Definitions containing dĂ bereiner's lamp

We've found 250 definitions:

Davy lamp

Davy lamp

A minersu2019 lamp or safety lamp used in coal mines to warn against methane (firedamp).

— Wiktionary

Davy lamp

Davy lamp

see Safety lamp, under Lamp

— Webster Dictionary

lampshade

lampshade

a decorative cover on a lamp

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

Arc lamp

Arc lamp

"Arc lamp" or "arc light" is the general term for a class of lamps that produce light by an electric arc. The lamp consists of two electrodes, first made from carbon but typically made today of tungsten, which are separated by a gas. The type of lamp is often named by the gas contained in the bulb; including neon, argon, xenon, krypton, sodium, metal halide, and mercury, or by the type of electrode as in carbon-arc lamps. The common fluorescent lamp is a low-pressure mercury arc lamp.

— Freebase

Halogen lamp

Halogen lamp

A halogen lamp, also known as a tungsten halogen lamp or quartz iodine lamp, is an incandescent lamp that has a small amount of a halogen such as iodine or bromine added. The combination of the halogen gas and the tungsten filament produces a halogen cycle chemical reaction which redeposits evaporated tungsten back onto the filament, increasing its life and maintaining the clarity of the envelope. Because of this, a halogen lamp can be operated at a higher temperature than a standard gas-filled lamp of similar power and operating life, producing light of a higher luminous efficacy and color temperature. The small size of halogen lamps permits their use in compact optical systems for projectors and illumination.

— Freebase

Diya

Diya

A diya, divaa, deepa, deepam, or deepak is an oil lamp, usually made from clay, with a cotton wick dipped in ghee or vegetable oils. Clay diyas are often used temporarily as lighting for special occasions, while diyas made of brass are permanent fixtures in homes and temples. Diyas are native to India, and are often used in Hindu, Sikh, Jain and Zoroastrian religious festivals such as Diwali or the Kushti ceremony. A similar lamp called a butter lamp is used in Tibetan Buddhist offerings as well.

— Freebase

focsle lamp

focsle lamp

A forecastle lamp

— Wiktionary

bedlamp

bedlamp

A bedside lamp.

— Wiktionary

neon light

neon light

A neon lamp.

— Wiktionary

minilamp

minilamp

A miniature lamp.

— Wiktionary

magnesium light

magnesium light

a magnesium lamp

— Wiktionary

Lucern

Lucern

a lamp

— Webster Dictionary

lampion

lampion

A small oil lamp.

— Wiktionary

spot

spot

A bright lamp; a spotlight.

— Wiktionary

sodium lamp

sodium lamp

A sodium vapor lamp.

— Wiktionary

compact fluorescent lamp

compact fluorescent lamp

A type of fluorescent lamp.

— Wiktionary

safelight

safelight

the lamp in a darkroom

— Wiktionary

Lampad

Lampad

a lamp or candlestick

— Webster Dictionary

Lamplight

Lamplight

light from a lamp

— Webster Dictionary

Light fixture

Light fixture

A light fixture, light fitting, or luminaire is an electrical device used to create artificial light by use of an electric lamp. All light fixtures have a fixture body and a light socket to hold the lamp and allow for its replacement. Fixtures may also have a switch to control the light. Fixtures require an electrical connection to a power source; permanent lighting may be directly wired, and moveable lamps have a plug. Light fixtures may also have other features, such as reflectors for directing the light, an aperture, an outer shell or housing for lamp alignment and protection, and an electrical ballast or power supply. A wide variety of special light fixtures are created for use in the automotive lighting industry, aerospace, marine and medicine. The use of the word "lamp" to describe light fixtures is common slang for an all-in-one luminary unit, usually portable "fixtures" such as a table lamp or desk lamp. In technical terminology, a lamp is the light source, what is typically called the light bulb.

— Freebase

Lampshade

Lampshade

A lampshade is a fixture that covers the lightbulb on a lamp to diffuse the light it emits. Conical, cylindrical and other forms on floor-, desk- or table top-mounted as well as suspended lamp models are the most common and are made in a wide range of materials. The term can also apply to the glass hung under many designs of ceiling lamp. Beyond its practical purpose, significant emphasis is also usually given to decorative and aesthetic features.

— Freebase

lucernal

lucernal

Of or pertaining to a lamp.

— Wiktionary

lampless

lampless

Without a lamp or lamps; unlit.

— Wiktionary

neon light

neon light

The light from such a lamp.

— Wiktionary

incandescent

incandescent

An incandescent lamp or bulb

— Wiktionary

lamplight

lamplight

The light emitted by a lamp.

— Wiktionary

lamplike

lamplike

Resembling or characteristic of a lamp.

— Wiktionary

white light

white light

A white-coloured light or lamp

— Wiktionary

desklamp

desklamp

A lamp used to illuminate a desk.

— Wiktionary

strobe

strobe

To flash like a stroboscopic lamp.

— Wiktionary

Mortar

Mortar

a chamber lamp or light

— Webster Dictionary

magnesium light

magnesium light

the intense light from such a lamp

— Wiktionary

pilot

pilot

Used to indicate operation ("pilot lamp")

— Wiktionary

streetlamp

streetlamp

A lamp that illuminates a street or sidewalk.

— Wiktionary

cruse

cruse

An oil lamp or similar emblem.

— Wiktionary

handlamp

handlamp

A small lamp carried in the hand

— Wiktionary

gaslight

gaslight

A lamp which operates by burning gas.

— Wiktionary

sodium vapour lamp

sodium vapour lamp

alternative spelling of sodium vapor lamp

— Wiktionary

Lucernal

Lucernal

of or pertaining to a lamp

— Webster Dictionary

Candelabrum

Candelabrum

a lamp stand of any sort

— Webster Dictionary

coach lamp

coach lamp

A lamp fixed to, or carried on a stagecoach

— Wiktionary

table lamp

table lamp

a lamp designed to be used on tables

— Wiktionary

Turreted

Turreted

formed like a tower; as, a turreted lamp

— Webster Dictionary

klieg light

klieg light

An intense carbon arc lamp used in cinematography

— Wiktionary

drop light

drop light

A lamp that is suspended, for example via a cable.

— Wiktionary

lamp

lamp

to hunt at night using a lamp; see lamping

— Wiktionary

nightlight

nightlight

a small, dim light or lamp left on overnight

— Wiktionary

halogen oven

halogen oven

A microwave oven supplemented with a halogen lamp for browning

— Wiktionary

kudlik

kudlik

A type of soapstone lamp used by the Inuit.

— Wiktionary

shine

shine

To create light with a flashlight, lamp, torch, etc.

— Wiktionary

lamplit

lamplit

lighted by a lamp

— Princeton's WordNet

lamplight

lamplight

light from a lamp

— Princeton's WordNet

lampad

lampad

A candlestick, or lamp of fire mentioned in Revelation (Bible).

— Wiktionary

blacklight

blacklight

A lamp used for decoration that gives off ultraviolet light.

— Wiktionary

electric lamp

electric lamp

a lamp powered by electricity

— Princeton's WordNet

Argand lamp

Argand lamp

The Argand lamp is a home lighting oil lamp producing a light output of 6 to 10 candela which was invented and patented in 1780 by Aimé Argand. Aside from the improvement in brightness, the more complete combustion of the wick and oil required much less frequent trimming of the wick. In France, they are known as "Quinquets" after Antoine-Arnoult Quinquet, a pharmacist in Paris, who used the idea originated by Argand and popularized it in France. He is sometimes credited with the addition of the glass chimney to the lamp.

— Freebase

sunlamp

sunlamp

A high-intensity lamp, used to produce an illusion of daylight.

— Wiktionary

fluorescent lamp

fluorescent lamp

a gas-discharge lamp that uses fluorescence to produce visible light.

— Wiktionary

strobe

strobe

A stroboscopic lamp, a device used to produce regular flashes of light

— Wiktionary

Geordie

Geordie

a name given by miners to George Stephenson's safety lamp

— Webster Dictionary

Fres'nel' lan'tern

Fres'nel' lan'tern

a lantern having a lamp surrounded by a hollow cylindrical Fresnel lens

— Webster Dictionary

table lamp

table lamp

a lamp that sits on a table

— Princeton's WordNet

gas lamp

gas lamp

a lamp that burns illuminating gas

— Princeton's WordNet

Neon lamp

Neon lamp

A neon lamp is a miniature gas discharge lamp that typically contains neon gas at a low pressure in a glass capsule. Only a thin region adjacent to the electrodes glows in these lamps, which distinguishes them from the much longer and brighter neon tubes used for signage. The term "neon lamp" is generally extended to lamps with similar design that operate with different gases. Neon glow lamps were very common in the displays of electronic instruments through the 1970s; the basic design of neon lamps is now incorporated in contemporary plasma displays.

— Freebase

Bodhipathapradu012Bpa

Bodhipathapradu012Bpa

Atiu015Ba's 11th century root text, A Lamp for the Path to Enlightenment

— Wiktionary

sunlamp

sunlamp

A lamp that produces ultraviolet radiation; used for therapeutic or cosmetic purposes.

— Wiktionary

foglamp

foglamp

A wide automotive lamp intended to increase visibility in poor weather conditions.

— Wiktionary

Wicked

Wicked

having a wick; -- used chiefly in composition; as, a two-wicked lamp

— Webster Dictionary

reading lamp

reading lamp

a lamp that provides light for reading

— Princeton's WordNet

fluorescent

fluorescent, fluorescent fixture

a lighting fixture that uses a fluorescent lamp

— Princeton's WordNet

floor lamp

floor lamp

a lamp that stands on the floor

— Princeton's WordNet

flashlight

flashlight, torch

a small portable battery-powered electric lamp

— Princeton's WordNet

torch

flashlight, torch

a small portable battery-powered electric lamp

— Princeton's WordNet

Lampic

Lampic

pertaining to, or produced by, a lamp; -- formerly said of a supposed acid

— Webster Dictionary

shine

shine

throw or flash the light of (a lamp)

— Princeton's WordNet

street lamp

streetlight, street lamp

a lamp supported on a lamppost; for illuminating a street

— Princeton's WordNet

streetlight

streetlight, street lamp

a lamp supported on a lamppost; for illuminating a street

— Princeton's WordNet

Camphine

Camphine

Camphine was the trade name of a purified spirit of turpentine formerly used for lamps, generally prepared by distilling turpentine with quicklime. Camphine gives a very brilliant light when burned in a lamp, but, to prevent smoking, the lamp must have a very strong draught. To achieve this special lamps were constructed, so called Vesta lamps.

— Freebase

photocoagulator

photocoagulator

An instrument containing a laser, or a xenon flash lamp, which is used in photocoagulation.

— Wiktionary

Davy lamp

Davy lamp

The Davy lamp is a safety lamp for use in flammable atmospheres, consisting of a wick lamp with the flame enclosed inside a mesh screen. It was invented in 1815 by Sir Humphry Davy. It originally burned a heavy vegetable oil. It was created for use in coal mines, to reduce the danger of explosions due to the presence of methane and other flammable gases, called firedamp or minedamp. Sir Humphry Davy had discovered that a flame enclosed inside a mesh of a certain fineness cannot ignite firedamp. The screen acts as a flame arrestor; air can pass through the mesh freely enough to support combustion, but the holes are too fine to allow a flame to propagate through them and ignite any firedamp outside the mesh. The news about Davy's lamp was made public at a Royal Society meeting in Newcastle on 3 November 1815, and the paper describing the lamp was formally presented on 9 November. For it, Davy was awarded the Society's Rumford Medal.. The first trial of a Davy lamp with a wire sieve was at Hebburn Colliery on 9 January 1816.

— Freebase

lamp housing

lamp house, lamphouse, lamp housing

housing that holds a lamp (as in a movie projector)

— Princeton's WordNet

lamphouse

lamp house, lamphouse, lamp housing

housing that holds a lamp (as in a movie projector)

— Princeton's WordNet

lamp house

lamp house, lamphouse, lamp housing

housing that holds a lamp (as in a movie projector)

— Princeton's WordNet

kerosine lamp

oil lamp, kerosene lamp, kerosine lamp

a lamp that burns oil (as kerosine) for light

— Princeton's WordNet

flash lamp

flash, photoflash, flash lamp, flashgun, flashbulb, flash bulb

a lamp for providing momentary light to take a photograph

— Princeton's WordNet

flash

flash, photoflash, flash lamp, flashgun, flashbulb, flash bulb

a lamp for providing momentary light to take a photograph

— Princeton's WordNet

flashgun

flash, photoflash, flash lamp, flashgun, flashbulb, flash bulb

a lamp for providing momentary light to take a photograph

— Princeton's WordNet

kerosene lamp

oil lamp, kerosene lamp, kerosine lamp

a lamp that burns oil (as kerosine) for light

— Princeton's WordNet

sunray

sunray, sun-ray

a ray of artificial ultraviolet light from a sunray lamp

— Princeton's WordNet

student lamp

student lamp

a reading lamp with a flexible neck; used on a desk

— Princeton's WordNet

sun-ray

sunray, sun-ray

a ray of artificial ultraviolet light from a sunray lamp

— Princeton's WordNet

photoflash

flash, photoflash, flash lamp, flashgun, flashbulb, flash bulb

a lamp for providing momentary light to take a photograph

— Princeton's WordNet

oil lamp

oil lamp, kerosene lamp, kerosine lamp

a lamp that burns oil (as kerosine) for light

— Princeton's WordNet

flash bulb

flash, photoflash, flash lamp, flashgun, flashbulb, flash bulb

a lamp for providing momentary light to take a photograph

— Princeton's WordNet

flashbulb

flash, photoflash, flash lamp, flashgun, flashbulb, flash bulb

a lamp for providing momentary light to take a photograph

— Princeton's WordNet

sodium vapor lamp

sodium vapor lamp

A street lamp in which electricity is passed through sodium vapour to emit a yellow light.

— Wiktionary

photoflood

photoflood

A lamp that produces a broad beam of continuous bright light; used to illuminate a photographic subject

— Wiktionary

safety lamp

safety lamp

A miner's lamp designed to avoid explosion by enclosing the flame in fine wire gauze.

— Wiktionary

spirit lamp

spirit lamp

a lamp that burns a volatile liquid fuel such as alcohol

— Princeton's WordNet

sunlamp

sunlamp, sun lamp, sunray lamp, sun-ray lamp

a mercury-vapor lamp used in medical or cosmetic treatments

— Princeton's WordNet

lamp chimney

lamp chimney, chimney

a glass flue surrounding the wick of an oil lamp

— Princeton's WordNet

sun-ray lamp

sunlamp, sun lamp, sunray lamp, sun-ray lamp

a mercury-vapor lamp used in medical or cosmetic treatments

— Princeton's WordNet

sunray lamp

sunlamp, sun lamp, sunray lamp, sun-ray lamp

a mercury-vapor lamp used in medical or cosmetic treatments

— Princeton's WordNet

lamppost

lamppost

a metal post supporting an outdoor lamp (such as a streetlight)

— Princeton's WordNet

diffuser

diffuser, diffusor

optical device that distributes the light of a lamp evenly

— Princeton's WordNet

diffusor

diffuser, diffusor

optical device that distributes the light of a lamp evenly

— Princeton's WordNet

aladdin's lamp

Aladdin's lamp

(Arabian Nights) a magical lamp from which Aladdin summoned a genie

— Princeton's WordNet

chimney

lamp chimney, chimney

a glass flue surrounding the wick of an oil lamp

— Princeton's WordNet

Lampadomancy

Lampadomancy

Lampadomancy is a form of divination using a single oil lamp or a torch flame. As with Lychnoscopy, the diviner reads presages from the movements of the flame. An alternate method is also practiced, consisting of reading the spots of carbon deposited on paper sheets held over the flame. In yet another method, the diviner uses the lamp as a means of "attracting spirits to the flames", in the hope of consulting them regarding future events. In this method, usually a specially designed lamp is employed, on the belief that grotesque forms will attract the spirits. Lychnomancy is a related form of divination with flames of three identical candles arranged in a triangle. Lampadomancy was a popular method of divination in ancient Egypt, where diviners would perform it at midday in a darkened room illuminated by a single lamp filled with oasis oil.

— Freebase

incandescent lamp

incandescent lamp

a lamp that creates radiant energy when its metallic filament is heated by an electric current

— Wiktionary

photoflash

photoflash

A lamp that emits a brief flash of bright light; used to take photographs in a dark environment

— Wiktionary

magic lamp

magic lamp

An oil lamp that can be rubbed in order to summon a genie who grants wishes.

— Wiktionary

Lamp-post

Lamp-post

a post (generally a pillar of iron) supporting a lamp or lantern for lighting a street, park, etc

— Webster Dictionary

Etna

Etna

a kind of small, portable, cooking apparatus for which heat is furnished by a spirit lamp

— Webster Dictionary

tail lamp

taillight, tail lamp, rear light, rear lamp

lamp (usually red) mounted at the rear of a motor vehicle

— Princeton's WordNet

taillight

taillight, tail lamp, rear light, rear lamp

lamp (usually red) mounted at the rear of a motor vehicle

— Princeton's WordNet

safety lamp

safety lamp, Davy lamp

an oil lamp that will not ignite flammable gases (methane)

— Princeton's WordNet

rear lamp

taillight, tail lamp, rear light, rear lamp

lamp (usually red) mounted at the rear of a motor vehicle

— Princeton's WordNet

rear light

taillight, tail lamp, rear light, rear lamp

lamp (usually red) mounted at the rear of a motor vehicle

— Princeton's WordNet

davy lamp

safety lamp, Davy lamp

an oil lamp that will not ignite flammable gases (methane)

— Princeton's WordNet

halogen lamp

halogen lamp

An incandescent lamp containing a small quantity of halogen (usually bromine) to reduce deposition on the glass

— Wiktionary

blackout lamp

blackout lamp

A hand-held lamp that has sliding or rotating doors to adjust the amount of light emitted.

— Wiktionary

magnesium lamp

magnesium lamp

A lamp, containing a coil of magnesium ribbon fed into a burner by clockwork, that produced an intense light.

— Wiktionary

lampstand

lampstand

A menorah or other holder or stand for a lamp.

— Wiktionary

chimney

chimney

The glass flue surrounding the flame of an oil lamp.

— Wiktionary

Slit lamp

Slit lamp

The slit lamp is an instrument consisting of a high-intensity light source that can be focused to shine a thin sheet of light into the eye. It is used in conjunction with a biomicroscope. The lamp facilitates an examination of the anterior segment, or frontal structures and posterior segment, of the human eye, which includes the eyelid, sclera, conjunctiva, iris, natural crystalline lens, and cornea. The binocular slit-lamp examination provides a stereoscopic magnified view of the eye structures in detail, enabling anatomical diagnoses to be made for a variety of eye conditions. A second, hand-held lens is used to examine the retina.

— Freebase

discharge lamp

discharge lamp

a lamp that generates light by a discharge between two electrodes in a gas

— Princeton's WordNet

Nernst lamp

Nernst lamp

A type of incandescent lamp using a ceramic rod, used as a source of infrared radiation.

— Wiktionary

arclight

arclight

A lamp that produces light by generating an electric arc across an enclosed gas.

— Wiktionary

spirit lamp

spirit lamp

A lamp that burns a volatile liquid fuel such as alcohol, ethanol or denatured alcohol.

— Wiktionary

infrared lamp

heat lamp, infrared lamp

electric heater consisting of a high-power incandescent lamp that emits infrared radiation

— Princeton's WordNet

heat lamp

heat lamp, infrared lamp

electric heater consisting of a high-power incandescent lamp that emits infrared radiation

— Princeton's WordNet

klieg light

klieg light

carbon arc lamp that emits an intense light used in producing films

— Princeton's WordNet

Cric

Cric

the ring which turns inward and condenses the flame of a lamp

— Webster Dictionary

Burner

Burner

the part of a lamp, gas fixture, etc., where the flame is produced

— Webster Dictionary

Compact fluorescent lamp

Compact fluorescent lamp

A compact fluorescent lamp, also called compact fluorescent light, energy-saving light, and compact fluorescent tube, is a fluorescent lamp designed to replace an incandescent lamp; some types fit into light fixtures formerly used for incandescent lamps. The lamps use a tube which is curved or folded to fit into the space of an incandescent bulb, and a compact electronic ballast in the base of the lamp. Compared to general-service incandescent lamps giving the same amount of visible light, CFLs use one-fifth to one-third the electric power, and last eight to fifteen times longer. A CFL has a higher purchase price than an incandescent lamp, but can save over five times its purchase price in electricity costs over the lamp's lifetime. Like all fluorescent lamps, CFLs contain mercury, which complicates their disposal. In many countries, governments have established recycling schemes for CFLs and glass generally. CFLs radiate a spectral power distribution that is different from that of incandescent lamps. Improved phosphor formulations have improved the perceived color of the light emitted by CFLs, such that some sources rate the best "soft white" CFLs as subjectively similar in color to standard incandescent lamps.

— Freebase

neon lamp

neon lamp

a small gas discharge lamp containing neon gas, sometimes with other noble gases to add colour

— Wiktionary

Aladdin

Aladdin

A classic Arabic tale about a young man named Aladdin who is recruited by a sorcerer to get a magic lamp from a cave.

— Wiktionary

Lamp

Lamp

a device or mechanism for producing light by electricity. See Incandescent lamp, under Incandescent

— Webster Dictionary

Carcel lamp

Carcel lamp

a French mechanical lamp, for lighthouses, in which a superabundance of oil is pumped to the wick tube by clockwork

— Webster Dictionary

Extinct

Extinct

extinguished; put out; quenched; as, a fire, a light, or a lamp, is extinct; an extinct volcano

— Webster Dictionary

grow light

grow light

An electric lamp designed to promote plant growth by emitting an electromagnetic spectrum appropriate for photosynthesis.

— Wiktionary

forecastle lamp

forecastle lamp

A lamp, hung in the forecastle of a ship to allow sailors to work and relax after dark

— Wiktionary

arc light

arc lamp, arc light

a lamp that produces light when electric current flows across the gap between two electrodes

— Princeton's WordNet

arc lamp

arc lamp, arc light

a lamp that produces light when electric current flows across the gap between two electrodes

— Princeton's WordNet

Lamp

Lamp

figuratively, anything which enlightens intellectually or morally; anything regarded metaphorically a performing the uses of a lamp

— Webster Dictionary

prefocus

prefocus

Describing a lamp whose light source is positioned to be in focus when fitted (especially in a motor car)

— Wiktionary

infrared lamp

infrared lamp

An incandescent lamp designed to produce radiant thermal energy in the infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum.

— Wiktionary

aladdin

Aladdin

in the Arabian Nights a boy who acquires a magic lamp from which he can summon a genie

— Princeton's WordNet

Chimney

Chimney

a tube usually of glass, placed around a flame, as of a lamp, to create a draft, and promote combustion

— Webster Dictionary

Glowlamp

Glowlamp

an incandescent lamp. See Incandescent, a

— Webster Dictionary

Glowlamp

Glowlamp

an aphlogistic lamp. See Aphlogistic

— Webster Dictionary

standard lamp

standard lamp

A lamp supported by a tall vertical pole in order that light comes from above those seated in the vicinity.

— Wiktionary

spotlight

spotlight

a bright, directional light or lamp, especially one used to illuminate the focus or center of attention on a stage

— Wiktionary

Chandelier

Chandelier

a candlestick, lamp, stand, gas fixture, or the like, having several branches; esp., one hanging from the ceiling

— Webster Dictionary

Xenon arc lamp

Xenon arc lamp

A xenon arc lamp is a specialized type of gas discharge lamp, an electric light that produces light by passing electricity through ionized xenon gas at high pressure. It produces a bright white light that closely mimics natural sunlight. Xenon arc lamps are used in movie projectors in theaters, in searchlights, and for specialized uses in industry and research to simulate sunlight. Xenon headlamps in automobiles actually use metal-halide lamps where xenon arc is only used during start-up.

— Freebase

bankers lamp

bankers lamp

A distinctive type of desk lamp, usually with a solid ornate base and a single stem leading to a horizontal (usually green) cover.

— Wiktionary

lightship

lightship

A ship equipped with a very large lamp; it can be positioned to warn off other ships from dangerous locations, as a sort of portable lighthouse.

— Wiktionary

gas mantle

gas mantle

The incandescent gauze surrounding the flame in a gas lamp. It contains rare earths to enhance the light output.

— Wiktionary

barndoor

barndoor

an opaque adjustable flap on a lamp fixture; used in photography to cut off light from particular areas

— Princeton's WordNet

infrared ray

infrared ray

a ray of infrared radiation; produces a thermal effect (as from an infrared lamp)

— Princeton's WordNet

Lava lamp

Lava lamp

A lava lamp is a decorative novelty item, invented by British accountant Edward Craven-Walker in 1963. The lamp contains blobs of colored wax inside a glass vessel filled with clear liquid; the wax rises and falls as its density changes due to heating from an incandescent light bulb underneath the vessel. The appearance of the wax is suggestive of pāhoehoe lava, hence the name. The lamps are designed in a variety of styles and colours.

— Freebase

mantle

mantle

The zone of hot gases around a flame; the gauzy incandescent covering of a gas lamp.

— Wiktionary

magnesium ribbon

magnesium ribbon

A thin ribbon of magnesium metal used in laboratory demonstrations and in the magnesium lamp.

— Wiktionary

ballast

ballast

device used for stabilizing current in an electric circuit (e.g.in a tube lamp supply circuit)

— Wiktionary

metal halide lamp

metal halide lamp

A high-pressure discharge lamp that is enclosed in a quartz envelope containing metal halides (usually iodides), and produces high-efficacy white light.

— Wiktionary

quartz lamp

quartz lamp

a mercury-vapor lamp that is enclosed in a quartz container instead of a glass container

— Princeton's WordNet

Lamp trimmer

Lamp trimmer

Lamp trimmer was a specialist position onboard ships that involved maintaining oil lamps. In the days when light came from burning oil in lamps, a vessel at sea needed crewmen to constantly care for the lamps. This care involved trimming the wick, which drew the oil up from the storage reservoir, so that the flame would be clean and bright. Lamp trimmers also refilled the reservoirs, which held enough oil for several hours of burning, but not enough to start a major fire if the lamp were to be knocked down or damaged somehow. As vessels became larger, the number of lamp trimmers increased significantly, because the only lighting below decks came from lamps. The position of lamp trimmer was so entrenched into marine tradition that electricians were called lamp trimmers for years after oil lamps had been completely replaced. The skilled part of being a lamp trimmer was the ability to trim a wick in such a way that it would burn evenly, without hot spots, so that it would not need attention again for some time. A poorly trimmed wick creates a flame which is dim and smokey. A properly trimmed wick should come to a rounded point, or should be wedge shaped. When lit, the wick should burn cleanly all the way up to the highest flame it can make. The flame should be at least the width of the wick, and even, not ragged.

— Freebase

taper

wick, taper

a loosely woven cord (in a candle or oil lamp) that draws fuel by capillary action up into the flame

— Princeton's WordNet

wick

wick, taper

a loosely woven cord (in a candle or oil lamp) that draws fuel by capillary action up into the flame

— Princeton's WordNet

Holophote

Holophote

a lamp with lenses or reflectors to collect the rays of light and throw them in a given direction; -- used in lighthouses

— Webster Dictionary

stroboscope

stroboscope

A lamp that produces short bursts of light that synchronizes with a camera shutter for photographing fast-moving objects; A photo made by such a machine.

— Wiktionary

Blink

Blink

to shine, esp. with intermittent light; to twinkle; to flicker; to glimmer, as a lamp

— Webster Dictionary

Lamplighter

Lamplighter

one who, or that which, lights a lamp; esp., a person who lights street lamps

— Webster Dictionary

xenon flash lamp

xenon flash lamp

A lamp that produces a very short, but very intense, flash of white light; used in photography and in photocoagulation

— Wiktionary

Bracket

Bracket

a gas fixture or lamp holder projecting from the face of a wall, column, or the like

— Webster Dictionary

Lithophane

Lithophane

porcelain impressed with figures which are made distinct by transmitted light, -- as when hung in a window, or used as a lamp shade

— Webster Dictionary

flasher

flasher

an electrical device that automatically turns a lamp on and off (as for an advertising display)

— Princeton's WordNet

sodium-vapour lamp

sodium-vapor lamp, sodium-vapour lamp

lamp in which an electric current passed through a tube of sodium vapor makes a yellow light; used is street lighting

— Princeton's WordNet

sodium-vapor lamp

sodium-vapor lamp, sodium-vapour lamp

lamp in which an electric current passed through a tube of sodium vapor makes a yellow light; used is street lighting

— Princeton's WordNet

Sealed beam

Sealed beam

A sealed beam is a type of unitized lamp with a parabolic reflector, one or more filaments, and a glass or polycarbonate lens all permanently attached together and sealed. Originally introduced for road vehicle headlamp service, sealed beams have since been applied elsewhere. Halogen sealed beam lamps have an inbuilt halogen lamp with the filaments contained in a quartz or hard glass envelope. Sealed beams are technically known as parabolic aluminumized reflector or "PAR" lamps. Round PAR lamp diameter is expressed in non-metric units of measurement equal to one eighth of an inch, so a PAR56 lamp, for example, is 56/8" in diameter. Other popular sizes are PAR30, PAR36, PAR38, PAR46, and PAR64. Rectangular PAR lamp size is expressed in millimeters, so a PAR200×142 is 200mm wide and 142mm tall. Sealed beams are available in a variety of nominal voltage ratings, most commonly 6, 12, 24, 28, 120, and 230 V. The actual operating voltage may differ from the nominal rated voltage; for example, "12 volt" sealed beam headlamps are meant for use in automobiles with typical line voltage of 13.5 to 14.2 with the engine running.

— Freebase

lightvessel

lightvessel

A ship equipped with a very large lamp, the ship can be positioned to warn off other ships from dangerous locations. A sort of portable lighthouse.

— Wiktionary

bulb

light bulb, lightbulb, bulb, incandescent lamp, electric light, electric-light bulb

electric lamp consisting of a transparent or translucent glass housing containing a wire filament (usually tungsten) that emits light when heated by electricity

— Princeton's WordNet

light bulb

light bulb, lightbulb, bulb, incandescent lamp, electric light, electric-light bulb

electric lamp consisting of a transparent or translucent glass housing containing a wire filament (usually tungsten) that emits light when heated by electricity

— Princeton's WordNet

electric light

light bulb, lightbulb, bulb, incandescent lamp, electric light, electric-light bulb

electric lamp consisting of a transparent or translucent glass housing containing a wire filament (usually tungsten) that emits light when heated by electricity

— Princeton's WordNet

lightbulb

light bulb, lightbulb, bulb, incandescent lamp, electric light, electric-light bulb

electric lamp consisting of a transparent or translucent glass housing containing a wire filament (usually tungsten) that emits light when heated by electricity

— Princeton's WordNet

incandescent lamp

light bulb, lightbulb, bulb, incandescent lamp, electric light, electric-light bulb

electric lamp consisting of a transparent or translucent glass housing containing a wire filament (usually tungsten) that emits light when heated by electricity

— Princeton's WordNet

electric-light bulb

light bulb, lightbulb, bulb, incandescent lamp, electric light, electric-light bulb

electric lamp consisting of a transparent or translucent glass housing containing a wire filament (usually tungsten) that emits light when heated by electricity

— Princeton's WordNet

Argand lamp

Argand lamp

a lamp with a circular hollow wick and glass chimney which allow a current of air both inside and outside of the flame

— Webster Dictionary

mercury-vapor lamp

mercury-vapor lamp

ultraviolet lamp that emits a strong bluish light (rich in ultraviolet radiation) as electric current passes through mercury vapor

— Princeton's WordNet

Lamp

Lamp

A lamp is a replaceable component such as an incandescent light bulb, which is designed to produce light from electricity. These components usually have a base of ceramic, metal, glass or plastic, which makes an electrical connection in the socket of a light fixture. This connection may be made with a screw-thread base, two metal pins, two metal caps or a bayonet cap. Re-lamping is the replacement of only the removable lamp in a light fixture.

— Freebase

snuff

snuff

To extinguish a candle or oil-lamp flame by covering the burning end of the wick until the flame is suffocated.

— Wiktionary

lampadomancy

lampadomancy

divination by the interpretation of the flame of a lamp. A type of pyromancy.

— Wiktionary

dimmer switch

dimmer switch

A light switch which can adjust the brightness of the switched lamp from dim to bright, as well as turning it on and off.

— Wiktionary

bullseye

bullseye

A convex glass lens which is placed in front of a lamp to concentrate the light so as to make it more conspicuous as a signal.

— Wiktionary

Aphlogistic

Aphlogistic

flameless; as, an aphlogistic lamp, in which a coil of wire is kept in a state of continued ignition by alcohol, without flame

— Webster Dictionary

neon glow lamp

neon glow lamp

a small, low-wattage lamp used as an indicator or nightlight; typically consists of a pair of electrodes sealed in a bulb containing neon at low pressure

— Wiktionary

sodium amalgam

sodium amalgam

An alloy of sodium and mercury; used as a powerful reducing agent, and in certain types of sodium lamp.

— Wiktionary

Fluorescent lamp

Fluorescent lamp

A fluorescent lamp or fluorescent tube is a very low pressure mercury-vapor gas-discharge lamp that uses fluorescence to produce visible light. The electric current excites mercury vapor which produce short-wave ultraviolet light that then causes a phosphor to fluoresce, producing visible light. A fluorescent lamp converts electrical power into useful light much more efficiently than incandescent lamps. The luminous efficacy of a compact fluorescent light bulb is about 60 lumens per watt, four times the efficacy of a typical incandescent bulb. For conventional tube fluorescent lamps the fixture is more costly because it requires a heavy ballast to regulate the current through the lamp, but the lower energy cost typically offsets the higher initial cost. In fact, it is estimated that a legitimate, qualified fluorescent light bulb can result in savings of $6.00 per year. The compact fluorescent light's ballast is contained in the base of the bulb, where the frequency of the AC current is boosted electronically to 60 kilohertz. At this frequency only a very small ballast is needed. While larger fluorescent lamps have been mostly used in commercial or institutional buildings, the compact fluorescent lamp is now available in the same popular sizes as incandescents and is used as an energy-saving alternative in homes.

— Freebase

calcium light

limelight, calcium light

a lamp consisting of a flame directed at a cylinder of lime with a lens to concentrate the light; formerly used for stage lighting

— Princeton's WordNet

limelight

limelight, calcium light

a lamp consisting of a flame directed at a cylinder of lime with a lens to concentrate the light; formerly used for stage lighting

— Princeton's WordNet

mercury-vapour lamp

mercury-vapour lamp

a gaseous discharge lamp in which the arc discharge takes place in mercury vapour; used for highway illumination and as an industrial source of ultraviolet radiation

— Wiktionary

strike

strike

cause to form (an electric arc) between electrodes of an arc lamp

— Princeton's WordNet

Deflector

Deflector

that which deflects, as a diaphragm in a furnace, or a cone in a lamp (to deflect and mingle air and gases and help combustion)

— Webster Dictionary

Lampless

Lampless

being without a lamp, or without light; hence, being without appreciation; dull

— Webster Dictionary

Plasma lamp

Plasma lamp

Plasma lamps are a type of electrodeless lamp energized by radio frequency power. They are distinct from the novelty plasma lamps that were popular in the 1980s. The electrode-less lamp was invented by Nikola Tesla after his experimentation with high-frequency currents in an evacuated glass tube for the purpose of studying high voltage phenomena. The first practical plasma lamps were the sulfur lamps manufactured by Fusion Lighting. This lamp suffered a number of practical problems and did not prosper commercially. These problems have gradually been overcome by manufacturers such as Ceravision and Luxim, and high-efficiency plasma lamps have been introduced to the general lighting market. Plasma lamps covered with phosphor are called external electrode fluorescent lamps; these so-called external electrodes are the conductors providing the radio frequency electric field.

— Freebase

Terebratula

Terebratula

a genus of brachiopods which includes many living and some fossil species. The larger valve has a perforated beak, through which projects a short peduncle for attachment. Called also lamp shell

— Webster Dictionary

spot

spotlight, spot

a lamp that produces a strong beam of light to illuminate a restricted area; used to focus attention of a stage performer

— Princeton's WordNet

spotlight

spotlight, spot

a lamp that produces a strong beam of light to illuminate a restricted area; used to focus attention of a stage performer

— Princeton's WordNet

langmuir

Langmuir, Irving Langmuir

United States chemist who studied surface chemistry and developed the gas-filled tungsten lamp and worked on high temperature electrical discharges (1881-1957)

— Princeton's WordNet

irving langmuir

Langmuir, Irving Langmuir

United States chemist who studied surface chemistry and developed the gas-filled tungsten lamp and worked on high temperature electrical discharges (1881-1957)

— Princeton's WordNet

Kudlik

Kudlik

Kudlik or qulliq is a type of oil lamp used by the Inuit. The lamp consists of a crescent-shaped cup of carved soapstone, filled with oil from blubber or seal. Arctic cottongrass, common cottongrass, or moss is used as a wick. In former time, the Inuit used the kudlik for illuminating and heating their tents and igloos, for melting snow, cooking, and drying their clothes. Today it is mainly used for ceremonial purposes. A qulliq is featured on the coat of arms of Nunavut.

— Freebase

lampshade

lampshade

A cover over a lamp to either diffuse the light or to block it in certain directions so it doesn't cause glare by shining directly in one's eyes.

— Wiktionary

lava lamp

lava lamp

A kind of lamp typically used more for decoration than illumination, in which the gentle flow of randomly-shaped clumps of wax purportedly suggests the flowing of lava.

— Wiktionary

Globe

Globe

anything which is nearly spherical or globular in shape; as, the globe of the eye; the globe of a lamp

— Webster Dictionary

Torch

Torch

a light or luminary formed of some combustible substance, as of resinous wood; a large candle or flambeau, or a lamp giving a large, flaring flame

— Webster Dictionary

Glimmer

Glimmer

to give feeble or scattered rays of light; to shine faintly; to show a faint, unsteady light; as, the glimmering dawn; a glimmering lamp

— Webster Dictionary

Sewer gas destructor lamp

Sewer gas destructor lamp

The main purpose of a sewer gas destructor lamp is to remove sewer gases and their hazards.

— Freebase

fog lamp

fog lamp

A bright red lamp (normally one of a pair) at the rear of a motor car that can be switched on during foggy weather so as to avoid collisions from cars approaching from behind

— Wiktionary

Cresset

Cresset

an open frame or basket of iron, filled with combustible material, to be burned as a beacon; an open lamp or firrepan carried on a pole in nocturnal processions

— Webster Dictionary

electric-discharge lamp

electric-discharge lamp, gas-discharge lamp

an electric lamp in which the light comes from an electric discharge between two electrodes in a glass tube

— Princeton's WordNet

gas-discharge lamp

electric-discharge lamp, gas-discharge lamp

an electric lamp in which the light comes from an electric discharge between two electrodes in a glass tube

— Princeton's WordNet

Lucubrate

Lucubrate

to study by candlelight or a lamp; to study by night

— Webster Dictionary

cord

cord

A small flexible electrical conductor composed of wires insulated separately or in bundles and assembled together usually with an outer cover; the electrical cord of a lamp, sweeper ( vacuum cleaner), or other appliance.

— Wiktionary

Blowpipe

Blowpipe

a tube for directing a jet of air into a fire or into the flame of a lamp or candle, so as to concentrate the heat on some object

— Webster Dictionary

storm lamp

hurricane lamp, hurricane lantern, tornado lantern, storm lantern, storm lamp

an oil lamp with a glass chimney and perforated metal lid to protect the flame from high winds; candlestick with a glass chimney

— Princeton's WordNet

storm lantern

hurricane lamp, hurricane lantern, tornado lantern, storm lantern, storm lamp

an oil lamp with a glass chimney and perforated metal lid to protect the flame from high winds; candlestick with a glass chimney

— Princeton's WordNet

tornado lantern

hurricane lamp, hurricane lantern, tornado lantern, storm lantern, storm lamp

an oil lamp with a glass chimney and perforated metal lid to protect the flame from high winds; candlestick with a glass chimney

— Princeton's WordNet

hurricane lantern

hurricane lamp, hurricane lantern, tornado lantern, storm lantern, storm lamp

an oil lamp with a glass chimney and perforated metal lid to protect the flame from high winds; candlestick with a glass chimney

— Princeton's WordNet

hurricane lamp

hurricane lamp, hurricane lantern, tornado lantern, storm lantern, storm lamp

an oil lamp with a glass chimney and perforated metal lid to protect the flame from high winds; candlestick with a glass chimney

— Princeton's WordNet

Sodium-vapor lamp

Sodium-vapor lamp

A sodium-vapor lamp is a gas-discharge lamp that uses sodium in an excited state to produce light. There are two varieties of such lamps: low pressure and high pressure. Low-pressure sodium lamps are the most efficient electrical light sources, but their yellow light restricts applications to outdoor lighting such as street lamps. High-pressure sodium lamps have a broader spectrum of light but poorer color rendering than other types. Because sodium-vapor lamps cause less light pollution than mercury-vapor lamps, many cities that have large astronomical observatories employ them.

— Freebase

gonioscopy

gonioscopy

the use of a gonioscope in conjunction with a slit lamp or operating microscope to gain a view of the anatomical angle formed between the eye's cornea and iris, known as the iridocorneal angle

— Wiktionary

Döbereiner

Döbereiner

a German chemist, professor at Jena; inventor of a lamp called after him; Goethe was much interested in his discoveries (1780-1849).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Dull

Dull

not bright or clear to the eye; wanting in liveliness of color or luster; not vivid; obscure; dim; as, a dull fire or lamp; a dull red or yellow; a dull mirror

— Webster Dictionary

Light

Light

to set fire to; to cause to burn; to set burning; to ignite; to kindle; as, to light a candle or lamp; to light the gas; -- sometimes with up

— Webster Dictionary

Street light

Street light

A street light, lamppost, street lamp, light standard, or lamp standard is a raised source of light on the edge of a road or walkway, which is turned on or lit at a certain time every night. Modern lamps may also have light-sensitive photocells to turn them on at dusk, off at dawn, or activate automatically in dark weather. In older lighting this function would have been performed with the aid of a solar dial. It is not uncommon for street lights to be on posts which have wires strung between them, such as on telephone poles or utility poles.

— Freebase

Black light

Black light

A black light, also referred to as a UV-A light, Wood's lamp, or simply ultraviolet light, is a lamp which emits long wave ultraviolet light and not much visible light. The lamp has a dark purple filter material, either on the bulb or in a separate glass filter in the lamp housing, which blocks most visible light and allows through UV, so the lamp has a dim purple glow when operating. Black light bulbs which have this filter have a lighting industry designation that includes the letters "BLB". A second type of bulb which is also called a black light produces ultraviolet but does not have the filter material, so it produces more visible light and has a blue color when operating. These are made for use in "bug zapper" insect traps and are identified by the industry designation "BL". Black light sources may be specially designed fluorescent lamps, mercury vapor lamps, light-emitting diodes, or incandescent lamps. In medicine, forensics, and some other scientific fields, such a light source is referred to as a Wood's lamp. Although many other types of lamp emit ultraviolet light with visible light, black lights are essential when UV-A light without visible light is needed, particularly in observing fluorescence, the colored glow that many substances emit when exposed to UV. Black lights are employed for decorative and artistic lighting effects, for diagnostic and therapeutic uses in medicine, for the detection of substances tagged with fluorescent dyes, rock-hunting, for the detection of counterfeit money, for the curing of plastic resins and for attracting insects. Strong sources of long-wave ultraviolet light are used in tanning beds. Although the low power UV-A emitted by black lights is not a hazard to skin or eyes and can be viewed without protection, powerful ultraviolet sources present dangers and require personal protective equipment such as goggles and gloves.

— Freebase

Argand

Argand

a Swiss physician and chemist, born at Geneva; inventor of the argand lamp, which, as invented by him, introduced a circular wick (1755-1803).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Asbes`tos

Asbes`tos

an incombustible mineral of a flax-like fibrous texture, which has been manufactured into cloth, paper, lamp-wick, steam-pipes, gas-stoves, &c.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Safety lamp

Safety lamp

A safety lamp is any of several types of lamp that provides illumination in coal mines and is designed to operate in air that may contain coal dust or gases both of which are potentially flammable or explosive. Before the invention of the electric light around 1900, miners used flame lamps to provide illumination. Open flame lamps could ignite flammable gases which collected in mines, causing explosions and so safety lamps were developed to enclose the flame and prevent it from igniting the surrounding atmosphere. Flame safety lamps have been replaced in mining with sealed explosion-proof electric lights.

— Freebase

Butter lamp

Butter lamp

Butter lamps are a conspicuous feature of Tibetan Buddhist temples and monasteries throughout the Himalayas. The lamps traditionally burn clarified yak butter, but now often use vegetable oil or vanaspati ghee. Each morning Tibetans offer a lighted butter lamp, representing the illumination of wisdom, along with seven bowls containing pure water before the images on their household shrine. The butter lamp usually being placed between the fourth and fifth bowls. At funeral ceremonies or when visiting temples and going on pilgrimage to sacred sites, Tibetan Buddhists often light a large number of butter lamps together at one time. The butter lamps help to focus the mind and aid meditation. According to the Root Tantra of Chakrasamvara, "If you wish for sublime realization, offer hundreds of lights". Pilgrims also supply lamp oil to gain merit. The monks in the monastery manage the actual lamps, taking extreme care to avoid starting one of the devastating fires which have damaged many monasteries over the years. For safety, butter lamps are sometimes restricted to a separate courtyard enclosure with a stone floor.

— Freebase

neon tube

neon lamp, neon induction lamp, neon tube

a lamp consisting of a small gas-discharge tube containing neon at low pressure; luminescence is produced by the action of currents at high frequencies that are wrapped a few turns around the tube

— Princeton's WordNet

neon lamp

neon lamp, neon induction lamp, neon tube

a lamp consisting of a small gas-discharge tube containing neon at low pressure; luminescence is produced by the action of currents at high frequencies that are wrapped a few turns around the tube

— Princeton's WordNet

neon induction lamp

neon lamp, neon induction lamp, neon tube

a lamp consisting of a small gas-discharge tube containing neon at low pressure; luminescence is produced by the action of currents at high frequencies that are wrapped a few turns around the tube

— Princeton's WordNet

Shade

Shade

that which intercepts, or shelters from, light or the direct rays of the sun; hence, also, that which protects from heat or currents of air; a screen; protection; shelter; cover; as, a lamp shade

— Webster Dictionary

Kerosene lamp

Kerosene lamp

The kerosene lamp is a type of lighting device that uses kerosene as a fuel. Kerosene lamps have a wick or mantle as light source, protected by a glass chimney or globe; lamps may be used on a table, or hand-held lanterns may used for portable lighting. There are three types of kerosene lamp: flat wick, central draught, and mantle lamp. Kerosene lanterns meant for portable use a flat wick and are made in dead flame, hot blast, and cold blast variants. Pressurized kerosene lamps have a gas generator and gas mantle; these are known as Petromax, Tilley lamps, or Coleman lamps, among other manufacturers. They produce more light per unit of fuel than wick-type lamps, but are more complex and expensive in construction, and more complex to operate. A hand-pump pressurizes air, which forces liquid fuel from a reservoir into a gas generator. Vapor from the gas generator burns, heating a mantle to incandescence and also providing heat to the gas generator. The first description of a simple lamp using crude mineral oil was provided by al-Razi in 9th century Baghdad, who referred to it as the "naffatah" in his Kitab al-Asrar. In 1846 Abraham Pineo Gesner invented a substitute for whale oil for lighting, distilled from coal. Later made from petroleum, kerosene became a popular lighting fuel. Modern versions of the kerosene lamp were later constructed by the Polish inventor Ignacy Ɓukasiewicz in 1853 Lviv, and by Robert Edwin Dietz of the United States at about the same time; it is not known which was first.

— Freebase

fluorescent lamp

fluorescent lamp

lamp consisting of a tube coated on the inside with a fluorescent material; mercury vapor in the tube emits ultraviolet radiation that is converted to visible radiation by the fluorescent material

— Princeton's WordNet

Oil lamp

Oil lamp

An oil lamp is an object used to produce light continuously for a period of time using an oil-based fuel source. The use of oil lamps began thousands of years ago and is continued to this day, although not commonly anymore. Often associated with stories about genies, fictional creatures who live in oil lamps. Oil lamps are a form of lighting, and were used as an alternative to candles before the use of electric lights. Starting in 1780 the Argand lamp quickly replaced other oil lamps still in their basic ancient form. These were, in turn, replaced by the kerosene lamp in about 1850. In small towns and rural areas these continued in use well into the 20th century, until such areas were finally electrified, and light bulbs could be used for lighting. Most modern lamps have been replaced with gas-based or petroleum-based fuels to operate when emergency non-electric light is required. As such, oil lamps of today are primarily used for the particular ambience they produce, or in rituals and religious ceremonies.

— Freebase

Diamond

Diamond

the name of Newton's favourite dog that, by upsetting a lamp, set fire to MSS. containing notes of experiments made over a course of years, an irreparable loss.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Strobe light

Strobe light

A strobe light or stroboscopic lamp, commonly called a strobe, is a device used to produce regular flashes of light. It is one of a number of devices that can be used as a stroboscope. The word originated from the Greek strobos, meaning "act of whirling." A typical commercial strobe light has a flash energy in the region of 10 to 150 joules, and discharge times as short as a few milliseconds, often resulting in a flash power of several kilowatts. Larger strobe lights can be used in “continuous” mode, producing extremely intense illumination. The light source is commonly a xenon flash lamp, or flashtube, which has a complex spectrum and a color temperature of approximately 5,600 kelvins. To obtain colored light, colored gels may be used.

— Freebase


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