Definitions containing fürst, walter

We've found 250 definitions:

Mozartkugel

Mozartkugel

The Mozartkugel, originally known as the “Mozartbonbon”, was created by the Salzburg confectioner, Paul Fürst, in 1890 and named after Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. The confectionery Fürst still produces the original Salzburg Mozartkugeln by hand according to the original recipe and only sells them in its shops or over its website. As the Fürst confectionery does not own a trademark for Mozartkugeln, there are numerous imitation products, most of which are produced using industrial techniques.

— Freebase

Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher

Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher

Gebhard Leberecht von Blücher, Fürst von Wahlstatt, Graf, later elevated to Fürst von Wahlstatt, was a Prussian Generalfeldmarschall who led his army against Napoleon I at the Battle of the Nations at Leipzig in 1813 and at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815 with the Duke of Wellington. The honorary citizen of Berlin, Hamburg and Rostock bore the nickname "Marschall Vorwärts" because of his approach to warfare.

— Freebase

Ivanhoe

Ivanhoe

A novel by Sir Walter Scott.

— Wiktionary

Walt

Walt

A diminutive of the male given name Walter.

— Wiktionary

Wat

Wat

A medieval English given name, short for Walter.

— Wiktionary

Raleigh

Raleigh

Sir Walter Raleigh English explorer and soldier

— Wiktionary

Waverley

Waverley

A novel (and subsequent series) by Walter Scott

— Wiktionary

bauhaus

Bauhaus

a German style of architecture begun by Walter Gropius in 1918

— Princeton's WordNet

Wally

Wally

A diminutive of the male given names Walter and Wallace.

— Wiktionary

macgregor

MacGregor, Robert MacGregor, Rob Roy

Scottish clan leader and outlaw who was the subject of a 1817 novel by Sir Walter Scott (1671-1734)

— Princeton's WordNet

robert macgregor

MacGregor, Robert MacGregor, Rob Roy

Scottish clan leader and outlaw who was the subject of a 1817 novel by Sir Walter Scott (1671-1734)

— Princeton's WordNet

rob roy

MacGregor, Robert MacGregor, Rob Roy

Scottish clan leader and outlaw who was the subject of a 1817 novel by Sir Walter Scott (1671-1734)

— Princeton's WordNet

over-ridden

over-ridden

excessively ridden (Example: "...there was blood on ... the sides of his over-ridden horse", Sir Walter Scott, The Black Dwarf)

— Wiktionary

Gwatkin

Gwatkin

A patronymic Welsh and English surname; derived from Watkin a pet name for the given name Walter. Originally 'ap Gwatkyn' or 'ap Gwatkin', meaning 'son of Watkin'.

— Wiktionary

Juke

Juke

"Juke" is a harmonica instrumental recorded by then 22-year-old Chicago bluesman Little Walter Jacobs in 1952. Although Little Walter had been recording sporadically for small Chicago labels over the previous five years, and had appeared on Muddy Waters' records for the Chess label since 1950, Juke was Little Walter's first hit, and it was the most important of his career. Due to the influence of Little Walter on blues harmonica, Juke is now considered a blues harmonica standard.

— Freebase

The Olympics

The Olympics

The Olympics were an American doo-wop group, formed in 1957 by lead singer Walter Ward. The group included Eddie Lewis, Charles Fizer, Walter Hammond and Melvin King and except for Lewis were friends in a Los Angeles, California, high school.

— Freebase

taghairm

taghairm

An ancient divination method of the Highland Scots: The oracle of the hide in which a person was sewn into the hide of a freshly killed ox, and placed beside a waterfall. This would enable him to foresee the results of an impending battle. From Sir Walter Scott, The Lady of the Lake.

— Wiktionary

Ballantyne, John

Ballantyne, John

brother of preceding, a confidant of Sir Walter's in the matter of the anonymity of the Waverley Novels; an inimitable story-teller and mimic, very much to the delight of Sir Walter (1774-1821).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Cure All

Cure All

Cure All is an album by keyboardist Robert Walter. The recording features James Singleton and Johnny Vidacovich. AllMusic states that Cure All is soul-jazz with "a healthy balance of intellect and funkiness". All About Jazz states Cure All's "simplicity is refreshing rather than predictable" and that Walter's sidemen for the album are known for their appreciation for the spirit of New Orleans.

— Freebase

Walter William Skeat

Walter William Skeat

Walter William Skeat, FBA English philologist, was born in London on the 21st of November 1835, and educated at King's College School, Highgate School, and Christ's College, Cambridge, of which he became a fellow in July 1860. His son was the anthropologist Walter William Skeat. His grandsons include the noted palaeographer T. C. Skeat and the stained glass painter Francis Skeat.

— Freebase

Reuss

Reuss

Reuss was the name of several historical states located in present-day Thuringia, Germany. Its rulers, the House of Reuss, named all of their male children Heinrich after the end of the 12th century in honour of Henry VI, Holy Roman Emperor, to whom they owed the estates of Weida and Gera. The head of each branch of the family bore the German title Fürst as did their children.

— Freebase

Walter Sans Avoir

Walter Sans Avoir

Walter Sans Avoir, also mistakenly known as the Penniless, was the lord of Boissy-sans-Avoir in the Ile-de-France. As lieutenant to Peter the Hermit he co-led the People's Crusade at the beginning of the First Crusade. Leaving well before the main army of knights and their followers, Walter led his band through the Holy Roman Empire, the Kingdom of Hungary and the Bulgarian province of the Eastern Roman Empire, traveling separately from Peter. While they passed through Germany and Hungary uneventfully, Walter's followers plundered the Belgrade area, drawing reprisals upon themselves. From here they continued to Constantinople under Byzantine escort. Walter and Peter joined forces at Constantinople where Alexius I Comnenus provided transport across the Bosporus. Despite Peter's entreaties to restrain themselves, the Crusaders engaged the Turks at once and were cut to pieces. Peter had returned to Constantinople, either for reinforcements or to protect himself. But Walter was killed, allegedly pierced by seven arrows on 21 October 1096 when the Seljuk leader Kilij Arslan attacked him and his followers.

— Freebase

Border Minstrel

Border Minstrel

Sir Walter Scott.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Great Magician

Great Magician

Sir Walter Scott.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Heymann Nephritis Antigenic Complex

Heymann Nephritis Antigenic Complex

A complex of antigenic proteins obtained from the brush border of kidney tubules. It contains two principal components LDL-RECEPTOR RELATED PROTEIN 2 and LDL-RECEPTOR RELATED PROTEIN-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN. The name of this complex is derived from researcher, Dr. Walter Heymann, who developed an experimental model of membranous glomerulonephritis (GLOMERULONEPHRITIS) by injecting this antigenic complex into rats to induce an autoimmune response.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Hardwired

Hardwired

Hardwired is a 1986 cyberpunk science fiction novel by Walter Jon Williams.

— Freebase

Argonautica

Argonautica

Argonautica is a speculative fiction novella published in 1999 that was written by Walter Jon Williams.

— Freebase

Battle of Ypres

Battle of Ypres

Battle of Ypres is a 1925 war film written and directed by Walter Summers.

— Freebase

Herrschaft

Herrschaft

In the German feudal system, a Herrschaft or Herrlichkeit was the fiefdom of a lord, who in this area exercised his full feudal rights. A fiefdom of the king or emperor within the Holy Roman Empire was known as a Reichsstandschaft. If they had become a Graf or a Fürst by purchase or inheritance, they were – unlike the Reichsritter – represented in the Reichstag on the Grafenbank. An Unterherrschaft or Unterherrlichkeit was a fief whose proprietor, an Unterherr, was more or less independent on his own estate, without however being free.

— Freebase

Walter Simons

Walter Simons

Walter Simons was a German lawyer and politician. He served as president of the Reichsgericht from 1922 to 1929.

— Freebase

Wizard of the North

Wizard of the North

name given to Sir Walter Scott, from the magic power displayed in his writings.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Gasbags

Gasbags

Gasbags is a 1941 British comedy film directed by Walter Forde and Marcel Varnel and starring The Crazy Gang.

— Freebase

The Silos

The Silos

The Silos is a rock band formed by Walter Salas-Humara and Bob Rupe in New York City in 1985.

— Freebase

Kansa Language

Kansa Language

Kansa is a Siouan language of the Dhegihan group once spoken by the Kaw people of Oklahoma. The last mother-tongue speaker, Walter Kekahbah, died in 1983.

— Freebase

Unknown, The Great

Unknown, The Great

name given to Sir Walter Scott from withholding his name in publishing the Waverley novels.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Rebecca the Jewess

Rebecca the Jewess

a high-souled Hebrew maiden, who is the heroine in Sir Walter Scott's "Ivanhoe."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Defauconpret

Defauconpret

French littérateur; translator of the novels of Sir Walter Scott and Fenimore Cooper (1767-1843).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Filer

Filer

Filer is a city in Twin Falls County, Idaho, United States. The population was 2,508 at the 2010 census. Filer is located just west of the intersection of U.S. Routes 93 and 30. It was named after Walter G. Filer, who served as general manager of the Twin Falls Water and Land Company. The city was established in 1906 as the terminus of the Oregon Short Line branch of Twin Falls. Walter Filer was a mining engineer and surveyor from Sharon, Pennsylvania, who supervised the construction of the Milner diversion dam on the Snake River. Since 1916, the City of Filer has been the home of the Twin Falls County Fair and Rodeo.

— Freebase

Paul Karrer

Paul Karrer

Paul Karrer was a Swiss organic chemist best known for his research on vitamins. He and Walter Haworth won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 1937.

— Freebase

Helvetium

Helvetium

Helvetium was the suggested name of chemical element number 85, now known as astatine, given to it by the Swiss chemist Walter Minder. Walter Minder announced the discovery in 1940. He chose the name based on "Helvetia", the Latin name for Switzerland, to honor his country of birth. In the year 1942 he together with Alice Leigh-Smith announced a second time the discovery of element number 85. This time he proposed the name anglohelvetium to honor also England, the home of Alice Leigh-Smith. Later it was proven that in fact he had not discovered element 85.

— Freebase

Gilbert, Sir Humphrey

Gilbert, Sir Humphrey

navigator, born in Devonshire, half-brother of Sir Walter Raleigh; in 1583 established a settlement in Newfoundland.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Vernon, Di

Vernon, Di

the heroine in Sir Walter Scott's "Rob Roy," an enthusiastic royalist, distinguished for her beauty and talents.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

James Walter Thompson

James Walter Thompson

James Walter Thompson was the namesake of the JWT advertising agency and a pioneer of many advertising techniques.

— Freebase

Jinny

Jinny

Jinny were an Italian 1990s band who released singles throughout Europe. The band members were Alessandro Gilardi, Claudio Varola, Federico Di Bonaventura and Walter Cremonini.

— Freebase

Zaj

Zaj

Zaj was an experimental music and performance art group formed in 1959 in Milan, Italy by composers and intermedia artists Walter Marchetti and Juan Hidalgo with the support of the American composer John Cage. The group received major contributions by different artists from the Spanish avant-garde scene, notably from the writer and diplomat José Luis Castillejo and from the interdisciplinary artist Esther Ferrer. During the 1960s, members of Zaj took part in different Fluxus events organised by George Maciunas. With the help of John Cage and his agent Mimi Johnson, Zaj also toured in different cities in the United States in the late 1970s. The group was disbanded in 1993 by Walter Marchetti.

— Freebase

Hutchinson

Hutchinson

Hutchinson & Co. was an English book publisher, founded in 1887 by George Hutchinson then succeeded by his son, Walter Hutchinson. Hutchinson's published books and magazines such as The Lady's Realm, Adventure-story Magazine, Hutchinson's Magazine and Woman. In the 1920's Walter Hutchinson published many of the "spook stories" of E.F. Benson in Hutchinson's Magazine and then in collections in a number of books. The company also first published the Professor Challenger novels of Arthur Conan Doyle, five novels by webwork mystery writer Harry Stephen Keeler, and short stories by Eden Phillpotts. In 1929 Walter Hutchinson stopped publishing magazines to focus on books. In the 1930s, Hutchinson published H.G. Wells's The Bulpington of Blup as well as the first English translations of Vladimir Nabokov's Camera Obscura in 1936 and Despair under its John Long marque of paperbacks. The company merged with Century Publishing in 1985 to form Century Hutchinson, and was folded into the British Random House Group in 1989, where it remains as an imprint in the Cornerstone Publishing division. Among notable books before the merge in 1985, Hutchinson published Una Lucy Silberrad's first novel, The Enchanter.

— Freebase

Riffraff

Riffraff

Riffraff is a 1936 film starring Jean Harlow and Spencer Tracy. The movie was written by Frances Marion, Anita Loos, and H. W. Hannaford, and directed by J. Walter Ruben.

— Freebase

Limequat

Limequat

The limequat is a citrus tree that is the result of a cross between the Key lime and the kumquat, hybridized by Dr. Walter Swingle in 1909.

— Freebase

Go to Blazes

Go to Blazes

Go to Blazes is a 1942 British information film, produced by the Ministry of Information, directed by Walter Forde and starring Will Hay and Thora Hird.

— Freebase

Lost Colony

Lost Colony

The Lost Colony is a historical play by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Paul Green about Roanoke, the first English colony in North America. The play is based on the historical accounts of Sir Walter Raleigh's failed attempts to establish a permanent settlement in the 1580s in part of what was then the Colony of Virginia. The Lost Colony has been performed since 1937 in an outdoor theater located on the site of Sir Walter's colony on Roanoke Island in the Outer Banks region near present-day Manteo, North Carolina. The original music for the play was provided by acclaimed American composer and conductor Lamar Stringfield. As of 2012, it is the United States' second longest running historical outdoor drama, behind The Ramona Pageant.

— Freebase

Dryburgh

Dryburgh

an abbey, now a ruin, founded by David I., on the Tweed, in Berwickshire, 3 m. SE. of Melrose; the burial-place of Sir Walter Scott.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Walter Mitty

Walter Mitty

Walter Mitty is a fictional character in James Thurber's short story "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty", first published in The New Yorker on March 18, 1939, and in book form in My World and Welcome to It in 1942. Thurber loosely based the character on his friend, Walter Mithoff. It was made into a film in 1947, with a remake directed by and starring Ben Stiller scheduled for release in 2013. Mitty is a meek, mild man with a vivid fantasy life: in a few dozen paragraphs he imagines himself a wartime pilot, an emergency-room surgeon, and a devil-may-care killer. The character's name has come into more general use to refer to an ineffectual dreamer, appearing in several dictionaries. The American Heritage Dictionary defines a Walter Mitty as "an ordinary, often ineffectual person who indulges in fantastic daydreams of personal triumphs". The most famous of Thurber's inept male protagonists, the character is considered "the archetype for dreamy, hapless, Thurber Man". Although the story has humorous elements, there is a darker and more significant message underlying the text, leading to a more tragic interpretation of the Mitty character. Even in his heroic daydreams, Mitty does not triumph, several fantasies being interrupted before the final one sees Mitty dying bravely in front of a firing squad. In the brief snatches of reality that punctuate Mitty's fantasies the audience meets well-meaning but insensitive strangers who inadvertently rob Mitty of some of his remaining dignity.

— Freebase

Walter Piston

Walter Piston

Walter Hamor Piston Jr., was an American composer of classical music, music theorist and professor of music at Harvard University whose students included Leroy Anderson, Leonard Bernstein, and Elliott Carter.

— Freebase

Broken Vow

Broken Vow

"Broken Vow" is a song that was written by Lara Fabian and Walter Afanasieff for Fabian's self-titled album released in 1999. It has since been recorded and performed by many other singers.

— Freebase

Telefon

Telefon

Telefon is a 1977 spy film, starring Charles Bronson, Donald Pleasence and Lee Remick. It was directed by Don Siegel. The film is based on a 1975 novel about mind control, by Walter Wager.

— Freebase

Ball`antyne, James

Ball`antyne, James

a native of Kelso, became a printer in Edinburgh, printed all Sir Walter Scott's works; failed in business, a failure in which Scott was seriously implicated (1772-1833).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Abbotsford

Abbotsford

the residence of Sir Walter Scott, on the Tweed, near Melrose, built by him on the site of a farm called Clarty Hole.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Heisman Trophy

Heisman Trophy

The Heisman Memorial Trophy Award, is awarded annually to the person deemed the most outstanding player in collegiate football. It is presented by the Heisman Trophy Trust in early December before the postseason bowl games. The award was created in 1935 as the Downtown Athletic Club trophy and renamed the following year after the death of the Club's athletic director, John Heisman, whose roles in college athletics included football player; head football, basketball, and baseball coach; and athletic director. It is the oldest of several overall awards in college football, including the Maxwell Award, Walter Camp Award, and the AP Player of the Year. The Heisman and the AP Player of the Year honor the most outstanding player, while the Maxwell and Walter Camp awards recognize the best player, and the Archie Griffin Award recognizes the most valuable player.

— Freebase

Freddy Goes to Florida

Freddy Goes to Florida

Freddy Goes to Florida, is the first of the Freddy the Pig books written by Walter R. Brooks. It tells how the animals of the Bean Farm traveled to Florida and back again, and their adventures on the way.

— Freebase

Trippin'

Trippin'

Trippin' is a 1999 comedy film starring Deon Richmond, Maia Campbell, Donald Faison, and Guy Torry. It is an African-American comedy based on The Secret Life of Walter Mitty. The film also served as one of Anthony Anderson's earliest film roles. It was directed by David Raynr.

— Freebase

Redgauntlet

Redgauntlet

an enthusiastic Jacobite character in Sir Walter Scott's novel of the name, distinguished by a "horse-shoe vein on his brow, which would swell up black when he was in anger."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

ORDO

ORDO

ORDO — Jahrbuch für die Ordnung von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft is a peer-reviewed academic journal established in 1948 by the German economists Walter Eucken and Franz Böhm. The journal focuses on the economic and political institutions governing modern society.

— Freebase

Walter Gropius

Walter Gropius

Walter Adolph Georg Gropius was a German architect and founder of the Bauhaus School, who, along with Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Le Corbusier and Frank Lloyd Wright, is widely regarded as one of the pioneering masters of modern architecture.

— Freebase

Imaginary Conversations

Imaginary Conversations

Imaginary Conversations is five volumes of imaginary conversations between personalities of classical Greece and Rome: poets and authors; statesmen and women; and fortunate and unfortunate individuals, written by the English poet and author Walter Savage Landor.

— Freebase

Cabalzarite

Cabalzarite

Cabalzarite is a mineral first found in an abandoned mine in Falotta, Graubünden, Switzerland and named for Walter Cabalzar, an amateur mineralogist of Chur, Switzerland who contributed to the mineralogy of the Graubünden canton.

— Freebase

Air Power

Air Power

Air Power is a historical educational television series broadcast in the 1950s over the CBS television network dealing with the rise of aviation as a military weapon. It starred Walter Cronkite as the narrator and featured a musical score by Norman Dello Joio.

— Freebase

Fishbone

Fishbone

Fishbone is a U.S. alternative rock band formed in 1979 in Los Angeles, California, which plays a fusion of ska, punk rock, funk, hard rock and soul. Critics have noted of the band: "Fishbone was one of the most distinctive and eclectic alternative rock bands of the late '80s. With their hyperactive, self-conscious diversity, goofy sense of humor, and sharp social commentary, the group gained a sizable cult following during the late '80s, yet they were never able to earn a mainstream audience." Fishbone first assembled in 1979 with John Norwood Fisher; his brother Phillip "Fish" Fisher; Angelo Moore, who sometimes uses the stage name "Dr. Madd Vibe"; Kendall Jones; "Dirty" Walter A. Kibby II; and Christopher Dowd, who sometimes uses the pseudonym "Charlie Down". Founding members John Norwood Fisher, Angelo Moore, and Walter Kibby remain with the band as of 2013.

— Freebase

Walter Rudolf Hess

Walter Rudolf Hess

Walter Rudolf Hess was a Swiss physiologist who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1949 for mapping the areas of the brain involved in the control of internal organs. He shared the prize with Egas Moniz.

— Freebase

John Gibson Lockhart

John Gibson Lockhart

John Gibson Lockhart was a Scottish writer and editor. He is best known as the author of the definitive biography of Sir Walter Scott. This biography has been called the second most admirable in the English language, after Boswell's Life of Johnson.

— Freebase

Inside Straight

Inside Straight

Inside Straight is a live album by jazz saxophonist Cannonball Adderley recorded at the Fantasy Studios in Berkeley, California in 1973 featuring performances by Adderley's Quintet with Nat Adderley, Hal Galper, Walter Booker and Roy McCurdy with guest percussionist King Errisson.

— Freebase

InAlienable

InAlienable

InAlienable is a 2008 science fiction film with horror and comic elements, written and produced by Walter Koenig, and directed by Robert Dyke. It was the first collaboration of Koenig and Dyke since their 1989 production of Moontrap.

— Freebase

Zotz!

Zotz!

Zotz! is a 1962 fantasy/comedy film produced and directed by William Castle, about a man obtaining magical powers from a god of an ancient civilization. The film is based on the 1947 novel of the same name by Walter Karig.

— Freebase

Daniel Rutherford

Daniel Rutherford

Daniel Rutherford FRSE FRCPE FLS FSA was a Scottish physician, chemist and botanist who is most famous for the isolation of nitrogen in 1772. Rutherford was the uncle of the novelist Sir Walter Scott, but not related to the atomic theorist Ernest Rutherford

— Freebase

Cornell Notes

Cornell Notes

The Cornell note-taking system is a note-taking system devised in the 1950s by Walter Pauk, an education professor at Cornell University. Pauk advocated its use in his best-selling How to Study in College.

— Freebase

Trossachs

Trossachs

a romantic pass in the Perthshire Highlands, 8 m. W. of Callander, stretching for about a mile between Lochs Katrine and Achray, is charmingly wooded; is celebrated by Sir Walter Scott in his "Lady of the Lake."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Bannatyne Club

Bannatyne Club

a club founded by Sir Walter Scott to print rare works of Scottish interest, whether in history, poetry, or general literature, of which it printed 116, all deemed of value, a complete set having been sold for £235; dissolved in 1861.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Rio Bravo

Rio Bravo

Rio Bravo is a 1959 American Western film directed by Howard Hawks and starring John Wayne, Dean Martin, and Ricky Nelson. The supporting cast includes Angie Dickinson, Walter Brennan, and Ward Bond. The script was written by Jules Furthman and Leigh Brackett, based on a short story by B.H. McCampbell.

— Freebase

Sneakers

Sneakers

Sneakers is a 1992 caper film directed by Phil Alden Robinson, written by Robinson, Walter F. Parkes, and Lawrence Lasker and starring Robert Redford, Dan Aykroyd, Ben Kingsley, Mary McDonnell, River Phoenix, Sidney Poitier and David Strathairn. It was filmed in late 1991 and released in 1992.

— Freebase

Humphrey Gilbert

Humphrey Gilbert

Sir Humphrey Gilbert of Devon in England was a half-brother of Sir Walter Raleigh. Adventurer, explorer, member of parliament, and soldier, he served during the reign of Queen Elizabeth and was a pioneer of English colonization in North America and the Plantations of Ireland.

— Freebase

Dreamboat

Dreamboat

"Dreamboat" is a popular music song, the words and music to which were written by Jack Hoffman. A version produced by Walter Ridley and performed by Alma Cogan reached #1 in the UK Singles Chart in 1955, and is one of Cogan's best known hits.

— Freebase

Humanistic

Humanistic

Humanistic is the debut album by Abandoned Pools. It was released in September 2001. Though two songs were co-written by Pete Pagonis, the album is considered a solo work of Tommy Walter's in which he used new material, as well as several songs he'd worked on beforehand in both Tely and Metromax, to compose, record, and release on Extasy Records. The album features a contrast of dark, gloomy, and sometimes aggressive songs such as "The Remedy" and "Blood" and more serene, upbeat tracks like "Start Over" and "Sunny Day." Elements of industrial rock are evident in various ways; keyboard is used in light melody of the ironically dark-lyric-themed "Ruin Your Life" as well as the raging chorus of "Fluorescein," and ambiguous, non-sung vocal recordings are featured in various tracks. Synth effects are also utilized in various songs. Four tracks include backing vocals by Angie Hart of Frente!. Hart's harmony style alongside Walter's somewhat androgynous voice creates a unique vocal chemistry.

— Freebase

I.Q.

I.Q.

I.Q. is a 1994 American romantic comedy film directed by Fred Schepisi and starring Tim Robbins, Meg Ryan, and Walter Matthau. The original music score was composed by Jerry Goldsmith. The film centers on a mechanic and a Princeton doctoral candidate who fall in love, thanks to the candidate's uncle, Albert Einstein.

— Freebase

Early

Early

Early is a city located in Brown County in west-central Texas. The population was 2,762 at the 2010 census. It is named for Walter U. Early, who donated land for the schools. It is home to the Early Independent School District and the Heartland Mall.

— Freebase

Lennep, Jacob van

Lennep, Jacob van

a Dutch dramatist and novelist, born at Amsterdam; bred to the bar and practised as a lawyer; was a devoted student of English literature, and executed translations from English poets; was called by his countrymen the Walter Scott of Holland (1802-1868).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Jailbird

Jailbird

Jailbird is a novel by Kurt Vonnegut, originally published in 1979. Its plot concerns a man recently released from a low security prison after having served time for a minor role in the Watergate scandal. The novel uses a standard memoir format, revealing Walter F. Starbuck's current situation, then going back to tell the story of his first two days after being released from prison. Through Walter F. Starbuck and near-rambling biographical sketches of the various characters referenced in the novel, Jailbird concerns itself with the history of the American labor movement, while also pointing out flaws in corporate America, the American political system, the American red scare of the late 1950s, and both capitalist and communist theory. Jailbird also features a brief appearance of Kilgore Trout, a recurring Vonnegut character who writes science fiction novels and stories. However in this appearance, "Kilgore Trout" is revealed to be the pseudonym of a character in prison, deliberately contradicting the autobiographical details of Trout's life as delineated in both earlier and subsequent Vonnegut novels.

— Freebase

Walter Lippmann

Walter Lippmann

Walter Lippmann was an American public intellectual, writer, reporter, and political commentator famous for being among the first to introduce the concept of Cold War; he coined the term stereotype in the modern psychological meaning as well. Lippmann was twice awarded a Pulitzer Prize for his syndicated newspaper column, "Today and Tomorrow".

— Freebase

Suzanna

Suzanna

Suzanna is a 1923 American silent comedy-drama film starring Mabel Normand and directed F. Richard Jones. The picture was produced by Mack Sennett, who also adapted the screenplay from a story by Linton Wells. The cinematographers were Fred W. Jackman, Homer Scott and Robert Walters, and the supporting cast features George Nichols, Walter McGrail, Léon Bary, Winifred Bryson and Minnie Devereaux.

— Freebase

Pitacottie, Robert Lindsay of

Pitacottie, Robert Lindsay of

proprietor in the 16th century of the Fifeshire estate name of which he bore, was the author of "The Chronicles of Scotland," to which Sir Walter Scott owed so much; his work is quaint, graphic, and, on the whole, trustworthy.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Redgauntlet

Redgauntlet

Redgauntlet is a historical novel by Sir Walter Scott, set in Dumfries, Scotland in 1765, and described by Magnus Magnusson as "in a sense, the most autobiographical of Scott's novels." It describes the beginnings of a fictional third Jacobite Rebellion, and includes "Wandering Willie's Tale", a famous short story which frequently appears in anthologies.

— Freebase

Gresham

Gresham

Gresham is a city located in Multnomah County, Oregon, United States immediately east of Portland. It was named after the American Civil War general, and Postmaster General, Walter Quinton Gresham. The population was 105,594 at the 2010 census. This makes Gresham the fourth largest city in Oregon.

— Freebase

Whoopee

Whoopee

Whoopee! is a musical comedy with the book, based on Owen Davis's play The Nervous Wreck, written by William Anthony McGuire, music by Walter Donaldson and lyrics by Gus Kahn. The musical premiered on Broadway in 1928, and introduced the hit song "Love Me or Leave Me", sung by Ruth Etting.

— Freebase

John Garstang

John Garstang

John Garstang was a British archaeologist of the ancient Near East, especially Anatolia and the southern Levant. John Garstang was born to Dr. Walter Garstang of Blackburn and was the younger brother of Professor Walter Garstang, FRS, a marine biologist and zoologist. He was educated at Queen Elizabeth's, Blackburn; and Jesus College, Oxford. Following undergraduate studies in mathematics at Oxford, his attentions turned to archaeology. From 1897 to 1908 he conducted excavations at Roman sites in Britain, Egypt, Nubia, Asia Minor and North Syria; in the Sudan and Meroe between 1909 and 1914, then in Palestine at Ashkelon and in Trans-Jordan at Jericho in 1930–1936. He was Professor of Archaeology at the University of Liverpool from 1907 to 1941. He served as the Director of the Department of Antiquities in the British Mandate of Palestine between 1920 and 1926, as well as filling the position of Head of the British School of Archaeology in Jerusalem. He taught at the Egyptology section of the Faculty of Arts when this was established in the 1920s. One of his students was Dr Pahor Labib, late Director of the Coptic Museum, Cairo.

— Freebase

Melrose

Melrose

a small town in Roxburghshire, at the foot of the Eildons, on the S. bank of the Tweed, famed for its abbey, founded by David I. in 1136; it is celebrated by Sir Walter Scott in his "Lay of the Last Minstrel."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Relascope

Relascope

The relascope, invented by Walter Bitterlich, is a multi-use instrument for forest inventory. It is primarily used to find height of a tree, basal area of a tree and diameter of a tree anywhere along the bole. This instrument is used mostly for applications involving variable radius sample plots in a forest survey.

— Freebase

Lucia di Lammermoor

Lucia di Lammermoor

Lucia di Lammermoor is a dramma tragico in three acts by Gaetano Donizetti. Salvadore Cammarano wrote the Italian language libretto loosely based upon Sir Walter Scott's historical novel The Bride of Lammermoor. Donizetti wrote Lucia di Lammermoor in 1835, a time when several factors led to the height of his reputation as a composer of opera. Gioachino Rossini had recently retired and Vincenzo Bellini had died shortly before the premiere of Lucia leaving Donizetti as "the sole reigning genius of Italian opera". Not only were conditions ripe for Donizetti's success as a composer, but there was also a European interest in the history and culture of Scotland. The perceived romance of its violent wars and feuds, as well as its folklore and mythology, intrigued 19th century readers and audiences. Sir Walter Scott made use of these stereotypes in his novel The Bride of Lammermoor, which inspired several musical works including Lucia. The story concerns the emotionally fragile Lucy Ashton who is caught in a feud between her own family and that of the Ravenswoods. The setting is the Lammermuir Hills of Scotland in the 17th century.

— Freebase

Rice, James

Rice, James

novelist, born at Northampton, educated at Cambridge; designed for the law, but took to literature; owned and edited Once a Week; best known as the successful collaborateur of Walter Besant (q. v.) in such popular novels as "The Golden Butterfly," "Ready-Money Mortiboy," &c. (1844-1882).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Kennaquhair

Kennaquhair

Kennaquhair is an imaginary locality in Walter Scott's novels The Monastery and The Abbot. In T. H. White's The Sword in the Stone, Kennaquhair is the land of Athene, mother-goddess of the owls, and is located at the doubly impossible co-ordinates of 91 degrees north and 181 degrees west.

— Freebase

Bürger, Gottfried August

Bürger, Gottfried August

a German lyric poet, author of the ballads "Lenore," which was translated by Sir Walter Scott, and "The Wild Huntsman," as well as songs; led a wild life in youth, and a very unhappy one in later years; died in poverty (1747-1794).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Bannatyne Club

Bannatyne Club

The Bannatyne Club, named in honour of George Bannatyne and his famous anthology of Scots literature the Bannatyne Manuscript, was a text publication society founded by Sir Walter Scott to print rare works of Scottish interest, whether in history, poetry, or general literature. It printed 116 volumes in all. It was dissolved in 1861.

— Freebase

Hanging Up

Hanging Up

Hanging Up is a 2000 American comedy-drama film about a trio of sisters who bond over their ambivalence toward the approaching death of their curmudgeonly father, to whom none of them were particularly close. This film features Diane Keaton, Meg Ryan, and Lisa Kudrow as the three sisters, and Walter Matthau as the father.

— Freebase

Robert II

Robert II

Robert was a 13th century prelate based in the Kingdom of Scotland. He was successively Archdeacon of Ross and Bishop of Ross; he is the second Robert to have held the bishopric of Ross. Robert can be found as Archdeacon of Ross as early as 6 July 1223, when his name occurred in a document relating to Durham Cathedral; it is not known how long he had been holding that position in 1223, but he is the first known Archdeacon of the diocese. He probably became Bishop of Ross sometime in 1149; he was consecrated sometime between 21 June 1249 and 20 June 1150. Turner interpreted a papal mandate of 1256 as sanctioning the increase in the number of canons in the cathedral chapter and authorising the relocation of the cathedral [from Rosemarkie] to Fortrose. Cowan and Easson thought that the cathedral had always been located at Fortrose, but it was simply called Rosemarkie. Bishop Robert appears, from the evidence of Walter Bower, to have died in the year 1171. Walter Bower confuses the man who died that year and the builder of the new cathedral with Robert II's predecessor, Robert I.

— Freebase

Regioselectivity

Regioselectivity

In chemistry, regioselectivity is the preference of one direction of chemical bond making or breaking over all other possible directions. It can often apply to which of many possible positions a reagent will affect, such as which proton a strong base will abstract from an organic molecule, or where on a substituted benzene ring a further substituent will add. A specific example is a halohydrin formation reaction with 2-propenylbenzene: Because of the preference for the formation of one product over another, the reaction is selective. This reaction is regioselective because it selectively generates one constitutional isomer rather than the other. Certain examples of regioselectivity have been formulated as rules for certain classes of compounds under certain conditions, many of which are named. Among the first introduced to chemistry students are Markovnikov's rule for the addition of protic acids to alkenes, and the Fürst-Plattner rule for the addition of nucleophiles to derivatives of cyclohexene, especially epoxide derivatives. Regioselectivity in ring-closure reactions is subject to Baldwin's rules. If there are two or more orientations that can be generated during a reaction, one of them is dominant

— Freebase

Gordon, Sir John Watson

Gordon, Sir John Watson

a portrait-painter, born in Edinburgh; was a pupil of Raeburn's, and his successor as a painter of portraits; executed portraits of most of the eminent Scotchmen of his time, and among the number Sir Walter Scott, the Duke of Buccleuch, Lord Cockburn, Dr. Chalmers, and Professor Wilson (1788-1864).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Goodman

Goodman

Goodman is a town in Holmes County, Mississippi. The population was 1,252 at the 2000 census. Goodman was settled in 1860; first chartered on November 16, 1865; and rechartered on March 5, 1878. The town is named for Walter Goodman. Goodman is the birthplace of John A. Lomax, pioneering folklorist, and David Herbert Donald, Pulitzer-prize-winning historian.

— Freebase

John Dryden

John Dryden

John Dryden was an English poet, literary critic, translator, and playwright who was made Poet Laureate in 1668. He is seen as dominating the literary life of Restoration England to such a point that the period came to be known in literary circles as the Age of Dryden. Walter Scott called him "Glorious John."

— Freebase

Maude

Maude

Maude is an American television sitcom that was originally broadcast on the CBS network from September 12, 1972 until April 22, 1978. Maude stars Bea Arthur as Maude Findlay, an outspoken, middle-aged, politically liberal woman living in suburban Tuckahoe, Westchester County, New York with her fourth husband, household appliance store owner Walter Findlay. Maude embraced the tenets of women's liberation, always voted for Democratic Party candidates, strongly supported legal abortion, and advocated for civil rights and racial and gender equality. However, her overbearing and sometimes domineering personality often got her into trouble when speaking out on these issues. The program was a spin-off of All in the Family, on which Beatrice Arthur had first played the character of Maude, Edith Bunker's cousin; like All in the Family, Maude was a sitcom with topical storylines created by producer Norman Lear. Unusual for a U.S. sitcom, several episodes featured only the characters of Maude and Walter, in what amounted to half-hour "two-hander" teleplays. Season 4's "The Analyst" was a solo episode for Bea Arthur, who delivered a soul-searching, episode-length monologue to an unseen psychiatrist.

— Freebase

Eildons, The

Eildons, The

a "triple-crested eminence" near Melrose, 1385 ft., and overlooking Teviotdale to the S., associated with Sir Walter Scott and Thomas the Rhymer; they are of volcanic origin, and are said to have been cleft in three by the wizard Michael Scott, when he was out of employment.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Wounded

Wounded

Wounded is a stage play collaboratively developed by The Los Angeles Theatre Ensemble under the direction of the ensemble's artistic director Tom Burmester. The play was inspired by interviews with injured veterans at the Walter Reed Medical Center in Washington DC. Wounded is the first part of The Los Angeles Theatre Ensemble's War Cycle'.

— Freebase

Philharmonia Orchestra

Philharmonia Orchestra

The Philharmonia Orchestra is a British orchestra based in London. It was founded in 1945 by Walter Legge, a former assistant at the Royal Opera House. Since 1995, the orchestra has been based in the Royal Festival Hall. The Philharmonia also has residencies at De Montfort Hall, Leicester, the Corn Exchange, Bedford, and The Anvil, Basingstoke. Since 2008, Esa-Pekka Salonen is the orchestra's principal conductor and artistic advisor.

— Freebase

Bruises

Bruises

"Bruises" is the first single from Brooklyn-based band Chairlift's debut album Does You Inspire You. Bruises was featured in a commercial for Apple's 4th generation iPod Nano, and in "Walter's Walk", the second episode of the USA Network series Covert Affairs. A music video for "Bruises" was released on June 5, 2009. Village Voice Media contributor John Hood called the song "distinctly dreamy", "utterly damaging" and "nothing short of astounding".

— Freebase

Cerebral ventriculography

Cerebral ventriculography

Cerebral ventriculography is a medical procedure developed by Walter Dandy, and designed to enable visualization of structures inside the skull. In this procedure, holes are drilled in the skull, and air pumped through the holes in to the ventricles, to facilitate clearer imaging on X-rays. It has been replaced by more effective and less invasive imaging techniques.

— Freebase

Robert II.

Robert II.

king of Scotland from 1371 to 1390, son of Walter Stewart and Marjory, only daughter of Robert the Bruce; succeeded David II., and became the founder of the Stuart dynasty; was a peaceable man, but his nobles were turbulent, and provoked invasions on the part of England by their forays on the Borders (1316-1390).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Thumbsucker

Thumbsucker

Thumbsucker is a 2005 American independent comedy-drama film directed by Mike Mills and adapted from the Walter Kirn novel of the same name. It stars Lou Taylor Pucci, Tilda Swinton, Vincent D'Onofrio, Kelli Garner, Benjamin Bratt, Vince Vaughn, and Keanu Reeves. The movie focuses on teenager Justin Cobb as he copes with his thumb-sucking problem, and on his experiments with hypnosis, sex, and drugs.

— Freebase

Bauhaus

Bauhaus

Staatliches Bauhaus, commonly known simply as Bauhaus, was a school in Germany that combined crafts and the fine arts, and was famous for the approach to design that it publicized and taught. It operated from 1919 to 1933. At that time the German term Bauhaus, literally "house of construction", stood for "School of Building". The Bauhaus school was founded by Walter Gropius in Weimar. In spite of its name, and the fact that its founder was an architect, the Bauhaus did not have an architecture department during the first years of its existence. Nonetheless it was founded with the idea of creating a "total" work of art in which all arts, including architecture, would eventually be brought together. The Bauhaus style became one of the most influential currents in Modernist architecture and modern design. The Bauhaus had a profound influence upon subsequent developments in art, architecture, graphic design, interior design, industrial design, and typography. The school existed in three German cities, under three different architect-directors: Walter Gropius from 1919 to 1928, Hannes Meyer from 1928 to 1930 and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe from 1930 until 1933, when the school was closed by its own leadership under pressure from the Nazi regime.

— Freebase

Limite

Limite

Limite is a film by Brazilian director and writer Mário Peixoto, filmed in 1930 and first screened in 1931. Sometimes cited as the greatest of all Brazilian films, this 120-minute silent experimental feature by novelist Peixoto, who never completed another film, was seen by Orson Welles and won the admiration of everyone from Sergei Eisenstein to Georges Sadoul to Walter Salles.

— Freebase

Ivanhoe

Ivanhoe

the hero of Sir Walter Scott's novel of the name, the disinherited son of Cedric of Rotherwood, who falls in love with Rowena, a ward of his father, but by the exhibition of his prowess as a knight is at the intercession of King Richard, reconciled to his father, with the result that he marries Rowena.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Arundinaria

Arundinaria

Arundinaria, commonly known as the canes, is the sole genus of bamboo native to eastern North America and the only temperate bamboo in North America. The genus is endemic to the eastern United States from New Jersey south to Florida and west to Ohio and Texas. Within this region they are found from the Coastal Plain to medium elevations in the Appalachian Mountains. Its members have running rhizomes and are woody and tree-like, attaining heights from 0.5 up to 8 metres. They produce seeds only rarely and usually reproduce vegetatively, forming large genets. When seed production does occur, the colony usually dies afterwards. Among the distinctive features of the canes is a fan-like cluster of leaves at the top of new stems called a top knot. The genus Arundinaria has a complex taxonomic history spanning over two centuries. The canes of the southeastern U.S. were originally described as two species of reed grasses in the genus Arundo by Thomas Walter in 1788. André Michaux, working in 1803 and unaware of Walter's work, correctly interpreted the canes as a distinct group and created the genus Arundinaria with one species. However, neither of these researchers left enough information to their successors, leading to confusion surrounding the identity of the species they had described. The later workers G.H.E. Muhlenberg and A.S. Hitchcock each changed the circumscriptions of the species within the group, but it wasn't until epitypes, type specimens that clarify older ambiguous names, were applied to Walter's and Michaux's species in 2009 that the taxonomy could be stabilised. Meanwhile, many similar Asian and even African bamboos were placed in this genus under a very broad concept for the group. Preliminary phylogenetic studies in 2006 using molecular and morphological evidence have suggested that the genus forms three natural species confined to the southeastern United States.

— Freebase

Häring, Wilhelm

Häring, Wilhelm

German novelist, born at Breslau; bred for law, but abandoned it for literature; wrote two romances, "Walladmor" and "Schloss Avalon," under the pseudonym of "Walter Scott," which imposed upon some; he afterwards assumed the name of Wilibald Alexis, a name by which he was long honourably known (1797-1871).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Saratoga

Saratoga

Saratoga is a 1937 American romantic comedy film written by Anita Loos and directed by Jack Conway. The movie stars Clark Gable and Jean Harlow in their sixth and final film collaboration, and features Lionel Barrymore, Frank Morgan, Walter Pidgeon, Hattie McDaniel, and Margaret Hamilton. Jean Harlow died before filming was finished, and it was completed using stand-ins. Saratoga was MGM's biggest moneymaker of 1937.

— Freebase

Harry Kroto

Harry Kroto

Sir Harold Walter Kroto, FRS, is the English chemist who shared the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Robert Curl and Richard Smalley. Kroto is the Francis Eppes Professor of Chemistry at the Florida State University, which he joined in 2004. Prior to that, he spent a large part of his career at the University of Sussex, where he now holds an emeritus professorship.

— Freebase

Mönchengladbach

Mönchengladbach

Mönchengladbach, formerly known as München Gladbach, is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is located west of the Rhine half way between Düsseldorf and the Dutch border. Mönchengladbach is home of the football club Borussia Mönchengladbach, Formula One race car drivers Nick Heidfeld and Heinz-Harald Frentzen, author/cartoonist Walter Moers, cabaret artist Volker Pispers, philosopher Hans Jonas, and manager of Bayern München, Jupp Heynckes.

— Freebase

Bobby Burns

Bobby Burns

Bobby Burns was an American film actor and director. He appeared in 201 films between 1908 and 1952 as well as directing 13 films between 1915 and 1916. Birns was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and died in Los Angeles, California. He played Jabbs in the Jabbs and Pokes silent comedies of the mid 1910s, with Walter Stull as Pokes and frequently featuring Babe Hardy.

— Freebase

Seekers

Seekers

The Seekers, or Legatine-Arians as they were sometimes known, were a Protestant dissenting group that emerged around the 1620s, probably inspired by the preaching of three brothers – Walter, Thomas, and Bartholomew Legate. Arguably, they are best thought of as forerunners of the Quakers, with whom many of them subsequently merged. Seekers considered all organised churches of their day to be corrupt, and preferred to wait for God's revelation.

— Freebase

Berlichingen, Goetz von

Berlichingen, Goetz von

surnamed "The Iron Hand," a brave but turbulent noble of Germany, of the 15th and 16th centuries, the story of whose life was dramatised by Goethe, "to save," as he said, "the memory of a brave man from darkness," and which was translated from the German by Sir Walter Scott.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Rigdum Funnidos

Rigdum Funnidos

Rigdum Funnidos is a character in Henry Carey's Chrononhotonthologos. Rigdum Funnidos is the comically plain-spoken contrast to the bombastic Aldiborontiphoscophornio. Both are courtiers, but whereas Aldiborontiphoscophornio might explain, when asked who Somnus is, Rigdum Funnidos responds, Rigdum is both a Sancho Panza to the absurd Aldiborontiphoscophornio and a figure of the "Plain Dealer". It is also Sir Walter Scott's nickname for John Ballantyne. Scott's epithet was a compliment.

— Freebase

Soundpainting

Soundpainting

Soundpainting is the live composing sign language created in 1974 by New York composer Walter Thompson for musicians, dancers, actors, poets, and visual artists. At present, the Soundpainting language comprises more than 1200 gestures that are signed by the composer/director, known as the Soundpainter, indicating the type of material desired of the performers. Direction of the composition is gained through the parameters of each set of signed gestures.

— Freebase

Ivanhoe

Ivanhoe

Ivanhoe is an historical novel by Sir Walter Scott published in 1820, and set in 12th-century England. Ivanhoe is sometimes credited for increasing interest in romance and medievalism; John Henry Newman claimed Scott "had first turned men's minds in the direction of the middle ages," while Carlyle and Ruskin made similar claims to Scott's overwhelming influence over the revival based primarily on the publication of this novel.

— Freebase

Situationism

Situationism

Situationism is a theory in psychology that began in 1968 when a Person-situation debate was triggered by the publication of a monograph by Walter Mischel. It refers to an approach to behavior which holds that general traits do not exist. Behavior, then, is seen as being influenced by external, situational factors rather than internal traits or motivations. It therefore challenged the position of trait theorists, such as Hans Eysenck or Raymond B. Cattell. Situationists based their claims on experiments in which traits such as extraversion were estimated based on behavior in different situations. They found that a particular person's ratings in one situation were not highly predictive of that person's score in another situation. However, in response to such evidence, Hans Eysenck has pointed out that the correlations, while low, are typically still high enough to reach statistical significance. A midrange position, which holds that personality is best understood as resulting from "subtle interplay" of internal and external factors, is known as "interactionism". Some notable situationist studies include: Zimbardo's Stanford prison experiment, bystander experiments, obedience experiments like Milgram experiment and Heat and aggression experiments. The term is popularly associated with Walter Mischel, although he himself does not appear to like the term.

— Freebase

DISC assessment

DISC assessment

DISC assessment is a behaviour assessment tool based on the DISC theory of psychologist William Marston. Marston's theory centers around four different personality traits: Dominance, Inducement, Submission, and Compliance. This theory was then developed into a personality assessment tool by industrial psychologist Walter Vernon Clarke. The version used today was developed from the original assessment by John Geier, who simplified the test for better, more concise results.

— Freebase

Dryasdust

Dryasdust

a name of Sir Walter Scott's invention, and employed by him to denote an imaginary character who supplied him with dry preliminary historical details, and since used to denote a writer who treats a historical subject with all due diligence and research, but without any appreciation of the human interest in it, still less the soul of it.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Gradient X

Gradient X

Gradient X is the most advanced programmatic marketing platform for mobile. The future of advertising is the mobile device. Gradient X has developed proven technologies that allow advertisers to capitalize on the potential of mobile media. The company brings feature parity to mobile with what has come to be expected of platforms in more mature channels, alleviating the friction marketers have experienced to date. Gradient X is built for mobile from the ground up by ad tech industry veterans who understand what marketers need and what is required to achieve scale advertising performance. Gradient X founding team members have been founders or executives at companies that collectively have: seven exits, two IPOs, raised over $345m in funding. They are experts in ad tech from social, display, video and mobile, with more than five years of experience in programmatic. Gradient X raised $3.75 million in spring 2012 in a seed financing round including seven institutional firms and six angel investors. Investors include GRP Partners, Rincon Venture Partners, Founder Collective, Crosscut Ventures, Double M Capital, Baroda Ventures, Siemer Ventures, and angel investors Walter Kortschak (Summit Capital), Mark Suster (GRP Partners), Jim Willenborg and Clark Landry.

— CrunchBase

Old Mortality

Old Mortality

Old Mortality is a novel by Sir Walter Scott set in the period 1679–89 in south west Scotland. It forms, along with The Black Dwarf, the 1st series of Scott's Tales of My Landlord. The two novels were published together in 1816. Old Mortality is considered one of Scott's best novels. It was originally titled The Tale of Old Mortality, but is generally shortened in most references.

— Freebase

William Shockley

William Shockley

William Bradford Shockley Jr. was an American physicist and inventor. Along with John Bardeen and Walter Houser Brattain, Shockley co-invented the transistor, for which all three were awarded the 1956 Nobel Prize in Physics. Shockley's attempts to commercialize a new transistor design in the 1950s and 1960s led to California's "Silicon Valley" becoming a hotbed of electronics innovation. In his later life, Shockley was a professor at Stanford and became a staunch advocate of eugenics.

— Freebase

Walter Reed

Walter Reed

Major Walter Reed, M.D., was a U.S. Army physician who in 1901 led the team that postulated and confirmed the theory that yellow fever is transmitted by a particular mosquito species, rather than by direct contact. This insight gave impetus to the new fields of epidemiology and biomedicine, and most immediately allowed the resumption and completion of work on the Panama Canal by the United States. Reed followed work started by Carlos Finlay and directed by George Miller Sternberg.

— Freebase

Gaberlunzie

Gaberlunzie

Gaberlunzie is a medieval Scots word for a licensed beggar. The name may derive from the wallet that such people carry, but there is no other known derivation. The word appears in several of Sir Walter Scott's books. It can be spelled gaberlunyie, since the z was originally a yogh. Gaberlunzies were also known as King's Bedesmen or blue gouns. Scott gives an account of the customs and of particular Bedesmen he knew in the introduction to The Antiquary.

— Freebase

MEDL Mobile

MEDL Mobile

MEDL was created to fill a void in the application developer spectrum - high end, custom development tempered by market intelligence and fueled by creativity.We are a pioneer, educator and leader of mobile app development and strategic mobile marketing. We have delivered custom mobile solutions for clients and partners that include Monster.com, Kaiser Permanente, Emirates Airlines, Teleflora, Wienerschnitzel, Focus Features, The New York Times Company, Phil Hellmuth and Walter Foster Publishing. We have assembled a team of more than 50 digital architects, strategists, designers, programmers, writers, video game developers, marketers and project managers. We have built a constantly growing community of hundreds of thousands of inventors, developers, designers, digital influencers and thought leaders. MEDL apps (we call them Shiny MEDL Objects) are consistently featured by Apple as What’s Hot, New & Noteworthy and Staff Picks, and have reached as high as #1 on the App Store.Our company and our Shiny MEDL Objects have been featured on CNBC, BBC, ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN and FOX, in the pages of Esquire, Fast Company, The New York Times, The LA Times, The OC Register, The Chicago Tribune, The Washington Post, The Guardian, and across the web from Mashable and Macworld to TUAW, Gizmodo and beyond.

— CrunchBase

KAET

KAET

KAET is the PBS member television station in Phoenix, Arizona. It broadcasts a high definition digital signal on VHF channel 8 from a transmitter on South Mountain in Phoenix. Its signal is relayed across Arizona on a network of 13 translator stations. Owned by the Arizona Board of Regents and operated by Arizona State University, KAET maintains studios at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication on the campus of ASU Downtown Phoenix.

— Freebase

Cubers

Cubers

CUBERS is a documentary directed by Richard LeBlanc and produced by Walter Forsyth. The documentary's production began in Toronto, Canada, but visits Paris, Budapest, Orlando, Tel Aviv, Toulouse and more. It was released in North America on CBC The Lens, followed by Biography, Access, and three other major stations. According to the official CUBERS website, the documentary is rated G. The documentary has already appeared in the Orlando Film Festival, Asheville Film Festival, and the Silver Wave Film Festival. The official television premiere was on November 25, 2008 on CBC's Newsworld.

— Freebase

Virginia

Virginia

one of the United States of America, a State somewhat larger than Scotland, between Maryland and North Carolina, so named by its founder Sir Walter Raleigh in honour of Queen Elizabeth; is divided from West Virginia by the Appalachians; it is well watered; the soil, which is fertile, yields the finest cotton and tobacco, and minerals, particularly coal and iron, are abundant; the largest city is Richmond, with flour-mills.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Madame Curie

Madame Curie

Madame Curie is a 1943 biographical film made by MGM. It was directed by Mervyn LeRoy and produced by Sidney Franklin from a screenplay by Paul Osborn, Paul H. Rameau, and Aldous Huxley, adapted from the biography by Eve Curie. It stars Greer Garson, Walter Pidgeon, Robert Walker, Henry Travers, Albert Bassermann, C. Aubrey Smith, Dame May Whitty, Reginald Owen, Van Johnson, and Margaret O'Brien and featuring narration read by James Hilton. The film tells the story of Polish-French physicist Marie Curie.

— Freebase

Jack-O

Jack-O

Carolyn wasn’t expecting a battle to the death with a demon from hell when she agreed to baby-sit young Sean Kelly on Halloween night. As Carolyn and Sean settle in for an evening of monster movies, the Jack-O- Lantern stalks and slashes his way through the small community determined to quench it’s revenge against the Kelly’s. Carolyn and Sean become unwilling warriors in a battle for the town’s soul against the still living spirit of Walter Machen.

— Freebase

Baillie, Joanna

Baillie, Joanna

a poetess, born at Bothwell, child of the Presbyterian manse there; joined a brother in London, stayed afterwards with a sister at Hampstead; produced a series of dramas entitled "Plays of the Passions," besides many others, both comedies and tragedies, one of which, the "Family Legend," was acted in the Theatre Royal, Edinburgh, under the auspices of Sir Walter Scott; she does not stand high either as a dramatist or a writer (1762-1851).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Malagrowther

Malagrowther

Sir Mungo Malagrowther is a fictional character in Walter Scott's 1822 The Fortunes of Nigel. He is a courtier soured by misfortune, and who would have everyone be as discontented as himself. In 1826 Scott wrote the Letters of Malachi Malagrowther to attack British government proposals to reform the issue of banknotes by private banks, adopting the transparent persona of a purported descendent of Sir Mungo. His campaign led to Scottish banks continuing to print their own banknotes.

— Freebase

Fordun, John of

Fordun, John of

a Scottish chronicler; lived in the 14th century; was a canon of Aberdeen Cathedral, and wrote a chronicle of Scottish history, bringing the story up to 1153; materials for further volumes, which he left, were utilised by Walter Bower, an abbot of Inchcolm, in the Forth, who extended the account to 1437, but often tampered with Fordun's narrative; the work is the chief authority in Scottish history up to the time it treats of.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Walter de la Mare

Walter de la Mare

Walter John de la Mare, OM, CH was an English poet, short story writer and novelist. He is probably best remembered for his works for children and for his poem "The Listeners". He also wrote some subtle psychological horror stories, amongst them "Seaton's Aunt" and "Out of the Deep". His 1921 novel Memoirs of a Midget won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction and his post-war Collected Stories for Children won the 1947 Carnegie Medal for British children's books.

— Freebase

Swift Current

Swift Current

Swift Current is a provincial electoral district for the Legislative Assembly of Saskatchewan, Canada. Located in southwestern Saskatchewan, it was created for the 2nd Saskatchewan general election in 1908. The city of Swift Current is the largest center in the constituency. Smaller communities in the district include the villages of Pennant, Stewart Valley, Wymark and Success. Two Saskatchewan premiers have been elected from this constituency – Thomas Walter Scott, the first premier of the province; and Brad Wall, the current premier.

— Freebase

Crac!

Crac!

Crac! is the third album of the Jazz fusion band Area and was released in 1975. With this album, the band gained more popularity in Italy, thanks to songs like "L'elefante Bianco", "La Mela di Odessa" and "Gioia e Rivoluzione", which quickly became concert favourites. All songs were written by Tofani, Fariselli and Tavolazzi, except for "Area 5" which was wrtten by Juan Hidalgo and Walter Marchetti. When touring for this album the band even played in Paris and in Lisboa.

— Freebase

Griselda

Griselda

or Griseldis, a famous heroine of mediæval tradition; figures in Boccaccio, Petrarch, and Chaucer, and in later dramatists of England, Germany, and Spain; the beautiful daughter of a Piedmontese peasant, she was loved and married by the Marquis Walter of Saluzzo; his jealous affection subjected her to several cruel tests of love, which she bore with "wyfly pacience," and in the end "love was aye between them twa."

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Music Box

Music Box

Music Box is the third studio album by American recording artist Mariah Carey. It was released by Columbia Records on August 31, 1993, in North America. The album comprises ballads primarily co-written by Carey and Walter Afanasieff, with whom she had previously worked on Emotions, and a few urban dance tracks. During the course of the album's development, Carey wanted to broaden her audience, choosing a more pop-oriented sound. During this time frame, they experimented with different organs and other musical instruments, leading the album's sound away from her more contemporary previous efforts. Two unused tracks from the album sessions were released as B-sides: "Do You Think of Me" and "Everything Fades Away". In order to successfully take the album in a new direction, Carey and Afanasieff sought out new and innovative producers, as well as some from Carey's previous releases. Kenneth "Babyface" Edmonds first began working with Carey on Music Box, where he helped produce some of the album's softer and more melodious tracks, as well as being part of the songwriting process. Additional writers and producers were Robert Clivillés and David Cole and Daryl Simmons. While the album featured a range of different talented music producers, the bulk of the songwriting was done by Carey and her writing partner, Walter Afanasieff. In future projects, they would continue writing material for Carey's albums, until her 1999 release Rainbow, where he is absent from the writing credits.

— Freebase

Mefloquine

Mefloquine

Mefloquine hydrochloride is an orally administered medication used in the prevention and treatment of malaria. Mefloquine was developed in the 1970s at the United States Department of Defense's Walter Reed Army Institute of Research as a synthetic analogue of quinine. The brand name drug, Lariam, is manufactured by the Swiss company Hoffmann–La Roche. In August 2009, Roche stopped marketing Lariam in the United States. Generic mefloquine from other manufacturers is still widely available. Rare but serious neuropsychiatric problems have been associated with its use.

— Freebase

Taghairm

Taghairm

Taghairm, sometimes interpreted as "spiritual echo," or calling up the dead, was an ancient Scottish mode of divination. The definition of what was required varied, but may have included an animal sacrifice and involved torture or cruelty to animals and humans. In one version of the taghairm said to be one of the most effective means of raising the devil, and getting unlawful wishes gratified; the ritual included roasting cats alive, one after the other, for several days, without tasting food. This supposedly summoned a legion of devils in the guise of black cats, with their master at their head, all screeching in a terrifying way. Scottish historical novelist Sir Walter Scott scornfully described the last method in a footnote to his influential poem Lady of the Lake. He further adds that it could involve another situation "where the scenery around him suggested nothing but objects of horror." However, Sir Walter Scott could not speak Scottish Gaelic and his concepts of Gaelic culture were sometimes distorted. Other variations practiced have been recorded, and the same name has also been applied to other ritual customs. One variation of the ritual was said to summon a demonic cat called Big Ears, who would grant the summoners answers to their questions, and fulfill their wishes. The last ceremony of this kind is said to have been performed in Mull some time before March 1824, when it was supposedly recorded in the London Literary Gazette.

— Freebase

Constable, Archibald

Constable, Archibald

Edinburgh publisher, born in Carnbee, Fife; started as a bookseller near the Cross in Edinburgh; published the Scots Magazine, the Edinburgh Review, and the "Encyclopædia Britannica," and from 1802 to 1826 the works of Sir Walter Scott, when the bankruptcy connected with the publication of these so affected him that it ruined his health, though he lived after the crash came to start the "Miscellany" which bears his name (1774-1827).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Laidlaw, William

Laidlaw, William

Sir Walter Scott's factor at Abbotsford, born in Selkirkshire; having failed in farming, entered Scott's service in 1817 and remained his trusted and faithful friend, advising him in his schemes of improvement and acting latterly as his amanuensis till his death in 1832; thereafter he was factor in Ross-shire, where he died; he had some poetic gift of his own, and contributed to the third volume of the "Minstrelsy" (1780-1845).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Dandy–Walker syndrome

Dandy–Walker syndrome

Dandy–Walker syndrome, or Dandy–Walker complex, is a congenital brain malformation involving the cerebellum and the fluid filled spaces around it. A key feature of this syndrome is the partial or even complete absence of the part of the brain located between the two cerebellar hemispheres. The Dandy–Walker complex is a genetically sporadic disorder that occurs one in every 30,000 live births. Prenatal diagnosis and prognosis of outcomes associated with Dandy-Walker can be difficult. It is named for Walter Dandy and Arthur Earl Walker.

— Freebase

Lochinvar

Lochinvar

Lochinvar is a loch in Dalry Parish, Kirkcudbrightshire, Scotland, that is now a reservoir. It is located in the Galloway Hills, around eight miles from St. John's Town of Dalry. For map see : The name Lochinvar is Scots Gaelic, Loch an barr, and means "Loch on the hilltop". Consequently it is stressed on the last syllable. The place gave the name to a number of aristocratic titles including the Baron of Lochinvar, the Laird of Lochinvar, and most notably to "young Lochinvar" in Walter Scott's epic poem Marmion.

— Freebase

Ethisterone

Ethisterone

Ethisterone is a progestogen hormone. The first orally active progestin, ethisterone, the 17α-ethynyl analog of testosterone, was synthesized in 1938 by Hans Herloff Inhoffen, Willy Logemann, Walter Hohlweg, and Arthur Serini at Schering AG in Berlin and marketed in Germany in 1939 as Proluton C and by Schering in the U.S. in 1945 as Pranone. Ethisterone was also marketed in the U.S. from the 1950s into the 1960s under a variety of trade names by other pharmaceutical companies that had been members of the pre-World War II European hormone cartel.

— Freebase

His Majesty

His Majesty

His Majesty, or, The Court of Vingolia is an English comic opera in two acts with dialogue by F. C. Burnand, lyrics by R. C. Lehmann, additional lyrics by Adrian Ross and music by Alexander Mackenzie. The work premiered at the Savoy Theatre in London on 20 February 1897, running for only 61 performances until 24 April 1897, despite a strong cast including George Grossmith, Ilka Pálmay, Scott Russell, Fred Billington, Florence Perry and Walter Passmore. The D'Oyly Carte Opera Company then toured the opera throughout 1897 alongside more familiar Gilbert and Sullivan works.

— Freebase

Ferrier, Susan Edmonston

Ferrier, Susan Edmonston

a Scottish novelist, aunt of the preceding, born in Edinburgh, where her life was chiefly spent, her father being Clerk in the Court of Session, and a colleague of Sir Walter Scott; her novels, "Marriage," "The Inheritance," and "Destiny," &c., are rich in humour and faithful in their pictures of Scottish life and character; Scott held her in high esteem, and kept up a warm friendship with her till his death (1782-1854).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Goetz von Berlichingen

Goetz von Berlichingen

a German knight of the 16th century; was involved in turbulent movements, and lost his right hand at the siege of Landshut, which he replaced by one of his own invention made of steel; spent his life in feuds, and left an autobiography which interested Goethe, who dramatised his story, "to save," as he said, "the memory of a brave man from darkness," a drama that had the honour of being translated by Sir Walter Scott.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Walter Raleigh

Walter Raleigh

Sir Walter Raleigh was an English aristocrat, writer, poet, soldier, courtier, spy, and explorer. He is also well known for popularising tobacco in England. Raleigh was born to a Protestant family in Devon, the son of Walter Raleigh and Catherine Champernowne. Little is known of his early life, though he spent some time in Ireland, in Killua Castle, Clonmellon, County Westmeath, taking part in the suppression of rebellions and participating in the Siege of Smerwick. Later he became a landlord of property confiscated from the native Irish. He rose rapidly in the favour of Queen Elizabeth I, and was knighted in 1585. Instrumental in the English colonisation of North America, Raleigh was granted a royal patent to explore Virginia, which paved the way for future English settlements. In 1591 he secretly married Elizabeth Throckmorton, one of the Queen's ladies-in-waiting, without the Queen's permission, for which he and his wife were sent to the Tower of London. After his release, they retired to his estate at Sherborne, Dorset. In 1594 Raleigh heard of a "City of Gold" in South America and sailed to find it, publishing an exaggerated account of his experiences in a book that contributed to the legend of "El Dorado". After Queen Elizabeth died in 1603 Raleigh was again imprisoned in the Tower, this time for allegedly being involved in the Main Plot against King James I, who was not favourably disposed toward him. In 1616 he was released to lead a second expedition in search of El Dorado. This was unsuccessful and men under his command ransacked a Spanish outpost. He returned to England and, to appease the Spanish, was arrested and executed in 1618.

— Freebase

Fight-or-flight response

Fight-or-flight response

The fight-or-flight response is a physiological reaction that occurs in response to a perceived harmful event, attack, or threat to survival. It was first described by Walter Bradford Cannon. His theory states that animals react to threats with a general discharge of the sympathetic nervous system, priming the animal for fighting or fleeing. More specifically, the adrenal medulla produces a hormonal cascade that results in the secretion of catecholamines, especially. This response is recognized as the first stage of a general adaptation syndrome that regulates stress responses among vertebrates and other organisms.

— Freebase

Chrząszcz

Chrząszcz

Chrząszcz by Jan Brzechwa is a poem famous for being one of the hardest-to-pronounce texts in Polish literature, and may cause problems even for adult, native Polish speakers. The first line “W Szczebrzeszynie chrząszcz brzmi w trzcinie” is a well-known Polish tongue-twister. Thanks to the poem, the town of Szczebrzeszyn is widely known in Poland. A monument to the beetle was erected there in 2002, and a yearly sculpture festival has been held there ever since. Chrząszcz was translated into English by Walter Whipple as Cricket.

— Freebase

Rob Roy

Rob Roy

Rob Roy is a historical novel by Walter Scott. It is narrated by Frank Osbaldistone, the son of an English merchant who travels first to the North of England, and subsequently to the Scottish Highlands, to collect a debt stolen from his father. On the way he encounters the larger-than-life title character, Rob Roy MacGregor. Though Rob Roy is not the lead character, his personality and actions are key to the novel's development. The book was loosely adapted into a film in 1995, starring Liam Neeson, Tim Roth, and Jessica Lange.

— Freebase

Baraminology

Baraminology

Baraminology is a creationist taxonomic system that classifies animals into groups called "created kinds" or "baramins" according to the account of creation in the book of Genesis and other parts of the Bible. Its proponents claim that kinds cannot interbreed and have no evolutionary relationship to one another. Baraminology developed as a subfield of creation science in the 1990s among creationists that included Walter ReMine and Kurt Wise. Creation science is considered to be pseudoscience by the scientific community, which accepts the evidence for the common ancestry of all life on Earth.

— Freebase

Schottky barrier

Schottky barrier

A Schottky barrier, named after Walter H. Schottky, is a potential energy barrier for electrons formed at a metal–semiconductor junction. Schottky barriers have rectifying characteristics, suitable for use as a diode. One of the primary characteristics of a Schottky barrier is the Schottky barrier height, denoted by ΦB. The value of ΦB depends on the combination of metal and semiconductor. Not all metal–semiconductor junctions form a rectifying Schottky barrier; a metal–semiconductor junction that conducts current in both directions without rectification, perhaps due to its Schottky barrier being too low, is called an ohmic contact.

— Freebase

Dryad

Dryad

A dryad is a tree nymph, that is a female spirit of a tree, in Greek mythology. In Greek drys signifies "oak". Thus, dryads are specifically the nymphs of oak trees, though the term has come to be used for all tree nymphs in general. "Such deities are very much overshadowed by the divine figures defined through poetry and cult," Walter Burkert remarked of Greek nature deities. They were normally considered to be very shy creatures, except around the goddess Artemis, who was known to be a friend to most nymphs.

— Freebase

Seventeen

Seventeen

Seventeen is an American magazine for teenagers. It was the first teen magazine to be established in the United States. The magazine's reader base is the female 12–19 year-old demographic. It began as a publication geared towards inspiring teen girls to become role models in work and citizenship. Soon after its debut, Seventeen took a more fashion and romance-oriented approach in presenting their material, while still maintaining their model of promoting self-confidence in young women. It was first published in September 1944 by Walter Annenberg's Triangle Publications.

— Freebase

Roebling

Roebling

Roebling is a station on the River Line light rail system, located on Hornberger Avenue in the Roebling section of Florence Township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. The station opened on March 15, 2004. Southbound service from the station is available to Camden, New Jersey, where transfer to the PATCO Speedline is available at the Walter Rand Transportation Center. Northbound service is available to the Trenton Rail Station with connections to New Jersey Transit trains to New York City, SEPTA trains to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Amtrak trains.

— Freebase

Dot.com

Dot.com

Dot.Com is an album released by Avant rock musicians, The Residents, in 2000. It was released in a limited edition of 1200 copies. In 2000, Ralph America collected all of the MP3s they had released on the Buy Or Die website on a CD entitled dot.com. Each MP3 is a never-before-released track from The Residents' history, dating from 1969 to 2000. Walter Westinghouse, track 9, was a bonus: it had never come out in MP3 format, but only appeared on this CD.

— Freebase

HRU

HRU

The HRU security model is an operating system level computer security model which deals with the integrity of access rights in the system. It is an extension of the Graham-Denning model, based around the idea of a finite set of procedures being available to edit the access rights of a subject on an object . It is named after its three authors, Michael A. Harrison, Walter L. Ruzzo and Jeffrey D. Ullman. Along with presenting the model, Harrison, Ruzzo and Ullman also discussed the possibilities and limitations of proving the safety of systems using an algorithm.

— Freebase

Sitting Pretty

Sitting Pretty

Sitting Pretty is a 1948 American comedy film which tells the story of a family who hires a man with a mysterious past to babysit their children. It stars Robert Young, Maureen O'Hara and Clifton Webb. The movie was adapted by F. Hugh Herbert from the comic novel Belvedere by Gwen Davenport. It was directed by Walter Lang. Webb was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actor for the role of Lynn Belvedere. The character proved so popular, Webb reprised his role in two more movies: Mr. Belvedere Goes to College and Mr. Belvedere Rings the Bell.

— Freebase

Frosty the Snowman

Frosty the Snowman

"Frosty the Snowman" is a popular song written by Walter "Jack" Rollins and Steve Nelson, and first recorded by Gene Autry and the Cass County Boys in 1950. It was written after the success of Autry's recording of "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" the previous year; Rollins and Nelson shipped the new song to Autry, who recorded "Frosty" in search of another seasonal hit. Like "Rudolph", "Frosty" was subsequently adapted to other media including a popular television special. The song was originally titled "Frosty the Snow Man". The song supposedly takes place in White Plains, New York, or Armonk, New York. Armonk has a parade dedicated to Frosty annually.

— Freebase

Supposition theory

Supposition theory

Supposition theory was a branch of medieval logic that was probably aimed at giving accounts of issues similar to modern accounts of reference, plurality, tense, and modality, within an Aristotelian context. Philosophers such as John Buridan, William of Ockham, William of Sherwood, Walter Burley, and Peter of Spain were its principal developers. By the 14th century it seems to have drifted into at least two fairly distinct theories, the theory of "supposition proper" which included an "ampliation" and is much like a theory of reference, and the theory of "modes of supposition" whose intended function is not clear.

— Freebase

Bruno Walter

Bruno Walter

Bruno Walter was a German-born conductor, pianist, and composer. Born in Berlin, he left Germany in 1933 to escape the Third Reich, settling finally in the United States in 1939. He worked closely with Gustav Mahler, whose music he helped establish in the repertory, held major positions with the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Salzburg Festival, Vienna State Opera, Bavarian State Opera, Staatsoper Unter den Linden and Deutsche Oper Berlin, among others, made recordings of historical and artistic significance, and is widely considered one of the great conductors of the 20th century.

— Freebase

My Fellow Americans

My Fellow Americans

My Fellow Americans is a 1996 American comedy film starring Jack Lemmon and James Garner as feuding ex-presidents. Dan Aykroyd, Lauren Bacall, Esther Rolle, John Heard, Wilford Brimley, Bradley Whitford and Jeff Yagher are also in the cast. The film is named for the traditional opening of Presidential addresses to the American people. Lemmon's perennial collaborator, Walter Matthau, was slated to co-star. Health problems kept Matthau from appearing so Garner was chosen to star opposite Lemmon for their first project together. The film was unofficially called "Grumpy Old Presidents" by those on the set.

— Freebase

Halofantrine

Halofantrine

Halofantrine is a drug used to treat malaria. Halofantrine's structure contains a substituted phenanthrene, and is related to the antimalarial drugs quinine and lumefantrine. Marketed as Halfan, halofantrine is never used to prevent malaria and its mode of action is unknown. A crystallographic study have shown that halofantrine binds to hematin in vitro, suggesting a possible mechanism of action. Alternatively or in addition, halofantrine has been shown to bind to plasmpesin, a haemoglobin degrading enzyme unique to the malarial parasites. Halofantrine was developed at SRI International for the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research from 1965-1975 by a team led by medicinal chemist William Colwell.

— Freebase

Rebus

Rebus

A rebus is an allusional device that uses pictures to represent words or parts of words. It was a favourite form of heraldic expression used in the Middle Ages to denote surnames, for example in its basic form three salmon fish to denote the name "Salmon". A more sophisticated example was the rebus of Bishop Walter Lyhart of Norwich, consisting of a stag lying down in a conventional representation of water. The composition alludes to the name, profession or personal characteristics of the bearer, and speaks to the beholder Non verbis, sed rebus, which Latin expression signifies "not by words but by things".

— Freebase

Flâneur

Flâneur

Flâneur, from the French noun flâneur, means "stroller", "lounger", "saunterer", or "loafer". Flânerie refers to the act of strolling, with all of its accompanying associations. The flâneur was, first of all, a literary type from 19th-century France, essential to any picture of the streets of Paris. It carried a set of rich associations: the man of leisure, the idler, the urban explorer, the connoisseur of the street. It was Walter Benjamin, drawing on the poetry of Charles Baudelaire, who made him the object of scholarly interest in the twentieth century, as an emblematic figure of urban, modern experience. Following Benjamin, the flâneur has become an important figure for scholars, artists and writers.

— Freebase

Raeburn, Sir Henry

Raeburn, Sir Henry

portrait-painter, born at Stockbridge, Edinburgh; was educated at George Heriot's Hospital; apprenticed to a goldsmith in the city, and gave early promise of his abilities as an artist; went to Italy; was introduced to Reynolds by the way, and after two years' absence settled in Edinburgh, and became famous as one of the greatest painters of the day; the portraits he painted included likenesses of all the distinguished Scotsmen of the period, at the head of them Sir Walter Scott; was knighted by George IV. a short time before his death (1756-1823).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Fanac

Fanac

Fanac is a fan slang term for activities within the realm of science fiction fandom, and occasionally used in media fandom. It may be distinguished from fan labor in that "fanac" includes the publication of science fiction fanzines of the traditional kind, and the organization and maintenance of science fiction conventions and science fiction clubs. "Fanac" has also been used as a title for at least two science fiction fanzines, one published by Terry Carr and Ron Ellik, and later continued by Walter H. Breen, in the late 1950s through early 1960s; and the other published by Swedish fan John-Henri Holmberg from 1963 to 1994.

— Freebase

Infant bodysuit

Infant bodysuit

An infant bodysuit is a garment designed to be worn by infants much like a T-shirt; they are distinguished from T-shirts by an extension below the waist, with snaps or Velcro that allow it to be closed over the crotch. The purpose of the opening at the crotch is to facilitate access to the infant's diaper. Like T-shirts, infant bodysuits come in a wide variety of designs and may be worn as undergarments or as outer shirts. Other names include Onesies, creepers, diaper shirts, babygro, babygrow, mameluco, snapsuits or vests. Babygro is also a trademark brand, invented in the U.S. in the 1950s by Walter Artzt.

— Freebase

Tintern Abbey

Tintern Abbey

Tintern Abbey was founded by Walter de Clare, Lord of Chepstow, on 9 May 1131. It is situated in the village of Tintern in Monmouthshire, on the Welsh bank of the River Wye which forms the border between Monmouthshire in Wales and Gloucestershire in England. It was only the second Cistercian foundation in Britain, and the first in Wales. It inspired William Wordsworth's poem "Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey", Alfred, Lord Tennyson's poem "Tears, Idle Tears", Allen Ginsberg's "Wales Visitation", and more than one painting by J. M. W. Turner. The village of Tintern adjoins the abbey ruins which are Grade I listed as of 29 September 2000.

— Freebase

All-rounder

All-rounder

An all-rounder is a cricketer who regularly performs well at both batting and bowling. Although all bowlers must bat and quite a few batsmen do bowl occasionally, most players are skilled in only one of the two disciplines and are considered specialists. Some wicket-keepers have the skills of a specialist batsman and have been referred to as all-rounders, but the term wicketkeeper-batsman is more commonly applied to them. Among the greatest all-rounders have been Imran Khan, George Hirst, Wilfred Rhodes, Chris Cairns, Shaun Pollock, Keith Miller, Garfield Sobers, Ian Botham, Jacques Kallis, Kapil Dev, Richard Hadlee, W. G. Grace, Mushtaq Mohammad, Lance Klusener, Walter Hammond and Andrew Flintoff

— Freebase

Robert Fergusson

Robert Fergusson

Robert Fergusson was a Scottish poet. After formal education at the University of St Andrews, Fergusson followed an essentially bohemian life course in Edinburgh, the city of his birth, then at the height of intellectual and cultural ferment as part of the Scottish enlightenment. Many of his extant poems were printed from 1771 onwards in Walter Ruddiman's Weekly Magazine, and a collected works was first published early in 1773. Despite a short life, his career was highly influential, especially through its impact on Robert Burns. He wrote both Scottish English and the Scots language, and it is his vivid and masterly writing in the latter leed for which he is principally acclaimed.

— Freebase

Lockhart, John Gibson

Lockhart, John Gibson

man of letters, born in Cambusnethan; bred for the Scottish bar and practised at it; contributed to Blackwood, wrote in collaboration with John Wilson "Peter's Letters to his Kinsfolk"; married Sophia Scott, Sir Walter's daughter, in 1820, lived a good deal near Abbotsford, wrote some four novels and "Spanish Ballads," became editor of the Quarterly in 1825, and began in 1837 his "Life of Scott," a great work, and his greatest; died at Abbotsford, health broken and in much sorrow; his "Life" has been interestingly written by Andrew Lang (1794-1854).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Bigger Than Life

Bigger Than Life

Bigger Than Life is an American DeLuxe Color CinemaScope film made in 1956 directed by Nicholas Ray and starring James Mason, who also co-wrote and produced the film, about a school teacher and family man whose life spins out of control upon becoming addicted to cortisone. The film co-stars Barbara Rush as his wife and Walter Matthau as his closest friend, a fellow teacher. Though it was a box-office flop upon its initial release, many modern critics hail it as a masterpiece and brilliant indictment of contemporary attitudes towards mental illness and addiction. In 1963, Jean-Luc Godard named it one of the ten best films ever made. Bigger Than Life was based on a 1955 The New Yorker article by medical writer Berton Roueché entitled "Ten Feet Tall".

— Freebase

Tongue-in-cheek

Tongue-in-cheek

Tongue-in-cheek is a phrase used as a figure of speech to imply that a statement or other production is humorously or otherwise not seriously intended and it should not be taken at face value. The facial expression typically indicates that one is joking or making a mental effort. In the past, it may also have indicated contempt, but that is no longer common. By 1842 the phrase had acquired its contemporary meaning similar to "take what I am saying with a grain of salt", indicating that a statement was not meant to be taken seriously. Early users of the phrase include Sir Walter Scott in his 1828 The Fair Maid of Perth.

— Freebase

Willy Pogany

Willy Pogany

William Andrew Pogany was a prolific Hungarian illustrator of children's and other books. His contemporaries include C. Coles Phillips, Joseph Clement Coll, Edmund Dulac, Harvey Dunn, Walter Everett, Harry Rountree, Sarah Stilwell Weber, and N.C. Wyeth. He is best known for his pen and ink drawings of myths and fables. A large portion of Pogany's work is described as Art Nouveau. Pogany's artistic style is heavily fairy-tale orientated and often feature motifs of mythical animals such as nymphs and pixies. He paid great attention to botanical details. He used dreamy and warm pastel scenes with watercolors, oil paintings, and especially pen and ink. Painstakingly detailed and confident, Pogany's pen and ink pieces portray the true extant of his talent.

— Freebase

Bonnie Dundee

Bonnie Dundee

Bonnie Dundee is the of title of a poem and a song written by Walter Scott in 1825 in honour of John Graham, 7th Laird of Claverhouse, who was appointed 1st Viscount Dundee in November 1688, then in 1689 led a Jacobite rising in which he died, becoming a Jacobite hero. The older tune Bonny Dundee adapted by Scott had already been used for several songs appearing under variations of that title and referring to the bonnie town of Dundee rather than to Claverhouse. Scott's song has been used as a regimental march by several Scottish regiments in the British Army and was adapted by Confederate troops during the American Civil War.

— Freebase

Chantrey, Sir Francis

Chantrey, Sir Francis

an English sculptor, born in Derbyshire; was apprenticed to a carver and gilder in Sheffield; displayed a talent for drawing and modelling; received a commission to execute a marble bust for the parish, church, which was so successful as to procure him further and further commissions; executed four colossal busts of admirals for Greenwich Hospital; being expert at portraiture, his busts were likenesses; executed busts of many of the most illustrious men of the time, among them of Sir Walter Scott, Wordsworth, Southey, and Wellington, as well as of royal heads; made a large fortune, and left it for the encouragement of art (1781-1841).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Gold Mine

Gold Mine

The Gold Mine is a 1,900 seat multi-purpose arena in Long Beach, California, on the campus of California State University, Long Beach. Opened in the late 1950s, when it was known as University Gym, the Gold Mine was home to Long Beach State's basketball and volleyball teams until the Walter Pyramid opened in 1994. It used to have nearly 2400 seats in wooden bleachers before a mid-80's renovation. The Gold Mine is still used occasionally for volleyball and basketball games, if there is a scheduling conflict at the Pyramid. Today, its primary function is for Long Beach State intramural sports and other campus events.

— Freebase

Abendmusik

Abendmusik

Abendmusik is an evening concert, usually performed in a church. Specifically, this designation refers to a series of performances at the Marienkirche of Lübeck, Germany, begun in the 17th century and lasting until 1810. Paid for by local businessmen and therefore with free admission for the public, Franz Tunder was the first to perform the Abendmusiken with organ music and a variety of vocal music. Under his successor Dieterich Buxtehude, these concerts came to prominence and were established on the five Sundays preceding Christmas. Buxtehude and his successors even composed five-part oratorios to be performed over the course of the five Sundays. Organist Walter Kraft renewed this Lübeck tradition in St. Mary's in 1926.

— Freebase

William Wallace

William Wallace

Sir William Wallace was a Scottish landowner who became one of the main leaders during the Wars of Scottish Independence. Along with Andrew Moray, Wallace defeated an English army at the Battle of Stirling Bridge in September 1297, and was appointed Guardian of Scotland, serving until his defeat at the Battle of Falkirk in July 1298. In August 1305 Wallace was captured in Robroyston near Glasgow and handed over to King Edward I of England, who had him hanged, drawn, and quartered for high treason and crimes against English civilians. Since his death, Wallace has obtained an iconic status far beyond his homeland. He is the protagonist of the 15th-century epic poem The Wallace, by Blind Harry. Wallace is also the subject of literary works by Sir Walter Scott and Jane Porter and of the 1995 Academy Award-winning film Braveheart.

— Freebase

Piccadill

Piccadill

A piccadill or pickadill is a large broad collar of cut-work lace that became fashionable in the late 16th century and early 17th century. The term may originate from a conjectured Spanish word picadillo, from picado meaning punctured or pierced. This is similar to the Spanish word picadura, used for the lace collars of the seventeenth century that contained much elaborate cut work. Examples of a piccadill can be seen on portraits of Queen Elizabeth I and other portraits of her contemporaries such as Sir Walter Raleigh. Piccadilly, a street in central London, is believed to be named after the piccadill, perhaps because a landowner in the area once made his fortune from them.

— Freebase

WarGames

WarGames

WarGames is a 1983 American Cold War science-fiction film written by Lawrence Lasker and Walter F. Parkes and directed by John Badham. The film stars Matthew Broderick, Dabney Coleman, John Wood, and Ally Sheedy. The film follows David Lightman, a young hacker who unwittingly accesses WOPR, a United States military supercomputer programmed to predict possible outcomes of nuclear war. Lightman gets WOPR to run a nuclear war simulation, originally believing it to be a computer game. The simulation causes a national nuclear missile scare and nearly starts World War III. The film was a box office success, costing US$12 million, and grossing $79,567,667 after five months in the United States and Canada. The film was nominated for three Academy Awards. A sequel, WarGames: The Dead Code, was released direct to DVD on July 29, 2008.

— Freebase

Information explosion

Information explosion

The information explosion is the rapid increase in the amount of published information or data and the effects of this abundance. As the amount of available data grows, the problem of managing the information becomes more difficult, which can lead to information overload. The Online Oxford English Dictionary indicates use of the phrase in a March 1964 New Statesman article. The New York Times first used the phrase in its editorial content in an article by Walter Sullivan on June 7, 1964 in which he described the phrase as “much discussed.” The earliest use of the phrase seems to have been in an IBM advertising supplement to the New York Times published on April 30, 1961 and by Frank Fremont-Smith, Director of the American Institute of Biological Sciences Interdisciplinary Conference Program, in an April 1961 article in the AIBS Bulletin Fortunately, techniques to gather knowledge from an overabundance of electronic information have existed since the 1970s.

— Freebase

Hogg, James

Hogg, James

a Scottish poet, born in Ettrick; had little or no schooling; was bred a shepherd; took to rhyming; fell in with Sir Walter Scott, whom he assisted with his "Border Minstrelsy"; rented a farm, and first came into notice by the publication of his poem, the "Queen's Wake"; he wrote in prose as well as poetry, with humour as well as no little graphic power; "was," says Carlyle, "a little red-skinned stiff sack of a body, with two little blue or grey eyes that sparkled, if not with thought, yet with animation; was a real product of nature" (1782-1835).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Folio

Folio

Folio is a realist sans-serif typeface designed by Konrad Bauer and Walter Baum in 1957 for the Bauersche Gießerei. Bauer licensed the design to Fonderie Typographique Française for sale in France under the name Caravelle. Like Helvetica and Univers, which were also released at the same time, it is part of the International Typographic Style and modeled after Akzidenz-Grotesk. However, Folio is more closely modeled on Akzidenz-Grotesk than the other two, which have larger x-heights. Due to good marketing, the typeface experienced moderate success in the United States. The typeface family was extended in 1963, adding an Extra Bold weight and a Bold Condensed width. The cold type version was issued by Hell AG.

— Freebase

John Bardeen

John Bardeen

John Bardeen was an American physicist and electrical engineer, the only person to have won the Nobel Prize in Physics twice: first in 1956 with William Shockley and Walter Brattain for the invention of the transistor; and again in 1972 with Leon N Cooper and John Robert Schrieffer for a fundamental theory of conventional superconductivity known as the BCS theory. The transistor revolutionized the electronics industry, allowing the Information Age to occur, and made possible the development of almost every modern electronic device, from telephones to computers to missiles. Bardeen's developments in superconductivity, which won him his second Nobel, are used in magnetic resonance imaging. In 1990, John Bardeen appeared on LIFE Magazine's list of "100 Most Influential Americans of the Century."

— Freebase

D

D

The D programming language is an object-oriented, imperative, multi-paradigm system programming language created by Walter Bright of Digital Mars. Though it originated as a re-engineering of C++, D is a distinct language, having redesigned some core C++ features while also taking inspiration from other languages, notably Java, Python, Ruby, C#, and Eiffel. D's design goals attempt to combine the performance of compiled languages with the safety and expressive power of modern dynamic languages. Idiomatic D code is commonly as fast as equivalent C++ code, while being shorter and memory-safe. Type inference, automatic memory management and syntactic sugar for common types allow faster development, while bounds checking, design by contract features and a concurrency-aware type system help reduce the occurrence of bugs.

— Freebase

Alice and Bob

Alice and Bob

The archetypal individuals used as examples in discussions of cryptographic protocols. Originally, theorists would say something like: “A communicates with someone who claims to be B, So to be sure, A tests that B knows a secret number K. So A sends to B a random number X. B then forms Y by encrypting X under key K and sends Y back to A” Because this sort of thing is quite hard to follow, theorists stopped using the unadorned letters A and B to represent the main players and started calling them Alice and Bob. So now we say “Alice communicates with someone claiming to be Bob, and to be sure, Alice tests that Bob knows a secret number K. Alice sends to Bob a random number X. Bob then forms Y by encrypting X under key K and sends Y back to Alice”. A whole mythology rapidly grew up around the metasyntactic names; see http://www.conceptlabs./definition/alicebob.In Bruce Schneier's definitive introductory text Applied Cryptography (2nd ed., 1996, John Wiley & Sons, ISBN 0-471-11709-9) he introduced a table of dramatis personae headed by Alice and Bob. Others include Carol (a participant in three- and four-party protocols), Dave (a participant in four-party protocols), Eve (an eavesdropper), Mallory (a malicious active attacker), Trent (a trusted arbitrator), Walter (a warden), Peggy (a prover) and Victor (a verifier). These names for roles are either already standard or, given the wide popularity of the book, may be expected to quickly become so.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Roanoke Colony

Roanoke Colony

The Roanoke Colony on Roanoke Island in Dare County, present-day North Carolina, United States, was a late 16th-century attempt by Queen Elizabeth I to establish a permanent English settlement. The enterprise was financed and organized originally by Sir Humphrey Gilbert, who drowned in 1583 during an aborted attempt to colonize St. John's, Newfoundland. Sir Humphrey Gilbert's half brother Sir Walter Raleigh later gained his brother's charter from Queen Elizabeth I and subsequently executed the details of the charter through his delegates Ralph Lane and Richard Grenville, Raleigh's distant cousin. The final group of colonists disappeared during the Anglo-Spanish War, three years after the last shipment of supplies from England. Their disappearance gave rise to the nickname "the Lost Colony". To this day there has been no conclusive evidence as to what happened to the colonists.

— Freebase

Steel, Sir John

Steel, Sir John

sculptor, born at Aberdeen; studied at Edinburgh and Rome; made his mark in 1832 by a model of a statue, "Alexander and Bucephalus," and soon took rank with the foremost and busiest sculptors of his day; his works are mostly to be found in Edinburgh, and include the equestrian statue of Wellington, statues of Sir Walter Scott (in the Scott Monument), Professor Wilson, Dr. Chalmers, Allan Ramsay, etc.; the splendid figure of Queen Victoria over the Royal Institution gained him the appointment (1844) of sculptor to Her Majesty in Scotland, and on the unveiling of his fine equestrian statue of Prince Albert in 1876 he was created a knight (1804-1891).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Frederick Sanger

Frederick Sanger

Frederick Sanger, OM, CH, CBE, FRS, FAA is a British biochemist who was twice the recipient of the Nobel Prize for Chemistry, the only person to have been so. In 1958 he was awarded a Nobel prize in chemistry "for his work on the structure of proteins, especially that of insulin". In 1980, Walter Gilbert and Sanger shared half of the chemistry prize "for their contributions concerning the determination of base sequences in nucleic acids". The other half was awarded to Paul Berg "for his fundamental studies of the biochemistry of nucleic acids, with particular regard to recombinant-DNA". He is the fourth person to have been awarded two Nobel Prizes, either individually or in tandem with others.

— Freebase

Twentieth Century

Twentieth Century

Twentieth Century is a 1934 American screwball comedy film. Much of the film is set on the 20th Century Limited train as it travels from Chicago to New York. The film was directed by Howard Hawks, stars John Barrymore and Carole Lombard, and features Walter Connolly, Roscoe Karns and Edgar Kennedy. Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur adapted their Broadway play of the same name – itself based on the unproduced play Napoleon of Broadway by Charles Bruce Millholland – with uncredited contributions from Gene Fowler and Preston Sturges. Along with Frank Capra's It Happened One Night, also released in 1934, Twentieth Century is considered to be a prototype for the screwball comedy. "Howard Hawks' rapid-fire romantic comedy established the essential ingredients of the screwball – a dizzy dame, a charming but befuddled hero, dazzling dialogue and a dash of slapstick." The film was added to the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress in 2011.

— Freebase

Forbes, James David

Forbes, James David

physicist, born at Edinburgh, the grandson of Sir William, and the son of the first lady-love of Sir Walter Scott, and very like her; was called to the bar in 1830; physical science, however, was his ruling passion, and in 1833 he became professor of Natural Philosophy in Edinburgh University, from which he was called in 1859 to the Principalship of the United College, St. Andrews, in which he succeeded Sir David Brewster, whom he had defeated in obtaining the Edinburgh chair; he made some valuable contributions to natural science, including discoveries in the polarisation of heat and in regard to the motion of glaciers, to investigate which he travelled in Norway and in the Alps (1809-1868).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Loch Katrine

Loch Katrine

Loch Katrine is a freshwater loch in Stirlingshire in the district of Stirling, Scotland. It is roughly 8 miles long by 2/3 of a mile wide and runs the length of Strath Gartney. It is a popular destination for tourists and day visitors from Glasgow and other nearby towns. The loch derives its name from the term cateran from the Gaelic ceathairne, a collective word meaning cattle thief or possibly peasantry. Historically this referred to a band of fighting men of a clan; hence the term applied to marauders or cattle-lifters, the most notorious of whom was Rob Roy MacGregor who was born at Glengyle House at the northern end of the Loch. It is the fictional setting of Sir Walter Scott's poem The Lady of the Lake and of the subsequent opera by Giachino Rossini, La donna del lago.

— Freebase

Authors

Authors

Authors or, The Game of Authors is a card game for three to five players. The first Game of Authors was published by G. M. Whipple & A. A. Smith of Salem, Massachusetts in 1861, and later published by Parker Brothers in 1897. The deck of cards consists of eleven sets of four cards each representing the works of eleven famous authors. The object of the game is to form complete sets of the four cards comprising the works of a particular author. The winner is the player with the most sets. The game is the creation of Anne Abbott, a Beverly, Massachusetts clergyman's daughter and editor of a young people's literary journal. Abbott also designed the hugely popular mid-19th century card game, Dr. Busby. Later decks included additional authors, but the authors represented in the original deck were: ⁕Louisa May Alcott ⁕James Fenimore Cooper ⁕Charles Dickens ⁕Nathaniel Hawthorne ⁕Washington Irving ⁕Henry Wadsworth Longfellow ⁕Sir Walter Scott ⁕William Shakespeare ⁕Robert Louis Stevenson ⁕Alfred, Lord Tennyson ⁕Mark Twain

— Freebase

Ben Hogan

Ben Hogan

William Ben Hogan was an American professional golfer, generally considered one of the greatest players in the history of the game. Born within six months of two other acknowledged golf greats of the twentieth century, Sam Snead and Byron Nelson, Hogan is notable for his profound influence on the golf swing theory and his legendary ball-striking ability, for which he remains renowned among players and fans. His nine career professional major championships tie him for fourth all-time, trailing only Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods and Walter Hagen. Furthermore, he is one of only five golfers to have won all four major championships currently open to professionals, the other four being Gene Sarazen, Gary Player, Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods.

— Freebase

Sextette

Sextette

Sextette is a 1978 American comedy/musical motion picture released by Crown International Pictures. The film stars Mae West. Other actors in the cast included Timothy Dalton, Dom DeLuise, Tony Curtis, Ringo Starr, Keith Moon, George Hamilton, Alice Cooper and Walter Pidgeon. Directed by Ken Hughes and produced by Daniel Briggs, Robert Sullivan and Harry Weiss for the production company Briggs and Sullivan, the script was dramatized for the screen, by Herbert Baker, from the play Sextet, which West herself had originally written. Costumes were designed by Edith Head. Filmed at Paramount Studios, Sextette was Mae West's final movie. Featured were cameos by Rona Barrett, Regis Philbin and George Raft, all of whom appeared as themselves. West had made her movie debut in Raft's Night After Night.

— Freebase

Waverley

Waverley

Waverley is an 1814 historical novel by Sir Walter Scott. Initially published anonymously in 1814 as Scott's first venture into prose fiction, Waverley is often regarded as the first historical novel. It became so popular that Scott's later novels were advertised as being "by the author of Waverley". His series of works on similar themes written during the same period have become collectively known as the "Waverley Novels". In 1815, Scott was given the honour of dining with George, Prince Regent, who wanted to meet "the author of Waverley". It is thought that at this meeting Scott persuaded George that as a Stuart prince he could claim to be a Jacobite Highland Chieftain, a claim that would be dramatised when George became King and visited Scotland.

— Freebase

Lake Poets

Lake Poets

The Lake Poets are a group of English poets who all lived in the Lake District of England at the turn of the nineteenth century. As a group, they followed no single "school" of thought or literary practice then known, their works were uniformly disparaged by the Edinburgh Review. They are considered part of the Romantic Movement. The three main figures of what has become known as the Lakes School are William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Robert Southey. They were associated with several other poets and writers, including Dorothy Wordsworth, Charles Lloyd, Hartley Coleridge, John Wilson, and Thomas De Quincey. The beauty of the Lake District has also inspired many other poets over the years, beyond the core Lake Poets. These include James Payn, Bryan Procter, Felicia Hemans, Walter Scott and Norman Nicholson.

— Freebase

James Hogg

James Hogg

James Hogg was a Scottish poet and novelist who wrote in both Scots and English. As a young man he worked as a shepherd and farmhand, and was largely self-educated through reading. He was a friend of many of the great writers of his day, including Sir Walter Scott, of whom he later wrote an unauthorized biography. He became widely known as the "Ettrick Shepherd", a nickname under which some of his works were published, and the character name he was given in the widely read series Noctes Ambrosianae, published in Blackwood's Magazine. He is best known today for his novel The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner. His other works include the long poem The Queen's Wake, his collection of songs Jacobite Reliques, and his two novels The Three Perils of Man, and The Three Perils of Woman.

— Freebase

Great Rift Valley

Great Rift Valley

The Great Rift Valley is a name given in the late 19th century by British explorer John Walter Gregory to the continuous geographic trench, approximately 6,000 kilometres in length, that runs from northern Syria to central Mozambique in South East Africa. The name continues in some usages, although it is today considered geologically imprecise as it combines features that are today regarded as separate, although related, rift and fault systems. Today, the term is most often used to refer to the valley of the East African Rift, the divergent plate boundary which extends from the Afar Triple Junction southward across eastern Africa, and is in the process of splitting the African Plate into two new separate plates. Geologists generally refer to these incipient plates as the Nubian Plate and the Somali Plate.

— Freebase

Checkpoint Charlie

Checkpoint Charlie

Checkpoint Charlie was the name given by the Western Allies to the best-known Berlin Wall crossing point between East Berlin and West Berlin during the Cold War. GDR leader Walter Ulbricht agitated and maneuvered to get the Soviet Union's permission for the construction of the Berlin Wall in 1961 to stop Eastern Bloc emigration westward through the Soviet border system, preventing escape across the city sector border from East Berlin to West Berlin. Checkpoint Charlie became a symbol of the Cold War, representing the separation of east and west. Soviet and American tanks briefly faced each other at the location during the Berlin Crisis of 1961. After the dissolution of the Eastern Bloc and the reunification of Germany, the building at Checkpoint Charlie became a tourist attraction. It is now located in the Allied Museum in the Dahlem neighborhood of Berlin.

— Freebase

Weldon process

Weldon process

The Weldon process is a process developed in 1866 by Walter Weldon for recovering manganese dioxide for re-use in chlorine manufacture. Commercial operations started at the Gamble works in St. Helens in 1869. The process is describe in considerable detailed in the book, The Alkali Industry, by J.R. Partington,D.Sc. The common method to manufacture chlorine at the time, was to react manganese dioxide with hydrochloric acid to give chlorine: Weldon's contribution was to develop a process to recycle the manganese. The waste manganese chloride solution is treated with lime, steam and oxygen, producing calcium manganite: The resulting calcium manganite can be reacted with HCl as in related processes: The manganese chloride can be recycled, while the calcium chloride is a waste byproduct. The Weldon process was first replaced by the Deacon process and later by the Chloralkali process.

— Freebase

Homeostasis

Homeostasis

Homeostasis is the property of a system that regulates its internal environment and tends to maintain a stable, relatively constant condition of properties such as temperature or pH. It can be either an open or closed system. In simple terms, it is a process in which the body's internal environment is kept stable. It was defined by Claude Bernard and later by Walter Bradford Cannon in 1926, 1929 and 1932. Typically used to refer to a living organism, the concept of homeostasis was preceded by that of milieu intérieur, defined by Claude Bernard and published in 1865. Multiple dynamic equilibrium adjustment and regulation mechanisms make homeostasis possible. Homeostasis needs to be distinguished from simple dynamic equilibriums, which are not regulated, and steady states, which may be stable but sensitive to perturbations.

— Freebase

Cunningham, Allan

Cunningham, Allan

poet and man of letters, born in the parish of Keir, Dumfriesshire; bred to the mason craft, but devoted his leisure hours to study and the composition of Scottish ballads, which, when published, gained him the notice of Sir Walter Scott; in 1810 he went to London, where he wrote for periodicals, and obtained employment as assistant to Chantrey the sculptor, in which post he found leisure to cultivate his literary proclivities, collating and editing tales and songs, editing Burns with a Life, and writing the Lives of famous artists, and died in London; "a pliant, Naturmensch," Carlyle found him to be, "with no principles or creed that he could see, but excellent old habits of character" (1784-1842).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Pier Head

Pier Head

The Pier Head is a riverside location in the city centre of Liverpool, England. It is part of the Liverpool Maritime Mercantile City UNESCO World Heritage Site, which was inscribed in 2004. The site encompasses a trio of landmarks, built on the site of the former George's Dock and referred to since at least 2000 as "The Three Graces": Royal Liver Building, built between 1908 and 1911 and designed by Walter Aubrey Thomas. It is a grade I listed building consisting of two clock towers, both crowned by mythical Liver Birds. The building is the headquarters of the Royal Liver Friendly Society. Cunard Building, constructed between 1914 and 1916 and a grade II* listed building. It is the former headquarters of the Cunard Line shipping company. Port of Liverpool Building, built from 1903 to 1907 and also grade II* listed. It is the former home of the Mersey Docks and Harbour Board. Also on the site is the grade II listed Mersey Tunnel building, to the east of the Port of Liverpool building. It was built in the 1930s and contains offices and ventilator equipment for the Queensway Tunnel.

— Freebase

Ben

Ben

"Ben" is a song written by Don Black and composed by Walter Scharf for the 1972 film of the same name. It was performed in the film by Lee Montgomery and by Michael Jackson over the closing credits. Jackson's single, recorded for the Motown label in 1972, spent one week at the top of the U.S. pop chart. It also reached number-one on the Australian pop chart, spending eight weeks at the top spot. The song also later reached a peak of number seven on the British pop chart. "Ben" won a Golden Globe for Best Song. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1973, losing to "The Morning After" from The Poseidon Adventure; Jackson performed the song in front of a live audience at the ceremony. The song was Jackson's first #1 solo hit.

— Freebase

Blessed Event

Blessed Event

Blessed Event is a 1932 comedy-drama film starring Lee Tracy as a newspaper gossip columnist who becomes entangled with a gangster. The Tracy character was patterned after Walter Winchell, famous gossip columnist of the era. In this film, the Tracy character feuds with the Bunny Harmon character, played by Dick Powell, to give comedy relief. Powell plays a crooner very much like his real-life persona. The Tracy character antagonizes a gangster, who sends over a henchman to threaten him. The Tracy character turns the tables on him. The title of the movie gets its name from the euphemism for giving birth. The columnist used to report on how people in society were expecting. This put him in conflict with the gangster. The movie was Dick Powell's film debut. The Alvin Roberts character was originally to be played by James Cagney.

— Freebase

Coronach

Coronach

A coronach is the Scottish Gaelic equivalent of the Goll, being the third part of a round of keening, the traditional improvised singing at a death, wake or funeral in the Highlands of Scotland and in Ireland. Though observers have reported hearing such songs in Ireland or in the Scottish Highlands, and melodies have been noted down and printed since the 18th century, audio recordings are rare; not only was the practice dying out or being suppressed through the 19th century, but it was also considered by its practitioners to have been a very personal and spiritual practice, not suitable for performance or recording. The Scottish border ballad The Bonny Earl of Murray is supposedly composed in the tradition of the coronach. Schubert's Opus 52 No 4 set words from Sir Walter Scott's Lady of the Lake under the title Coronach, for female choir with piano accompaniment.

— Freebase

Undisputed

Undisputed

Undisputed is a 2002 action-thriller-drama movie released through Miramax. It starred and was co-produced by Wesley Snipes, co-starring Ving Rhames. The film was directed and produced by Walter Hill, and written by David Giler and Hill, who is probably best known as the writer/director of 48 Hrs. and Streets of Fire, but had most recently directed Supernova. He and Giler had previously collaborated on the Alien series and Southern Comfort. It failed at the box-office and received mixed reviews from critics. However it found success on home video market, then later a direct-to-video sequel without any of the original cast members, Undisputed II: Last Man Standing, was released in 2006. A second sequel, Undisputed III: Redemption, was released in 2010 following Undisputed II's Yuri Boyka as the main character.

— Freebase

Griffith

Griffith

Griffith is a city in south-western New South Wales, Australia. It is also the seat of the City of Griffith local government area. Like the Australian capital, Canberra and the nearby town of Leeton, Griffith was designed by Walter Burley Griffin. Griffith was named after Sir Arthur Griffith the first New South Wales minister of Public Works. Griffith was proclaimed a city in 1987, and had a population of 17,616 in 2011. It can be accessed by road from Sydney and Canberra via the Hume Highway and the Burley Griffin Way and from Melbourne, Victoria via the Newell Highway and either by using the Kidman Way or the Irrigation Way. The city of Griffith had contained no traffic lights up until February 2010 when the first set of traffic lights was installed at the intersection of Burrell Place and Wakaden Street.

— Freebase

Protoceratops

Protoceratops

Protoceratops is a genus of sheep-sized herbivorous ceratopsian dinosaur, from the Upper Cretaceous Period of what is now Mongolia. It was a member of the Protoceratopsidae, a group of early horned dinosaurs. Unlike later ceratopsians, however, it was a much smaller creature that lacked well-developed horns and retained some primitive traits not seen in later genera. Protoceratops had a large neck frill which was likely used as a display site to impress other members of the species. Other hypotheses about its function include protection of the neck and anchoring of jaw muscles, but the fragility of the frill and the poor leverage offered by possible attachment sites here makes these ideas implausible. Described by Walter W. Granger and W.K. Gregory in 1923, Protoceratops was initially believed to be an ancestor of the North American ceratopsians. Researchers currently distinguish two species of Protoceratops, based in part by their respective sizes.

— Freebase

Extreme Prejudice

Extreme Prejudice

Extreme Prejudice is an American action film starring Nick Nolte and Powers Boothe, originally released in 1987. The film was directed by Walter Hill; it was written by John Milius, Fred Rexer and Deric Washburn. Extreme Prejudice is an homage, of sorts, to The Wild Bunch, a western directed by Sam Peckinpah, with whom Hill worked on The Getaway. Both films end with a massive gunfight in a Mexican border town. The title originates from "terminate with extreme prejudice", a phrase popularized by the 1979 film Apocalypse Now, also written by John Milius. The character of Jack Benteen was loosely based on Joaquin Jackson, now a retired Texas Ranger. Nolte spent three weeks in Texas with Jackson learning the day to day activities of a Ranger. Nolte took what he learned and incorporated it into his character; the mannerisms and dress.

— Freebase

A New Leaf

A New Leaf

A New Leaf is a dark comedy film based on the short story The Green Heart by Jack Ritchie, starring Elaine May, Walter Matthau, George Rose and James Coco. Better known for her collaboration as a stage comedienne with The Graduate director Mike Nichols, May also wrote and directed. For this film May consulted Dr. Dominick Basile, a botany professor at Columbia University. Dr. Basile wrote botanically accurate lines into the script and supplied the botanical equipment seen in the film. May also modeled Henrietta's office after his. The film was a critical success upon its initial release and is now considered a cult classic. However, despite several accolades, award nominations, and a Radio City Music Hall run, A New Leaf fared poorly at the box office and remains little known by the general public. For his performance as Henry, Matthau affected an accent and mannerisms reminiscent of Cary Grant.

— Freebase

My All

My All

"My All" is a song by American singer-songwriter Mariah Carey from her sixth studio album, Butterfly. It was released as the album's fourth and second commercial single on April 21, 1998 by Columbia Records. The song was written and produced by Carey and Walter Afanasieff. "My All" is built around Latin guitar chord melodies, and makes subtle use of Latin percussion throughout the first chorus, before taking on a more conventional contemporary R&B-style beat. Carey was inspired to write the song and use Latin inspired melodies after her trip to Puerto Rico, where she was influenced by the culture. The song's lyrics tell of a lonely woman declaring she would give "her all" to have just one more night with her estranged lover. The music video for the song was recorded in April 1998. It shows many scenes of Carey laying on a submerged vessel in a large body of water, while lamenting her lost lover. Towards the video's climax, Carey and her love interest climb atop a lighthouse and caress each other under the night's sky.

— Freebase

Poly(methyl methacrylate)

Poly(methyl methacrylate)

Poly(methyl methacrylate) is a transparent thermoplastic often used as a lightweight or shatter-resistant alternative to glass. Although it is not technically a type of glass, the substance has sometimes historically been called acrylic glass. Chemically, it is the synthetic polymer of methyl methacrylate. The material was developed in 1928 in several different laboratories by many chemists such as William Chalmers, Otto Röhm and Walter Bauer and was first brought to market in 1933 by the Rohm and Haas Company, under the trademark Plexiglas. It has since been sold under many different names, including Acrylite, Lucite, and Perspex. PMMA is an economical alternative to polycarbonate when extreme strength is not necessary. Additionally, PMMA does not contain the potentially harmful bisphenol-A subunits found in polycarbonate. It is often preferred because of its moderate properties, easy handling and processing, and low cost. Non-modified PMMA behaves in a brittle manner when loaded, especially under an impact force, and is more prone to scratching than conventional inorganic glass, but modified PMMA can achieve high scratch and impact resistance.

— Freebase

Hera

Hera

Hera is the wife and one of three sisters of Zeus in the Olympian pantheon of Greek mythology and religion. Her chief function is as the goddess of women and marriage. Her counterpart in the religion of ancient Rome was Juno. The cow, lion and the peacock are sacred to her. Hera's mother is Rhea and her father Cronus. Portrayed as majestic and solemn, often enthroned, and crowned with the polos, Hera may bear a pomegranate in her hand, emblem of fertile blood and death and a substitute for the narcotic capsule of the opium poppy. A scholar of Greek mythology Walter Burkert writes in Greek Religion, "Nevertheless, there are memories of an earlier aniconic representation, as a pillar in Argos and as a plank in Samos." Hera was known for her jealous and vengeful nature, most notably against Zeus's lovers and offspring, but also against mortals who crossed her, such as Pelias. Paris offended her by choosing Aphrodite as the most beautiful goddess, earning Hera's hatred.

— Freebase

Eyre

Eyre

An Eyre or Iter was the name of a circuit traveled by an itinerant justice in medieval England, or the circuit court he presided over, or the right of the king to visit and inspect the holdings of any vassal. The eyre involved visits and inspections at irregular intervals of the houses of all vassals in the kingdom. The eyre of 1194, was intitiated under Hubert Walter's justiciarship to restore royal justice following the anarchy of Prince John's rebellion. Within two months, justices on eyre had visited every shire in England. The Articles of Eyre appointed local knights as coroners to record crown pleas to be presented to the justices. The motivation for this administrative reform was the need to raise money for King Richard I's reconquest of Normandy. The coroners were also required to account for the wealth forfeited by the rebels and list the financial resources of each shire. The 1233 Eyre of Cornwall, provoked terror in the populace causing most of the population to flee into the woods.

— Freebase

Cheeky Weekly

Cheeky Weekly

Cheeky Weekly was a British comic published every Monday by IPC Magazines Ltd. It ran for 117 issues from 22 October 1977 to 2 February 1980, failing to be published for 3 weeks in December 1978 due to an industrial dispute. It merged with stable-mate Whoopee!, initially as a 16-page pull-out section. The title character originated in an earlier comic called Krazy as a character in the strip The Krazy Gang and also the star of the 'Ello, It's Cheeky feature, and proved popular enough to get his own comic, which managed to outlive Krazy itself. The first issue came with a free "Red Jet Rattler". Its characters and strips included: ⁕Cheeky's Week, a comic strip featuring the title character meeting various regular characters with much joke-telling. This strip was drawn by Frank McDiarmid. ⁕Lily Pop ⁕Posh Claude ⁕Walter Wurx ⁕Jogging Jeremy ⁕Baby Burpo ⁕Baker's Boy ⁕Sid the Street Sweeper ⁕Ursula the Usherette

— Freebase

Cateran

Cateran

The term cateran historically referred to a band of fighting men of a Scotland Highland clan; hence the term applied to the Highland, and later to any, marauders or cattle-lifters. An individual member is a ceithernach or catanach. According to Dr. Randy Lee Eichoff, PhD, Old Celtic, it derives from Old Celtic 'cat' and 'nach' Catanach means war-man, warrior. Its plural is ceithern or ceithrenn or caithereine or kettering or kettenring and several other spellings. Magnus Magnusson states in his Scotland, The Story of a Nation that some Highland chieftains retained substantial private armies of professional soldiers known as 'ceatharn' used against their neighbours. Problems arose when the third royal son of King Robert II, Alexander Stewart, Earl of Buchan began using a force of 'caterans' himself. Subsequently, the word 'cateran' came to refer to those Highland bandits or malefactors. Caterans feature in many Scottish novels and short stories, notably Hamish MacTavish Mhor in Walter Scott's 'The Highland Widow'.

— Freebase

Walter Scott

Walter Scott

Sir Walter Scott, 1st Baronet, FRSE was a Scottish historical novelist, playwright, and poet, popular throughout much of the world during his time. Scott was the first English-language author to have a truly international career in his lifetime, with many contemporary readers in Europe, Australia, and North America. His novels and poetry are still read, and many of his works remain classics of both English-language literature and of Scottish literature. Famous titles include Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, The Lady of the Lake, Waverley, The Heart of Midlothian and The Bride of Lammermoor. Although primarily remembered for his extensive literary works and his political engagement, Scott was an advocate, judge and legal administrator by profession, and throughout his career combined his writing and editing work with his daily occupation as Clerk of Session and Sheriff-Depute of Selkirkshire. A prominent member of the Tory establishment in Edinburgh, Scott was an active member of the Highland Society and served a long term as President of the Royal Society of Edinburgh.

— Freebase

Charade

Charade

Charade is a 1963 American romantic comedy/mystery film directed by Stanley Donen, written by Peter Stone and Marc Behm, and starring Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn. The movie also features Walter Matthau, James Coburn, George Kennedy, Dominique Minot, Ned Glass, and Jacques Marin. It spans three genres: suspense thriller, romance and comedy. Because Universal Pictures published the movie with an invalid copyright notice, the film entered the public domain in the United States immediately upon its release. The film is notable for its screenplay, especially the repartee between Grant and Hepburn, for having been filmed on location in Paris, for Henry Mancini's score and theme song, and for the animated titles by Maurice Binder. Charade has received generally positive reviews from critics, and was additionally noted to contain influences of genres such as whodunit, screwball and spy thriller; it has also been referred to as "the best Hitchcock movie that Hitchcock never made."

— Freebase

Red Heat

Red Heat

Red Heat is a 1988 buddy cop film directed by Walter Hill. The film stars Arnold Schwarzenegger, as Moscow narc Ivan Danko, and James Belushi, as Chicago detective Art Ridzik. Finding themselves on the same case, Danko and Ridzik work as partners to catch a cunning and deadly Soviet Georgian drug kingpin, Viktor Rostavili, who also happens to be the killer of Danko's previous partner back in Soviet Russia. The film was released with the tagline "Moscow's toughest detective. Chicago's craziest cop. There's only one thing more dangerous than making them mad: making them partners." It was the first American film given permission to shoot in Moscow's Red Square - however, most of the scenes set in the USSR were actually shot in Hungary. Schwarzenegger was paid a salary of $8 million for his role in the film. It has found a cult audience amongst fluent Russian speakers because of the movie's weak portrayal of the Russian language and stereotypes.

— Freebase

To the Left

To the Left

To the Left was a social-democratic and democratic-socialist faction within the Democratic Party, a centre-left political party in Italy. It was founded as an electoral list for the election for the Constituent Assembly of the Democratic Party of 14 October 2007, comprising Livia Turco, Furio Colombo, Peppino Caldarola, the Democrats, Laicists, Socialists, Say Left and some Liberal Socialists. The list, which was present in only 15 constituencies out of 29, scored 7.7% in the election, electing more than 300 delegates to the Assembly. Its strongholds are the cities and especially Turin and Rome. On 5 July 2008 the three groups cited before plus Left for the Country, a group of splinters from Democratic Left and the Party of Italian Communists, merged into the faction, which became a united social-democratic and democratic-socialist faction within the Democratic Party. The members of To the Left included both supporters of Walter Veltroni, notably Vincenzo Vita, and supporters of Massimo D'Alema, including Livia Turco, who is also an active member of Reformists and Democrats.

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Dandie Dinmont Terrier

Dandie Dinmont Terrier

A Dandie Dinmont Terrier is a small Scottish breed of dog in the terrier family. The breed has a very long body, short legs, and a distinctive "top-knot" of hair on the head. A character in Sir Walter Scott's novel Guy Mannering has lent the name to the breed, with "Dandie Dinmont" thought to be based on James Davidson, who is credited as being the "father" of the modern breed. Davidson's dogs descended from earlier terrier owning families, including the Allans of Holystone, Northumberland. There are three breed clubs in the UK supporting the breed, although it is registered as a Vulnerable Native Breed by the Kennel Club due to its low number of puppy registrations on a yearly basis. The breed is friendly, but tough and is suitable for interaction with older children. There are no breed specific health concerns, but they can be affected by spinal issues due to their elongated body and the breed is affected by canine cancer at a higher than average rate.

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William Wyler

William Wyler

William Wyler was an American film director, producer and screenwriter. Notable works included Ben-Hur, The Best Years of Our Lives, and Mrs. Miniver, all of which won Wyler Academy Awards for Best Director, as well as Best Picture in their respective years. Wyler won his first Oscar nomination for directing Dodsworth in 1936, starring Walter Huston, Ruth Chatterton and Mary Astor, "sparking a 20-year run of almost unbroken greatness." Film historian Ian Freer calls Wyler a "bona fide perfectionist", whose penchant for retakes and an attempt to hone every last nuance, "became the stuff of legend." His ability to direct a string of classic literary adaptations into huge box-office and critical successes made him one of "Hollywood's most bankable moviemakers" during the 1930s and 1940s. Other popular Wyler films include Funny Girl, How to Steal a Million, The Children's Hour, The Big Country, Roman Holiday, The Heiress, The Letter, The Westerner, Wuthering Heights, Jezebel, Dodsworth, and Hell's Heroes.

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Power pitcher

Power pitcher

In baseball, a power pitcher is a pitcher who relies on the velocity of his pitches, sometimes at the expense of accuracy. Power pitchers usually record a high number of strikeouts and statistics such as strikeouts per 9 innings pitched are common measures of power. An average pitcher strikes out about 5 batters per nine innings while a power pitcher will often strike out one or more every inning. The prototypical power pitcher is National Baseball Hall of Fame member, Nolan Ryan, who struck out a Major League Baseball record 5,714 batters in 5,386 innings. Ryan recorded seven no-hitters, appeared in eight Major League Baseball All-Star Games but also holds the record for most walks issued. Other prominent power pitchers include Hall of Famers Walter Johnson, Bob Gibson, Sandy Koufax, and Bob Feller who led his league in strikeouts and walks several times. The traditional school of thought on power pitching was "throw till you blow" but multimillion-dollar contracts have changed mentalities. The number of pitches thrown is now counted by a team's staff, with particular attention paid to young power arms.

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Manorialism

Manorialism

Manorialism, an essential element of feudal society, was the organizing principle of rural economy that originated in the villa system of the Late Roman Empire, was widely practiced in medieval western and parts of central Europe, and was slowly replaced by the advent of a money-based market economy and new forms of agrarian contract. Manorialism was characterized by the vesting of legal and economic power in a Lord of the Manor, supported economically from his own direct landholding in a manor, and from the obligatory contributions of a legally subject part of the peasant population under the jurisdiction of himself and his manorial court. These obligations could be payable in several ways, in labor, in kind, or, on rare occasions, in coin. In examining the origins of the monastic cloister, Walter Horn found that "as a manorial entity the Carolingian monastery ... differed little from the fabric of a feudal estate, save that the corporate community of men for whose sustenance this organization was maintained consisted of monks who served God in chant and spent much of their time in reading and writing."

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Citrus japonica 'Japonica'

Citrus japonica 'Japonica'

Citrus japonica 'Japonica' is a species of Kumquat. It is an evergreen tree. It produces edible golden-yellow colored fruit. The fruit is small and usually round but can be oval shaped. The peel has a sweet flavor but the fruit has a sour center. The fruit can be eaten raw and but mainly used to make marmalade and jelly. It is grown as an ornamental plant and can be used in bonsai. This plant is symbolized as good luck and are presented during the Chinese new year. It's more commonly cultivated than most other kumquats as it is cold tolerant. It can be kept as a houseplant. Carl Peter Thunberg originally classified the kumquats as members of the citrus genus in 1784 in his book Flora Japonica. They were moved to a new genus, Fortunella, in 1915 by Walter T. Swingle in honor of Robert Fortune. In accordance with the 1994 Tokyo Code of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, the genus name reverted to Citrus.

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Karrada

Karrada

Karrada is a major affluent district of the city Baghdad, Iraq. It is of a mixed population but has a Shia majority. There are also Christians. It is considered one of the most integrated areas of the city since its residences in general have roots in the area. Karrada as a land is part of a peninsula created by the Tigris river significant turn, which gives this part of the city a remarkable character. The area has the river running on both sides. Although the peninsula created by the river is not all Karrada, the latter represents the major portion of it. The other significant part of the peninsula, though not as big as Karrada, is Al-Jadriya. It is a small district which lies at the south tip of the peninsula where Tigris river makes its major turn and heads to the north-east. Its significance comes from the quality of life style of the neighborhood. The real estate is the most expensive of all Baghdad. The design and the building of the University of Baghdad Campus in 1958 in this area added to its value since this project had become one of the important cultural centers of the city. The University of Baghdad campus was designed by Walter Gropius, AIA, Louis Mcmillen and Robert McMillan of The Architects Collaborative.

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Skaw

Skaw

Skaw is a tiny settlement on the Shetland island of Unst. It is located north of Haroldswick on a peninsula in the northeast corner of the island, and is the most northerly settlement in the United Kingdom. The burn of Skaw flows from the uplands to the west through the constellation of small crofts that make up Skaw, and then east into the Wick of Skaw, a bay of the North Sea. A sheltered sandy beach lines the coast of the Wick of Skaw. During World War II, the Royal Air Force built a Chain Home radar station at Skaw. A combined Coastal Defence U-Boat and Chain Home Low station was also built at Saxa Vord; after the war this became a ROTOR radar station. RAF Saxa Vord continued as a radar station after the end of the ROTOR programme. The unclassified road from the B9087 to Skaw is the most northerly road in the UK road network. Walter Sutherland, a former inhabitant of the northernmost cottage in the UK, was reportedly the last native speaker of the Norn language.

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Churches of Christ

Churches of Christ

Churches of Christ are autonomous Christian congregations associated with one another through common beliefs and practices. They seek to base doctrine and practice on the Bible alone, and see themselves as restoring the New Testament church established by Christ. Historically, Churches of Christ in the United States have roots in the American Restoration Movement, and were recognized as a distinct religious group by the U.S. Religious Census of 1906. Prior to that all congregations associated with the Restoration Movement had been reported together by the Census Bureau. The Restoration Movement began on the American frontier during the Second Great Awakening of the early 19th century under the leadership of Thomas and Alexander Campbell, Walter Scott, and Barton W. Stone. Those leaders had declared their independence from their Presbyterian roots, seeking a fresh start to restore the New Testament church, and abandoning creeds. They did not see themselves as establishing a new church. Rather, the movement sought the restoration of the church and "the unification of all Christians in a single body patterned after the church of the New Testament." The names "Church of Christ," "Christian Church" and "Disciples of Christ" were adopted by the movement because they believed these terms to be biblical.

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International Style

International Style

The International Style is a major architectural style that emerged in the 1920s and 1930s, the formative decades of Modern architecture. The term originated from the name of a book by Henry-Russell Hitchcock and Philip Johnson, The International Style, that identified, categorized and expanded upon characteristics common to Modernism across the world and its stylistic aspects. The authors identified three principles: the expression of volume rather than mass, the emphasis on balance rather than preconceived symmetry, and the expulsion of applied ornament. The aim of Hitchcock and Johnson was to define a style that would encapsulate this modern architecture, doing this by the inclusion of specific architects. The book was written to record the International Exhibition of Modern Architecture held at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City in 1932. All the works in the exhibition were carefully selected, only displaying those that strictly followed these rules. Previous uses of the term in the same context can be attributed to Walter Gropius in Internationale Architektur, and Ludwig Hilberseimer in Internationale neue Baukunst.

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Dryasdust

Dryasdust

Dryasdust was an imaginary and tediously thorough literary authority cited by Sir Walter Scott to present background information in his novels; thereafter, a derisory term for anyone who presents historical facts with no feeling for the personalities involved. “Dryasdust” is mentioned in a whole introductory chapter of Thomas Carlyle’s Oliver Cromwell's Letters and Speeches, this chapter being entitled “Anti-Dryasdust.” It is continually referenced, as Carlyle depicts history being surrendered to Dryasdust. "To Dryasdust, who wishes merely to compile torpedo Histories of the philosophical or other sorts, and gain immortal laurels for himself by writing about it and about it, all this is sport; but to us who struggle piously, passionately, to behold, but in glimpses, the faces of our vanished Fathers, it is death! - Oh, Dryasdust, my voluminous friend, had Human Stupidity continued in the diligent state, think you it might have ever come to this? Surely at least you might have made an Index for these huge books!"

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Xyris

Xyris

Xyris is the botanical name of a genus of flowering plants in the Yellow-eyed-grass family. The genus counts over two hundred fifty species, with the center of distribution in the Guianas. The leaves are mostly distichous, linear, flat and thin or round with a conspicuous sheath at the base. They are arranged in a basal aggregation. The small, yellow flowers are dioecious, borne on a spherical or cylindrical spike or head. Each flower grows from the axil of a leathery bract. The fruit is a non-fleshy, dehiscent capsule. In Xyris complanata a single flower bud on the spike appears in the morning, and expands into a conspicuous flower during the afternoon hours. The APG II system, of 2003, places the genus in family Xyridaceae, into the order Poales in the clade commelinids, in the monocots. Species include: ⁕Xyris andina Malme ⁕Xyris ambigua Beyrich ex Kunth ⁕Xyris baldwiniana Schultes ⁕Xyris brevifolia Michaux ⁕Xyris caroliniana Walter ⁕Xyris complanata R.Br. ⁕Xyris difformis Chapman ⁕Xyris drummondii Malme ⁕Xyris elliottii Chapman ⁕Xyris elongata Rudge ⁕Xyris exilis Doust & B.J.Conn ⁕Xyris fimbriata Elliott ⁕Xyris flabelliformis Chapman ⁕Xyris flexifolia R.Br.

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Terminism

Terminism

Terminism is the Christian doctrine that there is a time limit for repentance from sin, after which God no longer wills the conversion and salvation of that person. This limit is asserted to be known to God alone, making conversion urgent. Among pietists such as Quakers, terminism permitted the co-existence, over the span of a human life, of human free will and God's sovereignty. Terminism is also mentioned in Max Weber's famous sociological work The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. "[Terminism] assumes that grace is offered to all men, but for everyone either once at a definite moment in his life or at some moment for the last time". Weber offers in the same paragraph that terminism is "generally attributed to Pietism by its opponents." Terminism is defined by rhetorician Walter J. Ong, who links it to nominalism, as "a concomitant of the highly quantified formal logic of medieval scholastic philosophy, and thus contrasts with theology which had closer connections with metaphysics and special commitments to rhetoric".

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Merry Men

Merry Men

The Merry Men are the group of outlaws who follow Robin Hood in English literature and folklore. The band appears in the earliest ballads about Robin Hood and remain popular in modern adaptations. The early ballads give specific names to only three companions: Little John, Much the Miller's Son, and William Scarlock or Scathelock, the Will Scarlet of later traditions. Joining them are between 20 and "seven score" outlawed yeomen. The most prominent of the Merry Men is Robin's second-in-command, Little John. He appears in the earliest ballads, and is mentioned in even earlier sources, such as Andrew of Wyntoun's Orygynale Chronicle of around 1420 and Walter Bower's expansion of the Scotichronicon, completed around 1440. Later ballads name additional Merry Men, some of whom appear in only one or two ballads, while others, like the minstrel Alan-a-Dale and the jovial Friar Tuck, became fully attached to the legend. Several of the Robin Hood ballads tell the story of how individual Merry Men join the group; this is frequently accomplished by defeating Robin in a duel.

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