Definitions containing d'aubigné, merle

We've found 22 definitions:

Merl

Merl

alt. of Merle

— Webster Dictionary

Merle

Merle

Merle is a pattern in a dog's coat, though is commonly incorrectly referred to as a colour. The merle gene creates mottled patches of color in a solid or piebald coat, blue or odd-colored eyes, and can affect skin pigment as well. Health issues are more typical and more severe when two merles are bred together, so it is recommended that a merle be bred to a dog with a solid coat color only.

— Freebase

Merle d'Aubigné, Jean-Henri

Merle d'Aubigné, Jean-Henri

. See D'Aubigné, Merle.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Drinkin'

Drinkin'

Drinkin' is the 2001 compilation album by Merle Haggard.

— Freebase

Paul Scarron

Paul Scarron

Paul Scarron was a French poet, dramatist, and novelist, born in Paris. His precise birthdate is unknown, but he was baptized on July 4, 1610. Scarron was the first husband of Françoise d'Aubigné, who later became Madame de Maintenon and secretly married King Louis XIV of France.

— Freebase

Blackbird

Blackbird

in England, a species of thrush (Turdus merula), a singing bird with a fin note; the merle. In America the name is given to several birds, as the Quiscalus versicolor, or crow blackbird; the Agelaeus phoeniceus, or red-winged blackbird; the cowbird; the rusty grackle, etc. See Redwing

— Webster Dictionary

Top Secret

Top Secret

Top Secret is an espionage-themed role-playing game written by Merle M. Rasmussen and first published in 1980 by TSR, Inc.

— Freebase

Neck and Neck

Neck and Neck

Neck and Neck is a collaborative album by American guitarist Chet Atkins and British singer-songwriter and guitarist Mark Knopfler, released on October 9, 1990 by Columbia Records. "Poor Boy Blues" was released as a single, and in 1991 won a Grammy Award for Best Country Collaboration with Vocals. That same year, "So Soft Your Goodbye" won a Grammy Award for Best Country Instrumental Performance. Atkins originally recorded "Yakety Axe", a parody of Boots' Randolph's "Yakety Sax", on his 1965 album More of That Guitar Country. This new recording features lyrics and a new arrangement that were composed by Merle Travis. Atkins also previously recorded "I'll See You in My Dreams" on an album with Merle Travis.

— Freebase

Blue Merle

Blue Merle

Blue Merle was an American band centered in Nashville, Tennessee. Their name comes from the lyrics of a Led Zeppelin song, Bron-Y-Aur Stomp from Led Zeppelin III, referring to a "blue-eyed merle" border collie dog. Their lead singer Luke Reynolds, has a voice that has been compared to those of Chris Martin and Dave Matthews. The band is also known for live renditions of the Talking Heads song Psycho Killer. The band was first formed when Luke Reynolds and Jason Oettel met and began to work together. A friend in a studio offered them some recording time, and they began recording several demo tracks. While they were doing so, the President of Sony Publishing happened to be there, and offered them a contract. While they passed on it, it was a start. Reynolds then met Beau Stapleton, a Mandolin player, on his way back to his home in Vermont and invited him to join. Oettel brought one of his own friends, William Ellis, a drummer into the band as well. It was William who came up with the band's name. The last member to join was Luke Bulla, a fiddle player, who had been asked to fill in for a couple weeks, and soon was a full-time member. In February 2005, Blue Merle released Burning In The Sun, which features the singles "Burning In The Sun", "Every Ship Must Sail Away", and "Lucky To Know You". The album hit #8 on the Billboard Heatseekers chart and peaked at #199 on the Billboard 200. Blue Merle played Lollapalooza in 2005, and toured with Guster, Jem, J.J. Cale, and Badly Drawn Boy.

— Freebase

John Merle Coulter

John Merle Coulter

John Merle Coulter, Ph. D. was an American botanist and educator. In his career in education administration, Coulter is notable for serving as the president of Indiana University and Lake Forest College and the head of the Department of Botany at the University of Chicago.

— Freebase

Uno

Uno

Uno is an American card game which is played with a specially printed deck. The game was originally developed in 1971 by Merle Robbins in Reading, Ohio, a suburb of Cincinnati. It has been a Mattel product since 1992. The game's general principles put it into the Crazy Eights family of card games.

— Freebase

Fancred

Fancred

Fancred is the first social platform that lets fans build their sports credibility. It was founded in August 2012 by Hossein Kash Razzaghi, Jeremy Merle, and Craig Johnson, and Michael Pan. Fancred is changing sports news and opinion through the verification and credibility of the source. Fancred provides a personalized way for sports fans to communicate, discover, and consume their favorite sports content.The Fancred app debuted for iOS in March 2013 and within 16 hours was #23 in the Apple App Store for free sports apps.Fancred is a part of the 2013 Spring class at TechStars Boston.

— CrunchBase

Bakersfield sound

Bakersfield sound

The Bakersfield sound was a genre of country music developed in the mid- to late 1950s in and around Bakersfield, California. The many hit singles were largely produced by Capitol Records country music head, Ken Nelson. Bakersfield country was a reaction against the slickly produced, string orchestra-laden Nashville sound, which was becoming popular in the late 1950s. Buck Owens and the Buckaroos, and Merle Haggard and the Strangers, are the most successful artists of the original Bakersfield sound era. Other major Bakersfield country artists include Wynn Stewart, Susan Raye, and Freddie Hart.

— Freebase

Désirée

Désirée

Désirée is a 1954 historical film biography made by 20th Century Fox. It was directed by Henry Koster and produced by Julian Blaustein from a screenplay by Daniel Taradash, based on the best-selling novel Désirée by Annemarie Selinko. The music score was by Alex North and the cinematography by Milton R. Krasner. The film was made in CinemaScope. It stars Marlon Brando, Jean Simmons, Merle Oberon and Michael Rennie with Cameron Mitchell, Elizabeth Sellars, Charlotte Austin, Cathleen Nesbitt, Carolyn Jones and Evelyn Varden. The film was nominated for two Academy Awards, for Best Art Direction and Costume Design.

— Freebase

Classic country

Classic country

Classic country is a music radio format that specializes in playing mainstream country and western music hits from past decades. The classic country format can actually be further divided into two formats. The first specializes in hits from the 1920s through the early 1970s, and focus primarily on innovators and artists from country music's Golden Age. The other focuses on hits from the 1960s through early 1990s, some pre-1960 music, latter-day Golden Age stars and innovators such as Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard to newer recurrent hits from current-day artists such as George Strait, Garth Brooks, Alan Jackson and Reba McEntire.

— Freebase

Outlaw country

Outlaw country

Outlaw country is a subgenre of country music, most popular during the late 1960s and the 1970s, sometimes referred to as the outlaw movement or simply outlaw music. The focus of the movement has been on "outlaws", such as Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Merle Haggard, David Allan Coe and his Eli Radish Band, Willie Nelson, Kris Kristofferson, Leon Russell, Hank Williams Jr., Townes Van Zandt, Billy Joe Shaver and Hank Williams III. The reason for the movement has been attributed to a reaction to the Nashville sound, developed by record producers like Chet Atkins who softened the raw honky tonk sound that was predominant in the music of performers like Jimmie Rodgers, and his successors such as Hank Williams, George Jones and Lefty Frizzell. According to Aaron Fox, "the fundamental opposition between law-and-order authoritarianism and the image of 'outlaw' authenticity... has structured country's discourse of masculinity since the days of Jimmie Rodgers."

— Freebase

Proximity fuze

Proximity fuze

A proximity fuze is a fuze that detonates an explosive device automatically when the distance to the target becomes smaller than a predetermined value, or when the fuze and the target pass by each other. Various kinds of proximity fuzes are designed for various targets such as planes, missiles, ships at sea and ground forces. They provide a more sophisticated trigger mechanism than the common contact fuze. The proximity fuze is considered one of the most important technological innovations of World War II. One of the first practical proximity fuzes was codenamed the VT fuze, an acronym of "Variable Time fuze", as deliberate camouflage for its operating principle. The VT fuze concept in the context of artillery shells originated in the UK with British researchers and was developed under the direction of physicist Merle A. Tuve at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab. The Germans were supposedly also working on proximity fuses in the 1930s, research and prototype work at Rheinmetall being halted in 1940 to devote available resources to projects deemed more necessary.

— Freebase

Merlot

Merlot

Merlot is a dark blue-coloured wine grape, that is used as both a blending grape and for varietal wines. The name Merlot is thought to derive from the Old French word for young blackbird, merlot, a diminutive of merle, the blackbird, probably from the color of the grape. Merlot-based wines usually have medium body with hints of berry, plum, and currant. Its softness and "fleshiness", combined with its earlier ripening, makes Merlot a popular grape for blending with the sterner, later-ripening Cabernet Sauvignon, which tends to be higher in tannin. Along with Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot, Merlot is one of the primary grapes in Bordeaux wine where it is the most widely planted grape. Merlot is also one of the most popular red wine varietals in many markets. This flexibility has helped to make it one of the world's most planted grape varieties. As of 2004, Merlot was estimated to be the third most grown variety at 260,000 hectares globally, with an increasing trend. This puts Merlot just behind Cabernet Sauvignon's 262,000 hectares.

— Freebase

Treasures

Treasures

Treasures is a 1996 Dolly Parton album, made up of covers of rock and country hits from the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. It was her 33rd studio album. Among the selections were work by Merle Haggard, Neil Young, Kris Kristofferson, Cat Stevens and Mac Davis. Perhaps the most surprising choices to fans were Young's "After the Gold Rush" and Stevens' "Peace Train", though Parton confessed a longtime admiration for both performers' work. The album received mixed reviews and reached number 24 on the U.S. country albums charts. Treasures featured a number of famous guest artists, including Ladysmith Black Mambazo, John Popper of Blues Traveler, David Hidalgo of Los Lobos, and Alison Krauss. Its release was accompanied by a CBS television special, in which Parton performed most of the songs, accompanied by video footage of the news stories and events from the year of each song's original release. In 1997, a dance remix version of Parton's recording of "Peace Train" was released and it reached the top ten on Billboard's dance singles charts; following the success of "Peace Train", a dance remix of "Walking on Sunshine" was released.

— Freebase

Ionosonde

Ionosonde

An ionosonde, or chirpsounder, is a special radar for the examination of the ionosphere. An ionosonde consists of: ⁕A high frequency transmitter, automatically tunable over a wide range. Typically the frequency coverage is 0.5–23 MHz or 1–40 MHz, though normally sweeps are confined to approximately 1.6–12 MHz. ⁕A tracking HF receiver which can automatically track the frequency of the transmitter. ⁕An antenna with a suitable radiation pattern, which transmits well vertically upwards and is efficient over the whole frequency range used. ⁕Digital control and data analysis circuits. The transmitter sweeps all or part of the HF frequency range, transmitting short pulses. These pulses are reflected at various layers of the ionosphere, at heights of 100–400 km, and their echos are received by the receiver and analyzed by the control system. The result is displayed in the form of an ionogram, a graph of reflection height versus carrier frequency. The basic ionosonde technology was invented in 1925 by Gregory Breit and Merle A. Tuve and further developed in the late 1920s by a number of prominent physicists, including Edward Victor Appleton. The term ionosphere and hence, the etymology of its derivatives, was proposed by Robert Watson-Watt.

— Freebase

Okie

Okie

Okie is a term dating from as early as 1907, originally denoting a resident or native of Oklahoma. It is derived from the name of the state, similar to Texan or Tex for someone from Texas, or Arkie or Arkansawyer for a native of Arkansas. In the 1930s in California, the term came to refer to very poor immigrants from Oklahoma. Jobs were very scarce in the 1930s, but after the defense boom began in 1940, there were plenty of high-paying jobs in the shipyards and defense factories. The "Okie" migration of the 1930s brought in over a million newly displaced people; many headed to the farms in California's Central Valley. Dunbar-Ortiz argues that 'Okie' denotes much more than being from Oklahoma. By 1950, four million individuals, or one quarter of all persons born in Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, or Missouri, lived outside the region, primarily in the West. The core group of Okies are descendants of Scotch Irish who display a marked individualistic political bent. During 1906-17 many became Socialists or joined the Industrial Workers of the World, and Okies tended toward left-populism in the 1930s. Prominent Okies in the 1930s included Woody Guthrie. Most prominent in the late 1960s and 1970s were country musician Merle Haggard and writer Gerald Haslam.

— Freebase

Shetland Sheepdog

Shetland Sheepdog

The Shetland Sheepdog, often known as the Sheltie, is a breed of herding dog. They are small to medium dogs, and come in a variety of colors, such as sable, tri-color, and blue merle. They are vocal, excitable, energetic dogs who are always willing to please and work hard. They are partly derived from dogs used in the Shetland Isles for herding and protecting sheep. The breed was formally recognized by the Kennel Club in 1909. The Shetland Sheepdog's early history is not well known. Although of obscure origin, the sheltie is probably a descendant of small specimens of the Scottish collie and the King Charles spaniel. It was developed to tend the diminutive sheep of the Shetland Islands, whose rugged, stormy shores have produced other small-statured animals such as the Shetland pony. Today it is raised as a farm dog and family pet. They were originally a small mixed-breed dog, often 10–13 inches in height and it is thought that the original Shetland herding dogs were of Spitz type, and were crossed with collie-type sheepdogs from mainland Britain. In the early 20th century, James Loggie added a small Rough Collie to the breeding stock, and helped establish what would become the modern Shetland sheepdog. The original name of the breed was "Shetland Collie", but this caused controversy among Rough Collie breeders at the time, so the breed's name was formally changed to Shetland Sheepdog.

— Freebase


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