname, or in Ireland directly from Gerard.

— Wiktionary

Morris

Morris

derived from the Norman given name Maurice.

— Wiktionary

Maurician

Maurician

Of or pertaining to Maurice, a Byzantine emperor.

— Wiktionary

montgolfier

Montgolfier, Josef Michel Montgolfier

French inventor who (with his brother Jacques Etienne Montgolfier) pioneered hot-air ballooning (1740-1810)

— Princeton's WordNet

josef michel montgolfier

Montgolfier, Josef Michel Montgolfier

French inventor who (with his brother Jacques Etienne Montgolfier) pioneered hot-air ballooning (1740-1810)

— Princeton's WordNet

Morse

Morse

, variant of Morris, from the given name Maurice.

— Wiktionary

Moe

Moe

A diminutive of the male given names Moses and Maurice.

— Wiktionary

Mo

Mo

A diminutive of the male given names Moses and Maurice.

— Wiktionary

Morris

Morris

, transferred from the surnames, or a spelling variant of Maurice.

— Wiktionary

comtism

Comtism

Auguste Comte's positivistic philosophy that metaphysics and theology should be replaced by a hierarchy of sciences from mathematics at the base to sociology at the top

— Princeton's WordNet

Brochet

Brochet

Constructions Aéronautiques Maurice Brochet was a French manufacturer of light aircraft established by Maurice Brochet in Neauphle-le-Château in 1947.

— Freebase

Comtism

Comtism

The positivistic philosophy of Auguste Comte (1798u20131857), according to which metaphysics and theology should be replaced by a hierarchy of sciences from mathematics at the base to sociology at the top.

— Wiktionary

lionel barrymore

Barrymore, Lionel Barrymore

United States actor; son of Maurice Barrymore and Georgiana Barrymore (1878-1954)

— Princeton's WordNet

john barrymore

Barrymore, John Barrymore

United States actor; son of Maurice Barrymore and Georgiana Barrymore (1882-1942)

— Princeton's WordNet

barrymore

Barrymore, John Barrymore

United States actor; son of Maurice Barrymore and Georgiana Barrymore (1882-1942)

— Princeton's WordNet

ethel barrymore

Barrymore, Ethel Barrymore

United States actress; daughter of Maurice Barrymore and Georgiana Barrymore (1879-1959)

— Princeton's WordNet

barrymore

Barrymore, Lionel Barrymore

United States actor; son of Maurice Barrymore and Georgiana Barrymore (1878-1954)

— Princeton's WordNet

barrymore

Barrymore, Ethel Barrymore

United States actress; daughter of Maurice Barrymore and Georgiana Barrymore (1879-1959)

— Princeton's WordNet

Atikamekw

Atikamekw

Any of the indigenous inhabitants of the area they refer to as Nitaskinan ("Our Land") in Saint-Maurice, Quebec.

— Wiktionary

Montgolfier brothers

Montgolfier brothers

Joseph-Michel Montgolfier and Jacques-Étienne Montgolfier were the inventors of the Montgolfière-style hot air balloon, globe aérostatique. The brothers succeeded in launching the first manned ascent, carrying Étienne into the sky. Later, in December 1783, in recognition of their achievement, their father Pierre was elevated to the nobility and the hereditary appellation of de Montgolfier by King Louis XVI of France.

— Freebase

Auguste Comte

Auguste Comte

Isidore Auguste Marie François Xavier Comte, better known as Auguste Comte, was a French philosopher. He was a founder of the discipline of sociology and of the doctrine of positivism. He is sometimes regarded as the first philosopher of science in the modern sense of the term. Strongly influenced by the utopian socialist Henri Saint-Simon, Comte developed the positive philosophy in an attempt to remedy the social malaise of the French Revolution, calling for a new social doctrine based on the sciences. Comte was a major influence on 19th-century thought, influencing the work of social thinkers such as Karl Marx, John Stuart Mill, and George Eliot. His concept of sociologie and social evolutionism, though now outdated, set the tone for early social theorists and anthropologists such as Harriet Martineau and Herbert Spencer, evolving into modern academic sociology presented by Émile Durkheim as practical and objective social research. Comte's social theories culminated in the "Religion of Humanity", which influenced the development of religious humanist and secular humanist organizations in the 19th century. Comte likewise coined the word altruisme.

— Freebase

Maurice Utrillo

Maurice Utrillo

Maurice Utrillo, born Maurice Valadon, was a French painter who specialized in cityscapes. Born in the Montmartre quarter of Paris, France, Utrillo is one of the few famous painters of Montmartre who were born there.

— Freebase

Saint-Étienne

Saint-Étienne

Saint-Étienne is a city in eastern central France. It is located in the Massif Central, 50 km southwest of Lyon in the Rhône-Alpes region, along the trunk road that connects Toulouse with Lyon. Saint-Étienne is the capital of the Loire département and has a population of approximately 178,500 in the city itself expanding to over 317,000 in the metropolitan area.

— Freebase

St. Leonard, Quebec

St. Leonard, Quebec

Saint Leonard is a borough of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Formerly a separate city, it was amalgamated into the city of Montreal in 2002. The former city was originally called St. Léonard de Port Maurice after Leonard of Port Maurice.

— Freebase

Tanguy

Tanguy

Tanguy is a French black comedy of 2001 by Étienne Chatiliez.

— Freebase

Étienne de Silhouette

Étienne de Silhouette

Étienne de Silhouette was a French Controller-General of Finances under Louis XV.

— Freebase

Earl

Earl

a nobleman of England ranking below a marquis, and above a viscount. The rank of an earl corresponds to that of a count (comte) in France, and graf in Germany. Hence the wife of an earl is still called countess. See Count

— Webster Dictionary

John Gerard

John Gerard

John Gerard aka John Gerarde was a botanist and herbalist. He maintained a large herbal garden in London. His chief notability is as the author of a big – 1480 pages – and heavily illustrated Herball, or Generall Historie of Plantes. First published in 1597, it was the most widely circulated botany book in English in the 17th century. Except for the additions of a number of plants from his own garden and from North America, Gerard's Herbal is largely an English translation of Rembert Dodoens Herbal of 1554, itself also highly popular. Gerard's Herball is profusely illustrated with high-quality drawings of plants, with the printer's woodcuts for the drawings largely coming from Dodoens' book and from other Continental European sources. A couple of decades after Gerard's death, his Herbal was corrected and expanded, which strengthened the book's position in the 17th century. The botanical genus Gerardia is named in his honour.

— Freebase

Pleure

Pleure

Pleure is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Brans

Brans

Brans is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Choux

Choux

Choux is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Brethren of the Common Life

Brethren of the Common Life

a Dutch branch of the "Friends of God," founded at Deventer by Gerard Groote.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

georgiana emma barrymore

Barrymore, Georgiana Barrymore, Georgiana Emma Barrymore

United States actress; daughter of John Drew and wife of Maurice Barrymore; mother of Ethel Barrymore and John Barrymore and Lionel Barrymore (1854-1893)

— Princeton's WordNet

barrymore

Barrymore, Georgiana Barrymore, Georgiana Emma Barrymore

United States actress; daughter of John Drew and wife of Maurice Barrymore; mother of Ethel Barrymore and John Barrymore and Lionel Barrymore (1854-1893)

— Princeton's WordNet

georgiana barrymore

Barrymore, Georgiana Barrymore, Georgiana Emma Barrymore

United States actress; daughter of John Drew and wife of Maurice Barrymore; mother of Ethel Barrymore and John Barrymore and Lionel Barrymore (1854-1893)

— Princeton's WordNet

Belfort

Belfort

Belfort is a city in north-east France in the Franche-Comté région, situated between Lyon and Strasbourg. It is the biggest town and the administrative town of the Territoire de Belfort département in the Franche-Comté region. Belfort is located at 400 km from Paris, 141 km from Strasbourg, 290 km from Lyon and 150 km from Zürich. The residents of the city are called ‘’Belfortains’’. It is located on the Savoureuse, on the strategically important natural route between the Rhine and the Rhône – the Belfort Gap or Burgundian Gate. The city of Belfort has 50,199 inhabitants. Together with its suburbs and satellite towns, Belfort forms the largest agglomeration in Franche-Comté region with an urban population of 308,601 inhabitants.

— Freebase

St. Simonians

St. Simonians

. See St. Simon, Comte de.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Mouthe

Mouthe

Mouthe is a commune in the Doubs department in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France.

— Freebase

Brères

Brères

Brères is a commune in the Doubs department in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France.

— Freebase

Corre

Corre

Corre is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Velet

Velet

Velet is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Gerard

Gerard

Gerard is a Japanese progressive rock band. The current members are : ⁕Toshio Egawa : keyboards ⁕Kenichi Fujimoto : drums ⁕Atsushi Hasegawa : bass

— Freebase

John Braine

John Braine

John Gerard Braine was an English novelist. Braine is usually associated with the Angry Young Men movement.

— Freebase

Lézat

Lézat

Lézat is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Mouchard

Mouchard

Mouchard is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Colonne

Colonne

Colonne is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Rans

Rans

Rans is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Orgelet

Orgelet

Orgelet is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Légna

Légna

Légna is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Chemin, Jura

Chemin, Jura

Chemin is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Peintre

Peintre

Peintre is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Courlans

Courlans

Courlans is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Rogna

Rogna

Rogna is a commune in the Jura department in Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Moval

Moval

Moval is a commune in the Territoire de Belfort department in Franche-Comté in northeastern France.

— Freebase

Frais

Frais

Frais is a commune in the Territoire de Belfort department in Franche-Comté in northeastern France.

— Freebase

Nathalie...

Nathalie...

Nathalie... is a 2003 French drama film directed by Anne Fontaine, and starring Fanny Ardant, Emmanuelle Béart, and Gérard Depardieu.

— Freebase

Maurice

Maurice

Maurice was Byzantine Emperor from 582 to 602. A prominent general in his youth, Maurice fought with success against the Sassanid Persians. Once he became Emperor, he brought the war with Persia to a victorious conclusion: the Empire's eastern border in the Caucasus was vastly expanded and for the first time in nearly two centuries the Romans were no longer obliged to pay the Persians thousands of pounds of gold annually for peace. Maurice campaigned extensively in the Balkans against the Avars – pushing them back across the Danube by 599. He also conducted campaigns across the Danube, the first Emperor to do so in over two hundred years. In the West, he established two large semi-autonomous provinces called exarchates, ruled by exarchs, or viceroys, of the emperor. In Italy, Maurice established the Exarchate of Ravenna in 584, the first real effort by the Empire to halt the advance of the Lombards. With the creation of the Exarchate of Africa in 590, he further solidified the empire's hold on the western Mediterranean. His reign was troubled by financial difficulties and almost constant warfare. In 602, a dissatisfied general named Phocas usurped the throne, having Maurice and his six sons executed. This event would prove cataclysmic for the Empire, sparking a devastating war with Persia that would leave both empires weakened prior to the Muslim invasions.

— Freebase

Cras

Cras

Cras is a district of Besançon located to the east of the city. Its name comes from the Franche-Comté "Cra" which means "crow".

— Freebase

Doubs

Doubs

Doubs is a department in the Franche-Comté region of eastern France named after the Doubs River.

— Freebase

Barneveldt, Johann van Olden

Barneveldt, Johann van Olden

Grand Pensionary of Holland, of a distinguished family; studied law at the Hague, and practised as an advocate there; fought for the independence of his country against Spain; concluded a truce with Spain, in spite of the Stadtholder Maurice, whose ambition for supreme power he courageously opposed; being an Arminian, took sides against the Gomarist or Calvinist party, to which Maurice belonged; was arrested, tried, and condemned to death as a traitor and heretic, and died on the scaffold at 71 years of age, with sanction, too, of the Synod of Dort, in 1619.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Positivism

Positivism

a system of philosophy originated by M. Auguste Comte, which deals only with positives. It excludes from philosophy everything but the natural phenomena or properties of knowable things, together with their invariable relations of coexistence and succession, as occurring in time and space. Such relations are denominated laws, which are to be discovered by observation, experiment, and comparison. This philosophy holds all inquiry into causes, both efficient and final, to be useless and unprofitable

— Webster Dictionary

Vitreux

Vitreux

Vitreux is a commune in the Jura department in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France.

— Freebase

Laire

Laire

Laire is a commune in the Doubs department in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France.

— Freebase

Lods

Lods

Lods is a commune in the Doubs département in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France.

— Freebase

Sochaux

Sochaux

Sochaux is a commune in the Doubs department in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France.

— Freebase

Supt

Supt

Supt is a commune in the Jura department in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France.

— Freebase

Levier

Levier

Levier is a French Commune in the Doubs department in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France.

— Freebase

Fresse

Fresse

Fresse is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Cuve

Cuve

Cuve is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Vanne

Vanne

Vanne is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Marast

Marast

Marast is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Écuelle

Écuelle

Écuelle is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Boulot

Boulot

Boulot is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Cordonnet

Cordonnet

Cordonnet is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Chancey

Chancey

Chancey is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Scye

Scye

Scye is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France.

— Freebase

Étienne

Étienne

Étienne is the stage name of Steven Langlois, who is a Warner Music Canada recording artist. He has sold tens of thousands of CDs worldwide. Following a successful 2007 World Tour 2007 that saw him perform sold-out concerts across Canada, the United States, and Australia, Étienne is a teacher with the Greater Essex County District School Board. Born and raised in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, he began performing at a young age. While attending the University of Windsor, where he graduated with a B.A. in French Language and Literature and a B.Ed., he began composing songs designed to help children learn English, French and Spanish using popular styles of music. Now residing in LaSalle, Ontario, with his wife and two children, he has taught English and French to students from grades one to twelve for the past sixteen years. Étienne writes for several widely-used international school programs produced by leading educational companies including Thomson Nelson, Oxford University Press, Pearson Education, Prentice Hall, Ginn, Gage Canada and Denmark's Forlag Malling Beck. He has had his songs translated into the Cree language in Saskatchewan.

— Freebase

Comte George Raphaël Béthenod de Montbressieux

Comte George Raphaël Béthenod de Montbressieux

"Raph" was the racing pseudonym of Comte George Raphaël Béthenod de Montbressieux, a French-Argentine racing driver. He was sometimes listed using his mother's name, "de las Casas".

— Freebase

Continental

Continental

Continental is an album by the British band Saint Etienne which had original release only in Japan. It is a compilation that includes previously released material such as the UK hit "He's on the Phone" as well as curios like their cover of the Paul Gardiner/Gary Numan song "Stormtrooper in Drag". Many of the tracks were recorded during the 'wilderness' years of 1996/97 when the band members worked on their separate projects. The remix versions on this album had all appeared on Casino Classics. As part of the 2009 Saint Etienne back catalogue reissue program, the album has had a UK release for the first time. It also has a Heavenly catalogue number - HVNLP70. The deluxe edition includes four previously unreleased tracks.

— Freebase

Commelin, Isaac

Commelin, Isaac

Dutch historian; wrote the "Lives of the Stadtholders William I. and Maurice" (1598-1676).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Gerard P. Kuiper

Gerard P. Kuiper

Gerard Peter Kuiper, Netherlands; died December 24, 1973 in Mexico City, was a Netherlands-born American astronomer after whom the Kuiper belt was named.

— Freebase

Choiseul

Choiseul

Choiseul is an illustrious family from Champagne, France, descendents of the comtes of Langres. The family's head was Renaud III de Choiseul, comte de Langres and sire de Choiseul, who in 1182 married Alix de Dreux, daughter of Louis VI of France. It has formed into the Langres, Clémont, Aigremont, Beaugré, Allecourt, Frontières, Praslin, Plessis branches, among others. It also took the name Choiseul-Gouffier from the 18th century onwards. It has produced several marshals: ⁕Jean de Baudricourt, seigneur of Baudricourt and of Choiseul ⁕Charles de Choiseul, comte of the Plessis-Praslin, who served under Henri IV and Louis XIII ⁕César de Choiseul du Plessis-Praslin, duc de Choiseul, who defied Turenne at Rethel, when he commanded the Spanish army ⁕Caesar, duc de Choiseul, French marshal and diplomat, generally known for the best part of his life as marshal du Plessis-Praslin ⁕Claude de Choiseul, comte de Choiseul-Francières, who distinguished himself in the battle of Seneffe against the Dutch Republic and made a marshal in 1693 Two bishops and an archbishop: ⁕Gilbert de Choiseul du Plessis Praslin, brother of marshal César de Choiseul du Plessis-Praslin, Bishop of Comminges from 1644 to 1670.

— Freebase

Congreve, Richard

Congreve, Richard

author of political tracts, was a pupil of Dr. Arnold's, and a disciple of Comte in philosophy; b. 1818.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Finisterre

Finisterre

Finisterre is the sixth studio album by English alternative dance band Saint Etienne, released on 30 September 2002 by Mantra Records. A double-disc deluxe edition was released on 3 May 2010 by Heavenly Records.

— Freebase

Vesoul

Vesoul

Vesoul is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté located in eastern France. Most populated municipality of the department with 15,920 inhabitants in 2009, is the seventh city Franche-Comté. The same year, Urban community of Vesoul which covers 19 municipalities together 34,055 inhabitants while the Urban area of Vesoul which includes 78 municipalities, groups 59,244 inhabitants. Its urban area is the fifth largest Franche-Comté. Its inhabitants are known in French as Vésuliens. Nicknamed the "Nice of the East", the reputation of Vesoul based primarily on the song "Vesoul" by Jacques Brel and the Vesoul International Film Festival of Asian Cinema. Its 16,000 inhabitants, account Vesoul 2000 students and 8000 licensed sport. The city has received many labels and names that reflect the investigation brings to life Vesoul common. Built on top of the hill de la Motte, in the first millennium, the old medieval town of Castrum Vesulium, the city is gradually presented as European commercial and economic center with many traders and exchangers and European Jews. At the end of the Middle Ages, the city experienced a period of strong difficulties as plagues, epidemics, destruction ...

— Freebase

Three Rivers

Three Rivers

capital of St. Maurice Co., Quebec, 95 m. NE. of Montreal; does a considerable trade in lumber, iron-ware, &c.; is the seat of a Roman Catholic bishop.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Benighted

Benighted

Benighted is a death metal band formed in Saint-Étienne, France, in 1998. The band comprises vocalist Julien Truchan, guitarists Adrien Guérin and Olivier Gabriel, bassist Eric Lombard and drummer Kevin "Kikou" Foley. They released six albums since formation.

— Freebase

Maurice Barrymore

Maurice Barrymore

Herbert Arthur Chamberlayne Blythe —stage name Maurice Barrymore — was a patriarch of the Barrymore acting family and great-grandfather of actress Drew Barrymore.

— Freebase

Farman Aviation Works

Farman Aviation Works

Farman Aviation Works was an aircraft company founded and run by the brothers Richard, Henri, and Maurice Farman. They designed and constructed aircraft and engines from 1908 until 1936; during the French nationalization and rationalization of its aerospace industry, Farman's assets were assigned to the Société Nationale de Constructions Aéronautiques du Centre. In 1941 the Farman brothers reestablished the firm as the "Société Anonyme des Usines Farman", but only three years later it was absorbed by Sud-Ouest. Maurice's son, Marcel Farman, reestablished the SAUF in 1952, but his effort proved unsuccessful and the firm was dissolved in 1956. The Farman brothers built more than 200 types of aircraft between 1908 and 1941.

— Freebase

Positivism

Positivism

Positivism is a philosophy of science based on the view that information derived from logical and mathematical treatments and reports of sensory experience is the exclusive source of all authoritative knowledge, and that there is valid knowledge only in scientific knowledge. Verified data received from the senses are known as empirical evidence. This view holds that society, like the physical world, operates according to general laws. Introspective and intuitive knowledge is rejected. Although the positivist approach has been a recurrent theme in the history of Western thought, the modern sense of the approach was developed by the philosopher and founding sociologist Auguste Comte in the early 19th century. Comte argued that, much as the physical world operates according to gravity and other absolute laws, so also does society.

— Freebase

Belga

Belga

Belga is a Belgian news agency. Belga was founded in 1920 as "Agence télégraphique belge de presse" by Pierre-Marie Olivier and Maurice Travailleur. Seat : 8B Frédéric Pelletier Street, 1030 Schaerbeek

— Freebase

Rive-de-Gier

Rive-de-Gier

Rive-de-Gier is a commune in the Loire department in central France. The town is located on both sides of the river Gier. It's between Saint-Etienne and Lyon and had an important part during the French industrial revolution. Rive de Gier is a town in the French department of Loire, arrondissement Saint-Etienne. Rive de Gier has 14,831 inhabitants, so the population is roughly back to the level it was at the end of the 19th Century. Economically Rive-de-Gier was known for coal mining, iron works and glass works. The river Gier has been covered in the center of the city, so the watercourse is not visible in the downtown. As the river is not navigable, was built to transport the coal from the canal Givors, but which is now filled. The community is situated on the edge of the Regional Natural Park Pilat and is associated with this.

— Freebase

Nereid

Nereid

Nereid is the third-largest moon of Neptune. It has a highly eccentric orbit. It was the second moon of Neptune to be discovered, by Gerard Kuiper in 1949.

— Freebase

Morris

Morris

Maurice De Bevere, better known as Morris, was a Belgian cartoonist and the creator of Lucky Luke. His pen name is an alternate spelling of his first name.

— Freebase

Mauritius

Mauritius

One of the Indian Ocean Islands, east of Madagascar. Its capital is Port Louis. It was discovered by the Portuguese in 1505, occupied by the Dutch 1598-1710, held by the French 1715-1810 when the British captured it, formally ceded to the British in 1814, and became independent in 1968. It was named by the Dutch in honor of Maurice of Nassau, Prince of Orange (1567-1625). (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p742 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p341)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Mucopolysaccharidosis VI

Mucopolysaccharidosis VI

Maroteaux–Lamy syndrome is a form of mucopolysaccharidosis caused by a deficiency in arylsulfatase B. It is named after Pierre Maroteaux and his mentor Maurice Emil Joseph Lamy, both French physicians.

— Freebase

Stéphane Mallarmé

Stéphane Mallarmé

Stéphane Mallarmé, whose real name was Étienne Mallarmé, was a French poet and critic. He was a major French symbolist poet, and his work anticipated and inspired several revolutionary artistic schools of the early 20th century, such as Dadaism, Surrealism, and Futurism.

— Freebase

Pierre Cambronne

Pierre Cambronne

Pierre Jacques Étienne Cambronne, later Pierre, Viscount Cambronne, was a General of the French Empire. He fought during the wars of the Revolution and the Napoleonic Era. He was wounded at the Battle of Waterloo.

— Freebase

Dow

Dow

or Douw, Gerard, a distinguished Dutch genre-painter, born at Leyden; a pupil of Rembrandt; his works, which are very numerous, are the fruit of a devoted study of nature, and are remarkable for their delicacy and perfection of finish; examples of his works are found in all the great galleries of Europe (1613-1675).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Saint-Simonianism

Saint-Simonianism

Saint-Simonianism was a French political and social movement of the first half of the 19th century, inspired by the ideas of Claude Henri de Rouvroy, comte de Saint-Simon. Saint-Simon has been "variously portrayed as a utopian socialist, the founder of sociology and a prescient madman". His ideas, expressed largely through a succession of journals such as l'Industrie, La politique and L'Organisateur centered on a perception that growth in industrialization and scientific discovery would have profound changes on society. He believed, nonetheless, that society would restructure itself by abandoning traditional ideas of temporal and spiritual power, an evolution that would lead, inevitably, to a productive society based on, and benefiting from, a " ... union of men engaged in useful work", the basis of "true equality". These ideas influenced Auguste Comte, Karl Marx, John Stuart Mill, and many other thinkers and social theorists.

— Freebase

Phocas

Phocas

Phocas was Byzantine Emperor from 602 to 610. He usurped the throne from the Emperor Maurice, and was himself overthrown by Heraclius after losing a civil war.

— Freebase

Pirates

Pirates

Pirates is a 1986 Franco-Tunisian adventure comedy film written by Gérard Brach, John Brownjohn, and Roman Polanski and directed by Polanski. It was screened out of competition at the 1986 Cannes Film Festival.

— Freebase

Chances Are

Chances Are

Chances Are is a 1989 romantic comedy film directed by Emile Ardolino and starring Cybill Shepherd, Robert Downey, Jr., Ryan O'Neal, and Mary Stuart Masterson. The original music score was composed by Maurice Jarre.

— Freebase

Minié ball

Minié ball

The Minié ball, or Minie ball, is a type of muzzle-loading spin-stabilized rifle bullet named after its co-developer, Claude-Étienne Minié, inventor of the Minié rifle. It came to prominence in the Crimean War and American Civil War.

— Freebase

Contes, Alpes-Maritimes

Contes, Alpes-Maritimes

Contes is a commune in the Alpes-Maritimes department in the region of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur in south-eastern France. Its inhabitants are Contois. Because the village sounds like the French word comte, the aristocratic title count, it called itself Point Libre during the revolutionary period.

— Freebase

Bobo

Bobo

Bobo is a Franco-Belgian comics series created by Paul Deliège and Maurice Rosy. The series features an eponymous prisoner of the jail Inzepocket. In Dutch, the series' name is Jaap.

— Freebase

Swietenia

Swietenia

Swietenia is a genus of trees in the chinaberry family, Meliaceae. It occurs natively in the Neotropics, from southern Florida, the Caribbean, Mexico and Central America south to Bolivia. The genus is named for Dutch-Austrian physician Gerard van Swieten.

— Freebase

Saint-Maurice River

Saint-Maurice River

The Saint-Maurice River is a river in central Quebec which flows south from Gouin Reservoir to empty into the Saint Lawrence River at Trois-Rivières, Quebec. The river is 563 km in length and has a drainage basin of 43,300 km². During the 18th century, early fur traders travelled along the river. During the second half of the 19th century, logging became an important industry in the surrounding Mauricie region. For much of the 20th century, the river was used to transport logs to mills down river and it was, and still is, a major source of hydroelectric power. The river was named after Maurice Poulin de La Fontaine, who owned property along the river in the 17th century. Communities on the river include: ⁕Trois-Rivières ⁕Shawinigan ⁕La Tuque Tributaries of this river include the: ⁕Trenche River ⁕Vermillon River ⁕Matawin River

— Freebase

Zetten

Zetten

Zetten is a village in the Overbetuwe municipality, Gelderland, Netherlands. The village is located in the Betuwe. This is also the base of the youth-clinic Ottho Gerard Heldringstichting, which was quite famous in the Netherlands.

— Freebase

Lipslide

Lipslide

Lipslide is the debut solo album from Saint Etienne lead singer Sarah Cracknell. The album was co-produced by Cracknell and a variety of producers and released in the UK by Gut Records in 1997. Upon its release Lipslide earned favorable reviews from music critics, although it was not a commercial success. Musically the album does not stray too far from Cracknell's work with Saint Etienne, as it contains electronic and indie-styled pop music. Lipslide was not released in the United States until 2000. Licenced to Instinct Records, the album's cover art and tracklist were altered — four tracks were removed and replaced by four new songs. Additionally, the song "Home" was presented in a different mix. These four missing songs and the original version of "Home" were later included on the Kelly's Locker EP, released in 2000 by Instinct. "Anymore" was released as a single in the UK prior to the album, peaking at number thirty-nine in the UK Singles Chart in 1996. "Desert Baby" was also released but did not chart.

— Freebase

Donald Johanson

Donald Johanson

Donald Carl Johanson is an American paleoanthropologist. Along with Maurice Taieb and Yves Coppens, he is known for discovering the fossil of a female hominid australopithecine known as "Lucy" in the Afar Triangle region of Hadar, Ethiopia.

— Freebase

Haplology

Haplology

Haplology is defined as the elimination of a syllable when two consecutive identical or similar syllables occur. The phenomenon was identified by American philologist Maurice Bloomfield in the 20th century. Linguists sometimes jokingly refer to the phenomenon as "haplogy".

— Freebase

Mansel, Henry Longueville

Mansel, Henry Longueville

dean of St. Paul's, born in Northamptonshire; wrote admirably on philosophical and religious subjects, and was a doughty adversary in controversy both with Mill and Maurice; he was a follower in philosophy of Sir William Hamilton (q. v.) (1820-1871).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Traveller's Joy

Traveller's Joy

Traveller's Joy is a 1949 British comedy film directed by Ralph Thomas and starring Googie Withers, John McCallum and Maurice Denham. Based on a play by Arthur MacRae, it was the last film released by the original Gainsborough Pictures.

— Freebase

Lawe

Lawe

The Lawe is a river of northern France, right tributary of the Lys. Its source is near Magnicourt-en-Comte. It flows generally northeast through Houdain, Bruay-la-Buissière, Béthune and Lestrem. It flows into the Lys in La Gorgue.

— Freebase

Joseph Bonaparte

Joseph Bonaparte

Joseph-Napoleon Bonaparte was the elder brother of Napoleon Bonaparte, who made him King of Naples and Sicily, and later King of Spain. After the fall of Napoleon, Joseph styled himself Comte de Survilliers.

— Freebase

Gerard Manley Hopkins

Gerard Manley Hopkins

Gerard Manley Hopkins was an English poet, Roman Catholic convert, and Jesuit priest, whose posthumous fame established him among the leading Victorian poets. His experimental explorations in prosody and his use of imagery established him as a daring innovator in a period of largely traditional verse.

— Freebase

Ça Ira

Ça Ira

Ça Ira is an opera in three acts by Roger Waters based on the French libretto co-written by Étienne and Nadine Roda-Gil on the historical subject of the early French Revolution. Ça Ira was released 26 September 2005, as a double CD album featuring baritone Bryn Terfel, soprano Ying Huang, and tenor Paul Groves.

— Freebase

Maurice de Vlaminck

Maurice de Vlaminck

Maurice de Vlaminck was a French painter. Along with André Derain and Henri Matisse he is considered one of the principal figures in the Fauve movement, a group of modern artists who from 1904 to 1908 were united in their use of intense color.

— Freebase

Louis Antoine de Bougainville

Louis Antoine de Bougainville

Louis-Antoine, Comte de Bougainville was a French admiral and explorer. A contemporary of James Cook, he took part in the French and Indian War against Britain. He later gained fame for his expeditions, the first recorded settlement on the Falkland Islands and his voyages into the Pacific Ocean.

— Freebase

For Pete's Sake

For Pete's Sake

For Pete's Sake is a 1974 American screwball comedy film directed by Peter Yates. The screenplay by Stanley Shapiro and Maurice Richlin chronicles the misadventures of a Brooklyn housewife. In 1977 it was remade in India as the Hindi film Aap Ki Khatir.

— Freebase

Metatextuality

Metatextuality

Metatextuality is a form of intertextual discourse in which one text makes critical commentary on another text. This concept is related to Gérard Genette's concept of transtextuality in which a text changes or expands on the content of another text.

— Freebase

Vernis Martin

Vernis Martin

In French interior design, vernis Martin is a type of imitation lacquer named for the French brothers Guillaume and Etienne-Simon Martin. It imitated Chinese lacquer and European subjects and was applied to a wide variety of items, from furniture to coaches. It is said to have been made by heating oil and copal and then adding Venetian turpentine.

— Freebase

Assay office

Assay office

Assay offices are institutions set up to assay precious metals, in order to protect consumers. Upon successful completion of an assay, the assay offices typically stamp a hallmark, punze, or poinçon on the item to certify its metallurgical content. Hallmarking first appeared in France, with the Goldsmiths' Statute of 1260 promulgated under Etienne Boileau, Provost of Paris, for King Louis IX.

— Freebase

Chambord

Chambord

spacious château in the dep. of Loire-et-Cher, France, built by Francis I.; after being long a residence for royalty and people of distinction, was presented in 1821 to the Duc de Bordeaux, the Comte de Chambord.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Bon Voyage

Bon Voyage

Bon Voyage is a French film directed by Jean-Paul Rappeneau, released 16 April 2003. The film was a critical success due in part to its tight interweaving of various genres, including spy, romance, World War II, and comedy. The film features the first reteaming of stars Isabelle Adjani and Gérard Depardieu since 1988's Camille Claudel.

— Freebase

The Wake

The Wake

The Wake are a British post-punk and later indie pop band, founded in Glasgow in 1981 by Gerard "Caesar" McInulty, Steven Allen and Joe Donnelly, who was later replaced by Bobby Gillespie, who was subsequently replaced by Alex Macpherson. Steven's sister Carolyn Allen soon joined, and remained in the band thereafter.

— Freebase

Kennedia

Kennedia

Kennedia is a genus of plants comprising 16 species, all native to Australia. They are evergreen climbing plants with woody stems. Thet usually have trifoliate leaves and pea-type flowers of various colours from pink to dark red and yellow to black. The genus was named by Étienne Pierre Ventenat after John Kennedy, a partner in the renowned firm of nurserymen, Lee and Kennedy of Hammersmith, London.

— Freebase

Repulsion

Repulsion

Repulsion is a 1965 British psychological horror film directed by Roman Polanski, based on a scenario by Gérard Brach and Roman Polanski. It was Polanski's first English language film, and was shot in London, making it his first feature made outside Poland. The cast includes Catherine Deneuve, Ian Hendry, John Fraser and Yvonne Furneaux.

— Freebase

Tex Ritter

Tex Ritter

Woodward Maurice Ritter, better known as Tex Ritter, was an American country music singer and movie actor popular from the mid-1930s into the 1960s, and the patriarch of the Ritter family in acting. He is a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame.

— Freebase

Rutebeuf

Rutebeuf

Rutebeuf, a trouvère, was born in the first half of the 13th century, possibly in Champagne; he was evidently of humble birth, and he was a Parisian by education and residence. His name is nowhere mentioned by his contemporaries. He frequently plays in his verse on the word Rutebeuf, which was probably a nom de guerre, and is variously explained by him as derived from rude boeuf and rude oeuvre. Paulin Paris thought that he began life in the lowest rank of the minstrel profession as a jongleur. Some of his poems have autobiographical value. In Le Mariage de Rutebeuf he says that on the 2 January 1261 he married a woman old and ugly, with neither dowry nor amiability. In the Complainte de Rutebeuf he details a series of misfortunes which have reduced him to abject destitution. In these circumstances he addresses himself to Alphonse, comte de Poitiers, brother of Louis IX, for relief. Other poems in the same vein reveal that his own miserable circumstances were chiefly due to a love of play, particularly a game played with dice; which was known as griesche. It would seem that his distress could not be due to lack of patrons; for his metrical Life of Saint Elizabeth of Hungary was written by request of Erard de Valery, who wished to present it to Isabel, queen of Navarre; and he wrote elegies on the deaths of Anceau de l'Isle Adam, the third of the name, who died about 1251, Eudes, comte de Nevers, Theobald II of Navarre, and Alphonse, comte de Poitiers, which were probably paid for by the families of the personages celebrated. In the Pauvreté de Rutebeuf, he addresses Louis IX himself.

— Freebase

Porcelaine

Porcelaine

The Porcelaine is a breed of dog originating from France. It is believed to be the oldest of the French scent hounds. Its alternate name is the Chien de Franche-Comté, named after a French region bordering Switzerland. This caused some debate over the dog's origin, but it has been decided that it is a French dog.

— Freebase

Second Fiddle

Second Fiddle

Second Fiddle is a 1957 British comedy film directed by Maurice Elvey and starring Adrienne Corri, Thorley Walters, Lisa Gastoni and Richard Wattis. Second Fiddle is currently missing from the BFI National Archive, and is listed as one of the British Film Institute's "75 Most Wanted" lost films.

— Freebase

Cyclopia

Cyclopia

Cyclopia, better known by the common name Honeybush, is a genus of flowering plants in the legume family, Fabaceae, of the subfamily Faboideae. The description was published by Étienne Pierre Ventenat in 1808. The name Ibbetsonia, published two years later, is regarded as a synonym of this genus; John Sims had commemorated the physiologist Agnes Ibbetson with this name. Another common name is 'Heuningbos' in Afrikaans.

— Freebase

Jelf, Richard William

Jelf, Richard William

Principal of King's College, London; was educated at Oxford, became Fellow of Oriel, canon of Christ's Church, and Principal of King's College; is remembered chiefly for his rigid orthodoxy and for the part he played in depriving Maurice of his professorship at King's College (1798-1871).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

1900

1900

1900 is a 1976 Italian epic film directed by Bernardo Bertolucci, starring Robert De Niro, Gérard Depardieu, Dominique Sanda, Donald Sutherland, Alida Valli, and Burt Lancaster. Set in Bertolucci's ancestral region of Emilia, the film chronicles the lives of two men during the political turmoils that took place in Italy in the first half of the 20th century. The film was screened at the 1976 Cannes Film Festival, but was not entered into the main competition.

— Freebase

Port Elizabeth, New Jersey

Port Elizabeth, New Jersey

Port Elizabeth is an unincorporated community within Maurice River Township, Cumberland County, New Jersey. The area is served as United States Postal Service ZIP code 08348. As of the 2000 United States Census, the population for ZIP Code Tabulation Area 08348 was 455. Route 47 and Route 55 intersect in Port Elizabeth.

— Freebase

Be My Girl

Be My Girl

"Be My Girl" is a 1986 ballad single from New Kids on the Block, with lead vocals by Donnie Wahlberg. Written and produced by Maurice Starr, it was the group's first release from their debut album New Kids on the Block. Although it received marginal airplay in their hometown of Boston, it was largely ignored nationally and failed to chart on the Billboard Hot 100.

— Freebase

Drom

Drom

Drom is a commune in the Ain department in eastern France. As well as a dairy selling comté cheese, butter, cream, fromage blanc and newly resurrected medieval fromage de CLON, Drom boasts three 'Artisans d'art'. Christine Brochier is a master craftswoman/couturière working in fur and leather. She holds the distinction of 'Meilleur Ouvrier de France'. Drom also has an art gallery of pictures, prints, and portraits by Margaret Steel and handmade bespoke desks by Tony Steel. See their website, galerie-steel.com As well as a dairy selling comté cheese, butter, cream, fromage blanc and newly resurrected medieval fromage de CLON, Drom boasts three 'Artisans d'art'. Christine Brochier is a master craftswoman/couturière working in fur and leather. She holds the distinction of 'Meilleur Ouvrier de France'. Drom also has an art gallery of pictures and handmade bespoke furniture run by Margaret and Tony Steel. See their website, www.galerie-steel.com

— Freebase

Jakob

Jakob

Jakob is a New Zealand post-rock band, based in the Hawkes Bay city of Napier. The band consists of guitarist Jeff Boyle; bassist Maurice Beckett; and drummer Jason Johnston. They have been compared to such bands as Mogwai, Sonic Youth, and High Dependency Unit, though they largely eschew any vocals or samples in their songs.

— Freebase

Onay

Onay

Onay is a commune in the Haute-Saône department in the region of Franche-Comté in eastern France. It is located 12 km south east of Gray, 60 km east of Dijon and 40 km north west of Besançon, on the route D177. Onay is within the prefecture of Vesoul and the sub-prefecture of Lure.

— Freebase

Sensualism

Sensualism

Sensualism is a philosophical doctrine of the theory of knowledge, according to which sensations and perception are the basic and most important form of true cognition. It may oppose abstract ideas. The basic principle of sensualism is "there is not anything in mind, which hasn't been in the sensations." The great philosophers of sensualism are: ⁕Aristotle ⁕Thomas Aquinas ⁕John Locke ⁕George Berkeley ⁕David Hume ⁕Étienne Bonnot de Condillac ⁕William James ⁕Friedrich Nietzsche

— Freebase

Soubise, Duc de

Soubise, Duc de

French soldier; served first under Prince Maurice of Orange, and commanded the Huguenots against Louis XIII., but after some successes was compelled to take refuge in England; distinguished himself at the defence of Rochelle, but was defeated again and had to betake himself to England as before, where he died (1589-1641).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Saint Maurice

Saint Maurice

Saint Maurice was the leader of the legendary Roman Theban Legion in the 3rd century, and one of the favorite and most widely venerated saints of that group. He was the patron saint of several professions, locales, and kingdoms. He is also a highly revered saint in the Coptic Orthodox Church.

— Freebase

Tetralogy of Fallot

Tetralogy of Fallot

Tetralogy of Fallot is a congenital heart defect which is classically understood to involve four anatomical abnormalities of the heart. It is the most common cyanotic heart defect, and the most common cause of blue baby syndrome. It was described in 1672 by Niels Stensen, in 1773 by Edward Sandifort, and in 1888 by the French physician Étienne-Louis Arthur Fallot, after whom it is named.

— Freebase

Queen's College

Queen's College

a college for women in Harley Street, London, founded in 1848, and incorporated by Royal Charter in 1853, of which Maurice, Trench, and Kingsley were among the originators; attendance of three years entitles to the rank of "Associate," and of six or more to that of "Fellow"; it is self-supporting.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Maskinongé

Maskinongé

The district of Maskinongé was established in 1853, under the Union regime of 1841. It was located in the current Mauricie area and was located southwest of the district of Saint-Maurice on the north shore of the St. Lawrence River. Champlain was represented by one Member at the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada.

— Freebase

Sociology

Sociology

the science which treats of the nature and the developments of society and of social institutions; a science to which Herbert Spencer, in succession to Comte, has contributed more than any other scientist, deducing, as he does, a series of generalisations by comparison of individual organisms with social.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Franche-Comté

Franche-Comté

Franche-Comté the former "Free County" of Burgundy, as distinct from the neighbouring Duchy, is an administrative region and a traditional province of eastern France. It is composed of the modern departments of Doubs, Jura, Haute-Saône and Territoire de Belfort and has a population of 1,168,208. The principal cities are the capital Besançon, Belfort, and Montbéliard. Other important cities are Dole, Vesoul, Arbois, and Lons-le-Saunier.

— Freebase

Delle

Delle

Delle is a commune in the Territoire de Belfort department in Franche-Comté in northeastern France. Delle is the last French town on the railway line from Belfort to Berne, in Switzerland. Visitors to Delle can travel there by bus from Belfort, timetables can be found at: www.optymo.fr There is a Swiss Federal Railways station in Delle for trains to Delemont.

— Freebase

Befriended

Befriended

Befriended is the sixth full-length studio album by American alternative rock band The Innocence Mission. The album was released on 25 August 2003 in the United Kingdom and Ireland by Agenda and on 2 September 2003 in the United States and Canada by Badman Recording Co.. The lyrics to the track "No Storms Come" are adapted from the poem "Heaven-Haven," written by poet Gerard Manley Hopkins.

— Freebase

Coucy

Coucy

an old noble family of Picardy, who had for device, "Roi ne suis, ne duc, ne comte aussi; je suis le sire de Coucy." Raoul, a court-poet of the family in the 12th century, lost his life at the siege of Acre in the third crusade.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Iniencephaly

Iniencephaly

Iniencephaly, a term derived from the Greek word “inion” for nape of the neck, is a rare type of cephalic disorder that was first described by Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire in 1836. Those afflicted with the disorder all share 3 common characteristics: a defect to the occipital bone, spina bifida of the cervical vertebrae and retroflexion of the head on the cervical spine. Stillbirth is the most common outcome, with a few rare examples of live birth, after which death almost invariably occurs within a short time.

— Freebase

Spring Affair

Spring Affair

"Spring Affair" is a song by Donna Summer from her 1976 album Four Seasons of Love. The song tells of the beginning of a new relationship. At the time of its release, Summer had already started to make her name as the leading female disco singer by releasing frankly sexual songs that were considerable in length. In its entirety "Spring Affair" lasted over eight minutes, though it was edited down for its release as a single. "Spring Affair" was sampled extensively on "Super Disco" by Alex Gopher and Étienne de Crécy from Super Discount.

— Freebase

Herbert, Edward, Lord

Herbert, Edward, Lord

of Cherbury, diplomatist, soldier, and scholar, born at Montgomery Castle, in Wales; served as a soldier under Maurice of Orange; was twice ambassador in France, but chiefly devoted to philosophical speculation; was the first of the deistical writers of England, though his deism was dogmatic not critical, positive not sceptical, as that of the subsequent English deists is (1581-1648).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Sociocracy

Sociocracy

Sociocracy is a system of governance, using consent-based decision making among equivalent individuals and an organizational structure based on cybernetic principles. The most recent implementation of sociocracy by Gerard Endenburg, also known as Circular Organizing, was developed as a new tool for governance of private enterprise, but has been adopted in many different kinds of organizations including public, private, non-profit and community organizations as well as professional associations.

— Freebase

Gerardia

Gerardia

Gerardia L. is a genus of flowering plants in the family Acanthaceae. It was once used as the generic name for the genus Agalinis, but based on the rules of the ICBN it is an illegitimate later homonym of Gerardia L. that is now unavailable for use Agalinis. The genus is named for the English herbalist John Gerard. Stenandrium is still preferred because of its widespread and historical use.

— Freebase

Francisco Villota

Francisco Villota

Francisco Villota was a Spanish pelotari who competed at the 1900 Summer Olympics in Paris, France. Villota competed in the only official pelota contest in Olympic history, the Basque pelota at the 1900 Summer Olympics two-man teams event. He and his partner José de Amézola y Aspizúa defeated the French team, Maurice Durquetty and Etchegaray.

— Freebase

Alain Robbe-Grillet

Alain Robbe-Grillet

Alain Robbe-Grillet was a French writer and filmmaker. He was, along with Nathalie Sarraute, Michel Butor and Claude Simon, one of the figures most associated with the Nouveau Roman trend. Alain Robbe-Grillet was elected a member of the Académie française on March 25, 2004, succeeding Maurice Rheims at seat No. 32. He was married to Catherine Robbe-Grillet.

— Freebase

Solex

Solex

Solex is a French manufacturer of carburetors and the powered bicycle VéloSoleX. The Solex company was founded by Marcel Mennesson and Maurice Goudard to manufacture vehicle radiators. These were fitted to several makes of early cars including Delaunay-Belleville and buses of the Paris General Omnibus company. After World War I the radiator business went into decline and the company bought the rights to the carburettor patents of Jouffret and Renée and named them Solex after their business.

— Freebase

Hortense de Beauharnais

Hortense de Beauharnais

Hortense Eugénie Cécile Bonaparte, Queen consort of Holland, was the stepdaughter of Emperor Napoleon I, being the daughter of his first wife, Joséphine de Beauharnais. She later became the wife of the former's brother, Louis Bonaparte, King of Holland, and the mother of Napoleon III, Emperor of the French. She had also an illegitimate son, Charles Auguste Louis Joseph, duc de Morny, by her lover Charles Joseph, comte de Flahaut.

— Freebase

Orlan

Orlan

Orlan is a French artist, born May 30, 1947 in Saint-Étienne, Loire. She adopted the name Orlan in 1971, which she always writes in capital letters : "ORLAN". She lives and works in Los Angeles, New York, and Paris. She was invited to be a scholar in residence at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, for the 2006-2007 academic year. She sits on the board of administrators for the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, and is a professor at the École nationale supérieure d'arts de Cergy-Pontoise. Although Orlan is best known for her work with plastic surgery in the early to mid-1990s, she has not limited her work to a particular medium.

— Freebase

Senay

Senay

Senay is a village and a hamlet of Présilly commune in the Jura département, in the French region of Franche-Comté. Senay has maximum 8 houses out of which almost half are occupied by same family who own the land around this Hamlet. Nearest commercial area is Canton of Orgelet. Présilly is well known for its vestiges of a castle dating from the 11th and 14th centuries where every summer open air theatrical shows are organized in the summer. There is an industrial zone between Senay and Orgelet where famous manufacturers like Verchere Plastiques

— Freebase

Pers, Cantal

Pers, Cantal

Pers is a commune in the Cantal department in south-central France. It is on the edge of the Chataignerie and near the Segala. It is also adjacent to the lake of St Etienne Cantales, a large body of water formed by the damming of the Cere river for hydro electric purposes. The village also has a very good go-cart track, and regularly hosts championship races. As well as the church and the town hall, there are two bars, and a camping site. Gites may also be rented from the farm. There are no shops.

— Freebase

Little Bear

Little Bear

Maurice Sendak's Little Bear is an educational Canadian children's television series starring a Little Bear voiced by Kristin Fairlie. Originally produced by Nelvana for Nickelodeon, it currently airs on Treehouse TV in Canada and Nick Jr. in the United States. It was first shown in the UK on the Children's BBC, and a part of Toy Box BBC video collection in the late 90s. It was also shown on Nick Jr UK and now airs on Tiny Pop. A direct-to-video/DVD full-length feature film was also created after the series ended. In The Little Bear Movie, Little Bear and his friends help a bear named Cub to help find his parents. It is based on the Little Bear series of books which were written by Else Holmelund Minarik, and illustrated by Maurice Sendak. Most of the characters are moderately anthropomorphic animals, exhibiting both animal and human behaviors, but generally dealing with human problems and concerns. However, Little Bear's friend, Emily, and her grandmother are human and Tutu, their dog, is mostly a normal pet. Other characters in the series include Little Bear and his parents Mother and Father Bear, his paternal uncle Rusty, his two grandparents, the eponymously named animals Duck, Cat, Owl and Hen, in addition to many recurring characters.

— Freebase

Words

Words

"Words" is a song by the English rock band Bee Gees, Written by Barry, Robin & Maurice Gibb. The song reached #1 in Germany, Switzerland, Netherlands and China. "Words" has been recorded by many other artists. Among them are a hit version by Rita Coolidge in 1978 and a version by Boyzone on the 1996 album A Different Beat. This was Boyzone's fifth single and their first number one hit in the UK.

— Freebase

Antoine Perrenot de Granvelle

Antoine Perrenot de Granvelle

Antoine Perrenot de Granvelle, Comte de La Baume Saint Amour, was a Burgundian statesman, made a cardinal, who followed his father as a leading minister of the Spanish Habsburgs, and was one of the most influential European politicians during the time which immediately followed the appearance of Protestantism in Europe; "the dominating Imperial statesman of the whole century". He was also a notable art collector, the "greatest private collector of his time, the friend and patron of Titian and Leoni and many other artists".

— Freebase

Harrison, Frederic

Harrison, Frederic

barrister, born in London, professor of Jurisprudence in the Inns of Court; author of articles contributed to Reviews and Essays, and of Lectures on a variety of current questions, historical, social, and religious, from the standpoint of the positivism of Auguste Comte, with his somewhat vague "Religion of Humanity" is the author of "Order and Progress," the "Choice of Books," &c.; b. 1831.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Phocomelia

Phocomelia

Phocomelia is an extremely rare congenital disorder involving malformation of the limbs. Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire coined the term in 1836. Although various numbers of factors can cause phocomelia, the prominent roots come from the use of the drug thalidomide and from genetic inheritance. The occurrence of this malformation in an individual results in various abnormalities to the face, limbs, ears, nose, vessels and many other underdevelopments. Although operations can be done to fix the abnormality it is difficult due to the lack of nerves, bones, and other related structures.

— Freebase

A Matter of Time

A Matter of Time

A Matter of Time is a 1976 American/Italian musical fantasy film directed by Vincente Minnelli. The screenplay by John Gay is based on the novel Film of Memory by Maurice Druon. The fictional story is based loosely on the real life exploits of the infamous Italian eccentric, the Marchesa Casati, whom Druon knew during her declining years in London while he was stationed there during World War II. The film marked the first screen appearance for Isabella Rossellini and the last for Charles Boyer, and proved to be Minnelli's final project.

— Freebase

Jean Cocteau

Jean Cocteau

Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau was a French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, playwright, artist and filmmaker. Cocteau is best known for his novel Les Enfants terribles, and the films Blood of a Poet, Les Parents terribles, Beauty and the Beast and Orpheus. His circle of associates, friends and lovers included Kenneth Anger, Pablo Picasso, Jean Hugo, Jean Marais, Henri Bernstein, Yul Brynner, Marlene Dietrich, Coco Chanel, Erik Satie, Igor Stravinsky, María Félix, Édith Piaf and Raymond Radiguet.

— Freebase

Thomas Tallis

Thomas Tallis

Thomas Tallis was an English composer who occupies a primary place in anthologies of English church music, and is considered one of England's greatest early composers. He is honoured for his original voice in English musicianship. No contemporary portrait of Tallis survives: the earliest, painted by Gerard van der Gucht, dates from 150 years after Tallis died, and there is no certainty that it is a likeness. In a rare copy of his signature that exists [in block letters], the composer spelled his last name "Tallys."

— Freebase

Green Card

Green Card

Green Card is a 1990 romantic comedy film written, produced, directed by Peter Weir and starring Gérard Depardieu and Andie MacDowell. The screenplay focuses on an American woman who enters into a marriage of convenience with a Frenchman so he can obtain a green card and remain in the United States. Depardieu won the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor. The film won the Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy, and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay.

— Freebase

Quarter tone

Quarter tone

A quarter tone, is a pitch halfway between the usual notes of a chromatic scale, an interval about half as wide as a semitone, which is half a whole tone. Many composers are known for having written music including quarter tones or the quarter tone scale, first proposed by 19th-century music theorist Mikha'il Mishaqah, including: Pierre Boulez, Julián Carrillo, Mildred Couper, Alberto Ginastera, Gérard Grisey, Alois Hába, Ljubica Marić, Charles Ives, Tristan Murail, Krzysztof Penderecki, Giacinto Scelsi, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Tui St. George Tucker, Ivan Alexandrovich Wyschnegradsky, and Iannis Xenakis.

— Freebase

Coburg

Coburg

Coburg is a town located on the Itz River in Bavaria, Germany. Its 2005 population was 42,015. Long one of the Thuringian states of the Wettin line, it joined with Bavaria by popular vote in 1920. Before 1918, it was one of the capital cities in the duchy of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha and the duchy of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. Coburg's coat of arms, honoring the city's patron Saint Maurice, was granted in 1493.

— Freebase

How Old Are You

How Old Are You

How Old Are You? is the second solo album released by British rock musician Robin Gibb it released in 1983, thirteen years after his debut Robin's Reign in 1970. The album was not a great success in America and failed to chart in Britain but it did spawn an international hit in "Juliet" which topped the charts in Germany. The album reached #6 in Germany. The album was produced by Robin and Maurice Gibb with Dennis Bryon.

— Freebase

Aim

Aim

Aim is a British musician, DJ and producer, who was born in Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria. Aim's sound is a blend of funky electronic music and hip hop beats, a sound which typified the Grand Central Records label. Much of Aim's work is instrumental, though his records include collaborations with other artists who provide vocals, including Stephen Jones of Babybird, Diamond D, Souls of Mischief, QNC and Kate Rogers. Aim has also worked as remixer, mixing songs for a variety of artists including Ian Brown, Saint Etienne, The Charlatans, Lil' Kim, Thunderbugs, Archive, Down to the Bone, Texas and former label-mates Rae & Christian.

— Freebase

Contrary

Contrary

Contrary was a character from Malibu Comics' Ultraverse. She was created by Gerard Jones and Martin Egeland and first appeared in the series Freex, though she was better known as the founder of Ultraforce. Though it has never been truly confirmed, it is heavily implied in Freex that the nurse nicknamed "Wetware Mary" was the same woman who would eventually become Contrary. Both were humans who had access to the advanced technology of the Fire People, and both manipulated people in various ways for their own agendas.

— Freebase

William the Silent

William the Silent

Prince of Orange, a cadet of the noble house of Nassau, the first Stadtholder of the Netherlands, a Protestant by birth; he was brought up a Catholic, but being at heart more a patriot than a Catholic, he took up arms in the cause of his country's freedom, and did not rest till he had virtually freed it from the Spanish yoke, which was then the dominant Catholic power; his enemies procured his assassination in the end, and he was murdered by Belthazar Gerard, at Delft; he was brought up at the court of Charles V., where "his circumspect demeanour procured him the surname of Silent, but under the cold exterior he concealed a busy, far-sighted intellect, and a generous, upright, daring heart" (1533-1584).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

No Way Out

No Way Out

No Way Out is a 1987 thriller film about a U.S. Naval officer investigating a Washington, D.C. murder. It stars Kevin Costner, Gene Hackman, and Sean Young. Will Patton, Howard Duff, George Dzundza, Jason Bernard, Fred Thompson, and Iman appear in supporting roles. The film is a remake of 1948's The Big Clock; both films are based on Kenneth Fearing's 1946 novel The Big Clock. Filming locations included Baltimore, Annapolis, Arlington, Washington, D.C., and Auckland, New Zealand. The film features original music by the Academy Award-winning Maurice Jarre.

— Freebase

Cynghanedd

Cynghanedd

In Welsh language poetry, cynghanedd is the basic concept of sound-arrangement within one line, using stress, alliteration and rhyme. The various forms of cynghanedd show up in the definitions of all formal Welsh verse forms, such as the awdl and cerdd dafod. Though of ancient origin, cynghanedd and variations of it are still used today by many Welsh-language poets. A number of poets have experimented with using cynghanedd in English-language verse, for instance Gerard Manley Hopkins. Some of Dylan Thomas' work is also influenced by cynghanedd.

— Freebase

Tonality

Tonality

Tonality is a system/language of music in which specific hierarchical pitch relationships are based on a key "center"—the tonic triad; that is, on hierarchical relationships between the triads. The term tonalité originated with Alexandre-Étienne Choron and was borrowed by François-Joseph Fétis in 1840. Although Fétis used it as a general term for a system of musical organization and spoke of types de tonalités rather than a single system, today the term is most often used to refer to major–minor tonality, the system of musical organization of the common practice period, and of Western-influenced popular music throughout much of the world today.

— Freebase

Laportea

Laportea

Laportea is a genus of plants in the family Urticaceae. They are herbaceous, either annual or perennial. Like many plants of the Urticaceae, they have stinging hairs, and have stinging and non-stinging hairs on the same plant. The genus contains 22 species, including: ⁕Laportea aestuans Chew. - West Indian woodnettle ⁕Laportea canadensis Weddell. - Canadian woodnettle ⁕Laportea cuneata Chew. - Weedy woodnettle ⁕Laportea cuspidata ⁕Laportea interrupta Chew. - Hawaiian woodnettle ⁕Laportea pterostigma Weddell. - Poisonous woodnettle ⁕Laportea urentissima Gagnep. The genus was named after the French naturalist François Louis de la Porte, comte de Castelnau.

— Freebase

baud

baud

[simplified from its technical meaning] n. Bits per second. Hence kilobaud or Kbaud, thousands of bits per second. The technical meaning is level transitions per second; this coincides with bps only for two-level modulation with no framing or stop bits. Most hackers are aware of these nuances but blithely ignore them.Historical note: baud was originally a unit of telegraph signalling speed, set at one pulse per second. It was proposed at the November, 1926 conference of the Comité Consultatif International Des Communications Télégraphiques as an improvement on the then standard practice of referring to line speeds in terms of words per minute, and named for Jean Maurice Emile Baudot (1845-1903), a French engineer who did a lot of pioneering work in early teleprinters.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Tess

Tess

Tess is a 1979 romance film directed by Roman Polanski, an adaptation of Thomas Hardy's 1891 novel Tess of the d'Urbervilles. It tells the story of a strong-willed, young peasant girl who finds out she has title connections by way of her old aristocratic surname and who is raped by her wealthy cousin, whose right to the family title may not be as strong as he claims. The screenplay was by Gérard Brach, John Brownjohn, and Roman Polanski. The film won three Academy Awards and was nominated for three more.

— Freebase

Klippel–Feil syndrome

Klippel–Feil syndrome

Klippel–Feil syndrome is a rare disease, initially reported in 1912 by Maurice Klippel and André Feil from France, characterized by the congenital fusion of any 2 of the 7 cervical vertebrae. The syndrome occurs in a heterogeneous group of patients unified only by the presence of a congenital defect in the formation or segmentation of the cervical spine. Klippel–Feil syndrome can be identified by shortness of the neck. Those with the syndrome have a very low hairline and the ability of the neck to move is limited.

— Freebase

Texas ratio

Texas ratio

The Texas ratio is a measure of a bank's credit troubles. The higher the Texas ratio, the more severe the credit troubles. Developed by Gerard Cassidy and others at RBC Capital Markets, it is calculated by dividing the value of the lender's non-performing assets by the sum of its tangible common equity capital and loan loss reserves. In analyzing Texas banks during the early 1980s recession, Cassidy noted that banks tended to fail when this ratio reached 1:1, or 100%. He noted a similar pattern among New England banks during the recession of the early 1990s.

— Freebase

Spinola, Ambrosio, Marquis of

Spinola, Ambrosio, Marquis of

great Spanish general under Philip II. of Spain, born at Genoa, with a following of 9000, maintained at his own expense, took Ostend after a resistance of 3 years, in consequence of which feat he was appointed commander-in-chief, in which capacity maintained and again maintained a long struggle with Prince Maurice of Nassau, terminated only with the death of the latter; his services on behalf of Spain, in the interest of which he spent his fortune, were never acknowledged, and he died with poignant grief (1571-1630).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Davies

Davies

Davies is a crater on Mars located at 46°N 0°E on the fringe of Acidalia Planitia near Arabia Terra. It is approximately 49 km in diameter. It was named in honor of Merton Davies, a pioneer in the cartography of planetary bodies. An employee of the Rand Corporation, he assisted NASA in mapping Mars with colleagues Gérard de Vaucouleurs and Harold Masursky and defined the prime meridian of Mars as passing through the crater Airy-0. Davies lies on the prime meridian, appropriate because Davies was principally responsible for its delineation. ⁕ Davies Crater, as seen by MTO's CTX.

— Freebase

Clematis

Clematis

Clematis is a genus of about 300 species within the buttercup family Ranunculaceae. Their garden hybrids have been popular among gardeners, beginning with Clematis × jackmanii, a garden standby since 1862; more hybrid cultivars are being produced constantly. They are mainly of Chinese and Japanese origin. Most species are known as clematis in English, while some are also known as traveller's joy, a name invented for the sole British native, C. vitalba, by the herbalist John Gerard; virgin's bower for C. viticella; old man's beard, applied to several with prominent seedheads; and leather flower or vase vine for the North American Clematis viorna.

— Freebase

Bernard of Clairvaux

Bernard of Clairvaux

Bernard of Clairvaux, O.Cist was a French abbot and the primary builder of the reforming Cistercian order. After the death of his mother, Bernard sought admission into the Cistercian order. "Three years later, he was sent to found a new abbey at an isolated clearing in a glen known as the Val d'Absinthe, about 15 km southeast of Bar-sur-Aube. According to tradition, Bernard founded the monastery on 25 June 1115, naming it Claire Vallée, which evolved into Clairvaux. There Bernard would preach an immediate faith, in which the intercessor was the Virgin Mary." In the year 1128, Bernard assisted at the Council of Troyes, at which he traced the outlines of the Rule of the Knights Templar, who soon became the ideal of Christian nobility. On the death of Pope Honorius II on 13 February 1130, a schism broke out in the Church. Louis VI of France convened a national council of the French bishops at Étampes in 1130, and Bernard was chosen to judge between the rivals for pope. After the council of Étampes, Bernard went to speak with the King of England, Henry I, Beauclerc, about the king's reservations regarding Pope Innocent II. Beauclerc was sceptical because most of the bishops of England supported Anacletus II; he convinced him to support Innocent. Germany had decided to support Innocent through Norbert of Xanten, who was a friend of Bernard's. However, Innocent insisted on Bernard's company when he met with Lothair III of Germany. Lothair became Innocent's strongest ally among the nobility. Despite the councils of Étampes, Wurzburg, Clermont, and Rheims all supporting Innocent, there were still large portions of the Christian world supporting Anacletus. At the end of 1131, the kingdoms of France, England, Germany, Castile, and Aragon supported Innocent; however, most of Italy, southern France, and Sicily, with the patriarchs of Constantinople, Antioch, and Jerusalem, supported Anacletus. Bernard set out to convince these other regions to rally behind Innocent. The first person whom he went to was Gerard of Angoulême. He proceeded to write a letter known as Letter 126, which questioned Gerard's reasons for supporting Anacletus. Bernard would later comment that Gerard was his most formidable opponent during the whole schism. After convincing Gerard, Bernard traveled to visit the Count of Poitiers. He was the hardest for Bernard to convince. He did not pledge allegiance to Innocent until 1135. After that, Bernard spent most of his time in Italy convincing the Italians to pledge allegiance to Innocent. He traveled to Sicily in 1137 to convince the king of Sicily to follow Innocent. The whole conflict ended when Anacletus died on 25 January 1138. In 1139, Bernard assisted at the Second Council of the Lateran. Bernard denounced the teachings of Peter Abelard to the pope, who called a council at Sens in 1141 to settle the matter. Bernard soon saw one of his disciples elected as Pope Eugenius III. Having previously helped end the schism within the church, Bernard was now called upon to combat heresy. In June 1145, Bernard traveled in southern France and his preaching there helped strengthen support against heresy.

— Freebase

Synthol

Synthol

Synthol is a mouthwash, hair product and tonic, available in France since 1925. It is not to be confused with the artificial bodybuilding aid, which is an injectable substance of the same name. The formula consists of chloral hydrate, menthol, veratrol, resorcinol and salicylic acid. Sold mainly as a mouthwash, in a distinctive black carton, it is also packaged as a gel and spray for the treatment of muscular pain. Synthol was developed by Maurice Bunau-Varilla, a prominent newspaper publisher of the early twentieth century. He promoted it as a cure-all tonic.

— Freebase

Minié rifle

Minié rifle

The Minié rifle was an important infantry weapon in the mid-19th century. A version was adopted in 1849 following the invention of the Minié ball in 1847 by the French Army captains Claude-Étienne Minié of the Chasseurs d'Orléans and Henri-Gustave Delvigne. The bullet was designed to allow rapid muzzle loading of rifles, and was an innovation that brought about the widespread use of the rifle as the main battlefield weapon for individual soldiers. The French adopted it following difficulties encountered by the French army in Northern Africa, where their muskets were outranged by long-barreled weapons which were handcrafted by their Algerian opponents. The Minié rifle belonged to the category of rifled muskets.

— Freebase

Kuiper

Kuiper

Kuiper is a small lunar impact crater in a relatively featureless part of the Mare Cognitum. It is a circular, cup-shaped feature with only some minor wear. This crater was previously identified as Bonpland E before being renamed by the IAU. The lava-flooded crater Bonpland lies to the east at the edge of the Mare Cognitum. To the east-southeast of Kuiper crater is the crash landing site of the Ranger 7 probe, the first American spacecraft to photograph the Moon. Gerard Kuiper was the Project Scientist for the Ranger program, and this feature was named for him after he died in 1973.

— Freebase

Count

Count

Count or Countess is a title in European countries for a noble of varying status, but historically deemed to convey an approximate rank intermediate between the highest and lowest titles of nobility. The word count came into English from the French comte, itself from Latin comes—in its accusative comitem—meaning "companion", and later "companion of the emperor, delegate of the emperor". The adjective form of the word is "comital". The British and Irish equivalent is an earl. Alternative names for the "Count" rank in the nobility structure are used in other countries, such as Graf in Germany and Hakushaku during the Japanese Imperial era.

— Freebase

Diaporama

Diaporama

A diaporama is a photographic slideshow, sometimes with accompanying audio, ranging from using only one or two slide projectors to a multi-image slideshow using a wide screen and several slide projectors connected to a central controlling device changing the slides, turning lamps on and off etc. The word shares etymological roots with the English words diorama and panorama, both of which come from the Greek root horama, meaning "a view." Diaporama is the French word for slideshow. Robert Thuillier is considered the inventor of the technique in 1950. Salon columnist Camille Paglia used the term as early as March 2008 when she wrote "Speaking of Edie [Sedgwick], I found this 'diaporama' tribute to her...set to a song composed and sung by Étienne Daho."

— Freebase

Broken rhyme

Broken rhyme

Broken rhyme, also called Split rhyme, is a form of rhyme. It is produced by dividing a word at the line break of a poem to make a rhyme with the end word of another line. Gerard Manley Hopkins' poem The Windhover, for example, divides the word "kingdom" at the end of the first line to rhyme with the word "wing" ending the fourth line. Hopkins is rare in using the device in serious poems. More commonly, the device is used in comic or playful poetry, as in the sixth stanza of Edward Lear's "How Pleasant to Know Mr. Lear" or in Elizabeth Bishop's "Pink Dog."

— Freebase

Barocco

Barocco

Barocco is a 1976 French romantic thriller film, directed by André Téchiné. The film stars Isabelle Adjani, Gérard Depardieu and Marie-France Pisier. Identity, redemption and resurrection are the themes of the film. The plot follows a young woman who convinces her boxer boyfriend to accept a bribe to tell a lie that discredits a local politician. When the boyfriend is murdered, she is racked with guilt until she meets the killer and plans to remake him into the image of her slain lover. The film won three César Awards: Best Actress in a Supporting Role, Best Cinematography and Best Music. The film had a total of 678,734 admissions in France.

— Freebase

Simplon

Simplon

Simplon is a station of the Paris Métro, serving line 4 in the 18th arrondissement of Paris. The station was opened on 21 April 1908 as part of the first section of the line from Châtelet to Porte de Clignancourt. It takes its name from the Rue du Simplon, named after the Simplon Pass in the Lepontine Alps, location of one of the longest railroad tunnels in the world. On August 6, 2005, a train passing through Simplon station caught fire: the station closed for refurbishment and re-opened in February 2006. Nearby attractions include the Square Maurice Kriegel-Valrimont and the Conservatoire Gustave Charpentier.

— Freebase

Maurice Wilkins

Maurice Wilkins

Maurice Hugh Frederick Wilkins CBE FRS was a New Zealand-born English physicist and molecular biologist, and Nobel Laureate whose research contributed to the scientific understanding of phosphorescence, isotope separation, optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction, and to the development of radar. He is best known for his work at King's College London on the structure of DNA. In recognition of this work, he, Francis Crick and James Watson were awarded the 1962 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, "for their discoveries concerning the molecular structure of nucleic acids and its significance for information transfer in living material."

— Freebase

Claude Vorilhon

Claude Vorilhon

Claude Maurice Marcel Vorilhon is the founder and current leader of the UFO religion known as Raëlism. Vorilhon began singing at a young age and soon became a sports-car journalist and test driver for his own car-racing magazine, Auto Pop. Following what he said was an extraterrestrial encounter in December 1973, he formed the Raëlian Movement and changed his name to Raël. He later published several books, which detail his claims of an encounter with a being called Yahweh in 1973. He traveled the world to promote his books for over 30 years.

— Freebase

Carlos Julio Arosemena Monroy

Carlos Julio Arosemena Monroy

Carlos Julio Arosemena Monroy served as Vice President of Ecuador and due to the ousting of President José María Velasco Ibarra, became President of Ecuador from 7 November 1961 to 11 July 1963. While in office, there were two failed attempts to impeach him. He was overthrown by a 1963 military junta after criticizing the US government and insulting Maurice Bernbaum, the US ambassador to Ecuador. He was also the son of former president Carlos Julio Arosemena Tola. His support of Fidel Castro’s revolution in Cuba caused an ongoing conflict with Congress and the military.[4]

— Freebase

VSD

VSD

VSD is a French weekly news, celebrity and leisure magazine, published on Thursdays. The name is formed from the first letters of the French names for Friday, Saturday and Sunday. VSD was first published on 9 September 1977 by Maurice Siegel. After Siegel's death in 1985, direction passed to his sons François and Jean-Dominique. Publication ceased in August 1995. The title was purchased by Prisma Presse and relaunched in June 1996. Like its rival Paris Match it relies heavily on paparazzi photography. Circulation in the 1980s reached 400,000 copies. In 2005, average sales were over 200,000.

— Freebase

Martineau, Harriet

Martineau, Harriet

English authoress, born at Norwich; a lady with little or no genius but with considerable intellectual ability, and not without an honest zeal for the "progress of the species"; she was what is called an "advanced" thinker, and was a disciple of Auguste Comte; wrote a number of stories bearing on social questions, and had that courage of her opinions which commanded respect; it was she who persuaded Carlyle to try lecturing when his finances were low, and she had a real pride at the success of the scheme (1802-1876).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Caquelon

Caquelon

A Caquelon is a cooking vessel of stoneware, ceramic, enamelled cast iron, or porcelain for the preparation of fondue. The word is from a Swiss French term originating in the 18th century derived from the Swiss German word Kakel meaning an earthenware casserole. The term is in common use throughout Switzerland, and in the Franche-Comté and Provence regions of France. The bottom of a caquelon requires a thickness sufficient to prevent burning of the melted cheese when the vessel is placed over a spirit burner at the table. Nevertheless, an encrusted layer of cheese forms on the bottom called the Grossmutter in German, La Religieuse in French, which is released when the fondue has been consumed and is shared between the diners.

— Freebase

Gérard Depardieu

Gérard Depardieu

Gérard Xavier Marcel Depardieu is a French actor, film-maker, businessman and vineyard owner. He is one of the most prolific character actors in film history, having completed approximately 170 movies since 1967. He has twice won the César Award for Best Actor as well as the Golden Globe award for Best Actor in Green Card. After he garnered huge critical acclaim for the title role in Cyrano de Bergerac, which landed him a nomination for an Academy Award, Depardieu acted in many big budget Hollywood movies. He is a Chevalier of the Légion d'honneur, Chevalier of the Ordre national du Mérite. He was granted Russian citizenship on 3 January 2013 by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

— Freebase

Zunk

Zunk

Zunk was an early version of a digital image editor. It was written in 1983 by Gerard Holzmann in the Bell Labs Unix group and inspired by the vismon program. It displayed 48x48 bitmap faces on the jerq bitmap terminal which had been designed by Bart Locanthi and Rob Pike. Due to the large number of options it had, Zunk also became known as the "swiss army knife" of image editing. It later became the pico image editor, as documented in a first book on the digital darkroom from 1988 — now out of print, but viewable online at http://spinroot.com/pico ⁕Beyond Photography – The Digital Darkroom, Prentice Hall, 1988. ISBN 0-13-074410-7

— Freebase

Centriole

Centriole

A centriole is a cylinder shaped cell structure found in most eukaryotic cells, though it is absent in higher plants and most fungi. An associated pair of centrioles, arranged perpendicularly and surrounded by an amorphous mass of dense material, called the pericentriolar material, or PCM, makes up a compound structure called a centrosome. Most centrioles are made up of nine sets of microtubule triplets, arranged in a cylindrical pattern. Deviations from this structure include crabs and Drosophila melanogaster embryos, with nine doublets, and Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cells and early embryos, with nine singlets. Edouard van Beneden and Theodor Boveri made the first observation and identification of centrioles in 1883 and 1888 respectively, while the pattern of centriole replication was first worked out independently by Etienne de Harven and Joseph G. Gall circa 1950

— Freebase

Mel Gibson

Mel Gibson

Mel Colm-Cille Gerard Gibson AO is an American actor, film director, producer and screenwriter. He was born in Peekskill, New York, moved with his parents to Sydney, Australia, when he was 12 years old, and later studied acting at the Australian National Institute of Dramatic Art. After appearing as an action hero during the 1980s, Gibson went on to found Icon Entertainment, a Production Company which independent film director Atom Egoyan has called, "an alternative to the studio system." In 1995, Gibson produced, directed, and stared in the Academy Award-winning Braveheart. In 2004, he directed and produced The Passion of the Christ, a globally successful film depicting the last hours in the life of Jesus Christ.

— Freebase

CQ

CQ

CQ is a 2001 film written and directed by Roman Coppola. It was screened out of competition at the 2001 Cannes Film Festival. It is a homage to 1960s European spy/sci-fi spoofs like Barbarella and Danger: Diabolik and the documentary spoof David Holzman's Diary. The cinematography is done by Robert D. Yeoman. The film stars Jeremy Davies, Jason Schwartzman, Giancarlo Giannini, Gérard Depardieu, Billy Zane, and Angela Lindvall. John Phillip Law also appears. The film features an original soundtrack by French electronic band Mellow, which was released on Emperor Norton Records. CQ was released by United Artists. The title "CQ" is revealed to be code for "Seek You", in line with the movie's theme of seeking and finding love.

— Freebase

Goodnight Sweetheart

Goodnight Sweetheart

Goodnight Sweetheart is a British sitcom that ran for six series on BBC1 from 1993 to 1999. It stars Nicholas Lyndhurst as Gary Sparrow, an accidental time traveller who leads a double life after discovering a time portal allowing him to travel between the London of the 1990s and the same area during the Second World War. The show was created by Laurence Marks and Maurice Gran, also creators of Birds of a Feather and The New Statesman. The creators wrote the first series, while subsequent episodes were by a team of writers. Although originally made for the BBC the series has subsequently been repeated on ITV3. Series 1-6 is now being broadcast on GOLD. For his starring role, Lyndhurst won the Most Popular Comedy Performer at the National Television Awards twice in 1998 and 1999.

— Freebase

You Had to Be There

You Had to Be There

You Had to Be There is a live double album by the American popular music singer-songwriter Jimmy Buffett. It was originally released in October 1978 as ABC AK-1008/2 and later re-released on ABC's successor label MCA. It is the first of Buffett's many live albums and his tenth album overall. The album's material was taken from several concerts in August 1978 at Fox Theatre in Atlanta, Georgia, and Maurice Gusman Cultural Center in Miami, Florida, and was mixed by Elliot Scheiner at AIR Studios in London. "Come Monday" is the only song on the album that features a vocal overdub recorded in a studio.

— Freebase

Still Waters (Run Deep)

Still Waters (Run Deep)

"Still Waters (Run Deep)" is a song by the Bee Gees. It was the third and final single issued from their multi-platinum Still Waters album, released in 1997. The song is a pop ballad written by Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb and recorded in 1996. The recording and the producing of the song were assisted by Hugh Padgham. For the third time in a row, the Bee Gees made a UK Top 20 hit single from the same album, peaking at #18. The single performed well around the European charts, and peaked at #57 in the U.S., which is their last appearance on the Billboard Hot 100 chart to date as artists.

— Freebase

Ṛta

Ṛta

In the Vedic religion, Ṛta is the principle of natural order which regulates and coordinates the operation of the universe and everything within it. In the hymns of the Vedas, Ṛta is described as that which is ultimately responsible for the proper functioning of the natural, moral and sacrificial orders. Conceptually, it is closely allied to the injunctions and ordinances thought to uphold it, collectively referred to as Dharma, and the action of the individual in relation to those ordinances, referred to as Karma – two terms which eventually eclipsed Ṛta in importance as signifying natural, religious and moral order in later Hinduism. Sanskrit scholar Maurice Bloomfield referred to Ṛta as "one of the most important religious conceptions of the Rig Veda", going on to note that, "from the point of view of the history of religious ideas we may, in fact we must, begin the history of Hindu religion at least with the history of this conception".

— Freebase

Brethren of the Common Life

Brethren of the Common Life

The Brethren of the Common Life was a Roman Catholic pietist religious community founded in the Netherlands in the 14th century by Gerard Groote, formerly a successful and worldly educator who had had a religious experience and preached a life of simple devotion to Jesus Christ. Without taking up irrevocable vows, the Brethren banded together in communities, giving up their worldly goods to live chaste and strictly regulated lives in common houses, devoting every waking hour to attending divine service, reading and preaching of sermons, labouring productively, and taking meals in common that were accompanied by the reading aloud of Scripture: "judged from the ascetic discipline and intention of this life, it had few features which distinguished it from life in a monastery", observes Hans Baron.

— Freebase

Esterel

Esterel

Esterel is a synchronous programming language for the development of complex reactive systems. The imperative programming style of Esterel allows the simple expression of parallelism and preemption. As a consequence, it is very well suited for control-dominated model designs. The development of the language started in the early 1980s, and was mainly carried out by a team of Ecole des Mines de Paris and INRIA led by Gérard Berry. Current compilers take Esterel programs and generate C code or hardware implementations. The language is still under development, with several compilers out. The commercial version of Esterel is the development environment Esterel Studio. The company that commercialize it has initiated a normalization process with the IEEE. The Esterel v7 Reference Manual Version v7 30 – initial IEEE standardization proposal is publicly available.

— Freebase

Timeline

Timeline

Timeline is a 2003 science fiction adventure film directed by Richard Donner, based on the novel of the same name by Michael Crichton. A team of present-day archaeologists are sent back in time to rescue their professor from medieval France in the middle of a battle. It stars Paul Walker, Frances O'Connor, Gerard Butler, Billy Connolly, David Thewlis and Anna Friel among others. Jerry Goldsmith composed the original score, which would have been his last before his death in 2004, but it was replaced with a new score by Brian Tyler, after the first cut was re-edited and Goldsmith's increasing health problems did not allow him to continue. The film was poorly received by critics and fans of the book and was a box office failure.

— Freebase

Gramont

Gramont

or Grammont, Philibert, Comte de, a celebrated French courtier in the age of Louis XIV.; he greatly distinguished himself in the army, as also at the court by his lively wit and gallant bearing, and soon established himself in the king's favour, but an intrigue with one of the royal mistresses brought about his exile from France; at the profligate court of Charles II of England he found a warm welcome and congenial surroundings; left memoirs which were mainly the work of his brother-in-law, Anthony Hamilton, and which give a marvellously witty and brilliant picture of the licentiousness and intrigue of the 17th-century court life (1621-1707).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Kennedia coccinea

Kennedia coccinea

Kennedia coccinea is a species of flowering plant in the family Fabaceae, endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is a low growing trailing shrub or climber which has twining rust-coloured branchlets with rounded leaflets that are about 1.5 cm long and occur in threes. Orange red or scarlet pea flowers are produced in clusters between August and November in its native range. The species was formally described in 1804 by French botanist Étienne Pierre Ventenat in Jardin de la Malmaison. Two varieties were described in Paxton's Magazine of Botany in 1835, namely var. elegans and var. coccinea. Three further varieties were transferred from the genus Zichya in 1923 by Czech botanist Karel Domin, namely var. molly, var. sericea and var. villosa. Currently, three subspecies are recognised: ⁕K. coccinea Vent. subsp. coccinea ⁕K. coccinea subsp. calcaria Lally ⁕K. coccinea subsp. esotera Lally

— Freebase

Philips

Philips

Koninklijke Philips N.V. is a Dutch multinational engineering and electronics conglomerate headquartered in Amsterdam. It was founded in Eindhoven in 1891 by Gerard Philips and his father Frederik. It is one of the largest electronics companies in the world and employs around 122,000 people across more than 60 countries. Philips is organized into three main divisions: Philips Consumer Lifestyle, Philips Healthcare and Philips Lighting. As of 2012 Philips was the largest manufacturer of lighting in the world measured by applicable revenues. In 2013, the company sold the bulk of its remaining consumer electronics operations to Funai Electric Co. Philips has a primary listing on the Euronext Amsterdam stock exchange and is a constituent of the AEX index. It has a secondary listing on the New York Stock Exchange.

— Freebase

Dianthus barbatus

Dianthus barbatus

Dianthus barbatus is a species of Dianthus native to southern Europe and parts of Asia which has become a popular ornamental garden plant. It is a herbaceous biennial or short-lived perennial plant growing to 30–75 cm tall, with flowers in a dense cluster of up to 30 at the top of the stems. Each flower is 2–3 cm diameter with five petals displaying serrated edges. Wild plants produce red flowers with a white base, but colours in cultivars range from white, pink, red, and purple or with variegated patterns. The exact origin of its English common name is unknown, but first appears in 1596 in botanist John Gerard's garden catalog. The flowers are edible and may have medicinal properties. Sweet william attracts bees, birds, and butterflies.

— Freebase

Elissa

Elissa

Elissar Zakaria Khoury is a Lebanese singer. She is known for her collaborations with well-known Arab and international artists, notably Ragheb Alama, Cheb Mami, Fadl Shaker, Chris DeBurgh and Gérard Ferrer. Born to a Lebanese father (Zakaria Khoury) and a Syrian mother (Youmna Suud), her debut was in 1992 in Studio El Fan, a popular music competition where she won a silver medal. Her debut album in 1999 was Baddi Doub on EMI followed by W'akherta Ma'ak and Ayshalak. In 2004 she signed with the major pan-Arab label Rotana Records, with Ahla Donya being the debut on the new label, followed by Bastanak, Ayami Beek and Tsadaq Bmein. Elissa's 8th studio album As'ad Wahda was released on June 25, 2012.

— Freebase

Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord

Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord

Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Périgord, prince de Bénévent, then prince de Talleyrand was a French diplomat. He worked successfully from the regime of Louis XVI, through the French Revolution and then under Napoleon I, Louis XVIII, Charles X, and Louis-Philippe. Known since the turn of the 19th century simply by the name Talleyrand, he remains a figure that polarizes opinion. Some regard him as one of the most versatile, skilled and influential diplomats in European history, and some believe that he was a traitor, betraying in turn, the Ancien Régime, the French Revolution, Napoleon, and the Restoration. He is also notorious for leaving the Catholic Church after ordination to the priesthood and consecration to the episcopacy.

— Freebase

Lugeon

Lugeon

A Lugeon is a unit devised to quantify the water permeability of bedrock and the hydraulic conductivity resulting from fractures; it is named after Maurice Lugeon, a Swiss geologist who first formulated the method in 1933. More specifically, the Lugeon test is used to measure the amount of water injected into a segment of the bored hole under a steady pressure; the value is defined as the loss of water in litres per minute and per metre borehole at an over-pressure of 1 MPa. Although the Lugeon test may serve other purposes, its main object is to determine the Lugeon coefficient which by definition is water absorption measured in litres per metre of test-stage per minute at a pressure of 10 kg/cm².

— Freebase

Rockets

Rockets

Rockets were a French space rock band that formed in Paris in 1974. Some of the former members had played together since 1970 in a local band called Crystal. In their most successful era the line-up comprised vocalist Christian Le Bartz, bassist and vocalist "Little" Gérard L'Her, guitarist and keyboardist Alain Maratrat, drummer and percussionist Alain Groetzinger, and keyboardist Fabrice Quagliotti. The band went through a number of name changes, being known as the Rocket Men and Rok-Etz, among others. In the year 2000 Fabrice Quagliotti decided to reform the band, but with a totally different line-up. This brought to an anomalous situation, as far as none of the former members agreed to hold a reunion. In fact, the last former member to leave the band was Alain Maratrat, in 1992.

— Freebase

Khatun

Khatun

Khatun is a female title of nobility and alternative to male "khan" prominently used in the First Turkic Empire and in the subsequent Mongol Empire. It is equivalent to "queen" or "empress" approximately. Before the advent of Islam in Central Asia, Khatun was the title of the Queen of Bukhara. According to the Encyclopaedia of Islam: Khatun [is] a title of Sogdian origin borne by the wives and female relatives of the T'u-chüeh and subsequent Turkish rulers. the Khatun in the Kazakh language, usually refers the married women, still many Kazakh people commonly call their wife as katyn or katun in this modern time. This word not only used in Kazakh language, but also one of the common word in all other Turkic speaking nations such as Turkish, Uzbek, Uighur, Tatar and Kirghiz etc. British Orientalist Gerard Clauson considers "xa:tun" as borrowed from Sogdian "xwat'yn", in Sogdian xwat'y and "xwat'yn"; it is the precise wife'; it is the precise meaning of "xat:un" in the early period; cf. Pers.

— Freebase

The Expert

The Expert

The Expert is a British television series produced by the BBC between 1968 and 1976. The series starred Marius Goring as Dr. John Hardy, a pathologist working for the Home Office and was essentially a police procedural drama, with Hardy bringing his forensic knowledge to solve various cases. The Expert was created and produced by Gerard Glaister. The series was also one of the first BBC dramas to be made in colour, and throughout its four series had numerous high quality guest appearances by actors such as John Carson, Peter Copley, Rachel Kempson, Peter Vaughan, Clive Swift, Geoffrey Palmer, Peter Barkworth, Jean Marsh, Ray Brooks, George Sewell, Anthony Valentine, Bernard Lee, Lee Montague, Geoffrey Bayldon, Mike Pratt, Edward Fox, André Morell, Brian Blessed, Nigel Stock, Philip Madoc and Warren Clarke.

— Freebase

Ilmenium

Ilmenium

Ilmenium was the proposed name for a new element found by the chemist R. Hermann in 1847. During the analysis of the mineral samarskite he concluded that it does contain an element similar to niobium and tantalum. The similar reactivity of niobium and tantalum complicated preparation of pure samples of the metals and therefore several new elements were proposed, which were later found to be mixtures of niobium and tantalum. The differences between tantalum and niobium and the fact that no other similar element was present, were unequivocally demonstrated in 1864 by Christian Wilhelm Blomstrand, and Henri Etienne Sainte-Claire Deville, as well as Louis J. Troost, who determined the formulas of some of the compounds in 1865 and finally by the Swiss chemist Jean Charles Galissard de Marignac Although it had been proven that ilmenium is only a mixture of niobium and tantalum, Hermann continued publishing articles on ilmenium for several years.

— Freebase

Libertine

Libertine

A libertine is one devoid of most moral restraints, which are seen as unnecessary or undesirable, especially one who ignores or even spurns accepted morals and forms of behaviour sanctified by the larger society. Libertines place value on physical pleasures, meaning those experienced through the senses. As a philosophy, libertinism gained new-found adherents in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, particularly in France and Great Britain. Notable among these were John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester, and the Marquis de Sade. "Libertine" is defined today as "a dissolute person; usually a person who is morally unrestrained". Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand wrote that Joseph Bonaparte "sought only life's pleasures and easy access to libertinism" while on the throne of Naples.

— Freebase

Picture book

Picture book

A picture book combines visual and verbal narratives in a book format, most often aimed at young children. The images in picture books use a range of media such as oil paints, acrylics, watercolor, and pencil, among others. Two of the earliest books with something like the format picture books still retain now were Heinrich Hoffmann's Struwwelpeter from 1845 and Beatrix Potter's The Tale of Peter Rabbit from 1902. Some of the best-known picture books are Robert McCloskey's Make Way for Ducklings, Dr. Seuss' The Cat In The Hat, and Maurice Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are. The Caldecott Medal and Kate Greenaway Medal are awarded annually for illustrations in children's literature. From the mid-1960s several children's literature awards include a category for picture books.

— Freebase

John Bruton

John Bruton

John Gerard Bruton is an Irish politician who served as Taoiseach of Ireland from 1994 to 1997. A minister under two taoisigh, Liam Cosgrave and Garret FitzGerald, Bruton held a number of the top posts in Irish government, including Minister for Finance, and Minister for Industry, Trade, Commerce and Tourism. He became leader of Fine Gael in 1990 and served as Taoiseach from 1994 until 1997, leading the Rainbow Coalition government of Fine Gael–Labour Party–Democratic Left. Bruton was first elected to Dáil Éireann as a TD for Meath in 1969, and served continuously until his retirement from domestic politics in 2004. He served as the Ambassador of the European Union to the United States from 2004–2009, and is a former Vice-President of the European People's Party.

— Freebase

Codename

Codename

Codename was a short-lived British television series produced by the BBC in 1970. An espionage thriller series, Codename was based around a secret organisation, MI17, being run from a residential hall at Cambridge University. The programme, lasting for one series of thirteen episodes, was produced by Gerard Glaister and starred Clifford Evans, Alexandra Bastedo, Anthony Valentine and Brian Peck. It was preceded by a one-off pilot play, with a different cast. The leads were well known from other series when this series was originally transmitted, Valentine from Callan, Bastedo from The Champions and Evans from The Power Game, and the first episode featured on the cover of the Radio Times. However, the show failed to capture the public imagination, and no further series were made. No episodes survive in the BBC archive, though there is a recording of the pilot.

— Freebase

Erskine, Thomas, of Linlathen

Erskine, Thomas, of Linlathen

member of the Scottish bar, but devoted in an intensely human spirit to theological interests, "one of the gentlest, kindliest, best bred of men," says Carlyle, who was greatly attached to him; "I like him," he says, "as one would do a draught of sweet rustic mead served in cut glasses and a silver tray ... talks greatly of symbols, seems not disinclined to let the Christian religion pass for a kind of mythus, provided one can retain the spirit of it"; he wrote a book, much prized at one time, on the "Internal Evidences of Revealed Religion," also on Faith; besides being the constant friend of Carlyle, he corresponded on intimate terms with such men as Maurice and Dean Stanley (1788-1870).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Paola

Paola

Paola is a town in the Grand Harbour area of Malta, with a population of 8,856 people. It is named after Grandmaster Antoine de Paule who laid the foundation stone in 1626, but is commonly known as Raħal Ġdid, which means "new town" in Maltese. Paola is renowned for the Ħal Saflieni Hypogeum, its large parish church, its beautiful square with shopping centres, the Good Friday procession, and its football club, Hibernians FC. A number of prominent Maltese personalities come from Paola, including Dr.Vincent Moran, Dr.Konrad Mizzi, Silvio Parnis, Jason Azzopardi,Gino Cauchi, Dr.Chris Fearne, Ino Bonello, Mons. Francesco Xuereb, Immanuel Mifsud, Massimo Ellul, Carmel Joseph Farrugia, TV personality Simone Cini, actor and TV personality Etienne St. John, radio & TV presenter Dorian Cassar, songwriter and television producer Joe Julian Farrugia, and singers Klinsmann Coleiro and Ruth Casingena. One of Malta's Prime Ministers, Sir Paul Boffa, resided in this locality.

— Freebase

Bunsen

Bunsen

Bunsen is a lunar crater that lies near the northwestern limb of the Moon. It is located to the west of the Oceanus Procellarum and the crater von Braun. To the southeast is the crater Lavoisier, and to the northeast lies Gerard. Northwest of Bunsen, on the far side of the Moon, is McLaughlin. Due to its position this crater appears foreshortened when viewed from the Earth, and its visibility is affected by libration. This crater has become considerably worn and eroded by subsequent impacts, leaving a formation that has been described as disintegrated. The most intact portion of the rim is along the northeastern side. There is a smaller, crater-like formation intruding into the southeastern rim. Within the crater, the floor is pitted by tiny impacts, and has a rille system of criss-crossing clefts near the northern and southern rims. There is a low ridge near the southwest corner of the interior.

— Freebase

Anthropomorpha

Anthropomorpha

Anthropomorpha is a defunct taxon which contained the manlike, or anthropoid, apes. The order was established by Carl Linnaeus in the first edition of his book Systema Naturae for genera Homo, Simia and Bradypus. In the 1758 edition of the same book, Linnaeus discarded this name and began to use the word Primates, which has replaced Anthropomorpha completely. The name is no longer considered valid, as the animals that were included within Anthropomorpha are now believed to belong to multiple clades. For example, two-toed sloths were included within Anthropomorpha, but are now considered to be in the family Megalonychidae, which is not closely related to the primates. The taxon Anthropomorpha was originally proposed by Carolus Linnaeus, although Linnaeus' archenemy, the Comte de Buffon, correctly rejected the combination of sloths and humans within the same order.

— Freebase

Comte, Auguste

Comte, Auguste

a French philosopher, born at Montpellier, the founder of Positivism (q. v.); enough to say here, it consisted of a new arrangement of the sciences into Abstract and Concrete, and a new law of historical evolution in science from a theological through a metaphysical to a positive stage, which last is the ultimate and crowning and alone legitimate method, that is, observation of phenomena and their sequence; Comte was first a disciple of St. Simon, but he quarrelled with him; commenced a "Cours de Philosophie Positive" of his own, in six vols.; but finding it defective on the moral side, he instituted a worship of humanity, and gave himself out as the chief priest of a new religion, a very different thing from Carlyle's hero-worship (1795-1857).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Souza, Madame de

Souza, Madame de

French novelist, born in Paris, and educated in a convent, on her leaving which she was married to the Comte de Flahaut, a man much older than herself, and with whom she lived unhappily; fled to Germany and then to England on the outbreak of the Revolution; afterwards returned to Paris, and as the wife of the Marquis de Souza-Botelho presided over one of the most charming of salons, in which the chief attraction was her own bright and gifted personality; her novels, "Eugène de Rothelin," "Eugénie et Mathilde," etc., breathe the spirit of the old régime, and are full of natural and vivacious pictures of French life (1761-1836).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Colutea

Colutea

Colutea is a genus of about 25 species of deciduous flowering shrubs in the legume family Fabaceae, growing from 2–5 m tall, native to southern Europe, north Africa and southwest Asia. The leaves are pinnate and light green to glaucous grey-green. The flowers are yellow to orange, pea-shaped and produced in racemes throughout the summer. These are followed by the attractive inflated seed pods which change from pale green to red or copper in colour. Colutea arborescens, known as Bladder Senna— John Gerard cautioned, however, that they are not true senna, "though we have followed others in giving it to name Bastard Sena, which name is very unproper to it"— is indigenous to the Mediterranean; it has yellow flowers. It has a height and spread of up to 5 m. Other species include Colutea orientalis, with grey leaves and coppery flowers.

— Freebase

Riverman

Riverman

Riverman was a French Thoroughbred racehorse. Foaled in Kentucky, he was bred by Harry F. Guggenheim of the prominent American Guggenheim family. Riverman was from the mare River Lady and sired by Guggenheim's stallion Never Bend, a grandson of the extremely important sire, Nearco. Purchased by French perfume magnate Pierre Wertheimer, head of the House of Chanel, the colt raced under the colors of his wife, Germaine. Trained by Alec Head, Riverman was sent to the track in 1971 where he won the Prix Yacowlef and finished second in the Critérium de Maisons-Laffitte. The following year, he won the Group II Prix Jean Prat plus two Group One races, the Prix d'Ispahan and the Poule d'Essai des Poulains. Sent to race in England, he notably ran third to Brigadier Gerard in July's King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes and second to him in October's Champion Stakes.

— Freebase

Adolphe

Adolphe

Adolphe is a classic French novel by Benjamin Constant, first published in 1816. It tells the story of an alienated young man, Adolphe, who falls in love with an older woman, Ellénore, the Polish mistress of the Comte de P***. Their illicit relationship serves to isolate them from their friends and from society at large. The book eschews all conventional descriptions of exteriors for the sake of detailed accounts of feelings and states of mind. Constant began the novel on 30 October 1806, and completed it some time before 1810. While still working on it he read drafts to individual acquaintances and to small audiences, and after its first publication in London and Paris in June 1816 it went through three further editions: in July 1816, July 1824 in Paris, and in 1828. Many variants appear, mostly alterations to Constant's somewhat archaic spelling and punctuation.

— Freebase

Galliano

Galliano

Galliano was a London-based acid jazz group, which started in 1988. The group was the first signing to Eddie Piller and Gilles Peterson's Acid Jazz record label. The original members were Rob Gallagher, Constantine Weir, Michael Snaith and Crispin Robinson. Other important members included Valerie Etienne, who participated in the recording of all their CDs, along with other musicians such as Mick Talbot on keyboards, Crispin Taylor on drums Ernie McKone on bass guitar, Mark Vandergucht guitar and Steve Ameedee, otherwise known as Uncle Big Man. Galliano achieved the peak of its success in 1994 with The Plot Thickens which peaked at number seven in the UK album chart. Galliano provided the track used in the title sequence of Kevin Reynolds' 1997 film, One Eight Seven, starring Samuel L. Jackson. The track "Slack Hands" appears on their 1996 album 4. In 1997, Gallagher broke Galliano up, and pursued other musical projects, Two Banks of Four and Earl Zinger.

— Freebase

Turenne, Vicomte de

Turenne, Vicomte de

a famous marshal of France, born at Sedan of noble parentage; was trained in the art of war under his uncles Maurice and Henry of Nassau in Holland, and entered the French service in 1630 under the patronage of Richelieu; gained great renown during the Thirty Years' War; during the wars of the Fronde (q. v.) first sided with the "Frondeurs," but subsequently joined Mazarin and the court party; crushed his former chief Condé; invaded successfully the Spanish Netherlands, and so brought the revolt to an end; was created Marshal-General of France in 1660; subsequently conducted to a triumphant issue wars within Spain (1667), Holland (1672), and during 1674 conquered and devastated the Palatinate, but during strategical operations conducted against the Austrian general Montecuculi was killed by a cannon-ball (1611-1675).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Anastatica

Anastatica

Anastatica is a monotypic genus with the type species Anastatica hierochuntica. The genus is a member of the family Brassicaceae, in the division Magnoliophyta of the class Magnoliopsida. The plant is a small gray annual herb that rarely grows above 15 centimetres high, and bears minute white flowers. It is a tumbleweed and a resurrection plant. The most commonly used common name in English may be rose of Jericho; other common names include dinosaur plant, Jericho rose, Mary's flower, Mary's hand, Palestinian tumbleweed, resurrection plant, St. Mary's flower, true rose of Jericho, and wheel. About the name "rose of Jericho", the 16th century herbalist John Gerard is said to have remarked The coiner of the name spoiled it in the mint; for of all plants that have been written of not any are more unlike unto the rose. This species is not to be confused with Selaginella lepidophylla, also known as rose of Jericho and false rose of Jericho.

— Freebase

Alka-Seltzer

Alka-Seltzer

Alka-Seltzer is an effervescent antacid and pain reliever first marketed by the Dr. Miles Medicine Company. It was developed by Maurice Treener, head chemist at Miles, in Elkhart, Indiana. Alka-Seltzer is marketed for relief of minor aches, pains, inflammation, fever, headache, heartburn, sour stomach, indigestion, and hangovers, while neutralizing excess stomach acid. It was launched in 1931. A spin-off of Alka-Seltzer made to relieve colds and flu, Alka-Seltzer Plus, was later introduced. A short-lived antacid non-aspirin variant, Alka-Mints, was introduced in 1994 and discontinued in 1997. Alka-Seltzer is currently owned by Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Germany. The name "Alka-Seltzer" has been extended to incorporate an entire line of medications sold over the counter and taken by means of rapidly dissolving tablets that form a carbonated solution in water.

— Freebase

Tigon

Tigon

A tigon or tiglon is a hybrid cross between a male tiger and a lioness. Thus, it has parents with the same genus but of different species. The tigon is not currently as common as the converse hybrid, the liger; however, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Gerard Iles wrote that he had been able to obtain three tigons, but he had never seen a liger. The tigon's genome includes genetic components of both parents. Tigons can exhibit visible characteristics from both parents: they can have both spots from the mother and stripes from the father. Any mane that a male tigon may have will appear shorter and less noticeable than a lion's mane and is closer in type to the ruff of a male tiger. It is a common misconception that tigons are smaller than lions or tigers. They do not exceed the size of their parent species because they inherit growth-inhibitory genes from the lioness mother, but they do not exhibit any kind of dwarfism or miniaturization; they often weigh around 180 kilograms.

— Freebase


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