Definitions containing e-book

We've found 250 definitions:

Book

Book

book, n. a collection of sheets of paper bound together, either printed, written on, or blank: a literary composition: a division of a volume or subject: the Bible: a betting-book, or record of bets made with different people: (fig.) any source of instruction: the libretto of an opera, &c.: (pl.) formal accounts of transactions, as minutes of meetings, records kept of his business by a merchant.—v.t. to write in a book.—ns. Book′-account′, an account of debt or credit in a book; Book′binder, one who binds books; Book′binding, the art or practice of binding or putting the boards on books; Book′-case, a case with shelves for books; Book′-club, an association of persons who buy new books for circulation among themselves; Book′-debt, a debt for articles charged by the seller in his book-account.—adj. Book′ful, full of information gathered from books.—ns. Book′-hold′er, one who holds the book of the play and prompts the actor in the theatre; Book′-hunt′er, one who rejoices in discovering rare books; Book′ing-of′fice, an office where names are booked or tickets are taken.—adj. Book′ish, fond of books: acquainted only with books.—ns. Book′ishness; Book′-keep′ing, the art of keeping accounts in a regular and systematic manner; Book′-land, land taken from the folcland or common land, and granted by bóc or written charter to a private owner; Book′-learn′ing, learning got from books, as opposed to practical knowledge.—adj. Book′less, without books, unlearned.—ns. Book′let, a small book; Book′-mak′er, one who makes up books from the writings of others, a compiler: one who makes a system of bets in such a way that the gains must exceed the losses, entering them in a memorandum book; Book′-mak′ing, the art or practice of compiling books from the writings of others: compilation: systematic betting; Book′-man, a scholar, student; Book′-mark, something placed in a book to mark a particular page or passage; Book′-mate (Shak.), a mate or companion in the study of books: a schoolfellow; Book′-mus′lin, muslin used in bookbinding; Book′-oath (Shak.), an oath made on the Book or Bible; Book′plate, a label usually pasted inside the cover of a book, bearing the owner's name, crest, coat-of-arms, or peculiar device; Book′-post, the department in the Post-office for the transmission of books; Book′seller, one who sells books; Book′selling; Book′shelf, a shelf on which books are placed; Book′shop, a shop where books are sold; Book′-stall, a stall or stand, generally in the open air, where books are sold; Book′-stand, a book-stall: a stand or support for holding up a book when rea

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Livrada

Livrada

Making e-book gifting personalLivrada was founded to make e-book gifting more personal. For centuries, people have given books to each other. Books are the perfect gift; meaningful and personal, a book reflects the thought that the gift-giver put into the purchase.We created Livrada title-based e-book gift cards (US Patent pending) to recapture this experience. We want to reintroduce a personal touch into the world of digital media, starting with e-books.What is a Livrada e-book card?A Livrada e-book card is a (physical) gift card, sold at retail, that represents a specific e-book title (e.g., The Adventures of Tom Sawyer ). Each card is beautifully designed with the book cover art and also includes a description, much like a traditional book jacket. The card allows the holder to redeem and download the specific e-book onto their e-reader device. At launch, this includes all Kindle and NOOK devices. The plan is to expand to other e-readers soon.The CompanyLivrada, Inc., based in Southern California, was formed in January 2012 by an experienced team of entrepreneurs with deep business and technology backgrounds.Our team consists of experienced executives from the digital media, wireless, pre-paid, payments, and e-commerce industries. We've spent time at world-class companies like Virgin Mobile USA, Warner Music Group, McKinsey & Co., Deloitte, and Lexis-Nexis, as well as a number of scrappy start-ups.We are lovers of technology who happen to believe that the off-line "real world" offers experiences that cannot be replicated in digital. We think Livrada e-book gift cards are a great way to start.

— CrunchBase

Scannx

Scannx

Scannx is a leading software developer of next generation, cloud-based document capture and delivery services that can be integrated with PCs and third-party document capture devices such as scanners, multifunction printers, smartphones and tablets. Applications include book scanning, network scanning, and mobile scanning solutions in the document management industry. Scannx has also entered into a Xerox Trademark Licensing Agreement to develop, market and support a new line of Xerox-branded, self-service book scanning kiosks for library patrons and staff.The Scannx Book ScanCenter family of products feature the industry's first cloud-based, touchscreen scanning technology integrated with an 11″x 17″ book-edge flatbed scanner with glass that comes to the beveled edge of the scanner. This patented book-edge design allows books to lay flat on each page, eliminating the blackened areas of text resulting from the page curvature at the book spine. As a result, the scan produces clearly readable text across the entire page. The book itself is also protected from damage to its spine, thereby reducing repair and replacement costs. In addition to scanning automatically to USB, email, printer or Google Docs, the Scannx Book ScanCenter product line is the first company to offer book scanning-to-fax, to smartphone and to tablets.

— CrunchBase

reading copy

reading copy

A used book, that may include highlighting or marginalia, and is suitable for reading, but is usually not collectible. This is a term used in the used book business, to indicate the lack of collectible value, while claiming that the book is in sufficiently good condition for a purchaser whose interest is primarily in actually reading the book. A reading copy is typically less expensive than a collectible copy.

— Wiktionary

Book token

Book token

A Book Token is a brand of gift voucher redeemable in hundreds of participating bookshops as an alternative to cash. The term Book Token was first coined the 1920s by Harold Raymond, an English publisher who noticed that for Christmas his friends had received a collective total of only three books out of 119 total gifts. He felt that some sort of coupon could be used to take the risk out of book gift giving and invented the "Book Token". The Book Token was launched in 1932 and soon after, Book Tokens Ltd was established as the sole issuer of Book Tokens in the UK. Book Tokens have now grown into one of the largest multi-retail gift cards in the UK and Ireland and were renamed "National Book Tokens" in 2000, the year the token was also sold online for the first time by firstbookshop.com. Book Tokens in the UK and Ireland are run by Book Tokens Ltd. National book voucher schemes also run in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, the Netherlands and Norway.

— Freebase

Kitab

Kitab

Kitab is the Arabic word for book. The word is also used in the Persian, Hindi, Nepali, Azerbaijani, Kazakh, Punjabi, Urdu, Assamese, Swahili, Tatar, Kyrgyz and Turkish languages and in some contexts in Greek. The word is also related to the Hebrew word for written. It is part of titles of many Arabic language books. Some prominent examples are: ⁕Al-Kitab - a reference to itself in Qur'an, also called "Kitabullah", The book of God. In Indonesian the word refers to the Bible. ⁕Kitab al-Aghani - The Book of Songs ⁕Kitab al-Buldan - Book of Lands ⁕Kitab al-Hiyal - The Book of Ingenious Devices ⁕Kitab al Majmu - Book of the Sum Total ⁕Kitab Ash-Shifa bi ta'rif huquq al-Mustafa - Healing by the recognition of the Rights of the Chosen one ⁕Kitab al-Musiqi al-Kabir - Great Book of Music ⁕Kitab al-Tabikh - The Book of Dishes ⁕Kitáb-i-Aqdas - Most Holy Book, the central book of the Bahá'í Faith. ⁕Kitáb-i-Íqán - Book of Certitude regarded as Bahá'u'lláh's primary theological work. ⁕Kitab al Khazari - Book of the Khazars, Dialogues between the Khazar King and a religious sage, originally written in Arabic in Medieval Spain, but since translated into Hebrew and English, perhaps incorrectly so. The original Arabic version has been lost, and therefore there is no way to validate the accuracy of the Hebrew translation, which occurred 700 years after the work was originally written in Arabic.

— Freebase

Used book

Used book

A used book or secondhand book is a book which has been owned before by an owner other than the publisher or retailer, usually by an individual or library. Used books typically become available on the market when they are sold or given to a second-hand shop or used bookstore; they are usually sold for about half or three-quarters the price of what they were originally bought for, though rare books and others still in demand or hard to obtain might sell for more than their original price. Some new book shops also carry used books, and some used book shops also sell new books. Though the original authors or publishers will not benefit financially from the sale of a used book, it helps to keep old books in circulation. Sometimes very old, rare, first edition, antique, or simply out of print books can be found as used books in used book shops. A reading copy of a book may be well-used, may include highlighting or marginalia, and is suitable for reading, but is not collectible. This is a term used in the used book business, to indicate the lack of collectible value, while claiming that the book is in sufficiently good condition for a purchaser whose interest is primarily in actually reading the book. A reading copy is typically less expensive than a collectible copy.

— Freebase

Greenleaf Book Group

Greenleaf Book Group

Greenleaf Book Group is a publisher and distributor that specializes in the development of independent authors and the growth of small presses. Their publishing model was designed to support the independent author and to make it possible for writers to retain the rights to their work and still compete with the major publishing houses. They have six imprints under the Greenleaf Book Group umbrella: Greenleaf Book Group Press, Emerald Book Company, Live Oak Book Company, Olive Tree Book Company, Inc. 500 Press, and Legacy Book Company.

— CrunchBase

Read

Read

rēd, v.t. to utter aloud written or printed words: to peruse: to comprehend: to study, as to read law, science: to teach: to make out, from signs: to solve, as to read a dream: to interpret: to understand, as reading the stars: to note the indication of, as to read a barometer: impute by inference, as to read a meaning into a book.—v.i. to perform the act of reading: to practise much reading: to appear on reading: to advise: to speak: to acquire information: to utter the words of a book: (mus.) to render music at first sight: to put a certain expression upon it: to be suitable for perusal:—pa.t. and pa.p. read (red).—n. Read, a reading, perusal: (Spens.) counsel, a saying, an interpretation.—adj Read (red), versed in books: learned.—ns. Readabil′ity, Read′ableness.—adj Readable (rēd′a-bl), that may be read: worth reading: interesting: enabling to read.—adv. Read′ably.—ns. Read′er, one who reads: one whose office it is to read prayers in a church, or lectures in a university, &c.: one who reads or corrects proofs: one who reads much: a reading-book; Read′ership, the office of a reader.—adj. Read′ing, addicted to reading.—n. act of reading: perusal: study of books: public or formal recital: the way in which a passage reads: an interpretation of a passage or work: a version: noting an instrument, as the reading of a barometer.—ns. Read′ing-book, a book of exercises in reading; Read′ing-boy (print.), a reader's assistant; Read′ing-desk, a desk for holding a book or paper while it is read: a church-lectern; Read′ing-lamp, a form of lamp for use in reading; Read′ing-room, a room with papers, periodicals, &c., resorted to for reading.—Read between the lines, to detect a meaning not expressed; Read one's self in, in the Church of England, to read the Thirty-nine Articles and repeat the declaration of assent prescribed by law to a new incumbent.—Penny reading, an entertainment consisting of readings, &c., to which the admission is a penny. [A.S. rǽdan, to discern, read—rǽd, counsel; Ger. rathen, to advise.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Book review

Book review

A book review is a form of literary criticism in which a book is analyzed based on content, style, and merit. A book review can be a primary source opinion piece, summary review or scholarly review. Books can be reviewed for printed periodicals, magazines and newspapers, as school work, or for book web sites on the internet. A book review's length may vary from a single paragraph to a substantial essay. Such a review may evaluate the book on the basis of personal taste. Reviewers may use the occasion of a book review for a display of learning or to promulgate their own ideas on the topic of a fiction or non-fiction work. There are many special journals devoted to book reviews and they are indexed in special databases such as Book Review Index, and Kirkus Reviews but many more book reviews can be found in newspaper databases and in scholarly databases such as Arts and Humanities Citation Index, Social Sciences Citation Index and discipline-specific databases.

— Freebase

Book discussion club

Book discussion club

A book discussion club is a group of people who meet to discuss a book or books that they have read and express their opinions, likes, dislikes, etc. It is more often called simply a book club, a term that is also used to describe a book sales club, which can cause confusion. Other frequently used terms to describe a book discussion club include reading group, book group, and book discussion group. Book discussion clubs may meet in private homes, libraries, bookstores, online forums, pubs, and in cafes or restaurants over meals or drinks. A practice also associated with book discussion, common reading program or common read, involves institutions encouraging their members to discuss select books in group settings; common reading programs are largely associated with educational institutions encouraging their students to hold book discussion meetings.

— Freebase

Covercake

Covercake

CoverCake is a Silicon Valley startup company that specializes in vertically-driven social media monitoring and analytics software. CoverCake has designed turn-key analytics engines, dashboards and API’s that are redefining expectations and vision for what is possible in the book industry. CoverCake’s book business vertical solutions are also giving book retailers unprecedented tools to leverage social media for their customers. CoverCake book discovery mobile apps are available on the iPad, iPhone, and Android platforms. CoverCake was founded by a few Silicon Valley pioneers who are very passionate about bringing innovative change in the book industry.In addition to groundbreaking social analytics capability, CoverCake has valuable data on books that have been featured in the media each year. CoverCake has extensive catalogs of books featured in broadcast media - be it TV shows, radio programs or even blogs. Users can access this information via the website, iPad application and now an Android application. With the amount of e-book readers hitting the market, it’s important to have efficient discovery mechanisms that will enable users to find the books they are looking for, and maintain an awareness of books that are no longer being featured in broadcast media.

— CrunchBase

Book of Malachi

Book of Malachi

Malachi is a book of the Hebrew Bible, the last of the twelve minor prophets and the final book of the Neviim. In the Christian ordering, the grouping of the Prophetic Books is the last section of the Old Testament, making Malachi the last book before the New Testament. The book is commonly attributed to a prophet by the name of Malachi. Although the appellation Malachi has frequently been understood as a proper name, its Hebrew meaning is simply "My [i.e., God's] messenger" and may not be the author's name at all. The sobriquet occurs in the superscription at 1:1 and in 3:1, although it is highly unlikely that the word refers to the same character in both of these references. Thus, there is substantial debate regarding the identity of the book's author. One of the Targums identifies Ezra as the author of Malachi. St. Jerome suggests this may be because Ezra is seen as an intermediary between the prophets and the 'great synagogue'. There is, however, no historical evidence yet to support this claim. Some scholars note affinities between Zechariah 9-14 and the book of Malachi. Zechariah 9, Zechariah 12, and Malachi 1 are all introduced as The word of Elohim. Many scholars argue that this collection originally consisted of three independent and anonymous prophecies, two of which were subsequently appended to the book of Zechariah with the third becoming the book of Malachi. As a result, most scholars consider the book of Malachi to be the work of a single author who may or may not have been identified by the title Malachi. The present division of the oracles results in a total of twelve books of minor prophets—a number parallelling the sons of Jacob who became the heads of the twelve tribes of Israel. The Catholic Encyclopedia asserts that "We are no doubt in presence of an abbreviation of the name Mál'akhîyah, that is Messenger of Elohim.

— Freebase

Book of the Dead

Book of the Dead

The Book of the Dead is an ancient Egyptian funerary text, used from the beginning of the New Kingdom to around 50 BCE. The original Egyptian name for the text, transliterated rw nw prt m hrw is translated as "Book of Coming Forth by Day". Another translation would be "Book of emerging forth into the Light". The text consists of a number of magic spells intended to assist a dead person's journey through the Duat, or underworld, and into the afterlife. The Book of the Dead was part of a tradition of funerary texts which includes the earlier Pyramid Texts and Coffin Texts, which were painted onto objects, not papyrus. Some of the spells included were drawn from these older works and date to the 3rd millennium BCE. Other spells were composed later in Egyptian history, dating to the Third Intermediate Period. A number of the spells which made up the Book continued to be inscribed on tomb walls and sarcophagi, as had always been the spells from which they originated. The Book of the Dead was placed in the coffin or burial chamber of the deceased. There was no single or canonical Book of the Dead. The surviving papyri contain a varying selection of religious and magical texts and vary considerably in their illustration. Some people seem to have commissioned their own copies of the Book of the Dead, perhaps choosing the spells they thought most vital in their own progression to the afterlife. The Book of the Dead was most commonly written in hieroglyphic or hieratic script on a papyrus scroll, and often illustrated with vignettes depicting the deceased and their journey into the afterlife.

— Freebase

backbone

spine, backbone

the part of a book's cover that encloses the inner side of the book's pages and that faces outward when the book is shelved

— Princeton's WordNet

spine

spine, backbone

the part of a book's cover that encloses the inner side of the book's pages and that faces outward when the book is shelved

— Princeton's WordNet

Pocket

Pocket

pok′et, n. a little pouch or bag, esp. one attached to a dress or to a billiard table: any cavity in which anything can lie: in mining, an irregular cavity filled with veinstone and ore: money, as being carried in the pocket: a bag of wool, &c., containing about 168 lb.—v.t. to put in the pocket: to take stealthily: to conceal:—pr.p. pock′eting; pa.t. and pa.p. pock′eted.ns. Pock′et-book, a note-book: a book for holding papers or money carried in the pocket: a book for frequent perusal, to be carried in the pocket; Pock′et-bor′ough (see Borough); Pock′et-cloth, a pocket-handkerchief; Pock′etful, as much as a pocket will hold; Pock′et-glass, a small looking-glass for the pocket; Pock′et-hand′kerchief, a handkerchief carried in the pocket; Pock′et-hole, the opening into a pocket; Pock′et-knife, a knife with one or more blades folding into the handle for carrying in the pocket; Pock′et-mon′ey, money carried for occasional expenses; Pock′et-pick′ing, act or practice of picking the pocket; Pock′et-pis′tol, a pistol carried in the pocket: a small travelling flask for liquor.—Pocket an insult, affront, &c., to submit to or put up with it; Pocket edition, a small portable edition of a standard book.—In pocket, in possession of money; Out of pocket, to lose money by a transaction; Pick a person's pocket, to steal from his pocket. [Fr. pochette, dim. of poche, pouch.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Title

Title

tī′tl, n. an inscription set over or at the beginning of a thing by which it is known, a title-page: a name of distinction: that which gives a just right to possession: ownership: the writing that proves a right: (B.) a sign: a fixed sphere of work required as a condition for ordination, a parish in Rome—of these fifty give titles to cardinal-priests: in bookbinding, the panel on the back on which the name of the book is printed.—adj. Tī′tled, having a title.—ns. Tī′tle-deed, a deed or document that proves a title or just right to exclusive possession; Tī′tle-leaf, the leaf on which is the title of a book.—adj. Tī′tleless (Shak.), wanting a title or name.—ns. Tī′tle-page, the page of a book containing its title and usually the author's name; Tī′tle-rôle, the part in a play which gives its name to it, as 'Macbeth;' Tī′tle-sheet, the first sheet of a book as printed, containing title, bastard-title, &c.; Tī′tling, the act of impressing the title on the back of a book; Tī′tlonym, a title taken as a pseudonym; Bas′tard-tī′tle (see Bastard). [O. Fr. title (Fr. titre)—L. titulus.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

book titles

book titles

There is a tradition in hackerdom of informally tagging important textbooks and standards documents with the dominant color of their covers or with some other conspicuous feature of the cover. Many of these are described in this lexicon under their own entries. See Aluminum Book, Camel Book, Cinderella Book, daemon book, Dragon Book, Orange Book, Purple Book, Wizard Book, and bible; see also rainbow series. Since about 1993 this tradition has gotten a boost from the popular O'Reilly and Associates line of technical books, which usually feature some kind of exotic animal on the cover and are often called by the name of that animal.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Bible

Bible

the Book by way of eminence, -- that is, the book which is made up of the writings accepted by Christians as of divine origin and authority, whether such writings be in the original language, or translated; the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments; -- sometimes in a restricted sense, the Old Testament; as, King James's Bible; Douay Bible; Luther's Bible. Also, the book which is made up of writings similarly accepted by the Jews; as, a rabbinical Bible

— Webster Dictionary

Bookmaker

Bookmaker

a betting man who "makes a book." See To make a book, under Book, n

— Webster Dictionary

Chapbook

Chapbook

any small book carried about for sale by chapmen or hawkers. Hence, any small book; a toy book

— Webster Dictionary

Reader

Reader

a book containing a selection of extracts for exercises in reading; an elementary book for practice in a language; a reading book

— Webster Dictionary

Supergirl

Supergirl

Supergirl is a female counterpart to Superman. As his cousin, she shares his super powers and vulnerability to Kryptonite. She was created by writer Otto Binder and designed by artist Al Plastino in 1959. She first appeared in the Action Comics comic book series and later branched out into animation, film, television, and merchandising. In May 2011, Supergirl placed 94th on IGN's list of the Top 100 Comic Book Heroes of All Time. Supergirl plays a supporting role in various DC Comics publications, including Action Comics, Superman, and several comic book series unrelated to Superman. In 1969, Supergirl's adventures became the lead feature in Adventure Comics, and she later starred in an eponymous comic book series which debuted in 1972 and ran until 1974, followed by a second monthly comic book series titled The Daring New Adventures of Supergirl, which ran from 1982 to 1984. Supergirl dies in the 1985 limited series Crisis on Infinite Earths, and DC Comics subsequently rebooted the continuity of the DC Comics Universe, reestablishing Superman's character as the sole survivor of Krypton's destruction. Following the conclusion of Crisis on Infinite Earths, several different characters written as having no familial relationship to Superman have assumed the role of Supergirl, including Matrix, Linda Danvers, and Cir-El. Following the cancellation of the third Supergirl comic book series, starring the Linda Danvers version of the character, a modern version of Kara Zor-El was reintroduced into the DC Comics continuity in issue #8 of the Superman/Batman comic book series titled "The Supergirl from Krypton". The modern Kara Zor-El stars as Supergirl in an eponymous comic book series, in addition to playing a supporting role in various other DC Comics publications.

— Freebase

Book of Mormon

Book of Mormon

The Book of Mormon is a sacred text of the Latter Day Saint movement, which adherents believe contains writings of ancient prophets who lived on the American continent from approximately 2200 BC to AD 421. It was first published in March 1830 by Joseph Smith as The Book of Mormon: An Account Written by the Hand of Mormon upon Plates Taken from the Plates of Nephi. According to Smith's account, and also according to the book's narrative, the Book of Mormon was originally written in otherwise unknown characters referred to as "reformed Egyptian" engraved on golden plates. Smith claimed that the last prophet to contribute to the book, a man named Moroni, buried it in a hill in present-day New York and then returned to earth in 1827 as an angel, revealing the location of the book to Smith and instructing him to translate it as evidence of the restoration of Christ's true church in the latter days. The Book of Mormon has a number of original and distinctive doctrinal discussions on subjects such as the fall of Adam and Eve, the nature of the Atonement, eschatology, redemption from physical and spiritual death, and the organization of the latter-day church. The pivotal event of the book is an appearance of Jesus Christ to the Americas shortly after his resurrection.

— Freebase

Book of Ruth

Book of Ruth

The Book of Ruth is a book of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. In the Jewish canon it is included in the third division, or the Writings; in the Christian canon it is treated as a history book and placed between Judges and 1 Samuel. It is named after its central figure, Ruth the Moabitess, the great-grandmother of David, and, according to the Gospel of Matthew, an ancestress of Jesus. The book tells of Ruth's accepting the God of the Israelites as her God and the Israelite people as her own. In Ruth 1:16 and 17 Ruth tells Naomi, her Israelite mother in law, "Where you go I will go, and where you stay I will stay. Your people will be my people and your God my God. Where you die I will die, and there I will be buried. May the Lord deal with me, be it ever so severely, if even death separates you and me." The book is held in esteem by Jews who fall under the category of Jews-by-choice, as is evidenced by the considerable presence of Boaz in rabbinic literature. As well, the "Book of Ruth" functions liturgically, being read during the Jewish holiday of Shavuot. The book is traditionally ascribed to the prophet Samuel, but does not name its author. A date during the monarchy is suggested by the book's interest in the ancestry of David, but Ruth's identity as a non-Israelite and the stress on the need for an inclusive attitude towards foreigners suggest an origin in the 5th century BCE, when intermarriage had become controversial.

— Freebase

Blue Book

Blue Book

Blue Book was a popular 20th-century American magazine with a lengthy 70-year run under various titles from 1905 to 1975. It was a sibling magazine to Redbook. Launched as The Monthly Story Magazine, it was published under that title from May 1905 to August 1906 with a change to The Monthly Story Blue Book Magazine for issues from September 1906 to April 1907. In its early days, Blue Book also carried a supplement on theatre actors called "Stageland". The magazine was aimed at both male and female readers. For the next 45 years, it was known as The Blue Book Magazine, Blue Book Magazine, Blue Book, and Blue Book of Fiction and Adventure. The title was shortened with the February 1952 issue to simply Bluebook, continuing until May 1956. With a more exploitative angle, the magazine was revived with an October 1960 issue as Bluebook for Men, and the title again became Bluebook for the final run from 1967 to 1975. In its 1920s heyday, Blue Book was regarded as one of the "Big Four" pulp magazines, along with Adventure, Argosy and Short Stories.

— Freebase

Pornified

Pornified

Pornified: How Pornography Is Damaging Our Lives, Our Relationships, and Our Families is a 2005 book by American writer Pamela Paul, discussing the impact of ready access to pornography on Americans. The book was selected as one of the best books of 2005 by The San Francisco Chronicle and was a New York Times Book Review Editor's Choice. Social conservatives such as Albert Mohler, President of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, endorsed the book enthusiastically, though he predicted it might "find a chilly reception in a society increasingly given over to the titillation, perversion, and profits offered by pornography." The Washington Post Book World characterized the book as "A persuasive argument that today’s pornography is not the Playboy centerfold or the Deep Throat of yesteryear…Paul’s remedy charts a sensible middle ground between restraints and free speech." Sex columnist Amy Sohn, on the other hand, cared less for the book and argued in the New York Times Book Review that "Paul never gives credence to the many women who enjoy consuming porn, alone or with partners."

— Freebase

Coping With

Coping With

The Coping With series of books is a series of books aimed at 11-16 year olds, written by Peter Corey and published by Scholastic Hippo. The first book, Coping with Parents, was released in 1989, and the series continued until the last book, Coping with Cash, in 2000. The books take a humorous look at issues which affect teenagers and how to cope with them. The books are generally built around the same basic structure: ⁕The first chapter is generally addressed to the reader before buying the book and persuading them to buy it. ⁕The author then introduces the team of researchers who helped him to write the book. Usually, the team includes 'Elderado Dingbatti', an escaped lunatic who frequently falls in love with pieces of furniture and confuses himself with Eldorado, the unsuccessful soap opera. ⁕Then follows a humorous description of how the subject of the book has developed through the ages. ⁕After this follows the A-Z section, which usually takes up most of the book. This section contains various objects related to the book's subject, arranged alphabetically. Every letter is used, which results in 'cheat' subjects only tenuously linked the book itself e.g. "Zoological Friend" or "Xams: If your spelling is this bad, maybe higher education isn't for you!".

— Freebase

Bookplates as Topic

Bookplates as Topic

Labels pasted in books to mark their ownership and sometimes to indicate their location in a library. Private bookplates are often ornate or artistic: simpler and smaller ones bearing merely the owner's name are called "book labels." They are usually pasted on the front endpaper of books. (From Harrod, The Librarians' Glossary and Reference Book, 4th rev ed & Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Bookplates

Bookplates

Works consisting of book owner's identification labels. They are usually intended for attaching inside a book or similar object. (From Thesaurus for Graphic Materials II: Genre and Physical Characteristic Terms, 1995)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

SyMynd

SyMynd

SyMynd is a knowledge marketplace where anyone can read books, courses, articles from experts, and journal articles, with embedded videos, audios and animations, all at the same place! You can discuss with other readers of a book on every page. SyMynd platform brings together professors, instructors, universities, book publishers, book authors and everyone at the same place. SyMynd’s goal is to make knowledge in any form accessible and affordable to anyone anywhere by creating a platform that benefits everyone, including book publishers, book authors, universities, and professors. Imagine you are a physics student, or a professional in microelectronics industry. Search for your topic of interest on SyMynd. Read inexpensive multimedia interactive books with readers discussion on each page, read short articles from the experts, access courses from leading universities. All this with seamlessly integrated multimedia, readers’ discussion, and reader tools, such as highlighting, bookmarks and notes.Imagine you are an expert in your field. Write short articles and subscriptions on topics of your expertise. Ask publisher of your books to use SyMynd platform. Connect with those who value your knowledge.

— CrunchBase

Blue book exam

Blue book exam

A blue book exam is a type of test administered at many post-secondary schools in the United States. Blue book exams typically include one or more essays or short-answer questions. Butler University was the first to introduce exam blue books. They were given a blue color because Butler's school colors are blue and white, therefore they gave them the name "blue books." Sometimes the instructor will provide students with a list of possible essay topics and will then choose one, or let the student choose from two or more topics that appear on the test. Blue books typically contain several sheets of wide-ruled notebook paper. Dimensions of the book itself is generally 8.5 by 7 inches, composed of two or three ruled leaves, bound in a sheet of paper and held together by staples. Although the color blue is most common, other colors may be used. The "Green Book" is an environmentally friendly green-colored book manufactured by Roaring Spring Paper Products that is the same size as its blue counterpart but is made with 100 percent recycled paper, 30 percent of it post-consumer waste. Prevalence of blue book exams varies between institutions and between academic disciplines. At many universities, virtually all exams in disciplines such as history or literature are blue book, while at the same universities, disciplines such as geology and math may virtually never hold such exams.

— Freebase

Book burning

Book burning

Book burning is the practice of destroying, often ceremoniously, books or other written material. In modern times, other forms of media, such as phonograph records, video tapes, and CDs have also been ceremoniously burned or shredded. Book burning is usually carried out in public, and is generally motivated by moral, religious, or political objections to the material. Book burning can be emblematic of a harsh and oppressive regime which is seeking to censor or silence an aspect of a nation's culture. In some cases the works destroyed are irreplaceable and their burning constitutes a severe loss to cultural heritage. Examples include obliteration of the Library of Baghdad, the burning of books and burying of scholars under China's Qin Dynasty, the destruction of Aztec codices by Itzcoatl, and the Nazi book burnings. Book burning can be an act of contempt for the book's contents or author, and the act is intended to draw wider public attention to this opinion. Examples include the burning of Wilhelm Reich's books by the FDA, the 2010 Qur'an-burning controversy, and the burning of Beatles records after a remark from John Lennon concerning Jesus Christ. Art destruction is related to book burning, both because it might have similar cultural, religious or political connotations and because in various historical cases books and artworks were destroyed at the same time.

— Freebase

Foreword

Foreword

A foreword is a piece of writing sometimes placed at the beginning of a book or other piece of literature. Typically written by someone other than the primary author of the work, it often tells of some interaction between the writer of the foreword and the book's primary author or the story the book tells. Later editions of a book sometimes have a new foreword prepended, which might explain in what respects that edition differs from previous ones. The foreword is sometimes confused with the preface, which is written by the author of the book and generally covers the story of how the book came into being or how the idea for the book was developed, and may include thanks and acknowledgments to people who were helpful to the author during the time of writing. Unlike a preface, a foreword is always signed. Information essential to the main text is generally placed in a set of explanatory notes, or perhaps in an introduction, rather than in the foreword or preface. The pages containing the foreword and preface are typically not numbered as part of the main work, which usually uses Arabic numerals. If the front matter is paginated, it uses lowercase Roman numerals. If there is both a foreword and a preface, the foreword appears first; both appear before the introduction, which may be paginated either with the front matter or the main text.

— Freebase

Book signing

Book signing

Book signing is the affixing of a signature to the title page or flyleaf of a book by its author. A book signing is an event, usually at a bookstore or library where an author sits and signs books for a period. Book signing is popular because an author's signature increases the value of books for collectors. The author may add a short message to the reader, called a dedication, to each book, which may be personalized with the recipient's name upon request. A simple author's signature without a dedication is typically more valuable to collectors. Many authors today spend a great deal of time signing their books, and sign many thousands of copies. James Ellroy is known for signing every copy of the 65,000 strong first run of My Dark Places. Book signings provide more than a just a chance to obtain signatures. Authors and bookstores are benefited by the fact that many copies of the book being promoted are sold. Signings also increase public goodwill and allow authors to connect with their fans.

— Freebase

Book lung

Book lung

A book lung is a type of respiration organ used for atmospheric gas exchange, found in arachnids, such as scorpions and spiders. Each of these organs is found inside a ventral abdominal, air-filled cavity and connects with the surroundings through a small opening. Book lungs are not related to the lungs of modern land-dwelling vertebrates. Their name describes their structure. Stacks of alternating air pockets and hemolymph-filled tissue give them an appearance similar to a "folded" book. Their number varies from just one pair in most spiders to four pairs in scorpions. Sometimes, book lungs can be absent, and gas exchange is performed by the thin walls inside the cavity instead, with their surface area increased by branching into the body as thin tubes called tracheae. The tracheae possibly have evolved directly from the book lungs, because in some spiders, the tracheae have a small number of greatly elongated chambers. Many arachnids, such as mites and harvestmen, have no traces of book lungs and breathe through tracheae or through their body surfaces only. The unfolded "pages" of the book lung are filled with hemolymph. The folds maximize the surface exposed to air, and thereby maximize the amount of gas exchanged with the environment. In most species, no motion of the plates is required to facilitate this kind of respiration.

— Freebase

Book paper

Book paper

A book paper is a paper that is designed specifically for the publication of printed books. Traditionally, book papers are off-white or low-white papers, are opaque to minimise the show-through of text from one side of the page to the other, and are made to tighter caliper or thickness specifications, particularly for case-bound books. Typically, books papers are light-weight papers 60 to 90 g/m² and often specified by their caliper/substance ratios. For example, a bulky 80 g/m² paper may have a caliper of 120 micrometres which would be Volume 15, whereas a low bulk 80 g/m² may have a caliper of 88 micrometres, giving a volume 11. This volume basis then allows the calculation of a book's PPI, which is an important factor for the design of book jackets and the binding of the finished book. Different paper qualities can be used as book paper depending on the type of book. Machine-finished coated papers, woodfree uncoated papers, coated fine papers and special fine papers are common paper grades.

— Freebase

Common

Common

kom′un, adj. belonging equally to more than one: public: general: usual: frequent: ordinary: easy to be had: of little value: vulgar: of low degree.—n. (Shak.) the commonalty: a tract of open land, used in common by the inhabitants of a town, parish, &c.—v.i. (Shak.) to share.—adj. Common′able, held in common.—ns. Comm′onage, right of pasturing on a common: the right of using anything in common: a common; Comm′onalty, the general body of the people without any distinction of rank or authority; Comm′oner, one of the common people, as opposed to the nobles: a member of the House of Commons: at Oxford, a student who pays for his commons.—adv. Comm′only.—ns. Comm′onness; Comm′onplace, a common topic or subject: a platitude: a memorandum: a note.—adj. common: hackneyed.—v.i. to make notes: to put in a commonplace-book.—n. Comm′onplace-book, a note or memorandum book.—n.pl. Comm′ons, the common people: their representatives—i.e. the lower House of Parliament or House of Commons: common land: food at a common table: at Oxford, rations served at a fixed rate from the college buttery: food in general, rations.—n. Comm′on-sense, average understanding: good sense or practical sagacity: the opinion of a community: the universally admitted impressions of mankind.—Common Bench, Common Pleas, one of the divisions of the High Court of Justice; Common forms, the ordinary clauses which are of frequent occurrence in identical terms in writs and deeds; Common law, in England, the ancient customary law of the land; Common Prayer (Book of), the liturgy of the Church of England; Common-riding, the Scotch equivalent of Beating the Bounds (see Beat); Common room, in schools, colleges, &c., a room to which the members have common access.—In common, together: equally with others.—Make common cause with, to cast in one's lot with: to have the same interests and aims with.—Philosophy of common-sense, that school of philosophy which takes the universally admitted impressions of mankind as corresponding to the facts of things without any further scrutiny.—Short commons, scant fare, insufficient supply of rations.—The common, that which is common or usual; The common good, the interest of the community at large: the corporate property of a burgh in Scotland; The common people, the people in general. [Fr. commun—L. communis, prob. from com, together, and munis, serving, obliging.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Folio

Folio

fō′li-ō, n. a sheet of paper once folded: a book of such sheets: the size of such a book: one of several sizes of paper adapted for folding once into well-proportioned leaves: (book-k.) a page in an account-book, or two opposite pages numbered as one: (law) a certain number of words taken as a basis for computing the length of a document: a wrapper for loose papers.—adj. pertaining to or containing paper only once folded.—v.t. to number the pages of: to mark off the end of every folio in law copying.—In folio, in sheets folded but once: in the form of a folio. [Abl. of L. folium, the leaf of a tree, a leaf or sheet of paper.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Table

Table

tā′bl, n. a smooth, flat slab or board, with legs, used as an article of furniture: supply of food, entertainment: the company at a table: the board or table on which a game is played, as billiards, backgammon, draughts: a surface on which something is written or engraved: that which is cut or written on a flat surface: a flat gravestone supported on pillars: an inscription: a condensed statement: syllabus or index; (B.) a writing tablet.—adj. of or pertaining to a table, or the food partaken from the table.—v.t. to make into a table or catalogue: to lay (money) on the table: to pay down: to lay on the table—i.e. to postpone consideration of.—ns. Tā′ble-beer, light beer for common use; Tā′ble-book, a book of tablets, on which anything is written without ink: a note-book: a book of tables, as of weights, measures, &c.; Tā′ble-cloth, a cloth usually of linen, for covering a table, esp. at meals; Tā′ble-cov′er, a cloth for covering a table, esp. at other than meal-times; Table-d'hôte (ta′bl-dōt), a meal for several persons at the same hour and at fixed prices; Tā′bleful, as many as a table will hold; Tā′bleland, an extensive region of elevated land with a plain-like or undulating surface: a plateau; Tā′ble-leaf, a board at the side of a table which can be put up or down to vary the size of the table; Tā′ble-lin′en, linen table-cloths, napkins, &c.; Tā′ble-mon′ey, an allowance granted to general officers in the army, and flag-officers in the navy, to enable them to fulfil the duties of hospitality within their respective commands; Tā′ble-rap′ping, production of raps on tables by alleged spiritual agency.—n.pl. Tā′bles, the game of backgammon.—ns. Tā′ble-spoon, one of the largest spoons used at table; Tā′ble-spoon′ful, as much as will fill a table-spoon; Tā′ble-talk, familiar conversation, as that round a table, during and after meals; Tā′ble-turn′ing, movements of tables or other objects, attributed by spiritualists to the agency of spirits—by rational persons to involuntary muscular action—similarly Tā′ble-lift′ing, Tā′ble-rap′ping; Tā′ble-ware, dishes, spoons, knives, forks, &c. for table use.—adv. Tā′blewise, like a table—of the communion-table, with the ends east and west—opp. to Altar-wise.—ns. Tā′ble-work, the setting of type for tables, columns of figures, &c.; Tā′bling, the act of tabling or forming into tables: (carp.) a rude dove-tailing: (naut.) a broad hem on the skirts of sails.—The Lord's Table, the table at which the Lord's Supper is partaken, or on which the elements are laid: the Lord's Supper.—Fence the tables (see Fence); Lay on the table, to lay aside any proposed measure indefinitely, or for future discussion; Lie on the table, to be laid upon the table; Turn the tables, to bring about a complete rever

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Gigit

Gigit

Gigit is a service that allows you to Book-a-Band for a party. Gigit is solving a multibillion-dollar event-booking problem while simultaneously creating more opportunities for artists to get paid to play their music. The process of booking a band or DJ is complex, confusing, and slowed by too many middlemen. Further to this, the music industry is hitting a point of stagnation in revenues. We live in a streaming world and no longer have to pay for music. Piracy is afoot, but you cannot pirate a live experience: Enter Gigit. For musicians, we exhibit a number of outside the box opportunities to get paid, create bespoke experiences with fans, and gain assets (content) that will drive more bookings. For the event planner, we create a transparent, succinct process in which you can discover bands, both up and coming or established, and book them as easily as you book a room, a car, or a dog sitter… a la AirBnb, or Dog Vacay. Marketplaces and collaborative consumption models are top of mind and serve as the new baseline in our day-to-day lives.Gigit’s design, UX and data will serve as the driving forces as to why we are the place where bands and DJs go to get booked and everyone else will go to book live music.

— CrunchBase

index

index

An alphabetical listing of items and their location; for example, the index of a book lists words or expressions and the pages of the book upon which they are to be found.

— Wiktionary

volume

volume

A single book of a publication issued in multi-book format, such as an encyclopedia.

— Wiktionary

annual

annual

An annual publication; a book, periodical, journal, report, comic book, yearbook, etc., which is published serially once a year, which may or may not be in addition to regular weekly or monthly publication.

— Wiktionary

Ezra

Ezra

The fifteenth book of the Old Testament and a book of the Hebrew Tanakh.

— Wiktionary

New Testament

New Testament

The second half of the Christian Bible, includes the four Gospels, the Book of Acts, the Epistles, and the Book of Revelation.

— Wiktionary

Matthew

Matthew

The Gospel of St. Matthew, the first book of the New Testament of the Bible. Traditionally the first of the four gospels, a book attributed to Matthew the Evangelist.

— Wiktionary

Numbers

Numbers

The Book of Numbers, the fourth of the Books of Moses in the Old Testament of the Bible, the fourth book in the Torah.

— Wiktionary

Judith

Judith

A book of the Old Testament of some Christian Bibles; a book of the Vulgate Apocrypha.

— Wiktionary

e-book

e-book

electronic book, a book published in electronic form

— Wiktionary

Joshua

Joshua

The sixth book of the Old Testament of Bible, and a book of the Tanakh.

— Wiktionary

Alma

Alma

One of two prophets, the Elder and the Younger, and a book in the Book of Mormon.

— Wiktionary

Ether

Ether

The ancient American prophet of Mormon theology who wrote the Book of Ether in the Book of Mormon.

— Wiktionary

Fe

Fe

American Library Association abbreviation for forty-eighth, a book size (7.5-10 cm in height); a book of that height.

— Wiktionary

Judges

Judges

The seventh book of the Old Testament, and a book of the Hebrew Tanakh.

— Wiktionary

folio

folio

A book made of sheets of paper each folded once (two leaves or four pages to the sheet); hence, a book of the largest kind, exceeding 30 cm in height.

— Wiktionary

psalter

psalter

The Book of Psalms. Often applied to a book containing the Psalms separately printed.

— Wiktionary

psalter

psalter

Specifically for Anglicans, the Book of Common Prayer which contains the Book of Psalms. For Catholics, the Breviary containing the Psalms arranged for each day of the week.

— Wiktionary

videobook

videobook

A book developed in video format, or a video structured similarly to a book, used chiefly in teaching and learning.

— Wiktionary

fore edge

fore edge

the edge of a book, book section, or illustration opposite the backbone

— Wiktionary

Nehemiah

Nehemiah

The sixteenth book of the Old Testament of the Bible, and a book of the Tanakh.

— Wiktionary

pocketbook

pocketbook

A small book, especially one that can fit in a pocket; a paperback; also a pocket book.

— Wiktionary

Moroni

Moroni

The last book in the Book of Mormon

— Wiktionary

Moroni

Moroni

A Book of Mormon prophet, the author of the Book of Moroni.

— Wiktionary

back cover

back cover

(of a book, magazine etc) the cover on the opposite side of the front cover; back of the book; associated with sports pages in publications.

— Wiktionary

prebound

prebound

Denoting that a book has been rebound with a library quality hardcover binding. In almost all commercial cases, the book in question began as a paperback.

— Wiktionary

dogear

dogear

A corner of a page in a book that has been folded down, usually to mark a place in the book.

— Wiktionary

abecedarium

abecedarium

A book used to teach the alphabet; alphabet book; primer.

— Wiktionary

2 Corinthians

2 Corinthians

The second book of Corinthians and the eighth book in the New Testament of the Bible, an epistle to the people of Corinth attributed to Paul the Apostle and Timothy.

— Wiktionary

1 Corinthians

1 Corinthians

The first book of Corinthians and the seventh book in the New Testament of the Bible, an epistle to the people of Corinth attributed to Paul the Apostle and Sosthenes.

— Wiktionary

cite chapter and verse

cite chapter and verse

To provide specific references from an authoritative book, as the Bible or a book of statutes or rules, to support a statement.

— Wiktionary

adversaria

adversaria

Originally, a book of accounts, so named from the placing of debt and credit in opposition to each other. A collection of notes or commentaries; a commonplace book.

— Wiktionary

inker

inker

In comic book production, a person who fills in material outlined by the comic book author.

— Wiktionary

penciler

penciler

In comic book production, a person who develops the plot and creative content of a comic book, and draws an outline to be filled in by an inker.

— Wiktionary

seven seals

seven seals

a concept of Christian eschatology, which comes from the Book of Revelation in the Christian Bible, where a book with seven seals is described in Revelation 5:1

— Wiktionary

Dust jacket

Dust jacket

The dust jacket of a book is the detachable outer cover, usually made of paper and printed with text and illustrations. This outer cover has folded flaps that hold it to the front and back book covers. Often the back panel or flaps are printed with biographical information about the author, a summary of the book from the publisher, critical praise from celebrities or authorities in the book's subject area. In addition to its promotional role, the dust jacket protects the book covers from damage. However, since it is itself relatively fragile, and since dust jackets have practical, aesthetic, and sometimes financial value, the jacket may in turn be wrapped in another jacket, usually transparent, especially if the book is a library volume.

— Freebase

Sex

Sex

Sex is a coffee table book written by Madonna, with photographs taken by Steven Meisel Studio and film frames shot by Fabien Baron. The book was edited by Glenn O'Brien and was released on October 21, 1992, by Warner Books, Maverick and Callaway Books. Approached with an idea for a book on erotic photographs, Madonna expanded on the idea and conceived the book and its content. Shot in early 1992 in New York City and Miami, the locations ranged from hotels and burlesque theaters, to the streets of Miami. The photographs were even stolen before publishing, but were quickly recovered. The book had a range of influences – from punk rock to earlier fashion iconoclasts like Guy Bourdin and his surrealism, and Helmut Newton, in its stylized, sado-masochistic look. Sex has photographs that feature adult content and softcore pornographic as well as simulations of sexual acts, including sadomasochism and analingus. Madonna wrote the book as a character named "Mistress Dita", inspired by 1930s film actress Dita Parlo. It also includes cameos by actress Isabella Rossellini, rappers Big Daddy Kane and Vanilla Ice, model Naomi Campbell, gay porn star Joey Stefano, actor Udo Kier, socialite Tatiana von Fürstenberg, and nightclub owner Ingrid Casares.

— Freebase

Book of Ezra

Book of Ezra

The Book of Ezra is a book of the Hebrew Bible. Originally combined with the Book of Nehemiah in a single book of Ezra-Nehemiah, the two became separated in the early centuries of the Christian era. Its subject is the Return to Zion following the close of the Babylonian captivity, and it is divided into two parts, the first telling the story of the first return of exiles in the first year of Cyrus the Great and the completion and dedication of the new Temple in Jerusalem in the sixth year of Darius, the second telling of the subsequent mission of Ezra to Jerusalem and his struggle to purify the Jews from the sin of marriage with non-Jews. Together with the Book of Nehemiah, it represents the final chapter in the historical narrative of the Hebrew Bible. Ezra is written to fit a schematic pattern in which the God of Israel inspires a king of Persia to commission a leader from the Jewish community to carry out a mission; three successive leaders carry out three such missions, the first rebuilding the Temple, the second purifying the Jewish community, and the third sealing of the holy city itself behind a wall. The theological program of the book explains the many problems its chronological structure presents. It probably appeared in its earliest version around 400 BC, and continued to be revised and edited for several centuries after before being accepted as scriptural around the time of Christ.

— Freebase

Book of Joshua

Book of Joshua

The Book of Joshua is the sixth book in the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament. Its 24 chapters tell of the entry of the Israelites into Canaan, their conquest and division of the land under the leadership of Joshua, and of serving God in the land. Joshua forms part of the biblical account of the emergence of Israel which begins with the exodus of the Israelites from slavery in Egypt, continues with the book of Joshua, and culminates in the Judges with the conquest and settlement of the land. The book is in two roughly equal parts, the story of the campaigns of the Israelites in central, southern and northern Canaan and the destruction of their enemies, followed by the division of the conquered land among the twelve tribes; the two parts are framed by set-piece speeches by God and Joshua commanding the conquest and at the end warning of the need for faithful observance of the Law revealed to Moses. Almost all scholars agree that the book of Joshua holds little historical value for early Israel and most likely reflects a much later period. Rather than being written as history, the Deuteronomistic history – Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings – was intended to illustrate a theological scheme in which Israel and her leaders are judged by their obedience to the teachings and laws set down in the book of Deuteronomy.

— Freebase

E-book

E-book

An electronic book is a book-length publication in digital form, consisting of text, images, or both, and produced on, published through, and readable on computers or other electronic devices. Sometimes the equivalent of a conventional printed book, e-books can also be born digital. The Oxford Dictionary of English defines the e-book as "an electronic version of a printed book," but e-books can and do exist without any printed equivalent. Commercially produced and sold E-books are usually intended to be read on dedicated e-book readers. However, almost any sophisticated electronic device that features a controllable viewing screen, including computers, many mobile phones, and nearly all smartphones, can also be used to read e-books. Some companies, such as Amazon, with their Kindle for PC software, provide an emulator that allows a user to read their format on other platforms.

— Freebase

Book of Nehemiah

Book of Nehemiah

The Book of Nehemiah is a book of the Hebrew Bible. Told largely in the form of a first-person memoir, it concerns the rebuilding of the walls of Jerusalem by Nehemiah, a Jew who is a high official at the Persian court, and the dedication of the city and its people to God's laws. The events take place in the second half of the 5th century BC, and together with the Book of Ezra, it represents the final chapter in the historical narrative of the Hebrew Bible The original core of the book, the first-person memoir, may have been combined with the core of the Book of Ezra around 400 BC. Further editing probably continued into the Hellenistic era, but this view is debated. The book tells how Nehemiah, at the court of the king in Susa, is informed that Jerusalem is without walls and resolves to restore them. The king appoints him as governor of Judah and he travels to Jerusalem. There he rebuilds the walls, despite the opposition of Israel's enemies, and reforms the community in conformity with the law of Moses. After 12 years in Jerusalem, he returns to Susa but subsequently revisits Jerusalem. He finds that the Israelites have been backsliding and taking non-Jewish wives, and he stays in Jerusalem to enforce the Law.

— Freebase

Joel

Joel

Joel was a prophet of ancient Israel, the second of the twelve minor prophets and the author of the Book of Joel. He is mentioned by name only once in the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, in the introduction to his own brief book, as the son of Pethuel. The name Joel combines the covenant name of God, YHWH, and el, and has been translated as "one to whom YHWH is God," that is, a worshipper of YHWH. The dates of his life are unknown; he may have lived anywhere from the 9th century BC to the 5th century BCE, depending on the dating of his book. The book's mention of Greeks has not given scholars any help in dating the text since the Greeks were known to have had access to Judah from Mycenaean times. However, the book's mention of Judah's suffering and to the standing temple has led some scholars to place the date of the book in the post-exilic period, after the construction of the Second Temple. Joel was originally from Judah/Judea, and, judging from its prominence in his prophecy, was quite possibly a prophet associated with the ritual of the Jerusalem temple. According to a long-standing tradition, Joel was buried in Gush Halav.

— Freebase

Octavo

Octavo

Octavo is a technical term describing the format of a book, which refers to the size of leaves produced from folding a full sheet of paper on which multiple pages of text were printed to form the individual sections of a book. An octavo is a book or pamphlet made up of one or more full sheets of paper on which 16 pages of text were printed, which were then folded three times to produce eight leaves. Each leaf of an octavo book thus represents one eighth the size of the original sheet. Other common book formats are folios and quartos. Octavo is also used as a general description of size of books that are about 8 to 10 inches tall, and as such does not necessarily indicate the actual printing format of the books, which may even be unknown as is the case for many modern books. These terms are discussed in greater detail in Book sizes.

— Freebase

Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945

Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945

Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945 is a 2005 book by historian Tony Judt, the former Director of New York University's Erich Maria Remarque Institute. The book examines the history of Europe from the end of World War II in 1945 up to 2005. The book has won considerable praise for its breadth and comprehensiveness. The New York Times Book Review listed it as one of the ten best books of 2005. It won the 2006 Arthur Ross Book Award for the best book published on international affairs. As is made clear in the introduction, the author makes no attempt to expound any grand theory or "overarching theme" for contemporary European history, aiming to avoid narrative fallacies by plainly retelling the entire scope of European history in that period, to let what themes do exist become self-apparent.

— Freebase

The Crock of Gold

The Crock of Gold

The Crock of Gold is a novel written by James Stephens and published in 1912. Some editions have a foreword by Walter de la Mare. Truly unique, it is a mixture of philosophy, Irish folklore and the battle of the sexes all with charm, humour and good grace. It contains 6 books, Book 1 – The Coming of Pan, Book 2 – The Philosophers Journey, Book 3 – The Two Gods, Book 4 – The Philosophers Return, Book 5 – The Policemen, Book 6 – The Thin Woman's Journey, that rotate around a philosopher and his quest to find Cáitlin Ni Murrachu and deliver her from the god Pan and himself going through a catharsis. He himself is apprehended for murdering a philosopher friend and his wife who committed a peaceful suicide some months before, then whisked away by his wife the Thin Woman of Inis Magrath and the fairy folk, all the while encountering many notable characters, in particular Angús Òg, and the Thin Woman's encounter with the Three Infinites. Arthur Rackham was to have illustrated it, but died before he could. Instead, it was illustrated by the artist Thomas Mackenzie.

— Freebase

Book of hours

Book of hours

A book of hours is an illuminated, Christian devotional book that was popular among the Christians of Northern Europe during the Middle Ages. A typical book of hours contains: ⁕A calendar of the liturgical year ⁕An excerpt from each of the four canonical gospels ⁕The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary ⁕The fifteen Psalms of Degrees ⁕The seven Penitential Psalms ⁕A Litany of Saints ⁕An Office for the Dead ⁕The Hours of the Cross ⁕Various other Christian prayers Sometimes included are the Marian prayers Obsecro te and O Intemerata, as well as devotions for use at Mass, meditations on the Passion of Christ, and other works. This book format is an abridgement of the breviary, a liturgical book that contains the Liturgy of the Hours recited in monasteries. The book of hours was developed for lay people who wished to incorporate elements of monasticism into their devotional life. In spiritual practice, a person might read or recite from the prayers or excerpts from Psalms. Tens of thousands of books of hours survive to the present day. Indeed, most of the extant medieval illuminated manuscripts are books of hours, although many of these have minimal decoration, and no illustrations at all. Some of the books made for wealthy patrons, however, were extremely lavish, boasting brightly coloured, full-page miniatures.

— Freebase

Himalaya

Himalaya

Himalaya is the book that Michael Palin wrote to accompany the BBC television documentary series Himalaya with Michael Palin. This book, like the other books that Michael Palin wrote following each of his seven trips for the BBC, consists both of his text and of many photographs to illustrate the trip. All of the pictures in this book were taken by Basil Pao, the stills photographer who was part of the team who did the trip. The book contains eight chapters: Pakistan, India, Nepal, Tibet, Yunnan, Nagaland and Assam, Bhutan, and Bangladesh. The book is presented in a diary format; Palin starts each section of the book with a heading such as "Day Forty One: Srinagar". Not all days are mentioned, a result of the trip as a whole being broken up into shorter trips. Palin makes several treks up into the mountains, including one trek up to Everest Base Camp at 17,500 feet. Not bad, considering that Palin was 60 years old at the time. Other encounters and experiences that are related by Michael Palin include finding out that the Dalai Lama not only knew who he was, but was a fan of Palin's TV programmes.

— Freebase

Shahrazad Ali

Shahrazad Ali

Shahrazad Ali raised in Cincinnati, Ohio is an author of several books, including a paperback called The Blackman's Guide to Understanding the Blackwoman. The book was controversial bringing "forth community forums, pickets and heated arguments among blacks in many parts" of the US when it was published in 1989. Stories about the book appeared in the Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Washington Post, Newsday, and Newsweek. Ali appeared on Tony Brown's Journal, the Sally Jessy Raphaël Show, The Phil Donahue Show, and Geraldo TV programs—and was ridiculed on In Living Color. The book reportedly brought black bookstores new business, while other black bookstores banned it. It also provoked a book of essays that explored the negative impact of The Blackman's Guide. Some passages of her book describing African American women—referred to as the Blackwoman, as is the parlance of the Nation of Islam—quoted in the media include the following: Ali stated, "I wrote the book because black women in America have been protected and insulated against certain kinds of criticism and examination."

— Freebase

abdias

Obadiah, Abdias, Book of Obadiah

an Old Testament book telling Obadiah's prophecies; the shortest book in the Christian Bible

— Princeton's WordNet

additions to esther

Additions to Esther

an Apocryphal book consisting of text added to the Book of Esther

— Princeton's WordNet

bel and the dragon

Bel and the Dragon

an Apocryphal book consisting of text added to the Book of Daniel

— Princeton's WordNet

book of obadiah

Obadiah, Abdias, Book of Obadiah

an Old Testament book telling Obadiah's prophecies; the shortest book in the Christian Bible

— Princeton's WordNet

book of susanna

Susanna, Book of Susanna

an Apocryphal book consisting of text added to the Book of Daniel

— Princeton's WordNet

book review

book review

a critical review of a book (usually a recently published book)

— Princeton's WordNet

obadiah

Obadiah, Abdias, Book of Obadiah

an Old Testament book telling Obadiah's prophecies; the shortest book in the Christian Bible

— Princeton's WordNet

prayer of azariah and song of the three children

Prayer of Azariah and Song of the Three Children

an Apocryphal book consisting of text added to the Book of Daniel

— Princeton's WordNet

susanna

Susanna, Book of Susanna

an Apocryphal book consisting of text added to the Book of Daniel

— Princeton's WordNet

Yellow pages

Yellow pages

a telephone book or part of a book in which the telephone numbers and often advertisements of business enterprises are listed in numerous sections, organized by the category of the business, the categories themselves being arranged alphabetically; a classified telephone directory. So called because for many years the listing thus organized was printed on yellow paper, to distinguish it from the white pages containing the names of individuals, listed alphabetically by last name. The yellow pages are usually bound together with the white pages in the telephone book distributed by the telephone company to its subscribers. The name was adopted by companies not affiliated with the telephone company, for the classified business directories that they sell.

— GCIDE

Antiphonary

Antiphonary

a book containing a collection of antiphons; the book in which the antiphons of the breviary, with their musical notes, are contained

— Webster Dictionary

Authority

Authority

a book containing such a statement or opinion, or the author of the book

— Webster Dictionary

Board

Board

paper made thick and stiff like a board, for book covers, etc.; pasteboard; as, to bind a book in boards

— Webster Dictionary

Book

Book

to enter the name of (any one) in a book for the purpose of securing a passage, conveyance, or seat; as, to be booked for Southampton; to book a seat in a theater

— Webster Dictionary

Bookful

Bookful

as much as will fill a book; a book full

— Webster Dictionary

Bookmark

Bookmark

something placed in a book to guide in finding a particular page or passage; also, a label in a book to designate the owner; a bookplate

— Webster Dictionary

Chelifer

Chelifer

see Book scorpion, under Book

— Webster Dictionary

Cookbook

Cookbook

a book of directions and receipts for cooking; a cookery book

— Webster Dictionary

Decimosexto

Decimosexto

a book consisting of sheets, each of which is folded into sixteen leaves; hence, indicating, more or less definitely, a size of book; -- usually written 16mo or 16¡.

— Webster Dictionary

Directory

Directory

a collection or body of directions, rules, or ordinances; esp., a book of directions for the conduct of worship; as, the Directory used by the nonconformists instead of the Prayer Book

— Webster Dictionary

Directory

Directory

a book containing the names and residences of the inhabitants of any place, or of classes of them; an address book; as, a business directory

— Webster Dictionary

Domebook

Domebook

a book said to have been compiled under the direction of King Alfred. It is supposed to have contained the principal maxims of the common law, the penalties for misdemeanors, and the forms of judicial proceedings. Domebook was probably a general name for book of judgments

— Webster Dictionary

Duodecimo

Duodecimo

a book consisting of sheets each of which is folded into twelve leaves; hence, indicating, more or less definitely, a size of a book; -- usually written 12mo or 12¡.

— Webster Dictionary

Enter

Enter

to inscribe; to enroll; to record; as, to enter a name, or a date, in a book, or a book in a catalogue; to enter the particulars of a sale in an account, a manifest of a ship or of merchandise at the customhouse

— Webster Dictionary

Folio

Folio

a book made of sheets of paper each folded once (four pages to the sheet); hence, a book of the largest kind. See Note under Paper

— Webster Dictionary

Folio

Folio

a page of a book; (Bookkeeping) a page in an account book; sometimes, two opposite pages bearing the same serial number

— Webster Dictionary

Formulary

Formulary

a book containing stated and prescribed forms, as of oaths, declarations, prayers, medical formulaae, etc.; a book of precedents

— Webster Dictionary

Judge

Judge

the title of the seventh book of the Old Testament; the Book of Judges

— Webster Dictionary

Ledger

Ledger

a book in which a summary of accounts is laid up or preserved; the final book of record in business transactions, in which all debits and credits from the journal, etc., are placed under appropriate heads

— Webster Dictionary

Manual

Manual

a small book, such as may be carried in the hand, or conveniently handled; a handbook; specifically, the service book of the Roman Catholic Church

— Webster Dictionary

Missal

Missal

the book containing the service of the Mass for the entire year; a Mass book

— Webster Dictionary

My

My

of or belonging to me; -- used always attributively; as, my body; my book; -- mine is used in the predicate; as, the book is mine. See Mine

— Webster Dictionary

Penitential

Penitential

a book formerly used by priests hearing confessions, containing rules for the imposition of penances; -- called also penitential book

— Webster Dictionary

Playbook

Playbook

a book of dramatic compositions; a book of the play

— Webster Dictionary

Primer

Primer

a small elementary book for teaching children to read; a reading or spelling book for a beginner

— Webster Dictionary

Print

Print

to strike off an impression or impressions of, from type, or from stereotype, electrotype, or engraved plates, or the like; in a wider sense, to do the typesetting, presswork, etc., of (a book or other publication); as, to print books, newspapers, pictures; to print an edition of a book

— Webster Dictionary

Psalter

Psalter

the Book of Psalms; -- often applied to a book containing the Psalms separately printed

— Webster Dictionary

Psalter

Psalter

specifically, the Book of Psalms as printed in the Book of Common Prayer; among the Roman Catholics, the part of the Breviary which contains the Psalms arranged for each day of the week

— Webster Dictionary

Pseudoscorpiones

Pseudoscorpiones

an order of Arachnoidea having the palpi terminated by large claws, as in the scorpions, but destitute of a caudal sting; the false scorpions. Called also Pseudoscorpii, and Pseudoscorpionina. See Illust. of Book scorpion, under Book

— Webster Dictionary

Quarto

Quarto

originally, a book of the size of the fourth of sheet of printing paper; a size leaves; in present usage, a book of a square or nearly square form, and usually of large size

— Webster Dictionary

Repertory

Repertory

a place in which things are disposed in an orderly manner, so that they can be easily found, as the index of a book, a commonplace book, or the like

— Webster Dictionary

Sextodecimo

Sextodecimo

a book composed of sheets each of which is folded into sixteen leaves; hence, indicating, more or less definitely, a size of a book; -- usually written 16mo, or 16¡.

— Webster Dictionary

Title

Title

a section or division of a subject, as of a law, a book, specif. (Roman & Canon Laws), a chapter or division of a law book

— Webster Dictionary

Travel

Travel

an account, by a traveler, of occurrences and observations during a journey; as, a book of travels; -- often used as the title of a book; as, Travels in Italy

— Webster Dictionary

Trigesimo-secundo

Trigesimo-secundo

a book composed of sheets so folded that each one makes thirty-two leaves; hence, indicating, more or less definitely, a size of book; -- usually written 32mo, or 32¡, and called thirty-twomo.

— Webster Dictionary

Twenty-fourmo

Twenty-fourmo

a book composed of sheets, each of which is folded into twenty-four leaves; hence, indicating more or less definitely a size of book whose sheets are so folded; -- usually written 24mo, or 24¡.

— Webster Dictionary

Vigesimo-quarto

Vigesimo-quarto

a book composed of sheets each of which is folded into twenty-four leaves; hence, indicating more or less definitely a size of book so made; -- usually written 24mo, or 24¡.

— Webster Dictionary

Vignette

Vignette

a decorative design, originally representing vine branches or tendrils, at the head of a chapter, of a manuscript or printed book, or in a similar position; hence, by extension, any small picture in a book; hence, also, as such pictures are often without a definite bounding line, any picture, as an engraving, a photograph, or the like, which vanishes gradually at the edge

— Webster Dictionary

Yearbook

Yearbook

a book published yearly; any annual report or summary of the statistics or facts of a year, designed to be used as a reference book; as, the Congregational Yearbook

— Webster Dictionary

Dragon Book

Dragon Book

The classic text Compilers: Principles, Techniques and Tools, by Alfred V. Aho, Ravi Sethi, and Jeffrey D. Ullman (Addison-Wesley 1986; ISBN 0-201-10088-6), so called because of the cover design featuring a dragon labeled ‘complexity of compiler design’ and a knight bearing the lance ‘LALR parser generator’ among his other trappings. This one is more specifically known as the ‘Red Dragon Book’ (1986); an earlier edition, sans Sethi and titled Principles Of Compiler Design (Alfred V. Aho and Jeffrey D. Ullman; Addison-Wesley, 1977; ISBN 0-201-00022-9), was the `‘reen Dragon Book’ (1977). (Also New Dragon Book, Old Dragon Book.) The horsed knight and the Green Dragon were warily eying each other at a distance; now the knight is typing (wearing gauntlets!) at a terminal showing a video-game representation of the Red Dragon's head while the rest of the beast extends back in normal space. See also book titles.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Job, Book of

Job, Book of

pronounced by Carlyle "one of the grandest things ever written with pen; grand in its sincerity, in its simplicity, in its epic melody and repose of reconcilement"; one perceives in it "the seeing eye, the mildly understanding heart, true eyesight and vision for all things; sublime sorrow and sublime reconciliation; oldest choral melody as of the heart of mankind; so soft and great as the summer midnight, as the world with its seas and stars"; the whole giving evidence "of a literary merit unsurpassed by anything written in Bible or out of it; not a Jew's book merely, but all men's book." It is partly didactic and partly biographic; that is to say, the object of the author is to solve a problem in part speculatively, or in the intelligence, and in part spiritually, or in the life; the speculative solution being, that sufferings are to prove and purify the righteous; and the spiritual, consisting in accepting them not as of merely Divine appointment, but manifestations of God Himself, which is accomplished in the experience of Job when he exclaims at last, "Now mine eye seeth Thee." It is very idle to ask if the story is a real one, since its interest and value do not depend on its historic, but its universal and eternal truth; nor is the question of the authorship of any more consequence, even if there were any clue to it, which there is not, as the book offers no difficulty to the interpreter which any knowledge of the author would the least contribute to remove. In such a case the challenge of Goethe is apropos, "What have I to do with names when it is a work of the spirit I am considering?" The book of Job was for long believed to be one of the oldest books in the world, and to have had its origin among a patriarchal people, such as the Arabs, but is now pretty confidently referred to a period between that of David and the return from the captivity, the character of it bespeaking a knowledge and experience peculiarly Jewish.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Sartor Resartus

Sartor Resartus

a book written by Carlyle at Craigenputtock (q. v.) in 1831, published piecemeal in Frazer's Magazine in 1833-34, and that first appeared in a book form in America, under Emerson's auspices, in 1836, but not in England till 1838. It professes to be on the philosophy of "clothes" (q. v.), and is divided into three sections, the first in exposition of the philosophy, the second on the life of the philosopher, and the third on the practical bearings of his idea. It is a book in many respects unparalleled in literature, and for spiritual significance and worth the most remarkable that has been written in the century. It was written in the time and for the time by one who understood the time as not another of his contemporaries succeeded in doing, and who interprets it in a light in which every man must read it who would solve its problems to any purpose. Its style is an offence to many, but not to any one who loves wisdom and has faith in God. For it is a brave book, and a reassuring, as well as a wise, the author of it regarding the universe not as a dead thing but a living, and athwart the fire deluges that from time to time sweep it, and seem to threaten with ruin everything in it we hold sacred, descrying nothing more appalling than the phoenix-bird immolating herself in flames that she may the sooner rise renewed out of her ashes and soar aloft with healing in her wings. See Carlyle, Thomas, Exodus from Houndsditch, Natural Supernaturalism, &c.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Abc

Abc

Abcee, ā-bē-sē′, n. the alphabet from its first letters: a first reading-book (obs.), hence fig. the first rudiments of anything.—ABC book (Shak.), a book to teach the a, b, c, or alphabet.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Domesday-

Domesday-

Doomsday-book, dōōmz′dā-book, n. a book compiled by order of William the Conqueror, containing a survey of all the lands in England, their value, owners, &c.—so called from its authority in judgment (A.S. dóm) on the matters contained in it.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Edit

Edit

ed′it, v.t. to prepare the work of an author for publication: to superintend the publication of (a newspaper, &c.): to compile, garble, or cook up materials into literary shape.—ns. Edi′tion, the publication of a book: the number of copies of a book printed at a time; Ed′itor, one who edits a book: one who conducts a newspaper or journal:—fem. Ed′itress.—adj. Editō′rial, of or belonging to an editor.—n. an article in a newspaper written by the editor, a leading article.—adv. Editō′rially.—n. Ed′itorship. [L. edĕre, edĭtume, out, dăre, to give.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Fly

Fly

flī, v.i. to move through the air on wings: to move swiftly: to pass away: to flee: to burst quickly or suddenly: to flutter.—v.t. to avoid, flee from: to cause to fly, as a kite:—pr.p. fly′ing; pa.t. flew (flōō); pa.p. flown (flōn).—n. a popular name best restricted in its simplicity to the insects forming the order Diptera, but often so widely used with a prefix—e.g. butterfly, dragon-fly, May-fly—as to be virtually equivalent to insect: a fish-hook dressed with silk, &c., in imitation of a fly: a light double-seated carriage, a hackney-coach: (mech.) a flywheel: (pl.) the large space above the proscenium in a theatre, from which the scenes, &c., are controlled.—adj. wide-awake: (slang) knowing.—adjs. Fly′away, flighty; Fly′-bit′ten, marked by the bite of flies.—n. Fly′blow, the egg of a fly.—adj. Fly′blown, tainted with the eggs which produce maggots.—ns. Fly′boat, a long, narrow, swift boat used on canals; Fly′book, a case like a book for holding fishing-flies; Fly′-catch′er, a small bird, so called from its catching flies while on the wing; Fly′-fish′er, one who fishes with artificial flies as bait; Fly′-fish′ing, the art of so fishing; Fly′-flap′per, one who drives away flies with a fly-flap; Fly′ing-bridge, a kind of ferry-boat which is moved across a river by the action of the combined forces of the stream and the resistance of a long rope or chain made fast to a fixed buoy in the middle of the river; Fly′ing-butt′ress, an arch-formed prop which connects the walls of the upper and central portions of an aisled structure with the vertical buttresses of the outer walls; Fly′ing-camp, a body of troops for rapid motion from one place to another; Fly′ing-Dutch′man, a Dutch black spectral ship, whose captain is condemned for his impieties to sweep the seas around the Cape of Storms unceasingly, without ever being able to reach a haven; Fly′ing-fish, a fish which can leap from the water and sustain itself in the air for a short time, by its long pectoral fins, as if flying; Fly′ing-fox, a large frugivorous bat; Fly′ing-lē′mur, a galeopithecoid insectivore whose fore and hind limbs are connected by a fold of skin, enabling it to make flying leaps from tree to tree; Fly′ing-par′ty, a small body of soldiers, equipped for rapid movements, used to harass an enemy; Fly′ing-phalan′ger, a general popular name for the petaurists; Fly′ing-shot, a shot fired at something in motion; Fly′ing-squid, a squid having broad lateral fins by means of which it can spring high out of the water; Fly′ing-squirr′el, a name given to two genera of squirrels, which have a fold of skin between the fore and hind legs, by means of which they can take great leaps in the air; Fly′leaf, a blank leaf at the beginning and end of a book; — Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Guide

Guide

gīd, v.t. to lead or direct: to regulate: to influence.—n. he who, or that which, guides: one who directs another in his course of life: a soldier or other person employed to obtain information for an army: a guide-book: anything calculated to maintain in a certain direction or position.—adj. Guid′able.—ns. Guid′age, guidance; Guid′ance, direction: government; Guide′-book, a book of information for tourists.—adj. Guide′less, having no guide.—ns. Guide′post, a post erected at a roadside to guide the traveller; Guid′er, one who guides, a director; Guid′on, a forked guide-flag carried by a cavalry company or mounted battery, also the officer bearing it. [O. Fr. guider; prob. from a Teut. root, as in A.S. witan, to know, wís, wise, Ger. weisen, to show, conn. with wit, wise.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Hand

Hand

hand, n. the extremity of the arm below the wrist: that which does the duty of a hand by pointing, as the hand of a clock: the fore-foot of a horse: a measure of four inches: an agent or workman: (pl.) work-people in a factory: performance, agency, co-operation: power or manner of performing: skill: possession: style of handwriting, sign-manual: side: direction: the set of cards held by a single player at whist, &c.: a single round at a game.—v.t. to give with the hand: to lead or conduct: (naut.) to furl, as sails.—ns. Hand′-bag, a bag for small articles, carried in the hand; Hand′-ball, the sport of throwing and catching a ball; Hand′-barr′ow, a barrow without a wheel, carried by men: Hand′-bas′ket, a small portable basket; Hand′-bell, a small bell held by the hand when rung, a table-bell; Hand′bill, a pruning-hook used in the hand: a bill or loose sheet with some announcement; Hand′book, a manual or book of reference: a guide-book for travellers; Hand′breadth, the breadth of a hand: a palm; Hand′-cart, a small cart drawn by hand.—adj. Hand′ed (Milt.), with hands joined: (Shak.) having a hand of a certain sort.—ns. Hand′er; Hand′fast, a firm grip, handle: a contract, esp. a betrothal.—adj. bound, espoused: tight-fisted.—adj. Hand′fasted, betrothed.—n. Hand′fasting, betrothal: a private or even probationary form of marriage.—adj. Hand′-foot′ed, having feet like hands, chiropod.—ns. Hand′ful, as much as fills the hand: a small number or quantity:—pl. Hand′fuls; Hand′-gall′op, an easy gallop, in which the speed of the horse is restrained by the bridle-hand; Hand′-glass, a glass or small glazed frame used to protect plants: a small mirror; Hand′-grenade′, a grenade to be thrown by the hand; Hand′grip, grasp, grip, close struggle; Hand′icuffs, Hand′ycuffs, fighting hand to hand.—adj. Hand′less, awkward.—ns. Hand-line, a fishing-line worked by hand without a rod; Hand′-list, a list for easy reference; Hand′-loom, a weaver's loom worked by hand, as distinguished from a power-loom.—adj. Hand′-made, manufactured by hand, not by a machine.—ns. Hand′maid, Hand′maiden, a female servant; Hand′-mill, a mill worked by hand for coffee, pepper, &c., a quern; Hand′-or′gan, a portable organ, played by means of a crank turned by the hand; Hand′-pā′per, a particular make of paper, early in use at the Record Office, with the water-mark of a hand pointing; Hand′-post, a finger-post, guide; — Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Law

Law

law, n. a rule of action established by authority: statute: the rules of a community or state: a rule or principle of science or art: the whole jurisprudence or the science of law: established usage: that which is lawful: the whole body of persons connected professionally with the law: litigation: a theoretical principle educed from practice or observation: a statement or formula expressing the constant order of certain phenomena: (theol.) the Mosaic code or the books containing it.—v.t. (coll.) to give law to, determine.—v.i. (obs.) to go to law.—adj. Law′-abid′ing, obedient to the law.—ns. Law-bind′ing; Law′-book, a book treating of law or law cases; Law′-break′er, one who violates a law; Law′-burr′ows (Scots law), a writ requiring a person to give security against doing violence to another; Law′-calf, a book-binding in smooth, pale-brown calf; Law′-day, a day of open court.—adj. Law′ful, allowed by law: rightful.—adv. Law′fully.—ns. Law′fulness; Law′giver, one who enacts laws: a legislator.—adj. Law′giving, legislating.—n. Law′ing, going to law: litigation: (obs.) the practice of cutting off the claws and balls of a dog's forefeet to hinder it from hunting: (Scot.) a reckoning at a public-house, a tavern bill.—adj. Law′less.—adv. Law′lessly.—ns. Law′lessness; Law′-list, an annual publication containing all information regarding the administration of law and the legal profession; Law′-lord, a peer in parliament who holds or has held high legal office: in Scotland, a judge of the Court of Session; Law′-mak′er, a lawgiver; Law′-man, one of a select body with magisterial powers in some of the Danish towns of early England; Law′-mer′chant, a term applied to the customs which have grown up among merchants in reference to mercantile documents and business; Law′-mong′er, a low pettifogging lawyer; Law′-stā′tioner, a stationer who sells parchment and other articles needed by lawyers; Law′suit, a suit or process in law; Law′-writ′er, a writer on law: a copier or engrosser of legal papers; Law′yer, a practitioner in the law: (N.T.) an interpreter of the Mosaic Law: the stem of a brier.—Law Latin, Latin as used in law and legal documents, being a mixture of Latin with Old French and Latinised English words; Law of nations, now international law, originally applied to those ethical principles regarded as obligatory on all communities; Law of nature (see Nature); Law of the land, the established law of a country; Laws of association (see Association); Laws of motion (see Motion); Lawful day, one on which business may be legally done—not a Sunday or a public holiday.—Boyle's (erron

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Leaf

Leaf

lēf, n. one of the lateral organs developed from the stem or axis of the plant below its growing-point: anything beaten thin like a leaf: two pages of a book: one side of a window-shutter, &c.:—pl. Leaves (lēvz).—v.i. to shoot out or produce leaves:—pr.p. leaf′ing; pa.p. leafed.—ns. Leaf′age, leaves collectively: abundance of leaves: season of leaves or leafing; Leaf′-bridge, a form of drawbridge in which the rising leaf or leaves swing vertically on hinges; Leaf′-bud, a bud producing a stem with leaves only; Leaf′iness; Leaf′-in′sect, an orthopterous insect of family Phasmidæ, the wing-covers like leaves.—adj. Leaf′less, destitute of leaves.—ns. Leaf′let, a little leaf, a tract; Leaf′-met′al, metal, especially alloys imitating gold and silver, in very thin leaves, for decoration; Leaf′-mould, earth formed from decayed leaves, used as a soil for plants; Leaf′-stalk, the petiole supporting the leaf.—adj. Leaf′y, full of leaves.—Take a leaf out of one's book (see Book); Turn over a new leaf, to take up a new and better course of conduct. [A.S. leáf; Ger. laub, Dut. loof, a leaf.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Letter

Letter

let′ėr, n. a conventional mark to express a sound: a written or printed message: literal meaning: a printing-type: (pl.) learning, literary culture.—v.t. to stamp letters upon.—ns. Lett′er-bal′ance, a balance for testing the weight of a letter for post; Lett′er-board (print.), board on which matter in type is placed for keeping or convenience in handling; Lett′er-book, a book in which letters or copies of letters are kept; Lett′er-box, a box in a post-office, at the door of a house, &c., for receiving letters; Lett′er-carr′ier, a postman; Lett′er-case, a portable writing-desk.—adj. Lett′ered, marked with letters: educated: versed in literature: belonging to learning (Lettered proof and Proof before letters; see Proof).—ns. Lett′erer; Lett′er-found′er, one who founds or casts letters or types; Lett′ering, the act of impressing letters: the letters impressed.—adj. Lett′erless, illiterate.—ns. Lett′er-miss′ive, an official letter on matters of common interest, sent to members of a church: a letter from the sovereign addressed to a dean and chapter, naming the person they are to elect bishop—also Royal letter; Lett′ern (same as Lectern); Lett′er-of-cred′it, a letter authorising credit or cash to a certain sum to be paid to the bearer; Lett′er-of-marque (märk), a commission given to a private ship by a government to make reprisals on the vessels of another state.—adj. Lett′er-per′fect, kept in the memory exactly (of an actor's part, &c.).—ns. Lett′erpress, letters impressed or matter printed from type, as distinguished from engraving: a copying-press; Lett′ers-pā′tent, a writing conferring a patent or authorising a person to enjoy some privilege, so called because written on open sheets of parchment; Lett′er-stamp, a post-office implement for defacing a postage-stamp: a stamp for imprinting dates, &c., on letters or papers; Lett′er-wood, the heart-wood of a tree found in British Guiana, dark brown, with darker spots somewhat resembling hieroglyphics; Lett′er-writ′er, one who writes letters, esp. for hire: a book containing forms for imitation in writing letters.—Letter of indication (see Circular); Letters of administration, a document issued by court appointing an administrator of an intestate estate; Letters requisitory, or rogatory, an instrument by which a court of one country asks that of another to take certain evidence on its behalf; Lettre de cachet (see Cachet). [Fr. lettre—L. littera.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Note

Note

nōt, n. that by which a person or thing is known: a mark or sign calling attention: a brief explanation: a short remark: a brief report, a catalogue, a bill: a memorandum: a short letter: a diplomatic paper: a small size of paper used for writing: (mus.) a mark representing a sound, also the sound itself, air, tune, tone, also a digital or key of the keyboard: a paper acknowledging a debt and promising payment, as a bank-note, a note of hand: notice, heed, observation: reputation: fame.—v.t. to make a note of: to notice: to attend to: to record in writing: to furnish with notes.—n. Note′-book, a book in which notes or memoranda are written: a bill-book.—adj. Not′ed, marked: well known: celebrated: eminent: notorious.—adv. Not′edly.—n. Not′edness.—adj. Note′less, not attracting notice.—ns. Note′-pā′per, folded writing-paper for letters (commercial, 5 × 8 in.; octavo, 4½ × 7; billet, 4 × 6; queen, 3½ × 5⅜; packet, 5½ × 9; Bath, 7 × 8); Not′er, one who notes or observes: one who makes notes, an annotator; Note′-shav′er (U.S.), a money-lender.—adj. Note′worthy, worthy of note or of notice.—Note a bill, to record on the back of it a refusal of acceptance, as a ground of protest. [Fr.,—L. nota, noscĕre, notum, to know.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Page

Page

pāj, n. one side of a written or printed leaf—4 pages in a folio sheet, 8 in a quarto, 16 in an octavo, 24 in a duodecimo, 36 in an octodecimo: a book, record, or source of knowledge: the type, illustrations, &c. arranged for printing one side of a leaf: (pl.) writings.—v.t. to number the pages of.—adj. Pag′inal.—v.t. Pag′ināte, to mark with consecutive numbers, to page.—ns. Paginā′tion, the act of paging a book: the figures and marks that indicate the number of pages; Pā′ging, the marking or numbering of the pages of a book. [Fr.,—L. pagina, a thing fastened—pangĕre, to fasten.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pass

Pass

pas, v.i. to pace or walk onward: to move from one place or state to another: to travel: to change: to circulate: to be regarded: to go by: to go unheeded or neglected: to elapse, as time: to be finished: to move away: to disappear: (B.) to pass away: to go through an examination or an inspection: to be approved: to meet with acceptance: to happen: to fall, as by inheritance: to flow through: to thrust, as with a sword: to run, as a road.—v.t. to go by, over, beyond, through, &c.: to spend: to omit: to disregard: to surpass: to enact, or to be enacted by: to cause to move: to send: to transfer: to give forth: to cause to go from one person or state to another: to approve: to undergo successfully: to give circulation to: (fencing) to thrust:—pa.p. passed and past.—n. a way through which one passes: a narrow passage, esp. over or through a range of mountains: a narrow defile: a passport: state or condition: a written permission to go out or in anywhere: a ticket: (fencing) a thrust: success in any examination or other test, a certificate of having reached a certain standard—without honours.—adj. Pass′able, that may be passed, travelled over, or navigated: that may bear inspection: that may be accepted or allowed to pass: a little above the common: tolerable.—n. Pass′ableness.—adv. Pass′ably.—ns. Pass′book, a book that passes between a trader and his customer, in which credit purchases are entered: a bank-book; Pass′-check, a ticket of admission to a place, or of readmission when one goes out intending to return; Pass′er, one who passes; Pass′er-by, one who passes by or near; Pass′key, a key enabling one to enter a house: a key for opening several locks.—adj. Pass′less, having no pass: impassable.—ns. Pass′man, one who gains a degree or pass without honours at a university; Pass′port, a warrant of protection and permission to travel; Pass′word (mil.), a private word by which a friend is distinguishable from a stranger, enabling one to pass or enter a camp, &c.—Pass muster, to go through an inspection without fault being found; Pass off, to impose fraudulently, to palm off; Pass on, to go forward: to proceed; Pass on, or upon, to come upon, to happen to: to give judgment or sentence upon: to practise artfully, to impose upon, to palm off; Pass over, or by, to go to the other side of: to cross, to go past without visiting or halting: to overlook, to disregard; Pass the time of day, to exchange any ordinary greeting of civility; Pass through, to undergo, experience.—Bring to pass, to cause to happen; Come to pass, to happen. [O. Fr. passer—It. passarepassus, a step.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pie

Pie

pī, n. a book which ordered the manner of performing divine service: a service-book: an ordinal.—By cock and pie (Shak.), a minced oath=By God and the service-book. [Fr.,—L. pica, lit. magpie, from its old black-letter type on white paper resembling the colours of the magpie.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Primer

Primer

prim′ėr, or prī′mer, n. a first book: a work of elementary religious instruction: a first reading-book: an elementary introduction to any subject: a kind of type of two species, long-primer (10 point) and great-primer (18 point). [Orig. a small prayer-book.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Refer

Refer

rē-fėr, v.t. to submit to another person or authority: to assign: to reduce: to carry back: to trace back: to hand over for consideration: to deliver over, as to refer a matter: to appeal: to direct for information.—v.i. to direct the attention: to give a reference: to have reference or recourse: to relate: to allude:—pr.p. refer′ring; pa.t. and pa.p. referred′.adjs. Ref′erable, Refer′rible, that may be referred or assigned to.—ns. Referēē′, one to whom anything is referred: an arbitrator, umpire, or judge; Ref′erence, the act of referring: a submitting for information or decision: relation: allusion: one who, or that which, is referred to: (law) the act of submitting a dispute for investigation or decision: a testimonial: a direction in a book, a quotation; Ref′erence-Bī′ble, a Bible having references to parallel passages; Ref′erence-book, a book to be referred to or consulted, as an encyclopædia; Ref′erence-Lī′brary, a library containing books to be consulted only in the premises.—n.pl. Ref′erence-marks (print.), the characters *, †, &c., used to refer to notes, &c.—ns. Referendar′, in Germany, a legal probationer who has passed the first of the two examinations for the judicial service; Referen′dary, one to whose decision a cause is referred, a referee: formerly a public official whose duty was to procure, execute, and despatch diplomas and charters, or who served as the medium of communication with a sovereign: the official through whom the patriarch of Constantinople communicates with the civil authorities; Referen′dum, in Switzerland, the right of the people to have all legislative acts passed in the Federal or Cantonal Assemblies referred to them en masse.—adj. Referen′tial, containing a reference: pointing or referring to something else.—adv. Referen′tially, in the way of reference.—ns. Refer′ment; Refer′rer. [O. Fr. referer (référer)—L. referre, to carry back—re-, back, ferre, to carry.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Register

Register

rej′is-tėr, n. a written record, regularly kept: the book containing the register: that which registers or records: one who registers, as the Scotch 'Lord Clerk Register:' that which regulates, as the damper of a furnace or stove: a stop or range of pipes on the organ, &c.: the compass of a voice or of a musical instrument: (print.) exact adjustment of position in the presswork of books printed on both sides.—v.t. to enter in a register: to record.—adjs. Reg′isterable, Reg′istrable, capable of being registered; Reg′istered, enrolled, as a registered voter.—ns. Reg′ister-grate, a grate with a shutter behind; Reg′ister-off′ice, a record-office: an employment office; Reg′ister-plate, in rope-making, a disc having holes so arranged as to give the yarns passing through them their proper position for entering into the general twist; Reg′istrant, one who registers, esp. a trade-mark or patent; Reg′istrar, one who keeps a register or official record; Reg′istrar-gen′eral, an officer having the superintendence of the registration of all births, deaths, and marriages; Reg′istrarship, office of a registrar.—v.t. Reg′istrāte.—ns. Registrā′tion, act of registering: in organ-playing, the act of combining stops for the playing of given pieces of music; Reg′istry, act of registering: place where a register is kept: facts recorded.—Registration Act, a statute of 1885 extending the borough system of registration to county towns; Registration of British ships, a duty imposed on ship-owners in order to secure to their vessels the privileges of British ships; Registration of copyright, the recording of the title of a book for the purpose of securing the copyright; Registration of trade-marks, the public system of registering such, with a view to secure their exclusive use.—Parish register, a book in which the births, deaths, and marriages are inscribed; Ship's register, a document showing the ownership of a vessel. [O. Fr. registre—Low L. registrum, for L. regestum, pl. regestare-, back, gerĕre, to carry.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Scrap

Scrap

skrap, n. a small piece: a remnant: a picture suited for preservation in a scrap-book: wrought-iron clippings: an unconnected extract.—v.t. to consign to the scrap-heap.—ns. Scrap′-book, a blank book for scraps or extracts, prints, &c.; Scrap′-heap, a place where old iron is collected; Scrap′-ī′ron, old iron accumulated for reworking; Scrap′-met′al, scraps or fragments of any kind of metal, which are only of use for remelting.—adv. Scrap′pily, in fragments, desultorily.—n. Scrap′piness, fragmentariness, disconnectedness.—adj. Scrap′py.—Go to the scrap-heap, to go to ruin. [Scand., Ice. skrap, scraps—skrapa, to scrape.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Service

Service

sėr′vis, n. condition or occupation of a servant: a working for another: duty required in any office: military or naval duty: any liturgical form or office, public religious worship, religious ceremonial: a musical composition for devotional purposes: labour, assistance, or kindness to another: benefit: profession of respect: order of dishes at table, or a set of them: official function, use, employment: that which is furnished: a tree of rarely more than 30 feet high, with leaves and flowers like the Rowan-tree, but the former downy beneath—also Sorb.—ns. Serviceabil′ity, Ser′viceableness.—adj. Ser′viceable, able or willing to serve: advantageous: useful: capable of rendering long service, durable.—adv. Ser′viceably.—ns. Ser′vice-berr′y, a berry of the service-tree: (Scot.) the fruit of the white beam: a North American shrub, the shadbush; Ser′vice-book, a book of forms of religious service: a prayer-book; Ser′vice-box, a form of expansion joint, used in street-mains of steam-heating systems; Ser′vice-clean′er, a portable air-compressing pump and receiver for service-pipes; Ser′vice-line, one of two lines drawn across the court twenty-one feet from the net, in lawn-tennis; Ser′vice-mag′azine, a magazine for storing ammunition for immediate use; Ser′vice-pipe, a smaller pipe from a main-pipe to a dwelling; Ser′vice-tree, a tree of the pear family, with close-grained wood and an edible fruit; Ser′ving-mall′et, a piece of wood having a groove on one side to fit the convexity of a rope; Din′ner-ser′vice, a full set of dishes for dinner; Tā′ble-ser′vice, a set of utensils for the table; Wild′-ser′vice, a small species of service-tree, cultivated in England for its fruit and wood.—Service of an heir (Scots law), a proceeding before a jury to determine the heir of a person deceased.—Active service, service of a soldier, &c., in the field, against an enemy; At your service, a phrase of civility; Have seen service, to have been in active military service: to have been put to hard use; Plain service, in Anglican usage, an office which is simply read. [Fr.,—L. servitium.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Sexto

Sexto

seks′to, n. a size of book made by folding a sheet of paper into six leaves.—n. Sex′to-dec′imo, a size of book made by folding a sheet of paper into sixteen leaves: a book of this size.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Text

Text

tekst, n. the original words of an author: that on which a comment is written: a passage of Scripture on which a sermon is supposed to be based.—ns. Text′-book, a book containing the leading principles of a science; Text′-hand, a large hand in writing—so called because it was the practice to write the text of a book in large-hand; Text′-man, Tex′tūalist, one ready in citing Scripture texts: one who adheres to the text.—adj. Tex′tūal, pertaining to, or contained in, the text: serving for a text.—adv. Tex′tually.—ns. Tex′tuary, a textualist; Tex′tus, the authoritative text, esp. of the Bible.—Textus receptus, the received text of the Greek Testament. [L. textustexĕre, textum, to weave.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Twenty

Twenty

twen′ti, adj. twice ten: nineteen and one: an indefinite number.—n. the number next after nineteen: the figures representing twenty: an old English division of infantry.—adj. Twen′tieth, next after the nineteenth.—n. one of twenty equal parts of anything.—adv. Twen′tyfold, twenty times as many.—adj. Twen′ty-four, twenty and four.—n. the number made up of four and twenty: (pl., print.) a form of composed type or plates containing twenty-four leaves or forty-eight pages, properly arranged for printing and folding: a book made up of sections of twenty-four pages.—n. Twen′ty-four′-mo, written 24mo, a leaf from a sheet of paper folded for a book in twenty-four equal parts: a book made up of leaves folded in twenty-four equal parts. [A.S. twentig, from twén=twegen, twain, two—tig (Goth. tigjus), ten; Ger. zwanzig.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Mein Kampf

Mein Kampf

Mein Kampf is a book by Nazi leader Adolf Hitler. It combines elements of autobiography with an exposition of Hitler's political ideology. Volume 1 of Mein Kampf was published in 1925 and Volume 2 in 1926. The book was edited by the former Hieronymite friar Bernhard Stempfle who later died during the Night of the Long Knives. Hitler began dictation of the book while imprisoned for what he considered to be "political crimes" following his failed Putsch in Munich in November 1923. Although Hitler received many visitors initially, he soon devoted himself entirely to the book. As he continued, Hitler realized that it would have to be a two-volume work, with the first volume scheduled for release in early 1925. The governor of Landsberg noted at the time that "he [Hitler] hopes the book will run into many editions, thus enabling him to fulfill his financial obligations and to defray the expenses incurred at the time of his trial."

— Freebase

Book of Exodus

Book of Exodus

The Book of Exodus or, simply, Exodus, is the second book of the Hebrew Bible, and of the five books of the Torah. The book tells how the children of Israel leave slavery in Egypt through the strength of Yahweh, the god who has chosen Israel as his people. Led by their prophet Moses they journey through the wilderness to Mount Sinai, where Yahweh promises them the land of Canaan in return for their faithfulness. Israel enters into a covenant with Yahweh who gives them their laws and instructions for the Tabernacle, the means by which he will dwell with them and lead them to the land, and give them peace. Traditionally ascribed to Moses himself, modern scholarship sees the book as initially a product of the Babylonian exile, with final revisions in the Persian post-exilic period. Carol Meyers in her commentary on Exodus suggests that it is arguably the most important book in the Bible, as it presents the defining features of Israel's identity: memories of a past marked by hardship and escape, a binding covenant with the god who chooses Israel, and the establishment of the life of the community and the guidelines for sustaining it.

— Freebase

Tideland

Tideland

Tideland is the third published book by author Mitch Cullin, and is the third installment of the writer's Texas Trilogy that also includes the coming-of-age novel Whompyjawed and the novel-in-verse Branches. The story is a first-person narrative told by the young Jeliza-Rose, detailing the summer she spent alone at an isolated, rundown farmhouse in Texas called What Rocks. With only the heads of old Barbie dolls to keep her company, Jeliza-Rose embarks on a series of highly imagined and increasingly surreal adventures in the tall grass surrounding the farmhouse. Tideland was first published in the United States in 2000 by Dufour Editions. The book received major notices upon publication, including a review from New York Times Book Review which wrote that the novel was "brilliant and beautiful." Some have favourably compared the book to earlier Southern Gothic American literature such as To Kill a Mockingbird and A Rose for Emily, while others, including Terry Gilliam and film producer Jeremy Thomas, have called the book a modern hybrid of Psycho and Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. A subsequent United Kingdom paperback edition followed in 2003 from Weidenfeld & Nicolson, with Gilliam's infamous blurb on the cover: "F*cking wonderful!" Other editions have since been published in the Netherlands, Japan, France, Greece, Italy, Poland, Russia, Turkey, and Korea.

— Freebase

Captivating

Captivating

Captivating is a popular and controversial book in the American/Christian market. Published in 2005 by John Eldredge and his wife Stasi, it proposes that women have three core desires: "to be romanced, to play an irreplaceable role in a great adventure, and to unveil beauty.". It also proposes that God made woman as the "Crown of Creation", an embodiment of God's beauty, mystery and vulnerability. The concept of woman as the "Crown of Creation" has become the subject of much controversy surrounding the book, critics claiming that it exalts women above men in the Creation. The book rejects the idea of an ideal woman and explores biblical scripture from the view that God desires woman to embrace her glory, rather than fear her femininity. Captivating is a companion to Wild at Heart, also by John Eldredge, and argues that its model of femininity complements men's innate desires for a battle to fight, an adventure to live, and a beauty to rescue. The authors use scriptural analysis, personal experience, and interviews with others as their basis for their argument. The book has received considerable criticism from people both within and outside of the Christian sphere. Many argue that the authors' personal experiences add too much bias to a book intended to address wide human conditions; many claim that the authors' scriptural analyses are incorrect.

— Freebase

Domesday Book

Domesday Book

Domesday Book, now held at The National Archives, Kew, in South West London, is the record of the great survey of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086. The survey was executed for William I of England: "While spending the Christmas time of 1085 in Gloucester, William had deep speech with his counsellors and sent men all over England to each shire to find out what or how much each landholder had in land and livestock, and what it was worth". One of the main purposes of the survey was to determine who held what and what taxes had been liable under Edward the Confessor; the judgment of the Domesday assessors was final—whatever the book said about who held the material wealth or what it was worth was the law, and there was no appeal. It was written in Latin, although there were some vernacular words inserted for native terms with no previous Latin equivalent, and the text was highly abbreviated. Richard FitzNigel, writing around the year 1179, stated that the book was known by the English as "Domesday", that is the Day of Judgment: In August 2006, a limited online version of Domesday Book was made available by the United Kingdom's National Archives site, charging users £2 per page to view the manuscript. In 2011, the Open Domesday site made the manuscript freely available for the first time. A survey approaching the scope and extent of the Domesday Book was not attempted until the Return of Owners of Land, 1873, which presented the first subsequent complete picture of the distribution of landed property in the British Isles, and is thus sometimes referred to as the "Modern Domesday".

— Freebase

1 Maccabees

1 Maccabees

The First book of Maccabees is a book written in Hebrew by a Jewish author after the restoration of an independent Jewish kingdom, about the latter part of the 2nd century BC. The original Hebrew is lost and the most important surviving version is the Greek translation contained in the Septuagint. The book is held as canonical scripture by some Christian churches, but not by most Protestant groups. Such Protestants consider it to be an apocryphal book. In modern-day Judaism, the book is often of great historical interest, but has no official religious status.

— Freebase

Spawn

Spawn

Spawn is a fictional character, a comic book superhero who appears in a monthly comic book of the same name published by Image Comics. Created by writer/artist Todd McFarlane, the character first appeared in Malibu Sun #13. Spawn was ranked 60th on Wizard magazine's list of the Top 200 Comic Book Characters of All Time, 50th on Empire magazine's list of The 50 Greatest Comic Book Characters and 36th on IGN's 2011 Top 100 Comic Book Heroes. The series has spun off several other comics, including Angela, Curse of the Spawn, Sam & Twitch, and the Japanese manga Shadows of Spawn. Spawn was adapted into a 1997 feature film, an HBO animated series lasting from 1997 until 1999, and a series of action figures whose high level of detail made McFarlane Toys known in the toy industry.

— Freebase

Exercise book

Exercise book

An exercise book is a notebook that is used in schools to copy down schoolwork and notes. A student will usually have a different exercise book for each separate lesson. The exercise book format is different for some subjects - for the majority of subjects, the exercise book will contain lined paper with a margin, but for other subjects such as mathematics, the exercise book will be blank or will be lined to aid in the drawing of graphs, tables or other diagrams. On the east coast of Canada they are called "Scribblers".

— Freebase

Future Shock

Future Shock

Future Shock is a book written by the futurist Alvin Toffler in 1970. In the book, Toffler defines the term "future shock" as a certain psychological state of individuals and entire societies. His shortest definition for the term is a personal perception of "too much change in too short a period of time". The book, which became an international bestseller, grew out of an article "The Future as a Way of Life" in Horizon magazine, Summer 1965 issue. The book has sold over 6 million copies and has been widely translated. A documentary film based on the book was released in 1972 with Orson Welles as on-screen narrator.

— Freebase

Codex

Codex

A codex is a book made up of a number of sheets of paper, vellum, or similar, with hand-written content, usually stacked and bound by fixing one edge and with covers thicker than the sheets, but sometimes continuous and folded concertina-style. The alternative to paged codex format for a long document is the continuous scroll. Examples of folded codices are the Maya codices. Sometimes the term is used for a book-style format, including modern printed books but excluding folded books. Developed by the Romans from wooden writing tablets, its gradual replacement of the scroll, the dominant form of book in the ancient world, has been termed the most important advance in the history of the book prior to the invention of printing. The codex all together transformed the shape of the book itself and offered a form that lasted for centuries. The spread of the codex is often associated with the rise of Christianity, which adopted the format for the Bible early on. First described by the 1st-century AD Roman poet Martial, who praised its convenient use, the codex achieved numerical parity with the scroll around AD 300, and had completely replaced it throughout the now Christianised Greco-Roman world by the 6th century.

— Freebase

Blook

Blook

A blook is printed book that contains or is based on content from a blog. The first printed blook was User Interface Design for Programmers, by Joel Spolsky, published by Apress on June 26, 2001, based on his blog Joel on Software. An early blook was written by Tony Pierce in 2002 when he compiled selected posts from his one-year-old blog and turned the collection into a book called "Blook". The name came about when Pierce held a contest, asking his readers to suggest a title for the book. Jeff Jarvis of BuzzMachine won the contest and subsequently invented the term. Pierce went on to publish two other blooks, How To Blog and Stiff. Print-on-demand publisher Lulu inaugurated the Lulu Blooker Prize for blooks, which was first awarded in 2006. The printed blook phenomenon is not limited to self-publishing. Several popular bloggers have signed book deals with major publishers to write books based on their blogs. However, some publishers are starting to realize that blog popularity does not translate to sales. Blog to book conversions via traditional publishing houses still happen, but the focus has shifted from blog popularity to content quality. "Blook" was short-listed in 2006 for inclusion in the Oxford English Dictionary and was a runner-up for Word of the Year.

— Freebase

Inger!

Inger!

Inger!, is a true story book by American writer James N. Sites. It was released in 2006 by the Jesse Stuart Foundation. The story is a first-person account of the life of the writer, Sites, and his wife Inger, the heroine of this book. Inger Krogh was a Norwegian exchange student coming to America after World War II, and this account begins when James Sites first meets her at sea following a shipwreck. The story touches on many political subjects, as Sites worked for and around many top government officials in the United States during his lifetime. The book's most singular contribution is its insider's portrayal of the strategy and follow-through tactics involved in a half-dozen national PR/political-action campaigns. The effect of this book was to get to the heart of what makes Washington tick and American democracy work. In essence the book describes this through the interplay between lobbyists, the news media, public relations pros and public officials that leads to government action.

— Freebase

Book of Daniel

Book of Daniel

The Book of Daniel is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament. It is notable for its changes from Hebrew to Aramaic and back. The first part of the book, comprising six chapters, is the story of Daniel set in the courts of Babylonian and Achaemenid Empire during the time of the Babylonian captivity. The remainder of the book contain three visions and their interpretation. There are differences between the fundamentalist view of Daniel and the scholarly consensus. Conservative Biblical scholars and evangelical commentators hold that its stories tell of real events and real prophecies written during and shortly after the Babylonian captivity by a real Daniel living in the late sixth century BCE. The scholarly consensus is that the Book of Daniel was written after Antiochus IV Epiphanes desecrated the altar of the Temple of Jerusalem around 167 BCE. In this view, Daniel was written in reaction to that incident and the final redaction of the work dates to the second century BCE. For secular scholars, the issue was settled over a century ago, but many Christians do not accept this line of reasoning, looking to Jesus' implicit approval of the book by quoting from it in his teachings.

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Book of Micah

Book of Micah

The Book of Micah is a prophetic book in the Tanakh/Old Testament, and the sixth of the twelve minor prophets. It records the sayings of Micah, Mikayahu, meaning "Who is like Yahweh?", an 8th-century B.C. prophet from the village of Moresheth in Judah. The book has three major divisions, chapters 1-2, 3-5 and 6-7, each introduced by the word "Hear," with a pattern of alternating announcements of doom and expressions of hope within each division. Micah reproaches unjust leaders, defends the rights of the poor against the rich and powerful, and preaches social justice; while looking forward to a world at peace centered on Zion under the leadership of a new Davidic monarch. While the book is relatively short it includes lament, theophany, hymnic prayer of petition and confidence, and the "covenant lawsuit", a distinct genre in which Yahweh sues Israel for breach of contract, that is, for violation of the Sinai covenant. It has been noticed as remarkable that this book commences with the last words of another prophet with similar name, “Micaiah the son of Imlah”: “Hearken, O people, every one of you.”.

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Book of Zephaniah

Book of Zephaniah

The superscription of the Book of Zephaniah attributes its authorship to “Zephaniah son of Cushi son of Gedaliah son of Amariah son of Hezekiah, in the days of King Josiah son of Amon of Judah”. All that is known of Zephaniah comes from the text. The superscription of the book is lengthier than most and contains two features. The name Cushi, Zephaniah’s father, means ‘Ethiopian’. In a society where genealogy was considered extremely important because of God's covenant with Abraham and his descendants, the author may have felt compelled to establish his Hebrew lineage. The author of Zephaniah does not shrink from condemning the Cushites or Ethiopians. Chapter 2:12 contains a succinct but unequivocal message: “You also, O Ethiopians, / Shall be killed by my sword.” Some question whether the translation "You, also, O Ethiopians / Shall be killed by my sword" is a good translation, given the fact that Ethiopia is a long way away from Jerusalem. As with many of the other prophets, there is no external evidence to directly associate composition of the book with a prophet by the name of Zephaniah. Some scholars believe that much of the material does not date from the days of King Josiah, but is actually post-monarchic. Three general possibilities are that a person, possibly named Zephaniah, prophesied the words of the book of Zephaniah; the general message of a Josianic prophet is conveyed through the book of Zephaniah; or the name could have been employed, either during the monarchic or post-monarchic period, as a ‘speaking voice’, possibly for rhetorical purposes. Although it is possible that a post-monarchic author assumed the persona of a monarchic prophet to add credibility to his message, there is no evidence to support such a claim.

— Freebase

Book value

Book value

In accounting, book value or carrying value is the value of an asset according to its balance sheet account balance. For assets, the value is based on the original cost of the asset less any depreciation, amortization or impairment costs made against the asset. Traditionally, a company's book value is its total assets minus intangible assets and liabilities. However, in practice, depending on the source of the calculation, book value may variably include goodwill, intangible assets, or both. When intangible assets and goodwill are explicitly excluded, the metric is often specified to be "tangible book value". In the United Kingdom, the term net asset value may refer to the book value of a company.

— Freebase

Blackmark

Blackmark

Blackmark is a Bantam Books paperback, published January 1971, that is one of the first American graphic novels, predating such seminal works as Richard Corben's Bloodstar, Jim Steranko's Chandler: Red Tide, Don McGregor & Paul Gulacy's Sabre, and Will Eisner's A Contract with God. It was conceived and drawn by the veteran comic book artist Gil Kane, and scripted by Archie Goodwin from an outline by Kane. The term "graphic novel", while seen in print as early as 1964 in an obscure fan publication, was not in mainstream use in 1971 when Blackmark, a science fiction/sword-and-sorcery adventure, was first published; the back-cover blurb of the February 2002 30th-anniversary edition calls the book, retroactively, "the very first American graphic novel." Blackmark is, objectively, a 119-page story of comic-book art, with captions and word balloons, published in a traditional book format. It is also the first with an original heroic-adventure character conceived expressly for this form. It originally sold for 75 cents, comparable to other paperbacks at the time. The 30th-anniversary edition also includes the planned second book, the 117-page The Mind Demons; an eight-page historical afterword; and the paperback's double-page frontispiece. It does not include the original final page: A full-body shot of Blackmark with sword, and a Kane floating-head self-portrait and one-paragraph biography / afterword.

— Freebase

Private Parts

Private Parts

Private Parts is the first book written by American radio personality Howard Stern. Released on October 7, 1993 by Simon & Schuster, it is the fastest-selling book in the company's history. It was later adapted into a film in 1997 starring Stern and his radio show staff as themselves. The early chapters are autobiographical, covering Stern's upbringing and early career, while later chapters are more in the style of a memoir, covering recurring themes from his radio show such as sex, flatulence, and celebrities. Stern's choices for the title were I, Moron, Mein Kampf and Penis but were refused by the publisher, although Mein Kampf would be used as the title of the book's fifth chapter regarding the beginning of his career. They then compromised with the title Private Parts, suggested by Stern's co-host Robin Quivers, which Stern liked as a sexual pun referring to the personal "private parts" of his life with a popular euphemism for genitalia. The book received mixed reviews from critics, often drawing comparisons to Lenny Bruce's How to Talk Dirty and Influence People. Like Stern's radio show, it received a great deal of opposition due to its content. It is number 87 on the American Library Association's list of the "100 Most Frequently challenged books Between 1990 and 2000." A paperback edition was released in September 1994, where Pocket Books, a division of Simon & Schuster, printed a further 2.8 million copies. In late 1995, Stern published a second book called Miss America.

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White Book

White Book

The White Book refers to a standard of compact disc that stores not only sound but also still pictures and motion video. It was released in 1993 by Sony, Philips, Matsushita, and JVC. These discs, most commonly found in Asia, are usually called "Video CDs". In some ways, VCD can be thought of as the successor to the Laserdisc and the predecessor to DVD. Note that Video CD should not be confused with CD Video which was an earlier and entirely different format. Several extensions to the White Book were published in later years: VCD 2.0 in 1995, VCD-Internet in 1997, and Super Video CD in 1998. The standard is not freely available and must be licensed from Philips. The White Book also defines the more general CD-i Bridge format, which are CD-ROM XA discs with an additional Green Book CD-i specific application program. The CD-ROM XA information in bridge discs can be obtained through CD-ROM drives, while CD-i players can use the CD-i program to read bridge discs as well. Bridge discs must conform to both the CD-ROM XA and Green Book CD-i specifications. VCDs and SVCDs fall under the category of bridge discs, as do Photo CDs and Karaoke CDs.

— Freebase

Spiritism

Spiritism

Spiritism or Spiritist Doctrine is a system of explanation of phenomena having in common the general belief in the survival of a spirit after death. In a stricter sense, Spiritism is a doctrine founded upon the existence, manifestations and teachings of the spirits. Compiled in the 19th century by the French educator Allan Kardec, Spiritism soon spread to other countries, having today 35 representative countries in the International Spiritist Council. Brazil is the country where the most significant number of adherents can be found. The term Spiritism was established by the French educator Hippolyte Léon Denizard Rivail to specify the teachings encoded by it, adopting the pseudonym Allan Kardec. The encoding of spiritism is present: The Spirits' Book; The Mediums' Book; The Gospel According to Spiritism; Heaven and Hell; The Genesis According to Spiritism. In the publication of the book "What is Spiritism", the encoder defines spiritism as "a science that deals with the nature, origin and destination of spirits, and of their relations with the corporeal world." The first appearance of the term occurred in French literature with the publication of the The Spirits' Book. In this book, Kardec sought to distinguish spiritualism and spiritism. Spiritualism is a name common to various religions, philosophies or other names, refers to the opposite of materialism. Spiritism is a spiritualist philosophy, also understood as a doctrine of scientific-philosophical-religious-oriented moral improvement of the human being.

— Freebase

Codicology

Codicology

Codicology is the study of books as physical objects, especially manuscripts written on parchment in codex form. It is often referred to as 'the archaeology of the book', concerning itself with the materials, and techniques used to make books, including their binding. There are no clear-cut definitions: some codicologists say that their field encompasses palaeography, the study of handwriting, while some palaeographers say that their field encompasses codicology. The study of written features such as marginalia, glosses, ownership inscriptions, etc. falls in both camps, as does the study of the physical aspects of decoration, which otherwise belongs to art history. By a close examination of the physical attributes of a book, it is sometimes possible to establish the history and provenance of a book, or to match up long-separated elements originally from the same book. Palaeographers and codicologists may also study the history of libraries, manuscript-collecting and of book-cataloguing.

— Freebase

Bec

Bec

Bec is a book by Darren Shan in The Demonata series. It is the fourth book of the series released but it is first chronologically. The protagonist of the book is the central character Bec. It takes place in Ireland around 1600 years ago. The last line of the book, "Screams in the dark," is also the first line of the book, as well as the tagline for the novel. Bec is the end of the first part of the Demonata books, where the three protagonists are introduced.

— Freebase

The Yellow Book

The Yellow Book

The Yellow Book, published in London from 1894 to 1897 by Elkin Mathews and John Lane, later by John Lane alone, and edited by the American Henry Harland, was a quarterly literary periodical that lent its name to the "Yellow Nineties". It was a leading journal of the British 1890s; to some degree associated with Aestheticism and Decadence, the magazine contained a wide range of literary and artistic genres, poetry, short stories, essays, book illustrations, portraits, and reproductions of paintings. Aubrey Beardsley was its first art editor, and he has been credited with the idea of the yellow cover, with its association with illicit French fiction of the period. He obtained works by such artists as Charles Conder, William Rothenstein, John Singer Sargent, Walter Sickert, and Philip Wilson Steer. The literary content was no less distinguished; authors who contributed were: Max Beerbohm, Arnold Bennett, "Baron Corvo", Ernest Dowson, George Gissing, Sir Edmund Gosse, Henry James, Richard Le Gallienne, Charlotte Mew, Arthur Symons, H. G. Wells, William Butler Yeats. Though Oscar Wilde never published anything within its pages, it was linked to him because Beardsley had illustrated his Salomé and because he was on friendly terms with many of the contributors. Moreover, in Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray, a major corrupting influence on Dorian is "the yellow book" which Lord Henry sends over to amuse him after the suicide of his first love. This "yellow book" is understood by critics to be À rebours by Joris-Karl Huysmans, a representative work of Parisian decadence that heavily influenced British aesthetes like Beardsley. Such books in Paris were wrapped in yellow paper to alert the reader to their lascivious content. It is not clear, however, whether Dorian Gray is the direct source for the review's title. Soon after Wilde was arrested in April 1895 Beardsley was dismissed as the periodical's art editor, his post taken over by the publisher, John Lane, assisted by another artist, Patten Wilson. Although critics have contended that the quality of its contents declined after Beardsley left and that The Yellow Book became a vehicle for promoting the work of Lane's authors, a remarkably high standard in both art and literature was maintained until the periodical ceased publication in the spring of 1897. A notable feature was the inclusion of work by women writers and illustrators, among them Ella D'Arcy and Ethel Colburn Mayne, George Egerton, Rosamund Marriott Watson, Ada Leverson, Netta and Nellie Syrett, and Ethel Reed.

— Freebase

Fore-edge painting

Fore-edge painting

A fore-edge painting is a scene painted on the edges of the pages of a book. There are two basic forms, including paintings on edges that have been fanned and edges that are closed; thus with the first instance a book edge must be fanned to see the painting and in the second the painting is on the closed edge itself and thus should not be fanned. A fanned painting is one that is not visible when the book is closed. In order to view the painting, the leaves of the book must be fanned, exposing the edges of the pages and thereby the painting. Another basic difference is that a painting on the closed edge is painted directly on the surface of the book edge. For the fanned painting the watercolor is applied to the top or bottom margin of the page/leaf and not to the actual "fore"-edge itself.

— Freebase

Breaking Dawn

Breaking Dawn

Breaking Dawn is the fourth and final novel in the The Twilight Saga by American author Stephenie Meyer. Divided into three parts, the first and third sections are written from Bella Swan's perspective and the second is written from the perspective of Jacob Black. The novel directly follows the events of the previous novel, Eclipse, as Bella and Edward Cullen get married, leaving behind a heartbroken Jacob. When Bella faces unexpected and life threatening situations, she willingly risks her human life and possible vampire immortality to undergo the ultimate transformation from a weak pawn to the strong queen with unique powers to fight the final battle to save all those she loves. Meyer finished an outline of the book in 2003, but developed and changed it as she wrote New Moon and Eclipse, though the main and most significant storylines remained unchanged. Little, Brown and Company took certain measures to prevent the book's contents from leaking, such as closing forums and message boards on several fansites and providing a special e-mail address for fans to send in links to leaks and spoilers online. Breaking Dawn was released on August 2, 2008 at midnight release parties in over 4,000 bookstores throughout the US. From its initial print run of 3.7 million copies, over 1.3 million were sold in the US and 20,000 in the UK in the first 24 hours of the book's release, setting a record in first-day sales performance for the Hachette Book Group USA. The book was highly successful, selling over 6 million copies in 2008, and was the third best-selling novel of 2008 behind Twilight and New Moon.

— Freebase

On Becoming Baby Wise

On Becoming Baby Wise

On Becoming Baby Wise: Giving Your Infant the Gift of Nighttime Sleep is a controversial book by evangelical Christian adviser Gary Ezzo and pediatrician Robert Bucknam about raising an infant. Formerly published by Multnomah Books, Baby Wise is currently self-published through Ezzo's own publishing company, Parent-Wise Solutions; approximately 250,000 copies have been sold. The book grew out of a church-based parenting book written by Ezzo and his wife as they raised two children. Baby Wise presents an infant care program which the authors say will cause babies to sleep through the night beginning between seven and nine weeks of age. It emphasizes parental control of the infant's sleep, play and feeding schedule rather than allowing the baby to decide when to eat, play and sleep. The Baby Wise program outlined in the book has come under criticism from a number of pediatricians and parents who are concerned that an infant reared using the book's advice will be at higher risk of failure to thrive, malnutrition, and emotional disorders.

— Freebase

Omeros

Omeros

Omeros is an epic poem by Caribbean writer Derek Walcott that was first published in 1990. Walcott divides the work into seven "books" which are divided into a total of sixty-four chapters. Many critics view Omeros "as Walcott's major achievement." Soon after its publication in 1990, it received praise from publications like The Washington Post and The New York Times Book Review which chose the book as one of its "Best Books of 1990" and called it "one of Mr. Walcott's finest poetic works." The book also won the WH Smith Literary Award in 1991. Soon after publishing Omeros, in 1992, Walcott was also awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, and the Nobel committee member who presented the award, Professor Kjell Espmark, singled out Walcott's most recent achievement at the time, in Omeros, recognizing the book as a "major work." Walcott painted the cover for the book which depicts some of his main characters at sea together in a boat.

— Freebase

Cross Fire

Cross Fire

Cross Fire is the seventeenth book of James Patterson's Alex Cross series. In the novel, Kyle Craig has come back for one final scare to finally kill Alex Cross, but Alex has a special day ahead of him, one that concerns Bree and his relationship. The novel was released in hardcover, paperback, and audio book on November 15, 2010. It was preceded by I, Alex Cross and was followed by Kill Alex Cross. The book sees Alex getting married to Bree after proposing to her in the previous book; the book also sees the final appearance of Kyle Craig, who dies by shooting an oxygen tank, killing him and two cops before he can be sent to prison again by Alex.

— Freebase

Eragon

Eragon

Eragon is the first book in the Inheritance Cycle by Christopher Paolini, who began writing at the age of 15. After writing the first draft for a year, he spent a second year rewriting it and fleshing out the story and characters. Paolini's parents saw the final manuscript and decided to self-publish Eragon. Paolini spent a year traveling around the United States promoting the novel. By chance, the book was discovered by Carl Hiaasen, who got it re-published by Alfred A. Knopf. The re-published version was released on August 26, 2003. The book tells the story of a young farm boy named Eragon, who finds a mysterious stone in the mountains. A dragon he later names Saphira hatches from the stone, which was really an egg. When the evil King Galbatorix finds out about Eragon and his dragon, he sends his servants, the Ra'zac, after them in an effort to capture them. Eragon and Saphira are forced to flee from their hometown, and decide to search for the Varden, a group of rebels who want to see the downfall of Galbatorix. Critiques of Eragon often pointed out the similarities to other works such as Earthsea and Dragonlance. Reviews also called the book a notable achievement for such a young author as Paolini. Eragon was the third-best-selling children's hardback book of 2003, and the second-best-selling paperback of 2005. It placed on the New York Times Children's Books Best Seller list for 121 weeks. Eragon was adapted into a feature film of the same name that was released on December 15, 2006.

— Freebase

Acts of God

Acts of God

Acts of God is the concluding novel of the Christ Clone Trilogy, written by James BeauSeigneur. This book primarily chronicles the Bowl Judgements as foretold in the Book of Revelation, as well as the institution of the Mark of the Beast, and the growing persecution of the followers of God. Other biblical prophecies from the Book of Revelation and the Book of Daniel are depicted as well. As with the first and second book in this trilogy, many footnotes are used from various sources. These sources include not only the bible, but also sources that were used as the author performed research and analysis to ensure scientific accuracy in the depiction of fictional events.

— Freebase

Prompt book

Prompt book

The prompt book, also called prompt book, transcript, the bible or sometimes simply "the book," is the copy of a production script that contains the information necessary to create a theatrical production from the ground up. It is a compilation of all blocking, business, light, speech and sound cues, lists of properties, drawings of the set, contact information for the cast and crew, and any other relevant information that might be necessary to help the production run smoothly and nicely. In modern theatrical productions, the prompt book is generally maintained and kept by the stage manager, with differences in the specific construction and organization to suit the style of the stage manager keeping the book, and the type of production. Modern prompt books will tend to be constructed using binders with multiple tab dividers, with the page of the production attached to a larger sheet of paper to provide more margin space for taking notes. Markings to the script are typically done in pencil, and either in the margins or on the blank side of the back of the opposing page.

— Freebase

Board book

Board book

A board book is a type of book printed on thick paperboard. The paperboard is printed and used for both the cover and the interior pages. Each page panel is a minimum of two plies of paperboard thickness. Unlike a typical paper book that is bound with saddle stitching or perfect binding, a board book's pages are specially folded and bound together. Board books are very durable and consequently intended for small children, who often tend to be less gentle with books. Most of the board books produced in the world are produced in China and Mexico; however, there is one board book printer still located in the United States.

— Freebase

Book of Matches

Book of Matches

Book Of Matches is a poetry book written by Simon Armitage, first published in 1993 by Faber and Faber. Several poems featured in the book are studied as part of the GCSE English Literature examination in the UK. The book is written in three sections, the first containing 30 short sonnets. Each is meant to be read within 20 seconds, the amount of time it would take for a match to be lit and burn out. The second, Becoming of Age, contains 14 titled poems, with the third, Reading the Banns, containing a collection of untitled poems based upon a wedding theme. Critical reception for Book of Matches was mostly positive, Ronald Carter calling it Armitage's "most distinctive volume". The Independent stated that it was a "fine collection" and noted that Armitage's persona had changed in the collection's tone.

— Freebase

Guinness World Records

Guinness World Records

Guinness World Records, known from its inception in 1955 through 1998 as The Guinness Book of Records and in previous U.S. editions as The Guinness Book of World Records, is a reference book published annually, listing world records, both human achievements and the extremes of the natural world. The book itself holds a world record, as the best-selling copyrighted book of all time. It is one of the most frequently stolen books from public libraries in the United States. As of the 2015 edition, it is now in its 61st year of publication. The international franchise has extended beyond print to include television series and museums. The popularity of the franchise has resulted in Guinness World Records becoming the primary international authority on the cataloguing and verification of a huge number of world records; the organization employs official record adjudicators authorised to verify the authenticity of the setting and breaking of records.

— Freebase

component-owned container

component-owned container

A 20- or 40-foot International Organization for Standardization container procured and owned by a single Department of Defense component. May be either on an individual unit property book or contained within a component pool (e.g., Marine Corps maritime pre-positioning force containers). May be temporarily assigned to the Department of Defense common-use container system. Also called Service-unique container. See also common-use container.

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

on hand

on hand

The quantity of an item that is physically available in a storage location and contained in the accountable property book records of an issuing activity.

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

Attributor

Attributor

Attributor is the leading provider of digital content protection solutions for the publishing industry. Attributor offers products that enable publishers to identify and verify copy infringement, enforce authorized use, analyze market demand and monetize digital content.Attributor’s system crawls tens to hundreds of millions of pages on the Internet daily and verifies whether it is authorized reuse. When Attributor finds a use that is not permitted, the hosting site is alerted and receives a range of options depending on the publisher and author, including a request to swap for authorized content, a licensing request, or a DMCA takedown notice. Attributor can digitally fingerprint each piece of content to uniquely identify the content based on its essential features. Each content owner can define permitted use of their original content, such as how much can be copied, what kind of attribution is required and whether and on what terms commercial use is permitted. Attributor’s products and services are highly scalable and are used by all types of publishers- from the largest in the world to individual authors across book publishing, news and magazine publishers and financial institutions.Operating 24x7 across geographies, Attributor’s solutions address all of the components of the digital content ecosystem including supply, distribution and demand.Research and Activity: In April 2009, Attributor and more than 1,000 publishing companies founded the Fair Syndication Consortium, the goal of which is to establish a new online content syndication model. In December 2009, Attributor and the Fair Syndication Consortium released research data on the proliferation of U.S. newspaper content, which found that over a 30-day period more than 75,000 unlicensed sites reused U.S. newspaper content online. According to the study, on these sites, 112,000 near-exact copies of unlicensed articles were detected. Attributor’s FairShare Guardian service monitored 913 books in 14 subjects in the final quarter of 2009 and estimated that more than 9 million copies of books were illegally downloaded from the 25 sites it tracked. In April 2010, Attributor reported on online magazine infringement. The researched looked at a segment of the magazine industry: 133 English language magazine titles, and the infringement that occurs on just 20 of the more than 2,000 domains that illegally host full-issue downloads of these magazines. Among the results, Attributor found 3,996 instances of downloadable, full issues of these 133 magazines on these 20 sites, and 84 of the 133 (63%) magazines had infringements. Following the magazine report, Attributor produced an Ad Server Report that analyzed those that monetize content across 270 million domains, which is nearly 75% more domains and pages covered than in previous studies. Most notably, Google and DoubleClick overwhelmingly dominated the market, combining for more than 65% of the market share, which, compared to the December 2008 report, is an increase of about 9%. In October 2010, Attributor released a research report on online book piracy, indicating that publishers could be losing out on as much as $3 billion to online book piracy. This was followed by the release of their Graduated Response Trial which showed the majority of sites were willing to license content or remove it.

— CrunchBase

Blurb

Blurb

Blurb is a startup that allows anyone to create customized books (as in, a real, tangible book that you can hold). Using the company’s BookSmart software (Mac and PC), users can create photo books, portfolios, business books, wedding books, blog books and more. Books can either be created for self-use or shared, marketed and sold at cost or for profit in Blurb’s online bookstore. Blurb authors get to keep 100% of the book’s mark-up.In October of 2007, the company introduced features that let users collaboratively create books and share photos.Blurb initially launched in May of 2006 with a tool to turn your blog into a book. The service has since been expanded. Many of Blurb’s competitors like Lulu and iUniverse tend to focus on creating books out of manuscripts, rather that photo-oriented books. Picaboo appears to be Blurb’s closest competitor.

— CrunchBase

MyTime

MyTime

MyTime is the convenient new way to find and book open appointments online or via your iPhone. Consumers nationwide can browse or search through 2 million businesses and find appointments for everyday local services ranging from Acupuncture to Yoga instruction. Consumers can see the exact price of the service they’re considering, and can even save money by booking ‘off-peak’ appointment times which can be discounted by MyTime’s dynamic pricing algorithm. When consumers are ready to book an appointment, they can do so right through MyTime’s website or mobile app because the product is directly integrated into the appointment calendaring systems of the local businesses on the site. If the business’s calendar isn’t integrated yet with MyTime, the MyTime team will concierge the appointment time for free.While consumers pay for the service through MyTime at the time of the appointment booking, they can receive a full-refund for cancellations outside of 24 hours.MyTime’s vision is to make finding and booking local services as easy as buying a book on Amazon. The service is currently available nationwide with 2 million businesses that can be booked via web (http://www.mytime.com) or iPhone app (http://www.mytime.com/iphone).

— CrunchBase

ReserveMyHome

ReserveMyHome

Company OverviewReserveMyHome’s mission is to display, promote, and book nationwide short-term vacation rentals from Lake Tahoe to Orlando, FL and beyond. Our vacation rentals are provided direct from owners at a low cost enabling travelers and renters to instantly and securely reserve their vacation accommodations at a discount.As a secure, trusted, customized, reservation and booking service for verified vacation homeowners who manage their own properties, ReserveMyHome.com is the perfect choice for an end-to-end listing and real-time booking solution, providing online and live-on-demand reservation and booking technology and service, similar to the front desk at a five-star hotel… We book vacation rentals, beach homes, cabins, huts and more! As vacation rental homeowners ourselves, we know how critical it is to respond very quickly with informed answers to traveler or renters. These answers will be presented in a very timely, friendly and informed fashion by our reservation specialists. We know that potential renters need information now, and will quickly travel on to the next home to book without that information.ReserveMyHome™s utility and ease of use have us en route to being one of the world’s best known booking and vacation home sites, almost entirely through word of mouth and our propritiary Reserve My Home instantly button from satisfied users. We keep our display and booking platform secure and up to date by teaming up with some of the most trusted names in the industry.

— CrunchBase

International Standard Book Number

International Standard Book Number

The International Standard Book Number is a unique numeric commercial book identifier based upon the 9-digit Standard Book Numbering code created by Gordon Foster, Emeritus Professor of Statistics at Trinity College, Dublin, for the booksellers and stationers W. H. Smith and others in 1965. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108. An SBN may be converted to an ISBN by prepending the digit "0". ISO has appointed the International ISBN Agency as the registration authority for ISBN worldwide and the ISBN Standard is developed under the control of ISO Technical Committee 46/Subcommittee 9 TC 46/SC 9. The ISO on-line facility only refers back to 1978. Since 1 January 2007, ISBNs have contained 13 digits, a format that is compatible with "Bookland" EAN-13s. Occasionally, a book may appear without a printed ISBN if it is printed privately or the author does not follow the usual ISBN procedure; however, this can be rectified later. Another identifier, the International Standard Serial Number, identifies periodical publications such as magazines.

— Freebase

Coffee table book

Coffee table book

A coffee table book is a hardcover book that is intended to sit on a coffee table or similar surface in an area where guests sit and are entertained, thus inspiring conversation or alleviating boredom. They tend to be oversized and of heavy construction, since there is no pressing need for portability. Subject matter is generally confined to non-fiction, and is usually visually oriented. Pages consist mainly of photographs and illustrations, accompanied by captions and small blocks of text, as opposed to long prose. Since they are aimed at anyone who might pick the book up for a light read, the analysis inside is often more basic and with less jargon than other books on the subject. Because of this, the term "coffee table book" can be used pejoratively to indicate a superficial approach to the subject.

— Freebase

Imprint

Imprint

In the publishing industry, an imprint can mean several different things: ⁕A piece of bibliographic information about a book, it refers to the name and address of the book's publisher and its date of publication as given at the foot or on the verso of its title page. ⁕It can mean a trade name under which a work is published. One single publishing company may have multiple imprints; the different imprints are used by the publisher to market works to different demographic consumer segments. In some cases, the diversity results from the takeover of smaller publishers by a larger company. This usage of the word has evolved from the first meaning given above. ⁕It can also refer to a finer distinction of a book's version than "edition". This is used to distinguish, for example different printings, or printing runs of the same edition, or to distinguish the same edition produced by a different publisher or printer. With the creation of the "ISBN" identification system, which is assigned to a text prior to its printing, a different imprint has effectively come to mean a text with a different ISBN—if one had been assigned to it. ⁕Under the UK Printer's Imprint Act 1961, which amended the earlier Newspapers, Printers, and Reading Rooms Repeal Act 1869, any printer must put their name and address on the first or last leaf of every paper or book they print or face a penalty of up to £50 per copy. In addition, under the Political Parties, Elections and Referendums Act 2000, any election material - including websites - must show the name of the promoter of the material and the name and address of the person on whose behalf it is being published.

— Freebase

Reeling

Reeling

Reeling was Pauline Kael's fifth collection of movie reviews, covering the years 1972 - 1975. The book is largely composed of movie reviews, ranging from her famous review of Last Tango in Paris to A Woman Under the Influence, but it also contains a longer essay entitled "On the Future of Movies" as well as a book review of The Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers Book, by fellow The New Yorker dance critic Arlene Croce. The book is out-of-print in the United States, but is still published by Marion Boyars Publishers in the United Kingdom.

— Freebase

The Book of Job

The Book of Job

The Book of Job, commonly referred to simply as Job, is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. It relates the story of Job, his trials at the hands of a character referred to as "the satan", in Hebrew, or in English, "the accuser", his discussions with friends on the origins and nature of his suffering, his challenge to God, and finally a response from God. The book is a didactic poem set in a prose frame. An oft-asked question in the book of Job is, "Why do the righteous suffer?". However, Maimonides suggests that the person of Elihu saw Job as a shallow, "unexamining" and "unwise", perhaps even foolish, man who was merely grateful on a superficial level for what he had, thereby creating an opening for trouble to enter into his life. The book of Job has been included in lists of the greatest books in world literature.

— Freebase

Book of Haggai

Book of Haggai

The Book of Haggai is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, and has its place as the antepenultimate of the Minor Prophets or the "Book of the Twelve." It is a short book, consisting of only two chapters. The historical setting dates around 520 BCE before the Temple has been rebuilt. 520 BCE falls between the start of the Persian empire in 539 BCE and 520 BCE a period that saw major kings such as Zerubbabel helped lead the Jews in their return to the land.

— Freebase

Book of Deuteronomy

Book of Deuteronomy

The Book of Deuteronomy is the fifth book of the Hebrew Bible, and of the Jewish Torah/Pentateuch. The Hebrew title is taken from the opening phrase Eleh ha-devarim, "These are the words..."; the English title is from a Greek mis-translation of the Hebrew phrase mishneh ha-torah ha-zoth, "a copy of this law", in Deuteronomy 17:18, as to deuteronomion touto - "this second law". The book consists of three sermons or speeches delivered to the Israelites by Moses on the plains of Moab, shortly before they enter the Promised Land. The first sermon recapitulates the forty years of wilderness wanderings which have led to this moment, and ends with an exhortation to observe the law; the second reminds the Israelites of the need for exclusive allegiance to one God and observance of the laws he has given them, on which their possession of the land depends; and the third offers the comfort that even should Israel prove unfaithful and so lose the land, with repentance all can be restored. While traditionally accepted as the genuine words of Moses delivered on the eve of the occupation of Canaan, a broad consensus of modern scholars now see its origins in traditions from Israel brought south to the Kingdom of Judah in the wake of the Assyrian destruction of Samaria and then adapted to a program of nationalist reform in the time of King Josiah, with the final form of the modern book emerging in the milieu of the return from the Babylonian exile during the late 6th century.

— Freebase

Preface

Preface

A preface is an introduction to a book or other literary work written by the work's author. An introductory essay written by a different person is a foreword and precedes an author's preface. The preface often closes with acknowledgements of those who assisted in the literary work. A preface generally covers the story of how the book came into being, or how the idea for the book was developed; this is often followed by thanks and acknowledgments to people who were helpful to the author during the time of writing. A preface is usually signed; a foreword by another person is always signed. Information essential to the main text is generally placed in a set of explanatory notes, or perhaps in an "Introduction" that may be paginated with Arabic numerals, rather than in the preface. The term preface can also mean any preliminary or introductory statement. It is sometimes abbreviated pref. Preface comes from the Latin, meaning either "spoken before" or "made before". While the former source of the word could have preface meaning the same as prologue, the latter strongly implies an introduction written before the body of the book. With this meaning of stated intention, British publishing up to at least the middle of the twentieth century distinguished between preface and introduction.

— Freebase

Book of Isaiah

Book of Isaiah

The Book of Isaiah is the first of the Latter Prophets in the Hebrew Bible, preceding Ezekiel, Jeremiah and the Book of the Twelve.. The first 39 chapters prophesy doom for a sinful Judah and for all the nations of the world that oppose God, while the last 27 prophesy the restoration of the nation of Israel and a new creation in God's glorious future kingdom; this section includes the Songs of the Suffering Servant, four separate passages referring to the nation of Israel, interpreted by Christians as prefiguring the coming of Jesus Christ. Tradition ascribes authorship of the book to Isaiah son of Amoz, but now scholars widely agree that the book is the work of three different authors - few scholars deny this view, and those that do, do so for theological reasons. The first, termed Proto-Isaiah, contains the words of the 8th-century BCE prophet with 7th-century BCE expansions; the second, Deutero-Isaiah, is the work of a 6th-century BCE author writing near the end of the Babylonian captivity; and the third, the poetic Trito-Isaiah, was composed in Jerusalem shortly after the return from exile, probably by multiple authors.

— Freebase

Paperback

Paperback

A paperback is a type of book characterized by a thick paper or paperboard cover, and often held together with glue rather than stitches or staples. In contrast, hardcover or hardback books are bound with cardboard covered with cloth; although more expensive, hardbacks are more durable. Inexpensive books bound in paper have existed since at least the 19th century in such forms as pamphlets, yellowbacks, dime novels, and airport novels. Most modern paperbacks are either "mass-market paperbacks" or "trade paperbacks". Paperback editions of books are issued when a publisher decides to release a book in a low-cost format. Cheap paper, glued bindings, and the lack of a hard cover contribute to the inherent low cost of paperbacks. Paperbacks can be the preferred medium when a book is not expected to be a major seller, or in other situations where the publisher wishes to release a book without putting forth a large investment. Examples include many novels, and newer editions or reprintings of older books. Since hardcovers tend to have a larger profit margin, publishers must balance the profit to be made by selling fewer hardcovers against the potential profit to be made by selling many paperbacks with a smaller profit per unit. First editions of many modern books, especially genre fiction, are issued in paperback. Best-selling books, on the other hand, may maintain sales in hardcover for an extended period in order to reap the greater profits that the hardcovers provide.

— Freebase

Commonplace book

Commonplace book

Commonplace books were a way to compile knowledge, usually by writing information into books. Such books were essentially scrapbooks filled with items of every kind: medical recipes, quotes, letters, poems, tables of weights and measures, proverbs, prayers, legal formulas. Commonplaces were used by readers, writers, students, and scholars as an aid for remembering useful concepts or facts they had learned. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. They became significant in Early Modern Europe. "Commonplace" is a translation of the Latin term locus communis which means "a theme or argument of general application", such as a statement of proverbial wisdom. In this original sense, commonplace books were collections of such sayings, such as John Milton's commonplace book. Scholars have expanded this usage to include any manuscript that collects material along a common theme by an individual. It should be noted that commonplace books are not diaries nor travelogues, with which they can be contrasted: English Enlightenment philosopher John Locke wrote the 1706 book A New Method of a Common Place Book, "in which techniques for entering proverbs, quotations, ideas, speeches were formulated. Locke gave specific advice on how to arrange material by subject and category, using such key topics as love, politics, or religion. Commonplace books, it must be stressed, are not journals, which are chronological and introspective."

— Freebase

Book of Tobit

Book of Tobit

The Book of Tobit is a book of scripture that is part of the Catholic and Orthodox biblical canon, pronounced canonical by the Council of Carthage of 397 and confirmed for Roman Catholics by the Council of Trent. It is listed as a book of the "Apocrypha" in Article VI of the Thirty-Nine Articles of the Church of England. Tobit is regarded by Protestants as apocryphal because it has never been included within the Tanakh nor considered canonical by Judaism. However, it is found in the Greek Hebrew Bible, and Aramaic and Hebrew fragments of the book are in the Dead Sea Scrolls, which were discovered in Cave IV at Qumran in 1952. These fragments are in agreement with the Greek text, which exists in three different recensions.

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Malachi

Malachi

Malachi, Malachias or Mal'achi was a Jewish prophet in the Hebrew Bible. He had two brothers, Nathaniel and Josiah. Malachi was the writer of the Book of Malachi, the last book of the Neviim section in the Jewish Tanakh. In the Christian Old Testament, the Prophetic Books are placed last, making Book of Malachi the last Old Testament book before the New Testament. No allusion is made to him by Ezra, however, and he does not directly mention the restoration of the temple. The editors of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia implied that he prophesied after Haggai and Zechariah and speculated that he delivered his prophecies about 420 BC, after the second return of Nehemiah from Persia, or possibly before his return, comparing Malachi 2:8 with Nehemiah 13:15; Malachi 2:10-16 with Nehemiah 13:23. According to the 1897 Easton's Bible Dictionary, it is possible that Malachi is not a proper name, but simply means "messenger of YHWH". The Septuagint superscription is ὲν χειρὶ ἀγγήλου αὐτοῦ,.

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BookCrossing

BookCrossing

BookCrossing is defined as "the practice of leaving a book in a public place to be picked up and read by others, who then do likewise." The term is derived from bookcrossing.com, a free online book club which was founded to encourage the practice, aiming to "make the whole world a library." The 'crossing' or exchanging of books may take any of a number of forms, including wild-releasing books in public, direct swaps with other members of the websites, or "book rings" in which books travel in a set order to participants who want to read a certain book. The community aspect of BookCrossing.com has grown and expanded in ways that were not expected at the outset, in the form of blog or forum discussions, mailing lists and annual conventions throughout the world.

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Book of Jeremiah

Book of Jeremiah

The Book of Jeremiah is the second of the Latter Prophets in the Hebrew Bible, following the book of Isaiah and preceding Ezekiel and the Book of the Twelve.. It derives its name from, and records the visions of, Jeremiah, who lived in Jerusalem in the late 7th and early 6th centuries BC during the time of king Josiah and the fall of the Kingdom of Judah to the Babylonians, and who subsequently went into exile in Egypt. The book is written in a complex and poetic Hebrew.

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Book of Revelation

Book of Revelation

The Book of Revelation, often known as Revelation, Apocalypse, or by a number of variants expanding upon its authorship or subject matter, is the final book of the New Testament and occupies a central part in Christian eschatology. Written in Koine Greek, its title is derived from the first word of the text, apokalypsis, meaning "unveiling" or "revelation". The author of the work identifies himself in the text as "John" and says that he was on Patmos, an island in the Aegean, when he "heard a great voice" instructing him to write the book. This John is traditionally supposed to be John the Apostle, although recent scholarship has suggested other possibilities including a putative figure given the name John of Patmos. Most modern scholars believe it was written around 95 AD, with some believing it dates from around 70 AD. The book spans three literary genres: epistolary, apocalyptic, and prophetic. It begins with an epistolary address to the reader followed by an apocalyptic description of a complex series of events derived from prophetic visions which the author claims to have seen. These include the appearance of a number of figures and images which have become important in Christian eschatology, such as the Whore of Babylon and the Beast, and culminate in the Second Coming of Jesus Christ. The obscure and extravagant imagery has led to a wide variety of interpretations: historicist interpretations see in Revelation a broad view of history; preterist interpretations treat Revelation as mostly referring to the events of the apostolic era, or—at the latest—the fall of the Roman Empire; futurists believe that Revelation describes future events; and idealist or symbolic interpretations consider that Revelation does not refer to actual people or events, but is an allegory of the spiritual path and the ongoing struggle between good and evil.

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Book entry

Book entry

Book entry is a system of tracking ownership of securities where no certificate is given to investors. In the case of book-entry-only issues, while investors do not receive certificates, a custodian holds one or more global certificates. Dematerialized securities, in contrast are ones in which no certificates exist, instead, the security issuer, its agent or a central securities depository keeps records, usually electronically, of who holds outstanding securities. Most investors who use an online broker or even a regular full-service broker will have their shares held in book-entry form. This is generally convenient, as one does not have to preserve physical stock certificates, and can buy/sell securities without turning certificates in or having new ones issued. Also, replacement costs for certificates are high in case one loses them, while book-entry ownership can never be lost thanks to technological backups.

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Book of Amos

Book of Amos

The Book of Amos is a prophetic book of the Hebrew Bible, one of the Twelve Minor Prophets. Amos, an older contemporary of Hosea and Isaiah, was active c. 750 BC during the reign of Jeroboam II, making the Book of Amos the first biblical prophetic book written. Amos lived in the kingdom of Judah but preached in the northern kingdom of Israel. His major themes of social justice, God's omnipotence, and divine judgment became staples of prophecy.

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Book of Esther

Book of Esther

The Book of Esther is a book in the Ketuvim, the third section of the Jewish Tanakh and is part of the Christian Old Testament. It tells the story of a Jewish girl named Esther who became queen of Persia and thwarted a plan to commit genocide against her people. Also called the Megillah, the book is the basis and an integral part of the Jewish celebration of Purim. Its full text is read aloud twice during the celebration, in the evening and again the following morning. Besides Song of Songs, it is the only book in the Bible that does not explicitly mention God.

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Book of Ezekiel

Book of Ezekiel

The Book of Ezekiel is the third of the Latter Prophets in the Hebrew Bible, following the books of Isaiah and Jeremiah and preceding the Book of the Twelve.. It derives its name from, and records the visions of, the 6th century BC priest and prophet Ezekiel. According to the book, the prophet, exiled in Babylon, experienced a series of seven visions during the 22 years from 593 to 571 BC, a period which spans the final destruction of Jerusalem in 586. The visions, and the book, are structured around three themes: judgment on Israel; judgment on the nations; and future blessings for Israel.

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Book of Baruch

Book of Baruch

The Book of Baruch, occasionally referred to as 1 Baruch, is called a deuterocanonical book of the Bible. Although not in the Hebrew Bible, it is found in the Septuagint and in the Vulgate Bible, and also in Theodotion's version. It is grouped with the prophetical books which also include Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, Daniel, and the twelve minor prophets. It is named after Baruch ben Neriah, Jeremiah's scribe. Some scholars propose that it was written during or shortly after the period of the Maccabees. In the Vulgate, the King James Bible Apocrypha, and many other versions, the Letter of Jeremiah is appended to the end of the Book of Baruch as a sixth chapter; in the Septuagint and Orthodox Bibles chapter 6 is usually counted as a separate book, called the Letter or Epistle of Jeremiah.

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Rachel Carson

Rachel Carson

Rachel Louise Carson was an American marine biologist and conservationist whose book Silent Spring and other writings are credited with advancing the global environmental movement. Carson began her career as an aquatic biologist in the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries, and became a full-time nature writer in the 1950s. Her widely praised 1951 bestseller The Sea Around Us won her a U.S. National Book Award, recognition as a gifted writer, and financial security. Her next book, The Edge of the Sea, and the reissued version of her first book, Under the Sea Wind, were also bestsellers. This sea trilogy explores the whole of ocean life from the shores to the depths. Late in the 1950s, Carson turned her attention to conservation, especially environmental problems that she believed were caused by synthetic pesticides. The result was Silent Spring, which brought environmental concerns to an unprecedented share of the American people. Although Silent Spring was met with fierce opposition by chemical companies, it spurred a reversal in national pesticide policy, which led to a nationwide ban on DDT and other pesticides, and it inspired a grassroots environmental movement that led to the creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Carson was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by Jimmy Carter.

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Book of Numbers

Book of Numbers

The Book of Numbers is the fourth book of the Hebrew Bible, and the fourth of five books of the Jewish Torah. Numbers begins at Mount Sinai, where the Israelites have received their laws and covenant from God and God has taken up residence among them in the sanctuary. The task before them is to take possession of the Promised Land. The people are numbered and preparations are made for resuming their march. The Israelites begin the journey, but immediately they "murmur" at the hardships along the way. They arrive at the borders of Canaan and send spies into the land, but on hearing the spies' report the Israelites refuse to take possession of Canaan and God condemns them to death in the wilderness until a new generation can grow up and carry out the task. The book ends with the new generation of Israelites in the plain of Moab ready for the crossing of the Jordan River. Numbers is the culmination of the story of Israel's exodus from oppression in Egypt and their journey to take possession of the land God promised their fathers. As such it draws to a conclusion the themes introduced in Genesis and played out in Exodus and Leviticus: God has promised the Israelites that they shall become a great nation, that they will have a special relationship with Yahweh their god, and that they shall take possession of the land of Canaan. Against this, Numbers also demonstrates the importance of holiness, faithfulness and trust: despite God's presence and his priests, Israel lacks faith and the possession of the land is left to a new generation. The book has a long and complex history, but its final form is probably due to a Priestly redaction of a Yahwistic original text some time in the early Persian period.

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Jaredites

Jaredites

The Jaredites are a people written of in the Book of Mormon, principally in the Book of Ether. In the Book of Ether, the Jaredites are described as the descendants of Jared and his brother, at the time of the Tower of Babel. According to the Book of Mormon, the people fled across the ocean via unique barges and established an ancient civilization in the Americas. The existence of the Jaredites is doubted by many non-Mormon historians and archaeologists.

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Egyptus

Egyptus

In Latter-day Saint theology, Egyptus is the name of two women in the Book of Abraham in the Pearl of Great Price. One is the wife of Ham, son of Noah, who bears his children. The other is their daughter, who discovers Egypt while "it was under water". The younger Egyptus places her eldest son on the throne as Pharaoh, the first king of Egypt. The word Egyptus is considered to be an anachronism in the Book of Abraham among non-Mormon Egyptologists and historians, since the origin of term "Egypt" is believed to have come from another source much later in history from the time of the narrative described in the Book of Abraham. The word "pharaoh" is also considered to be an anachronism in the Book of Abraham for similar reasons.

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Achates

Achates

In the Aeneid, Achates was a close friend of Aeneas; his name became a by-word for an intimate companion. He accompanied Aeneas throughout his adventures, reaching Carthage with him in disguise when the pair were scouting the area, and leading him to the Sibyl of Cumae. Virgil represents him as remarkable for his fidelity, and a perennial type of that virtue. However, despite being Aeneas's most important Trojan, he is notable for his lack of character development. In fact, he has only one spoken line in the entire epic. Aeneas, surrounded by only a shadowy cast of allies, is thus emphasised as the lone protagonist and at the same time cut off from help on his quest. Appears in Aeneid, Book I, line 188, 312, and 459, Book III, line 523, Book VI, lines 34 and 158 and Book VIII, 466. Besides the Virgil, Edith Hamilton's Mythology is a good resource.

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Robert Lowell

Robert Lowell

Robert "Cal" Traill Spence Lowell IV was an American poet. He was born into a Boston Brahmin family that could trace its origins back to the Mayflower, and his family, past and present, were important subjects in his poetry. Growing up in Boston also informed his poems, which were frequently set in Boston and the New England region. Lowell stated, "The poets who most directly influenced me ... were Allen Tate, Elizabeth Bishop, and William Carlos Williams. An unlikely combination! ... but you can see that Bishop is a sort of bridge between Tate's formalism and Williams's informal art." After the publication of his 1959 book Life Studies, which won the 1960 National Book Award and "featured a new emphasis on intense, uninhibited discussion of personal, family, and psychological struggles," he was considered an important part of the confessional poetry movement. However, much of Lowell's work, which often combined the public with the personal, did not conform to a typical "confessional poetry" model. Instead, Lowell worked in a number of distinctive stylistic modes and forms over the course of his career. He was appointed the sixth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, where he served from 1947 until 1948. In addition to winning the National Book Award, he won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1947 and 1974, the National Book Critics Circle Award in 1977, and a National Institute of Arts and Letters Award in 1947. He is "widely considered one of the most important American poets of the postwar era." His biographer Paul Mariani called him "the poet-historian of our time" and "the last of [America's] influential public poets."

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Time and Again

Time and Again

Time and Again is a 1970 illustrated novel by Jack Finney. The many illustrations in the book are real, though, as explained in an endnote, not all are from the 1882 period in which the actions of the book take place. It had long been rumored that Robert Redford would convert the book into a movie. The project has never come to fruition. In July 2012, it was announced that Lionsgate studios optioned the film rights to the novel, with Doug Liman set to direct and produce. A much-later sequel, From Time to Time, was published a year after the author's death. The book left room for a third novel, apparently never written.

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Nihil obstat

Nihil obstat

Nihil obstat is a declaration of no objection to an initiative or an appointment. Apart from this general sense, the phrase is used more particularly to mean an "attestation by a church censor that a book contains nothing damaging to faith or morals". The Censor Librorum delegated by a bishop of the Catholic Church reviews the text in question, but the nihil obstat is not a certification that those granting it agree with the contents, opinions or statements expressed in the work; instead, it merely confirms "that it contains nothing contrary to faith or morals." The nihil obstat is the first step in having a book published under Church auspices. If the author is a member of a religious institute and if the book is on questions of religion or morals, the book must also obtain the imprimi potest of the major superior. The final approval is given through the imprimatur of the author's bishop or of the bishop of the place of publication.

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Philip Roth

Philip Roth

Philip Milton Roth is an American novelist. He first gained attention with the 1959 novella Goodbye, Columbus, an irreverent and humorous portrait of American-Jewish life for which he received the U.S. National Book Award for Fiction, Roth's fiction, regularly set in Newark, New Jersey, is known for its intensely autobiographical character, for philosophically and formally blurring the distinction between reality and fiction, for its "supple, ingenious style" and for its provocative explorations of Jewish and American identity. His profile rose significantly in 1969 after the publication of the controversial Portnoy's Complaint, the humorous and sexually explicit psychoanalytical monologue of "a lust-ridden, mother-addicted young Jewish bachelor," filled with "intimate, shameful detail, and coarse, abusive language." Roth is one of the most awarded U.S. writers of his generation: his books have twice received the National Book Award, twice the National Book Critics Circle award, and three times the PEN/Faulkner Award. He received a Pulitzer Prize for his 1997 novel, American Pastoral, which featured one of his best-known characters, Nathan Zuckerman, the subject of many other of Roth's novels. The Human Stain, another Zuckerman novel, was awarded the United Kingdom's WH Smith Literary Award for the best book of the year. In 2001, Roth received the inaugural Franz Kafka Prize and, in 2012, he received Spain's Prince of Asturias Award for Literature.

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Mowgli

Mowgli

Mowgli is a fictional character and the protagonist of Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book stories. He is a feral child from Pench area in Central India who originally appeared in Rudyard Kipling's short story "In the Rukh" and then went on to become the most prominent and memorable character in his fantasies The Jungle Book and The Second Jungle Book, which also featured stories about other characters. The Mowgli stories, including In the Rukh, were first collected in chronological order in one volume as The Works of Rudyard Kipling Volume VII: The Jungle Book, and subsequently in All the Mowgli Stories. In the Rukh describes how Gisborne, an English forest ranger at Pench area in Central India at the time of the British Raj, discovers a young man named Mowgli, who has extraordinary skill at hunting and tracking, and asks him to join the forestry service. Later Gisborne learns the reason for Mowgli's almost superhuman talents: he was raised by a pack of wolves in the jungle. Kipling then proceeded to write the stories of Mowgli's childhood in detail. Lost by his parents in the Indian jungle during a tiger attack, a human baby is adopted by the wolves Mother and Father Wolf, who call him Mowgli the Frog because of his lack of fur and his refusal to sit still. Shere Khan the tiger demands that they give him the baby but the wolves refuse. Mowgli grows up with the pack, hunting with his brother wolves. In the pack, Mowgli learned he was able to stare down any wolf, but his unique ability to remove the painful thorns from the paws of his brothers was deeply appreciated as well.

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Graphic novel

Graphic novel

A graphic novel is a book made up of comics content. Although the word "novel" normally refers to long fictional works, the term "graphic novel" is applied broadly, and includes fiction, non-fiction, and anthologized work. It is distinguished from the term "comic book", which is used for comics periodicals. The term "graphic novel" was first used in 1964; it was popularized within the comics community after the publication of Will Eisner's A Contract with God in 1978, and became familiar with the public in the late 1980s after the commercial successes of the first volume of Spiegelman's Maus, Moore and Gibbons's Watchmen, and Miller's The Dark Knight Returns. At the beginning of the 21st century, the Book Industry Study Group added "graphic novel" as a category in book stores.

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Photo-book

Photo-book

A photo-book or photobook is a book in which photographs make a significant contribution to the overall content. A photo-book is related to and also often used as a coffee table book.

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Ark of the Covenant

Ark of the Covenant

The Ark of the Covenant, also known as the Ark of the Testimony, is a chest described in the Book of Exodus as containing the Tablets of Stone on which the Ten Commandments were inscribed. According to some traditional interpretations of the Book of Exodus, Book of Numbers, and the Letter to the Hebrews the Ark also contained Aaron's rod, a jar of manna and the first Torah scroll as written by Moses; however, the first of the Books of Kings says that at the time of King Solomon, the Ark contained only the two Tablets of the Law. According to the Book of Exodus, the Ark was built at the command of God, in accordance with the instructions given to Moses on Mount Sinai. God was said to have communicated with Moses "from between the two cherubim" on the Ark's cover. The biblical account relates that during the Israelites' exodus from Egypt, the Ark was carried by the priests some 2,000 cubits in advance of the people and their army, or host. When the Ark was borne by priests into the bed of the Jordan, water in the river separated, opening a pathway for the entire host to pass through. The city of Jericho was taken with no more than a shout after the Ark of the Covenant was paraded for seven days around its wall by seven priests sounding seven trumpets of rams' horns. When carried, the Ark was always wrapped in a veil, in skins and a blue cloth, and was carefully concealed, even from the eyes of the priests who carried it. There are no contemporary extra-biblical references to the Ark.

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Between a Rock and a Hard Place

Between a Rock and a Hard Place

Between a Rock and a Hard Place is the autobiography of Aron Ralston. Published in 2004, the book predominantly recounts Ralston's experience being trapped in Blue John Canyon in the Utah desert and how he was forced to amputate his own right arm with a dull multi-tool in order to free himself after his arm became trapped by a boulder. Inc.com named Ralston's account one of seven "great entrepreneurship books that have nothing to do with business." The book also describes Ralston's childhood, how he took up outdoor activities after moving to Colorado from Indiana, how he came to be an obsessive outdoorsman and how he left his engineering career at Intel in Arizona to take up outdoor activities as much as possible. The book goes back and forth, in alternating chapters, between Ralston's past experiences and his entrapment in the slot canyon, and the efforts of his mother to find him. Included in the hardcover edition are pictures of his days in the canyon, various photos from the past excursions he speaks of in the book, a glossary of mountaineering jargon, and maps of Blue John Canyon and the proximity of the canyon in central-eastern Utah. Ralston's ordeal is also the subject of the 2010 film 127 Hours, starring James Franco and directed by Danny Boyle. Since the film's release, the autobiography has also been sold with the title 127 Hours: Between a Rock and a Hard Place.

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Comic book

Comic book

A comic book or comicbook, also called comic magazine or simply comic, is a publication, first popularized in the United States, of comics art in the form of sequential juxtaposed panels that represent individual scenes. Panels are often accompanied by brief descriptive prose and written narrative, usually dialog contained in word balloons emblematic of the comics art form. The first comic book appeared in the United States in 1933 and was a reprinting of earlier newspaper comic strips which had established many of the story-telling devices used in comics. The term comic book arose because the first comic book reprinted humor comic strips. Despite their name, comic books are not necessarily humorous in tone—modern comic books tell stories in many genres.

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Slam book

Slam book

A slam book in United States schools is a notebook which is passed among junior high school students. The keeper of the book starts by posing a question and the book is then passed round for each contributor to fill in their own answer to the question. Slam books can also exist in virtual formats. Web-based slam book sites have attracted controversy for hosting virtual slam books in which individuals or organizations are targeted for criticism that constitutes bullying or defamation.

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What Is Literature?

What Is Literature?

What Is Literature? is a 1947 book by Jean-Paul Sartre. The book is divided into three topics of discussion: ⁕Sartre condemns the bourgeoisie as being devoid of culture. ⁕Sartre claims authors and poets are outside of language and are trapped. ⁕Sartre states that the writer must write for a public which has the freedom of changing everything. The basic roots of existentialism are left to one side by Sartre in this book, as he devises an understanding of the effect literature has on those who are subjected to it. The second chapter of this book, entitled 'Why Write?' has been reprinted as a free standing essay.

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Nephite

Nephite

According to the Book of Mormon, a religious text of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, a Nephite is a member of one of the four main groups of settlers of the ancient Americas. The other early settlers described in the Book of Mormon include the Lamanites, Jaredites and Mulekites. Some LDS scholars believe that the forebears of the Nephites settled somewhere in present-day Central America after departing Jerusalem. However, both the Smithsonian Institution and the National Geographic Society have issued statements that they have seen no evidence to support these claims in the Book of Mormon and furthermore, no secular archeologist or historian has supported their existence. In the Book of Mormon, the Nephites are described as a group of people that descended from or were associated with Nephi, the son of the prophet Lehi who left Jerusalem at the urging of God c. 600 BC and traveled with his family to the Western Hemisphere, arriving in the present-day Americas c. 589 BC. The Nephites are further described as an initially righteous people, who eventually "had fallen into a state of unbelief and awful wickedness" and were destroyed by their brothers the Lamanites c. AD 385.

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Lamanite

Lamanite

According to the Book of Mormon, a Lamanite is a member of a dark-skinned nation of indigenous Americans that occasionally battled with the light-skinned Nephite nation. Mainstream archaeologists, geneticists, and historians do not recognize the existence of Lamanites but adherents of the Latter Day Saint movement typically believe that the Lamanites comprise some part, if not the entirety, of the indigenous peoples of the Americas and the Polynesian people. The Book of Mormon describes the Lamanites as descendants of Laman and Lemuel, two rebellious brothers of a family of Israelites who crossed the ocean in a boat around 600 BC. Their brother Nephi founded the Nephite nation. The Lamanites reputedly gained their dark skin as a sign of the curse for their rebelliousness, and warred with the Nephites over a period of centuries. The book says that Jesus appeared and converted all the Lamanites to Christianity; however, after about two centuries, the Lamanites fell away and eventually exterminated all the Nephites. By the end of the Book of Mormon, the Lamanites were defined less by their skin color than by their lack of Christianity. Many Mormons believe that the Polynesian people originated from the descendents of Hagoth who led his people off on a ship and was never heard from again. Although Hagoth was a Nephite, these Mormons regard Polynesians as Lamanites.

— Freebase

Pentecostarion

Pentecostarion

The Pentecostarion is the liturgical book used by the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches which follow the Byzantine Rite during the Paschal Season which extends from Pascha to the Sunday following All Saints Sunday. The name means the Book of the "Fifty Days", referring to the period of time from Pascha to Pentecost. In Greek, it is also sometimes called the Joyful Pentecostarion. In English, it is sometimes called the Paschal Triodion. The name "Pentecostarion" is also applied to the liturgical season covered by the book. The Pentecostarion is part of the Paschal cycle or "Moveable Cycle" of the ecclesiastical year. This cycle is dependent upon the date of Pascha and continued throughout the coming year until the next Pascha. Pascha is the most important feast of the entire year, outranking by far all others. Each week of the Pentecostarion is named after the Gospel lesson which is read on the Sunday which begins it; for instance, the week that follows Thomas Sunday is referred to as Thomas Week. During the liturgical season of the Pentecostarion, the Gospel of John is read in full, as is the Acts of the Apostles. Both of these books were chosen because of their instructive content. Pascha is the traditional time for baptizing new converts to the faith. So, just as Great Lent, with its liturgical book, the Triodion, was the final period of preparation for the catechumens before their baptism, so the time of the Pentecostarion is the time of initiation into the Sacred Mysteries of the Christian religion for the "Newly-Illumined".

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The Position

The Position

The Position: A Novel is a 2005 novel by Meg Wolitzer. It tells the story of a book titled Pleasuring: One Couple's Journey to Fulfillment and the effects it has on a family. The fictional book is a sex manual, much like The Joy of Sex. It was written by the parents and is full of detailed illustrations of them engaged in numerous sexual positions. One day while the parents are out, the children discover it and their lives are changed forever. The story looks at the effect the book has on their lives over the course of many decades, jumping forward decade by decade. For example, it looks at the effect it has on the child at 10, then when they are 20 and so on. The author tells the story by switching among the different points of view of the members of the family. The parents are unaware the children have discovered the book, so their story is very different from the children's. It also explores how each character feels about the others. For example, the husband thinks his wife is the most sexually desirable woman to him on the Earth and feels he is the luckiest man alive. On the other hand, she feels her husband is too mechanical when it comes to lovemaking, approaching it as some sort of scientific experiment.

— Freebase

Khrushchev

Khrushchev

Khrushchev: The Man and His Era is a 2003 biography of Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev. Written by William Taubman, the book is the first in-depth and comprehensive American biography of Khrushchev. Taubman was the recipient of the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography, as well as the 2004 National Book Critics Circle Award. The author spent almost 20 years researching the life of Khrushchev in preparation to write the book. Extensive research was made possible through access to archives in Russia and the Ukraine, which was opened to the public following the collapse of the Soviet Union. In addition to printed materials and documentation, he spent time engaging Khrushchev's children and extended relatives, resulting in over 70 personal interviews. Taubman presents a historical narrative and study of the life of Nikita Khrushchev, the Soviet leader who succeeded Joseph Stalin. The book concludes with Khrushchev's death on September 11, 1971.

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Switchers

Switchers

Switchers is the first book of the Switchers Trilogy by Kate Thompson. Originally published in Ireland in 1994, it was first published in Great Britain by The Bodley Head in 1997. It introduces Tess and Kevin, the two main characters of the series. The story begins in Dublin, although most of the book is set in the Arctic circle. The first book by this award-winning writer, it was described as "unmissable" and "spellbinding" by the Sunday Telegraph while in the Guardian it was called "one of the best books of the year". It was shortlisted for the Smarties Book Award in 1998.

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Seven seals

Seven seals

The Seven Seals is a phrase in the Book of Revelation that refers to seven symbolic seals that secure the book or scroll, that John of Patmos saw in his Revelation of Jesus Christ. The opening of the seals of the Apocalyptic document occurs in Revelation Chapters 5-8. In John's vision, the only one worthy to open the book is referred to as both the "Lion of Judah" and the "Lamb having seven horns and seven eyes". Upon the Lamb opening a seal from the book, a judgment is released or an apocalyptic event occurs. The opening of the first four seals release The Four Horsemen, each with their own specific mission. The opening of the fifth seal releases the cries of martyrs for the "word of God". The sixth seal prompts cataclysmic events. The seventh seal cues seven angelic trumpeters who in turn cue the seven bowl judgments.

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Coming of Age in Samoa

Coming of Age in Samoa

Coming of Age in Samoa is a book by American anthropologist Margaret Mead based upon her research and study of youth on the island of Ta'u in the Samoa Islands which primarily focused on adolescent girls. Mead was 23 years old when she carried out her field work in Samoa. First published in 1928, the book launched Mead as a pioneering researcher and the most famous anthropologist in the world. Since its first publication, Coming of Age in Samoa was the most widely read book in the field of anthropology, until Napoleon Chagnon's "Yanomamö: The Fierce People" took the lead in sales. The book has sparked years of ongoing and intense debate and controversy on questions pertaining to society, culture and science. It is a key text in the nature vs nurture debate as well as issues relating to family, adolescence, gender, social norms and attitudes.

— Freebase

Either/Or

Either/Or

Published in two volumes in 1843, Either/Or is an influential book written by the Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard, exploring the aesthetic and ethical "phases" or "stages" of existence. Either/Or was Kierkegaard's first published book; it was released under the pseudonym Victor Eremita, Latin for "the victorious hermit". Either/Or portrays two life views, one consciously hedonistic, the other based on ethical duty and responsibility. Each life view is written and represented by a fictional pseudonymous author, with the prose of the work reflecting and depending on the life view being discussed. For example, the aesthetic life view is written in short essay form, with poetic imagery and allusions, discussing aesthetic topics such as music, seduction, drama, and beauty. The ethical life view is written as two long letters, with a more argumentative and restrained prose, discussing moral responsibility, critical reflection, and marriage. The views of the book are not neatly summarized, but are expressed as lived experiences embodied by the pseudonymous authors. The book's central concern is the primal question asked by Aristotle, "How should we live?" His motto comes from Plutarch, "The deceived is wiser than one not deceived.”

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Book collecting

Book collecting

Book collecting is the collecting of books, including seeking, locating, acquiring, organizing, cataloging, displaying, storing, and maintaining whatever books are of interest to a given individual collector. The love of books is bibliophilia, and someone who loves to read, admire, and collect books is a bibliophile. Bibliophile book collecting is distinct from casual book ownership and the accumulation of books for reading. It can probably be said to have begun with the collections of illuminated manuscripts, both commissioned and second-hand, by the elites of Burgundy and France in particular, which became common in the 15th century. Duke Philip the Good of Burgundy appears to have had the largest private collection of his day, with about six hundred volumes. With the advent of printing with movable type books became considerably cheaper, and book collecting received a particular impetus in England and elsewhere during the Reformation when many monastic libraries were broken up, and their contents often destroyed. There was an English antiquarian reaction to Henry VIII's dissolution of the Monasteries. The commissioners of Edward VI plundered and stripped university, college, and monastic libraries, so to save books from being destroyed, those who could began to collect them.

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