Definitions containing d'angoulême, duchesse

We've found 12 definitions:

Cassolette

Cassolette

Cassolette may refer to: A small porcelain, glass or metal container used for the cooking and serving of individual dishes. It also refers to the ingredients and recipe itself: ⁕Cassolettes ambassadrice–A ragoût of chicken livers with a duchesse potato border. ⁕Cassolettes bouquetière–creamed vegetables topped with asparagus tips and cauliflower florets. ⁕Cassolettes marquise–Crayfish tails à la Nantua to which diced truffles and mushrooms have been added with a border of puff pastry. ⁕Cassolettes Régence–a salpicon of chicken breast and truffles in a velouté sauce, topped with asparagus tips with a border of duchesse potatoes. {The above definition is incorrect. Above describes/defines cassoulet, NOT cassolette. /*References*/ 1. http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Cassoulet-1000068227 2. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/26/magazine/cassoulet.html?_r=0 3. http://www.amateurgourmet.com/2008/03/cassoulet_in_10.html} The correct definition of cassolette is: Cassolette Correct references are http://dinnerisserved1972.com/2012/02/28/65-cassoulet/ and http://www.angelfire.com/musicals/makeworld/ch14.html

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Charente

Charente

Charente is a department in southwestern France, in the Poitou-Charentes region, named after the Charente River, the most important river in the department, and also the river beside which the department's two largest towns, Angoulême and Cognac, are sited.

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Bernard of Clairvaux

Bernard of Clairvaux

Bernard of Clairvaux, O.Cist was a French abbot and the primary builder of the reforming Cistercian order. After the death of his mother, Bernard sought admission into the Cistercian order. "Three years later, he was sent to found a new abbey at an isolated clearing in a glen known as the Val d'Absinthe, about 15 km southeast of Bar-sur-Aube. According to tradition, Bernard founded the monastery on 25 June 1115, naming it Claire Vallée, which evolved into Clairvaux. There Bernard would preach an immediate faith, in which the intercessor was the Virgin Mary." In the year 1128, Bernard assisted at the Council of Troyes, at which he traced the outlines of the Rule of the Knights Templar, who soon became the ideal of Christian nobility. On the death of Pope Honorius II on 13 February 1130, a schism broke out in the Church. Louis VI of France convened a national council of the French bishops at Étampes in 1130, and Bernard was chosen to judge between the rivals for pope. After the council of Étampes, Bernard went to speak with the King of England, Henry I, Beauclerc, about the king's reservations regarding Pope Innocent II. Beauclerc was sceptical because most of the bishops of England supported Anacletus II; he convinced him to support Innocent. Germany had decided to support Innocent through Norbert of Xanten, who was a friend of Bernard's. However, Innocent insisted on Bernard's company when he met with Lothair III of Germany. Lothair became Innocent's strongest ally among the nobility. Despite the councils of Étampes, Wurzburg, Clermont, and Rheims all supporting Innocent, there were still large portions of the Christian world supporting Anacletus. At the end of 1131, the kingdoms of France, England, Germany, Castile, and Aragon supported Innocent; however, most of Italy, southern France, and Sicily, with the patriarchs of Constantinople, Antioch, and Jerusalem, supported Anacletus. Bernard set out to convince these other regions to rally behind Innocent. The first person whom he went to was Gerard of Angoulême. He proceeded to write a letter known as Letter 126, which questioned Gerard's reasons for supporting Anacletus. Bernard would later comment that Gerard was his most formidable opponent during the whole schism. After convincing Gerard, Bernard traveled to visit the Count of Poitiers. He was the hardest for Bernard to convince. He did not pledge allegiance to Innocent until 1135. After that, Bernard spent most of his time in Italy convincing the Italians to pledge allegiance to Innocent. He traveled to Sicily in 1137 to convince the king of Sicily to follow Innocent. The whole conflict ended when Anacletus died on 25 January 1138. In 1139, Bernard assisted at the Second Council of the Lateran. Bernard denounced the teachings of Peter Abelard to the pope, who called a council at Sens in 1141 to settle the matter. Bernard soon saw one of his disciples elected as Pope Eugenius III. Having previously helped end the schism within the church, Bernard was now called upon to combat heresy. In June 1145, Bernard traveled in southern France and his preaching there helped strengthen support against heresy.

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Angoumois

Angoumois

Angoumois was a county and province of France, nearly corresponding today to the Charente département. Its capital was Angoulême.

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Sers, Charente

Sers, Charente

Sers is a commune in the Charente department in the Poitou-Charentes region in southwestern France. Located to the southeast of Angoulême on a plateau above the river Échelle, Sers is on the edge of the forest of Horte to the south. The name is pronounced without sounding the final s [sɛʀ].

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Galop

Galop

In dance, the galop, named after the fastest running gait of a horse, a shortened version of the original term galoppade, is a lively country dance, introduced in the late 1820s to Parisian society by the Duchesse de Berry and popular in Vienna, Berlin and London. In the same closed position familiar in the waltz, the step combined a glissade with a chassé on alternate feet, ordinarily in a fast 2/4 time. The galop was a forerunner of the polka, which was introduced in Prague ballrooms in the 1830s and made fashionable in Paris when Raab, a dancing teacher of Prague, danced the polka at the Odéon Theatre, 1840. In Australian bush dance, the dance is often called galopede. The galop was particularly popular as the final dance of the evening. The "Post horn Galop" written by the cornet virtuoso Herman Koenig was first performed in London, 1844; it remains a signal that the dancing at a hunt ball or wedding reception is ended. Numerous galops were written by the "Waltz King" Johann Strauss II. Dmitri Shostakovich employed a "posthorn galop" as the second, Allegro scherzo of his Eighth Symphony, 1943. Franz Schubert also composed the fourth movement of his Symphony No. 2 on the galop. Particularly famous is the "Devil's Galop" by Charles Williams.

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Opéra bouffe

Opéra bouffe

Opéra bouffe is a genre of late 19th-century French operetta, closely associated with Jacques Offenbach, who produced many of them at the Théâtre des Bouffes-Parisiens that gave its name to the form. Opéras bouffes are known for elements of comedy, satire, parody and farce. The most famous examples are La belle Hélène, Barbe-bleue, La vie parisienne, La Périchole and La Grande-Duchesse de Gérolstein.

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Nantes Busway

Nantes Busway

The Nantes Busway is a bus rapid transit line operating in the city of Nantes, France. The service was inaugurated on November 6, 2006 and is operated by Semitan. The line runs from Place Foch to Porte de Vertou on dedicated way, and interconnects with line 1 of the Nantes Tramway at Duchesse Anne Château station. Four park & ride facilities have been built along the construction of the line to encourage passengers to use public transports. Nantes Busway line 4 is NF certified. Victim of its success, Busway line 4 benefits higher ridership above Semitan's expectations pushing the system to saturation and overcrowded buses at peak times and nearly full off peak. Semitan has been testing the Hess LighTram on November 23 and 24 2009 to eventually increase capacity of the system and relieve the transit at peak times. Though that solution hasn't been retained, Semitan decided to increase passage frequencies to less than 3 minutes at peak times. If saturation recurs, Busway line 4 may be converted into a Tramway line in the future.

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Duchess potatoes

Duchess potatoes

Duchess potatoes or Duchesse potatoes consist of a seasoned purée of mashed potato and egg which is forced from a piping bag or hand-moulded into various shapes which are then baked until golden. They are a classic item of French cuisine.

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Chenonceaux

Chenonceaux

a magnificent château near Amboise, in, France; built by Francis I. for the Duchesse d'Etampes, afterwards the property of the Condés, and afterwards of Madame Dupont.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Genlis, Stephanie Félicité, Comtesse de

Genlis, Stephanie Félicité, Comtesse de

a celebrated French novelist, born at Champceri, near Autun, Burgundy; at the age of 16 she was married to the Comte de Genlis, who eventually fell a victim to the fury of the Revolution; in 1770 she was a lady-in-waiting to the Duchesse de Chartres, and 12 years later became governess to the children of the Duc d'Orléans, amongst whom was the future king of the French, Louis-Philippe; the Revolution drove her to Switzerland, but on the elevation of Napoleon she returned to Paris, and received from him a pension, which continued to be paid her even under the restored Bourbon dynasty: she was a voluminous writer of moral tales, comedies, &c., and her works amount to about 90 vols., among them the celebrated "Mémoirs" of her life and times; she was ill-natured, and in her "Memoirs" inaccurate, as well as prejudiced (1746-1830).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Offenbach, Jacques

Offenbach, Jacques

a musical composer, born at Cologne, of Jewish parents, creator of the opera bouffe; was the author of "La Belle Hélène," "Orphée aux Enfers," "La Grande Duchesse," "Madame Favart," &c. (1810-1880)

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia


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