Definitions containing d'aubigné, merle

We've found 50 definitions:

Blue Merle

Blue Merle

Blue Merle was an American band centered in Nashville, Tennessee. Their name comes from the lyrics of a Led Zeppelin song, Bron-Y-Aur Stomp from Led Zeppelin III, referring to a "blue-eyed merle" border collie dog. Their lead singer Luke Reynolds, has a voice that has been compared to those of Chris Martin and Dave Matthews. The band is also known for live renditions of the Talking Heads song Psycho Killer. The band was first formed when Luke Reynolds and Jason Oettel met and began to work together. A friend in a studio offered them some recording time, and they began recording several demo tracks. While they were doing so, the President of Sony Publishing happened to be there, and offered them a contract. While they passed on it, it was a start. Reynolds then met Beau Stapleton, a Mandolin player, on his way back to his home in Vermont and invited him to join. Oettel brought one of his own friends, William Ellis, a drummer into the band as well. It was William who came up with the band's name. The last member to join was Luke Bulla, a fiddle player, who had been asked to fill in for a couple weeks, and soon was a full-time member. In February 2005, Blue Merle released Burning In The Sun, which features the singles "Burning In The Sun", "Every Ship Must Sail Away", and "Lucky To Know You". The album hit #8 on the Billboard Heatseekers chart and peaked at #199 on the Billboard 200. Blue Merle played Lollapalooza in 2005, and toured with Guster, Jem, J.J. Cale, and Badly Drawn Boy.

— Freebase

Merle

Merle

Merle is a pattern in a dog's coat, though is commonly incorrectly referred to as a colour. The merle gene creates mottled patches of color in a solid or piebald coat, blue or odd-colored eyes, and can affect skin pigment as well. Health issues are more typical and more severe when two merles are bred together, so it is recommended that a merle be bred to a dog with a solid coat color only.

— Freebase

Neck and Neck

Neck and Neck

Neck and Neck is a collaborative album by American guitarist Chet Atkins and British singer-songwriter and guitarist Mark Knopfler, released on October 9, 1990 by Columbia Records. "Poor Boy Blues" was released as a single, and in 1991 won a Grammy Award for Best Country Collaboration with Vocals. That same year, "So Soft Your Goodbye" won a Grammy Award for Best Country Instrumental Performance. Atkins originally recorded "Yakety Axe", a parody of Boots' Randolph's "Yakety Sax", on his 1965 album More of That Guitar Country. This new recording features lyrics and a new arrangement that were composed by Merle Travis. Atkins also previously recorded "I'll See You in My Dreams" on an album with Merle Travis.

— Freebase

Paul Scarron

Paul Scarron

Paul Scarron was a French poet, dramatist, and novelist, born in Paris. His precise birthdate is unknown, but he was baptized on July 4, 1610. Scarron was the first husband of Françoise d'Aubigné, who later became Madame de Maintenon and secretly married King Louis XIV of France.

— Freebase

Blackbird

Blackbird

in England, a species of thrush (Turdus merula), a singing bird with a fin note; the merle. In America the name is given to several birds, as the Quiscalus versicolor, or crow blackbird; the Agelaeus phoeniceus, or red-winged blackbird; the cowbird; the rusty grackle, etc. See Redwing

— Webster Dictionary

Merl

Merl

alt. of Merle

— Webster Dictionary

Merulidan

Merulidan

me-rōō′li-dan, n. a bird of the thrush family (Turdidæ), the typical genus of which is the Mer′ula. [Merle.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Fancred

Fancred

Fancred is the first social platform that lets fans build their sports credibility. It was founded in August 2012 by Hossein Kash Razzaghi, Jeremy Merle, and Craig Johnson, and Michael Pan. Fancred is changing sports news and opinion through the verification and credibility of the source. Fancred provides a personalized way for sports fans to communicate, discover, and consume their favorite sports content.The Fancred app debuted for iOS in March 2013 and within 16 hours was #23 in the Apple App Store for free sports apps.Fancred is a part of the 2013 Spring class at TechStars Boston.

— CrunchBase

Merle d'Aubigné, Jean-Henri

Merle d'Aubigné, Jean-Henri

. See D'Aubigné, Merle.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Uno

Uno

Uno is an American card game which is played with a specially printed deck. The game was originally developed in 1971 by Merle Robbins in Reading, Ohio, a suburb of Cincinnati. It has been a Mattel product since 1992. The game's general principles put it into the Crazy Eights family of card games.

— Freebase

Merlot

Merlot

Merlot is a dark blue-coloured wine grape, that is used as both a blending grape and for varietal wines. The name Merlot is thought to derive from the Old French word for young blackbird, merlot, a diminutive of merle, the blackbird, probably from the color of the grape. Merlot-based wines usually have medium body with hints of berry, plum, and currant. Its softness and "fleshiness", combined with its earlier ripening, makes Merlot a popular grape for blending with the sterner, later-ripening Cabernet Sauvignon, which tends to be higher in tannin. Along with Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot, Merlot is one of the primary grapes in Bordeaux wine where it is the most widely planted grape. Merlot is also one of the most popular red wine varietals in many markets. This flexibility has helped to make it one of the world's most planted grape varieties. As of 2004, Merlot was estimated to be the third most grown variety at 260,000 hectares globally, with an increasing trend. This puts Merlot just behind Cabernet Sauvignon's 262,000 hectares.

— Freebase

Okie

Okie

Okie is a term dating from as early as 1907, originally denoting a resident or native of Oklahoma. It is derived from the name of the state, similar to Texan or Tex for someone from Texas, or Arkie or Arkansawyer for a native of Arkansas. In the 1930s in California, the term came to refer to very poor immigrants from Oklahoma. Jobs were very scarce in the 1930s, but after the defense boom began in 1940, there were plenty of high-paying jobs in the shipyards and defense factories. The "Okie" migration of the 1930s brought in over a million newly displaced people; many headed to the farms in California's Central Valley. Dunbar-Ortiz argues that 'Okie' denotes much more than being from Oklahoma. By 1950, four million individuals, or one quarter of all persons born in Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, or Missouri, lived outside the region, primarily in the West. The core group of Okies are descendants of Scotch Irish who display a marked individualistic political bent. During 1906-17 many became Socialists or joined the Industrial Workers of the World, and Okies tended toward left-populism in the 1930s. Prominent Okies in the 1930s included Woody Guthrie. Most prominent in the late 1960s and 1970s were country musician Merle Haggard and writer Gerald Haslam.

— Freebase

Outlaw country

Outlaw country

Outlaw country is a subgenre of country music, most popular during the late 1960s and the 1970s, sometimes referred to as the outlaw movement or simply outlaw music. The focus of the movement has been on "outlaws", such as Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Merle Haggard, David Allan Coe and his Eli Radish Band, Willie Nelson, Kris Kristofferson, Leon Russell, Hank Williams Jr., Townes Van Zandt, Billy Joe Shaver and Hank Williams III. The reason for the movement has been attributed to a reaction to the Nashville sound, developed by record producers like Chet Atkins who softened the raw honky tonk sound that was predominant in the music of performers like Jimmie Rodgers, and his successors such as Hank Williams, George Jones and Lefty Frizzell. According to Aaron Fox, "the fundamental opposition between law-and-order authoritarianism and the image of 'outlaw' authenticity... has structured country's discourse of masculinity since the days of Jimmie Rodgers."

— Freebase

Bakersfield sound

Bakersfield sound

The Bakersfield sound was a genre of country music developed in the mid- to late 1950s in and around Bakersfield, California. The many hit singles were largely produced by Capitol Records country music head, Ken Nelson. Bakersfield country was a reaction against the slickly produced, string orchestra-laden Nashville sound, which was becoming popular in the late 1950s. Buck Owens and the Buckaroos, and Merle Haggard and the Strangers, are the most successful artists of the original Bakersfield sound era. Other major Bakersfield country artists include Wynn Stewart, Susan Raye, and Freddie Hart.

— Freebase

Top Secret

Top Secret

Top Secret is an espionage-themed role-playing game written by Merle M. Rasmussen and first published in 1980 by TSR, Inc.

— Freebase

Shetland Sheepdog

Shetland Sheepdog

The Shetland Sheepdog, often known as the Sheltie, is a breed of herding dog. They are small to medium dogs, and come in a variety of colors, such as sable, tri-color, and blue merle. They are vocal, excitable, energetic dogs who are always willing to please and work hard. They are partly derived from dogs used in the Shetland Isles for herding and protecting sheep. The breed was formally recognized by the Kennel Club in 1909. The Shetland Sheepdog's early history is not well known. Although of obscure origin, the sheltie is probably a descendant of small specimens of the Scottish collie and the King Charles spaniel. It was developed to tend the diminutive sheep of the Shetland Islands, whose rugged, stormy shores have produced other small-statured animals such as the Shetland pony. Today it is raised as a farm dog and family pet. They were originally a small mixed-breed dog, often 10–13 inches in height and it is thought that the original Shetland herding dogs were of Spitz type, and were crossed with collie-type sheepdogs from mainland Britain. In the early 20th century, James Loggie added a small Rough Collie to the breeding stock, and helped establish what would become the modern Shetland sheepdog. The original name of the breed was "Shetland Collie", but this caused controversy among Rough Collie breeders at the time, so the breed's name was formally changed to Shetland Sheepdog.

— Freebase

Classic country

Classic country

Classic country is a music radio format that specializes in playing mainstream country and western music hits from past decades. The classic country format can actually be further divided into two formats. The first specializes in hits from the 1920s through the early 1970s, and focus primarily on innovators and artists from country music's Golden Age. The other focuses on hits from the 1960s through early 1990s, some pre-1960 music, latter-day Golden Age stars and innovators such as Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard to newer recurrent hits from current-day artists such as George Strait, Garth Brooks, Alan Jackson and Reba McEntire.

— Freebase

Désirée

Désirée

Désirée is a 1954 historical film biography made by 20th Century Fox. It was directed by Henry Koster and produced by Julian Blaustein from a screenplay by Daniel Taradash, based on the best-selling novel Désirée by Annemarie Selinko. The music score was by Alex North and the cinematography by Milton R. Krasner. The film was made in CinemaScope. It stars Marlon Brando, Jean Simmons, Merle Oberon and Michael Rennie with Cameron Mitchell, Elizabeth Sellars, Charlotte Austin, Cathleen Nesbitt, Carolyn Jones and Evelyn Varden. The film was nominated for two Academy Awards, for Best Art Direction and Costume Design.

— Freebase

Ionosonde

Ionosonde

An ionosonde, or chirpsounder, is a special radar for the examination of the ionosphere. An ionosonde consists of: ⁕A high frequency transmitter, automatically tunable over a wide range. Typically the frequency coverage is 0.5–23 MHz or 1–40 MHz, though normally sweeps are confined to approximately 1.6–12 MHz. ⁕A tracking HF receiver which can automatically track the frequency of the transmitter. ⁕An antenna with a suitable radiation pattern, which transmits well vertically upwards and is efficient over the whole frequency range used. ⁕Digital control and data analysis circuits. The transmitter sweeps all or part of the HF frequency range, transmitting short pulses. These pulses are reflected at various layers of the ionosphere, at heights of 100–400 km, and their echos are received by the receiver and analyzed by the control system. The result is displayed in the form of an ionogram, a graph of reflection height versus carrier frequency. The basic ionosonde technology was invented in 1925 by Gregory Breit and Merle A. Tuve and further developed in the late 1920s by a number of prominent physicists, including Edward Victor Appleton. The term ionosphere and hence, the etymology of its derivatives, was proposed by Robert Watson-Watt.

— Freebase

Proximity fuze

Proximity fuze

A proximity fuze is a fuze that detonates an explosive device automatically when the distance to the target becomes smaller than a predetermined value, or when the fuze and the target pass by each other. Various kinds of proximity fuzes are designed for various targets such as planes, missiles, ships at sea and ground forces. They provide a more sophisticated trigger mechanism than the common contact fuze. The proximity fuze is considered one of the most important technological innovations of World War II. One of the first practical proximity fuzes was codenamed the VT fuze, an acronym of "Variable Time fuze", as deliberate camouflage for its operating principle. The VT fuze concept in the context of artillery shells originated in the UK with British researchers and was developed under the direction of physicist Merle A. Tuve at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab. The Germans were supposedly also working on proximity fuses in the 1930s, research and prototype work at Rheinmetall being halted in 1940 to devote available resources to projects deemed more necessary.

— Freebase

Treasures

Treasures

Treasures is a 1996 Dolly Parton album, made up of covers of rock and country hits from the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. It was her 33rd studio album. Among the selections were work by Merle Haggard, Neil Young, Kris Kristofferson, Cat Stevens and Mac Davis. Perhaps the most surprising choices to fans were Young's "After the Gold Rush" and Stevens' "Peace Train", though Parton confessed a longtime admiration for both performers' work. The album received mixed reviews and reached number 24 on the U.S. country albums charts. Treasures featured a number of famous guest artists, including Ladysmith Black Mambazo, John Popper of Blues Traveler, David Hidalgo of Los Lobos, and Alison Krauss. Its release was accompanied by a CBS television special, in which Parton performed most of the songs, accompanied by video footage of the news stories and events from the year of each song's original release. In 1997, a dance remix version of Parton's recording of "Peace Train" was released and it reached the top ten on Billboard's dance singles charts; following the success of "Peace Train", a dance remix of "Walking on Sunshine" was released.

— Freebase

John Merle Coulter

John Merle Coulter

John Merle Coulter, Ph. D. was an American botanist and educator. In his career in education administration, Coulter is notable for serving as the president of Indiana University and Lake Forest College and the head of the Department of Botany at the University of Chicago.

— Freebase

Drinkin'

Drinkin'

Drinkin' is the 2001 compilation album by Merle Haggard.

— Freebase

Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide is a naturally occurring chemical compound composed of two oxygen atoms covalently bonded to a single carbon atom. It is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and exists in Earth's atmosphere in this state, as a trace gas at a concentration of 0.039 per cent by volume. As part of the carbon cycle, plants, algae, and cyanobacteria use light energy to photosynthesize carbohydrate from carbon dioxide and water, with oxygen produced as a waste product. However, photosynthesis cannot occur in darkness and at night some carbon dioxide is produced by plants during respiration. Carbon dioxide is produced by combustion of coal or hydrocarbons, the fermentation of sugars in beer and winemaking and by respiration of all living organisms. It is exhaled in the breath of humans and land animals. It is emitted from volcanoes, hot springs, geysers and other places where the earth's crust is thin and is freed from carbonate rocks by dissolution. CO2 is also found in lakes at depth under the sea, and commingled with oil and gas deposits. The environmental effects of carbon dioxide are of significant interest. Carbon dioxide is an important greenhouse gas, warming the Earth's surface to a higher temperature by reducing outward radiation. Atmospheric carbon dioxide is the primary source of carbon in life on Earth and its concentration in Earth's pre-industrial atmosphere since late in the Precambrian eon has been regulated by photosynthetic organisms. Burning of carbon-based fuels since the industrial revolution has rapidly increased concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, increasing the rate of global warming and causing anthropogenic climate change. It is also a major source of ocean acidification since it dissolves in water to form carbonic acid, which is a weak acid as its ionization in water is incomplete.

— Freebase

Mountain Ash

Mountain Ash

Mountain Ash is a town and community in the Cwm Cynon, Rhondda Cynon Taf, Wales. Mountain Ash has a population of around 7,039. Mountain Ash lies near the villages of Penrhiwceiber, Cefnpennar, Cwmpennar, Darranlas, Fernhill, Glenboi and Newtown and Miskin. Mountain Ash lies within the historic county boundaries of Glamorgan.

— Freebase

Livermore

Livermore

Livermore is a city in Alameda County. The estimated population as of 2011 was 82,039. Livermore is located on the eastern edge of California's San Francisco Bay Area. Livermore was founded by William Mendenhall and named after Robert Livermore, his friend and a local rancher who settled in the area in the 1840s. Livermore is the home of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, for which the chemical element livermorium is named. Its south side, home to local vineyards, has developed several executive subdivisions near Ruby Hill. The city has also redeveloped its downtown district. The city is considered part of the Tri-Valley area, including Amador, Livermore and San Ramon Valleys.

— Freebase

Wenzhou

Wenzhou

Wenzhou is a prefecture-level city in southeastern Zhejiang province, People's Republic of China. As of the 2010 census, about 3,039,500 live in the Wenzhou city proper; the area under its jurisdiction, which includes two satellite cities and six counties, had a population of 9,122,100. The prefectural area borders Lishui to the west, Taizhou to the north, and looks out to the East China Sea on its eastern coast. Wenzhou was a prosperous foreign treaty port, which remains well-preserved today. It is situated in a mountainous region and, as a result, has been isolated for most of its history from the rest of the country, making the local culture and language very distinct not only from the rest of China but from neighbouring areas as well. It is also known for its emigrants who leave their native land for Europe and the United States, with a reputation for being entrepreneurs who start restaurants, retail and wholesale businesses in their adopted countries. People of Wenzhou origin make up a large number of ethnic Chinese residents of Italy, the Netherlands, France, and Africa.

— Freebase

Recife

Recife

Recife is the fifth-largest metropolitan area in Brazil with 3,743,854 inhabitants, the largest metropolitan area of the North/Northeast Regions, the 5th-largest metropolitan influence area in Brazil, and the capital and largest city of the state of Pernambuco. The population of the city proper was 1,555,039 in 2012. Recife is located where the Beberibe River meets the Capibaribe River to flow into the Atlantic Ocean. It is a major port on the Atlantic Ocean. Its name is an allusion to the coral reefs that are present by the city's shores. The many rivers, small islands and over 50 bridges found in Recife city center characterize its geography and gives it the moniker of the "Brazilian Venice." The Metropolitan Region of Recife is the main industrial zone of the State of Pernambuco; most relevant products are those derived from cane, electronics, food, and others; thanks to the fiscal incentives of government, many industrial enterprises were started in the 1970s and 1980s. Recife has a tradition of being the most important commercial center of the North/Northeastern region of Brazil with more than 52,500 business enterprises in Recife itself plus 32,500 in the Metro Area which totals more than 85,000.

— Freebase

Chantilly

Chantilly

Chantilly is an unincorporated community located in western Fairfax County of Northern Virginia. Recognized by the U.S. Census Bureau as a census designated place, the community population was 23,039 as of the 2010 census -- down from 41,041 in 2000, due to the splitting off of parts of it to form new CDP's including Greenbriar and Fair Lakes. It is named after an early 19th-century mansion and farm. Chantilly is part of the Washington metropolitan area and is approximately 24 miles from Washington, D.C. Chantilly is home to Washington Dulles International Airport, which serves Washington, D.C. It is also the location of the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center annex of the National Air and Space Museum and the headquarters of the National Reconnaissance Office. Chantilly was also home to the annual Bilderberg summit in 2008 and 2012.

— Freebase

Bangor

Bangor

Bangor is a city in and the county seat of Penobscot County, Maine, United States, and the major commercial and cultural center for eastern and northern Maine. It is the principal city of the Bangor, Maine Metropolitan Statistical Area, which encompasses all of Penobscot County. As of 2008, Bangor is the third most-populous city in Maine, as it has been for more than a century. The population of the city was 33,039 at the 2010 census; the Bangor Metropolitan Statistical Area, 153,923. Bangor is the largest market town, distribution center, transportation hub, and media center in a five-county area whose population tops 330,000 and which includes Penobscot, Piscataquis, Hancock, Aroostook, and Washington counties. Bangor is about 30 miles from Penobscot Bay up the Penobscot River at its confluence with the Kenduskeag Stream. It is connected by bridge to the neighboring city of Brewer. Nearby towns include Orono, Hampden, Hermon, Old Town, Glenburn, and Veazie.

— Freebase

Decathlon

Decathlon

The decathlon is a combined event in athletics consisting of ten track and field events. The word decathlon is of Greek origin, from δέκα and ἄθλος. Events are held over two consecutive days and the winners are determined by the combined performance in all. Performance is judged on a points system in each event, not by the position achieved. The decathlon is contested mainly by male athletes, while female athletes typically compete in the heptathlon. Traditionally, the title of "World's Greatest Athlete" has been given to the man who wins the Olympic decathlon. This began when King Gustav V of Sweden told Jim Thorpe, "You, sir, are the world's greatest athlete" after Thorpe won the decathlon at the Stockholm Olympics in 1912. The current decathlon world record holder is American Ashton Eaton, who scored 9,039 points at the 2012 United States Olympic Trials. The event developed from the ancient pentathlon. Pentathlon competitions were held at the ancient Greek Olympics. Pentathlons involved five disciplines – long jump, discus throw, javelin throw, sprint and a wrestling match. Introduced in Olympia during 708 BC, the competition was extremely popular for many centuries. By the 6th century BC, pentathlons had become part of religious games. The Amateur Athletic Union held "all around events" from the 1880s and a decathlon first appeared on the Olympic athletics program at the 1904 Games.

— Freebase

Patmos

Patmos

Patmos is a small Greek island in the Aegean Sea. One of the northernmost islands of the Dodecanese complex, it has a population of 2,998 and an area of 34.05 km². The highest point is Profitis Ilias, 269 metres above sea level. The Municipality of Patmos, which includes the offshore islands of Arkoi, Marathos, and several uninhabited islets, has a total population of 3,047 and a combined land area of 45.039 square kilometres. It is part of the Kalymnos regional unit. Patmos' main communities are Chora, and Skala, the only commercial port. Other settlements are Grikou and Kampos. The churches and communities on Patmos are of the Eastern Orthodox tradition. In 1999, the island's historic center Chora, along with the Monastery of Saint John the Theologian and the Cave of the Apocalypse, were declared World Heritage Sites by UNESCO. The monastery was founded by Saint Christodulos. Patmos is also home to the Patmian School, a notable Greek seminary. Patmos is mentioned in the Christian scriptural Book of Revelation. The book's introduction states that its author, John, was on Patmos when he was given a vision from Jesus. Early Christian tradition identified this writer John of Patmos as John the Apostle, though some modern scholars are uncertain. As such, Patmos is a destination for Christian pilgrimage. Visitors can see the cave where John is said to have received his Revelation, and several monasteries on the island are dedicated to Saint John.

— Freebase

Parage

Parage

Parage is a village located in the Bačka Palanka municipality, in the South Bačka District of Serbia. It is situated in the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina. The village has a Serb ethnic majority and its population numbering 1,039 people.

— Freebase

Murmansk

Murmansk

Murmansk is a port city and the administrative center of Murmansk Oblast, Russia, located in the extreme northwest part of Russia, on the Kola Bay, 12 kilometers from the Barents Sea on the northern shore of the Kola Peninsula, not far from Russia's borders with Norway and Finland. Population: 307,257; 336,137; 468,039. Despite its rapidly declining population, Murmansk remains the largest city north of the Arctic Circle.

— Freebase

Diadema

Diadema

Diadema is a municipality in São Paulo state, Brazil. Belonging to the ABC Region of Greater São Paulo, it is 17 km distant from São Paulo's central point. Initially part of São Bernardo do Campo, Diadema became a city of its own in 1959. The city has an area of 30.65 square kilometres and a population of 386,039, the 14th largest in the state. Entirely urbanised, the annual mean temperature in the city is 19,6°C. Its HDI is 0.790. Although located in the heart of a traditionally industrial region, its main source of income is the service sector, featuring 77 healthcare installations. Diadema is still home to a butterfly zoo, a botanical garden, an art museum and an observatory.

— Freebase

Ayan

Ayan

Ayan is a rural locality and the administrative center of Ayano-Maysky District of Khabarovsk Krai, Russia, located on the shore of a well-protected bay of the Sea of Okhotsk, 1,447 kilometers from Khabarovsk and 631 kilometers by sea from Nikolayevsk-on-Amur. Population: 967; 1,325; 2,039.

— Freebase

Karaman

Karaman

Karaman is a town in south central Turkey, located in Central Anatolia, north of the Taurus Mountains, about 100 km south of Konya. It is the capital district of the Karaman Province. According to 2000 census, the population of the province is 231,872 of which 132,064 live in the town of Karaman. The district covers an area of 3,686 km², and the town lies at an average elevation of 1,039 m. The Karaman Museum is one of the major sights.

— Freebase

Changwon

Changwon

Changwon is the capital city of Gyeongsangnam-do, South Korea. Changwon is the 8th most populated city in South Korea, with an established population of 1,089,039 people in 2010. It encompasses a land area of 743 square kilometres on the southeastern coast of South Korea. The population of southeastern Korea, including the city of Busan, is more than 6,478,000. Changwon is known as a heavy industrial city. The city only covers 7% of Gyeongsangnam-do province, also known as Gyeongnam, but holds 33.6% of its population; it also accounted for 38.5% of the total 2.1821 trillion won budget of the Gyeongnam province. In 209 AD, during the Three Kingdoms period, Changwon was named Gulja-gun, a province of the Silla kingdom. In 757 Changwon was renamed Uian-gun during the reorganization of all Silla provinces. In 1408 during the Joseon period, King Taejong established Changwon-bu. In 1415, King Taejong renamed Changwon-bu to Changwon-dohobu and it became the capital of the Gyeongnam province. On April 1, 1974 Changwon was designated 'Industrial Base Development Area No. 92.' As a result, the city was developed and significantly expanded.

— Freebase

Newnan

Newnan

Newnan is a city in Metro Atlanta, and the county seat of Coweta County, Georgia, about 40 miles southwest of Atlanta. The population was 33,039 at the 2010 census, up from 16,242 at the 2000 census, for a growth rate of 103.4% over that decade.

— Freebase

Bauru

Bauru

Bauru is a Brazilian municipality in midwestern region of the state of São Paulo. It is also the capital of the micro-region of Bauru. The population in 2010 is 344 039, the area of the municipality is 675.2 km² and the population density is 464.56/km². Established in 1896, its boundaries are Reginópolis to the north, Arealva to the northeast, Pederneiras to the east, Agudos and Piratininga to the south and Avaí to the west. The presence of a strong service sector, many college campuses - including the University of São Paulo and Universidade Estadual Paulista - and the city's location at the junction of three railroads and three highways make Bauru a major urban center of the State of São Paulo. It is the hometown of Marcos César Pontes, the first Brazilian in space. It is also the town where Pelé grew up and learned his football skills. The city is served by two airports: the older Bauru Airport, and the newer Bauru-Arealva Airport, officially known as Moussa Nakhl Tobias Airport, located in the adjoining municipality of Arealva.

— Freebase

Takagi

Takagi

Takagi is a village located in Shimoina District, Nagano Prefecture, Japan. As of 2003, the village has an estimated population of 7,039 and a density of 105.66 persons per km². The total area is 66.62 km².

— Freebase

Pindorama

Pindorama

Pindorama is the Tupi word for Land of the Palms, the natives' name for Brazil. Pindorama is also a municipality in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The population of the city is 15,039 and the area is 184.8 km². Pindorama belongs to the Mesoregion of São José do Rio Preto.

— Freebase

Atmosphere of Earth

Atmosphere of Earth

The atmosphere of Earth is the layer of gases surrounding the planet Earth that is retained by Earth's gravity. The atmosphere protects life on Earth by absorbing ultraviolet solar radiation, warming the surface through heat retention, and reducing temperature extremes between day and night. The common name air is given to the atmospheric gases used in breathing and photosynthesis. By volume, dry air contains 78.09% nitrogen, 20.95% oxygen, 0.93% argon, 0.039% carbon dioxide, and small amounts of other gases. Air also contains a variable amount of water vapor, on average around 1% at sea level, and 0.4% over the entire atmosphere. Air content and atmospheric pressure vary at different layers, and air suitable for the survival of terrestrial plants and terrestrial animals is found only in Earth's troposphere and artificial atmospheres. The atmosphere has a mass of about 5.15×10^ kg, three quarters of which is within about 11 km of the surface. The atmosphere becomes thinner and thinner with increasing altitude, with no definite boundary between the atmosphere and outer space.

— Freebase

organ transplantation

organ transplantation

The moving of an organ from one body to another; or from a donor site to another location on the patient's own body, for the purpose of replacing the recipient's damaged or absent organ.

— Editors Contribution

loo

loo

A toilet facility, 'restroom', men or ladies lounge in Great Britain; This term can is used globally:

— Editors Contribution

jehovah's witness

jehovah's witness

A member of the jehovah's witnesses belief and faith.

— Editors Contribution

kingdom hall

kingdom hall

A building or place where members of the jehovah's witnesses gather for fellowship and worship.

— Editors Contribution

fundamentalism

fundamentalism

Fundamentalism, this word's semantic meaning can only be relevant to the degree of understanding of a current social intellectual domain. This innate didactic sense has been proven by the ability of newer generation capacity to resolve ancient metaphysical problems. Therefore, what was fundamental to old generations may not be fundamental to modern current intellectuals.

— Editors Contribution

Omnism

Omnism

Omnist derive from Omni-Theist- It is not a Religion, but the combining of the Religious and Non-Religious through the Epistemology of God's literal Writings, the 10 Commandments.

— Editors Contribution

Omni-theist

Omni-theist

You Cannot believe in all religions, because the 3 major religions(Judaism, Christianity and Muslim) Prohibits you from worshiping any other God other than Jehovah God, because it's part of his literal Writings, The 10 commandments.

— Editors Contribution