Definitions containing débats, journal des

We've found 250 definitions:

Des Moines

Des Moines

Des Moines is the capital and the most populous city in the U.S. state of Iowa. It is also the county seat of Polk County. A small portion of the city extends into Warren County. It was incorporated on September 22, 1851, as Fort Des Moines which was shortened to "Des Moines" in 1857. It is named after the Des Moines River, which may have been adapted from the French Rivière des Moines, literally meaning "River of the Monks." The five-county metropolitan area is ranked 88th in terms of population in the United States with 580,255 residents according to the 2011 estimate by the United States Census Bureau. The city proper population was 203,433 at the 2010 census. Des Moines is a major center for the insurance industry and also has a sizable financial services and publishing business base. In fact, Des Moines was credited with the "number one spot for U.S. insurance companies" in a Business Wire article and dubbed the third largest insurance capital of the world. The city is the headquarters for the Principal Financial Group, Aviva insurance, the Meredith Corporation, Ruan Transportation, EMC Insurance Companies, and Wellmark Blue Cross Blue Shield. Other major corporations such as Wells Fargo, ING Group, Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company, Marsh, Monsanto and Pioneer Hi-Bred have large operations in or near the metro area. In recent years Microsoft, Hewlett Packard and Facebook have established data processing and logistical facilities in the Des Moines metro. Forbes magazine ranked Des Moines as the "Best Place for Business" in 2010 and, in 2011, ranked the city #1 among "America's Best Cities for Young Professionals." Kiplinger's Personal Finance 2008 Best Cities List featured Des Moines as #9. In November 2011, the city of Des Moines was listed as the #1 Greenest city for Women by Self Magazine.

— Freebase

Journal entry

Journal entry

A journal entry, in accounting, is a logging of transactions into accounting journal items. The journal entry can consist of several items, each of which is either a debit or a credit. The total of the debits must equal the total of the credits or the journal entry is said to be "unbalanced". Journal entries can record unique items or recurring items such as depreciation or bond amortization. In accounting software, journal entries are usually entered using a separate module from accounts payable, which typically has its own subledger that indirectly affects the general ledger; journal entries directly change the account balances on the general ledger. Some data commonly included in journal entries are: Journal entry number; batch number; type; amount of money, name, auto-reversing; date; accounting period; and description. Typically, accounting software imposes strict limits on the number of characters in the description; a limit of about 30 characters is not uncommon. This allows all the data for a particular transaction in a journal entry to be displayed on one row. The balance sheet is a statement showing net worth on a particular date. Journal entries are used to record injections and ejections to such net worth. After recording the transactions through journal entries the revised balance sheet can be prepared.

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Diethylstilbestrol

Diethylstilbestrol

Diethylstilbestrol is a synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen that was first synthesized in 1938. It is also classified as an endocrine disruptor. Human exposure to DES occurred through diverse sources, such as dietary ingestion from supplemented cattle feed and medical treatment for certain conditions, including breast and prostate cancers. From about 1940 to 1970, DES was given to pregnant women in the mistaken belief it would reduce the risk of pregnancy complications and losses. In 1971, DES was shown to cause a rare vaginal tumor in girls and women who had been exposed to this drug in utero. The United States Food and Drug Administration subsequently withdrew DES from use in pregnant women. Follow-up studies have indicated DES also has the potential to cause a variety of significant adverse medical complications during the lifetimes of those exposed. The United States National Cancer Institute recommends women born to mothers who took DES undergo special medical exams on a regular basis to screen for complications as a result of the drug. Individuals who were exposed to DES during their mothers' pregnancies are commonly referred to as "DES daughters" and "DES sons".

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Encyclopédie

Encyclopédie

Encyclopédie, ou dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers was a general encyclopedia published in France between 1751 and 1772, with later supplements, revised editions, and translations. It was edited by Denis Diderot and, until 1759, co-edited by Jean le Rond d'Alembert. As of 1750, the full title was Encyclopédie, ou Dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers, par une société de gens de lettres, mis en ordre par M. Diderot de l'Académie des Sciences et Belles-Lettres de Prusse, et quant à la partie mathématique, par M. d'Alembert de l'Académie royale des Sciences de Paris, de celle de Prusse et de la Société royale de Londres. The title page was amended as D'Alembert acquired more titles. The Encyclopédie was an innovative encyclopedia in several respects. Among other things, it was the first encyclopedia to include contributions from many named contributors, and it was the first general encyclopedia to lavish attention on the mechanical arts. Still, the Encyclopédie is famous above all for representing the thought of the Enlightenment. According to Denis Diderot in the article "Encyclopédie", the Encyclopédie's aim was "to change the way people think". He wanted to incorporate all of the world's knowledge into the Encyclopédie and hoped that the text could disseminate all this information to the public and future generations.

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Science

Science

Science, also widely referred to as Science Magazine, is the academic journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and is one of the world's top scientific journals. The peer-reviewed journal, first published in 1880, is circulated weekly and has a print subscriber base of around 130,000. Because institutional subscriptions and online access serve a larger audience, its estimated readership is one million people. The major focus of the journal is publishing important original scientific research and research reviews, but Science also publishes science-related news, opinions on science policy and other matters of interest to scientists and others who are concerned with the wide implications of science and technology. Unlike most scientific journals, which focus on a specific field, Science and its rival Nature cover the full range of scientific disciplines. According to the Journal Citation Reports, Science's 2011 impact factor was 31.201. Although it is the journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, membership in the AAAS is not required to publish in Science. Papers are accepted from authors around the world. Competition to publish in Science is very intense, as an article published in such a highly cited journal can lead to attention and career advancement for the authors. Fewer than 10% of articles submitted to the editors are accepted for publication and all research articles are subject to peer review before they appear in the journal.

— Freebase

Feuilleton

Feuilleton

Feuilleton was originally a kind of supplement attached to the political portion of French newspapers, consisting chiefly of non-political news and gossip, literature and art criticism, a chronicle of the latest fashions, and epigrams, charades and other literary trifles. The feuilleton may be described as a "talk of the town", and a contemporary English-language example of the form is the "Talk of the Town" section of The New Yorker. In English newspapers, the term "feuilleton" instead came to refer to an installment of a serial story printed in one part of a newspaper. The genre of the feuilleton in its French sense was eventually included in English newspapers, but was not referred to as a feuilleton. In contemporary French, feuilleton takes on the definition of "soap opera," specifically ones aired for television. German and Polish newspapers still use the term for their literary and arts sections. The term feuilleton was invented by Julien Louis Geoffroy and Bertin the Elder, editors of the French Journal des Débats in 1800.

— Freebase

International Affairs

International Affairs

International Affairs is a peer-reviewed academic journal of international relations founded by Chatham House in 1924. It is published six times a year by Wiley-Blackwell. Its current editor is Caroline Soper. The journal is available online for subscribers via Wiley Online Library. International Affairs has become renowned for its coverage of global policy issues and had an impact factor of 1.256 in 2011, according to Thomson Reuters' Journal Citation Reports, ranking 15th out of 80 in the world among international relations journals. The journal has also been acclaimed for its extensive book review section. Vince Cable, UK Business Secretary and former head of International Economics at Chatham House, has called International Affairs 'a journal that contributes to the foreign policy thinking within any serious political party'. International Affairs publishes both commissioned and unsolicited articles; during its almost 90 years of publication, prominent contributors to the journal have included Robert Keohane, Zbigniew Brzezinski, Joseph Nye, Barry Buzan, Arnold J. Toynbee, Lawrence Freedman, John N. Gray, Malcolm Bradbury, Fred Halliday, Michael Quinlan, Vernon Bogdanor, Amitai Etzioni, Mary Kaldor, Mahmood Mamdani and Susan Strange.

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Sirena

Sirena

Sirena: Poesía, arte y crítica is an international and multilingual academic journal founded in 2004 by Jorge R. Sagastume. After a feature article published in The Chronicle of Higher Education, the Johns Hopkins University Press approached the college to offer the distribution of the journal, and ever since it has been published and distributed by the JHU Press. Sirena has published in over twenty languages; it uniqueness resides in the fact that every poem appears in its original with facing translations into English and Spanish. The journal has published poets such as Günter Grass, Günter Kunert, Adrian Mitchell, Clara Janés, Homero Aridjis, and many other renowned poets. The journal publishes critical essays on poetry, art, and translation studies as well as book reviews. Essays attempt to bring together the multifaceted perspectives of the journal to deepen understanding and appreciation of the art and poetry presented therein. The journal is published biannually in March and October. The average length of an issue is 160 pages. The current editor is Mark Aldrich.

— Freebase

Journal of Applied Ichthyology

Journal of Applied Ichthyology

The Journal of Applied Ichthyology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal on ichthyology, marine biology, and oceanography published by Wiley-Blackwell. It is the official journal of the World Sturgeon Conservation Society and of the Deutsche Wissenschaftliche Kommission für Meeresforschung. The editors-in-chief are Harald Rosenthal and Dietrich Schnack. The Journal of Applied Ichthyology was established as a separate journal in 1985, but merged with the Archive of Fishery and Marine Research in 2005. The latter journal had been established as Berichte der Deutschen Wissenschaftlichen Kommission für Meeresforschung, published from before World War I until volume 24 in 1975–1976. It was then renamed to Meeresforschung: Reports on Marine Research and was published by Paul Parey Verlag in Hamburg from 1976 until 1991, when the last volume appeared in print. From 1994 until 2005 it was published as the Archive of Fishery and Marine Research.

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Raccoon River

Raccoon River

The Raccoon River is a 30.8-mile-long tributary of the Des Moines River in central Iowa in the United States. As measured using the longest of its three forks, its length increases to 226 miles. Via the Des Moines River, it is part of the watershed of the Mississippi River. Des Moines obtains its drinking water from the Raccoon River just before the Raccoon River empties into the Des Moines River. During the Great Flood of 1993, the Raccoon River flooded the water treatment facility of Des Moines, shutting off the city's supply of drinking water.

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Charles Despiau

Charles Despiau

Charles Despiau was a French sculptor. Despiau was born at Mont-de-Marsan, Landes and attended first the École des Arts Décoratifs and later the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts. He began exhibiting at the Salon des Artistes Français, from 1898 to 1900; then at the less academic Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts, where he showed from 1901 to 1921, and finally to the Salon des Tuileries, where he exhibited from 1923 to 1944. Rodin hired him as an assistant in 1907. Despiau worked with Rodin, as well as doing his own sculpture, until 1914, when he was drafted for service in the camouflage unit in World War I. Returning to sculpture after the war, his success was established with his one-man show at the Brummer Gallery in New York in late 1927. He died in Paris in 1946. Despiau was not a prolific sculptor, preferring to work for as long as it took to realize his vision. There are several surviving plaster statues which repeat a model with only slight variations. His works, mostly portraits and nudes exemplifying a calm classicism, are in the collections of over thirty museums in France and over 100 museums around the world, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The Museum of Modern Art in New York owns the bronze Assia, perhaps his best-known work.

— Freebase

e-journal

e-journal

electronic journal, a journal published in electronic form

— Wiktionary

Parapsychology

Parapsychology

The term parapsychology was coined in or around 1889 by philosopher Max Dessoir, and originates from para meaning "alongside", and psychology. The term was adopted by J.B. Rhine in the 1930s as a replacement for the term psychical research. Parapsychologists study a number of ostensibly paranormal phenomena, including telepathy, precognition, clairvoyance, psychokinesis, near-death experiences, reincarnation and apparitional experiences. Parapsychology research is conducted in some 30 different countries. Laboratory and field research is conducted through private institutions and universities. Privately funded units in psychology departments at universities in the United Kingdom are among the most active today. In the United States, interest in research peaked in the 1970s and university-based research has declined since then, although private institutions still receive funding from donations. While parapsychological research has occasionally appeared in mainstream academic journals, most of the recent research is published in a small number of niche journals. Journals dealing with parapsychology include the Journal of Parapsychology, Journal of Near-Death Studies, Journal of Consciousness Studies, Journal of the Society for Psychical Research and Journal of Scientific Exploration.

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Retrovirology

Retrovirology

Retrovirology is a peer-reviewed scientific journal which publishes original and review articles on the basic research of retroviruses. It is edited by Monsef Benkirane, Ben Berkhout, Masahiro Fujii, Ariberto Fassati, Persephone Borrow, Andrew Lever and Mark Wainberg with the assistance of an internationally renowned editorial Board. Kuan-Teh Jeang was a former editor-in-chief. The journal is published by Biomed Central and can be accessed online. It is an Open Access journal which means that all articles published in Retrovirology can be read in full text form without the need to pay for a subscription. Retrovirology has an ISI tabulated impact factor for 2011 of 6.47. This impact factor ranks Retrovirology ahead of the Journal of Virology, Virology and Journal of General Virology and at the forefront of virological journals.

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Contexts

Contexts

Contexts: Understanding People in their Social Worlds is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal and an official publication of the American Sociological Association. It is designed to be a more accessible source of sociological ideas and research and has been inspired by the movement towards public sociology. The journal was established in 2002 by Claude Fischer and is published by SAGE Publications; until 2011, it was published by the University of California Press. Fischer was succeeded by Jeff Goodwin and James M. Jasper, who edited the journal from 2005 to 2007, injecting a certain amount of controversial humor such as New Yorker cartoons and a column written by "Harry Green" called "The Fool." The current editors-in-chief are Jodi O'Brien and Arlene Stein. The journal differs from a typical academic journal as it is targeted more toward students and the general public. It is used widely in courses, and has been excerpted in The Contexts Reader edited by Jeff Goodwin and James M. Jasper. The Reader is also used in many undergraduate courses.

— Freebase

SueEasy

SueEasy

SueEasy has become the de facto tool for online dispute resolution.It empowers the common man to register for free any genuine compliant against a corporation, service or product and seek the best legal representation. With over 1 Million hits in its first month and a steady rate of 800,000 hits each month, SueEasy has resolved a wide variety of legal problems for the North American population. At the same time, it™s also a paid, membership based, Client Directory For Lawyers… as described by the Wall Street Journal recently. Customer Problem: Currently, people seeking good legal help are forced to make confusing online searches, scramble through Yellow Pages, make frantic phone calls or ask somebody for referrals. SueEasy solves this problem by being a “..Matchmaker For Would-Be Plaintiffs”(ABA Journal " American Bar Association). Product/Services: People with legal problems, mainly potential Class Actions can file their case and then VIRALLY spread the user-generated page on 72 of the hottest Social Networks & Bookmarking sites such as Facebook, Digg, MySpace etc. This is consumer activism at a whole new level, giving people the power to fight corporate wrongdoing and keep checks & balances. Complaints received range from deaths resulting from FDA recalled drugs to bad gaskets from a major automobile company to unfair NSF/overdraft charges from certain US. Banks. Interested attorneys contact potential litigants for Class Action, personal injury and 62 other types of cases, thus creating a transparent, streamlined and efficient process. Market Trends: Lawyers spend roughly $4.5 billion on advertising. Most of that occurs in traditional media, with $1.3 billion going to print ads in Yellow Pages. They have gone the way of the dinosaurs. We feel these are wasted marketing dollars.Sales/Marketing Strategy: For the litigants, SueEasy aims to be a name synonymous with Ëœlegal help™ and the first place they turn to. Successful viral marketing (10 YouTube ads created by the founders), PR are already in place using founders contacts; (trade publications, journals, TV & Radio spots planned). Competitive Advantage: SueEasy is a pioneer in bringing Web 2.0 & litigation together, thus creating massive lead generation for attorneys. Featured on the Wall Street Journal, Fox News, CNN, CNBC, KillerStartups, San Francisco Daily Journal, LA Times, Lawyers USA, American Bar Association Journal, Mountain View Voice, United Press International (syndicated to thousands of news outlets). TechCrunch40 Semi-Finalist; hand-picked by Michael Arrington (TIME™s 100 Most Influential People). Over 5000 registered litigants. Over 500 emerging Class Actions, and 2000 potential cases (in 60 categories)

— CrunchBase

Clive

Clive

Clive is a city in Dallas and Polk counties in the U.S. state of Iowa. As of the 2010 Census the population is at 15,447. It is part of the Des Moines–West Des Moines Metropolitan Statistical Area. Clive is known for its outstanding Greenbelt Park and trail system running through the entire community. Considered "Distinct By Nature" the community offers a high quality of life for its residents through its recreation offerings and one of the most recognized Public Art Programs in the state. Clive serves as the axis of the western Des Moines suburbs, being located between Urbandale and West Des Moines along the major transportation corridors of I-35, I-80 and I-235.

— Freebase

Radiopulsar

Radiopulsar

Retrouvez un condensé des meilleures émissions de RADIOPULSAR! Vous y découvrirez des nouveautés et talents musicaux, des interviews d\'artistes, des émissions spéciales consacrées à un style de musique précis, etc. CARPE DIEM!! La communauté

— Freebase

Bookkeeping

Bookkeeping

the art of recording pecuniary or business transactions in a regular and systematic manner, so as to show their relation to each other, and the state of the business in which they occur; the art of keeping accounts. The books commonly used are a daybook, cashbook, journal, and ledger. See Daybook, Cashbook, Journal, and Ledger

— Webster Dictionary

Box

Box

an axle box, journal box, journal bearing, or bushing

— Webster Dictionary

Brass

Brass

a journal bearing, so called because frequently made of brass. A brass is often lined with a softer metal, when the latter is generally called a white metal lining. See Axle box, Journal Box, and Bearing

— Webster Dictionary

Daybook

Daybook

a journal of accounts; a primary record book in which are recorded the debts and credits, or accounts of the day, in their order, and from which they are transferred to the journal

— Webster Dictionary

Gudgeon

Gudgeon

the pin of iron fastened in the end of a wooden shaft or axle, on which it turns; formerly, any journal, or pivot, or bearing, as the pintle and eye of a hinge, but esp. the end journal of a horizontal

— Webster Dictionary

Journalist

Journalist

the conductor of a public journal, or one whose business it to write for a public journal; an editorial or other professional writer for a periodical

— Webster Dictionary

Alternatives

Alternatives

Founded in 1994, Alternatives, Action and Communication Network for International Development, is a non-governmental, international solidarity organization based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Alternatives works to promote justice and equality amongst individuals and communities worldwide. Active in over 35 countries, Alternatives supports local, community-based initiatives working towards the greater economic, social, and political rights of people and communities affected by poverty, discrimination, exploitation, and violence. The organization publishes the Le Journal des Alternatives newsletter, a publication inserted every three months in Montreal's French paper Le Voir. Alternatives also publishes the Alternatives International Journal, a monthly publication in English distributed electronically. Alternatives Montreal is the headquarters of an International Federation consisting of nine NGOs spread across the world. Alternative-Niger, Alternatives Asia, Alternative Information Center, Forum Macrocain des Alternatives Sud, Initiative Pour un Autre Monde, Institut Alternatives Terrazul, Khanya College, and Teacher Creativity Center.

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Receptor, Bradykinin B1

Receptor, Bradykinin B1

A subtype of bradykinin receptor that is induced in response to INFLAMMATION. It may play a role in chronic inflammation and has a high specificity for KININS lacking the C-terminal ARGININE such as des-Arg(10)-kallidin and des-Arg(9)-bradykinin. The receptor is coupled to G-PROTEIN, GQ-G11 ALPHA FAMILY and G-PROTEIN, GI-GO ALPHA FAMILY signaling proteins.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Journal

Journal

A journal has several related meanings: ⁕a daily record of events or business; a private journal is usually referred to as a diary ⁕a newspaper or other periodical, in the literal sense of one published each day ⁕many publications issued at stated intervals, such as magazines, or scholarly journals, academic journals, or the record of the transactions of a society, are often called journals. Although journal is sometimes used as a synonym for "magazine", in academic use, a journal refers to a serious, scholarly publication that is peer-reviewed. A non-scholarly magazine written for an educated audience about an industry or an area of professional activity is usually called a professional magazine. The word "journalist", for one whose business is writing for the public press and nowadays also other media, has been in use since the end of the 17th century.

— Freebase

Analysis

Analysis

Analysis is a peer-reviewed academic journal of philosophy established in 1933 that is published quarterly by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Analysis Trust. Prior to January 2009, the journal was published by Blackwell Publishing. Electronic access to this journal is available via JSTOR, Wiley InterScience, and Oxford Journals. The journal publishes short, concise articles in virtually any field of the analytic tradition.

— Freebase

TISH

TISH

TISH was a Canadian poetry newsletter, founded by student-poets at the University of British Columbia in 1961 and edited by a number of Vancouver poets until 1969. The newsletter's poetics were built on those of writers associated with North Carolina's Black Mountain College experiment. Contributing writers included George Bowering, Fred Wah, Frank Davey, Daphne Marlatt, David Cull, Carol Bolt, Dan McLeod, Robert Hogg, Jamie Reid, and Lionel Kearns. Influenced by the poetry theorist Warren Tallman, the Tish Group also drew inspiration from Robert Creeley, Robert Duncan, Charles Olson and Jack Spicer. TISH was the launching pad for a number of other publications including the alternative newspaper The Georgia Straight, edited by McLeod, the poetry newsletter SUM, edited by Wah, the magazine of the long poem Imago, edited by Bowering, the journal of writing and theory Open Letter, edited by Davey, the prose journal Periodics, edited by Marlatt and Paul de Barros, and the on-line journal Swift Current, edited by Davey and Wah, and described by them as the world's first e-magazine. Of Tish George Fetherling wrote in 2001 in The Georgia Straight that "The journal started by George Bowering, Frank Davey, David Dawson, Jamie Reid and Fred Wah is probably the most influential literary magazine ever produced in Canada, of greater significance than even Preview or First Statement, the two that brought poetic modernism to the country in the 1940s."

— Freebase

Anaesthesia

Anaesthesia

Anaesthesia is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal covering research in anaesthesiology. It is the official journal of the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2011 impact factor of 2.958, ranking it 7th out of 28 journals in the category "Anesthesiology".

— Freebase

Erkenntnis

Erkenntnis

Erkenntnis is a journal of philosophy that publishes papers in analytic philosophy. Its name is derived from the German word for knowledge recognition. The journal was founded by Hans Reichenbach and Rudolf Carnap in 1930, and circulated under its original title, Erkenntnis, in 1930-1938. Renamed The Journal of Unified Science and interrupted after the beginning of World War II in 1940. The journal was "refounded" by Wilhelm K. Essler, Carl G. Hempel and Wolfgang Stegmüller in 1975. The current editors are Hans Rott, Wilhelm K. Essler, Patrick Suppes and Wolgang Spohn.

— Freebase

PAJ

PAJ

PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art, originally Performing Arts Journal, is a triannual academic journal of arts that was established in 1976 by Bonnie Marranca and Gautam Dasgupta. It has taken a particular interest in contemporary performance art and features expanded coverage in video, drama, dance, installations, media, and music. The journal is published by special arrangement with the MIT Press. Issues can also be accessed through the online databases JSTOR and Project MUSE.

— Freebase

Spiritus

Spiritus

Spiritus: A Journal of Christian Spirituality is a biannual academic journal published by the Johns Hopkins University Press. It was established in 1993 as the Christian Spirituality Bulletin: Journal of the Society for the Study of Christian Spirituality and obtained its current title in 2001. It is the official publication of the Society for the Study of Christian Spirituality and covers research on Christian spirituality while fostering creative dialogue with non-Christian traditions. As such, it explores the relationship between spirituality and cultural analysis using the disciplines of history, philosophy, theology, and psychology, among others. The journal includes original articles, reviews, and translations. Readership includes academics as well as a general audience. The current and founding editor-in-chief is Douglas Burton-Christie.

— Freebase

Organometallics

Organometallics

Organometallics is a journal published by the American Chemical Society. Its area of focus is organometallic, as well as organometalloid chemistry. This peer-reviewed journal received an Impact Factor of 4.145 as reported by the 2012 Journal Citation Reports by Thomson Reuters. The current Editor-in-Chief is John A. Gladysz. The past Editor-in-Chief is Dietmar Seyferth. This journal is indexed in: Chemical Abstracts Service, British Library, CAB International, EBSCOhost, Proquest, PubMed, SCOPUS, SwetsWise, and Web of Science.

— Freebase

Impact factor

Impact factor

The impact factor of an academic journal is a measure reflecting the average number of citations to recent articles published in the journal. It is frequently used as a proxy for the relative importance of a journal within its field, with journals with higher impact factors deemed to be more important than those with lower ones. The impact factor was devised by Eugene Garfield, the founder of the Institute for Scientific Information. Impact factors are calculated yearly starting from 1975 for those journals that are indexed in the Journal Citation Reports.

— Freebase

Social Forces

Social Forces

Social Forces is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal of social science published by Oxford University Press for the Department of Sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It concentrates on sociology but also has a multidisciplinary approach, publishing works from the fields of social psychology, anthropology, political science, history, and economics. Each issue includes between 20 and 25 articles. In addition, the journal also publishes book reviews. Social Forces was established by Howard W. Odum in 1922 as Journal of Social Forces. The name was changed relatively quickly and since 1925 it has been published as Social Forces. This journal is currently edited by Arne L. Kalleberg.

— Freebase

Current Science

Current Science

Current Science is a peer-reviewed scientific journal established in 1932 and published by the Current Science Association along with the Indian Academy of Sciences. It is published every fortnight by the Association, in collaboration with the Indian Academy of Sciences. It was started in 1932 by the then stalwarts of Indian science such as C.V. Raman, Birbal Sahni, Meghnad Saha, Martin Foster and S.S. Bhatnagar. In 2011, the journal completed one hundred volumes. The journal is intended as a medium for communication and discussion of important issues that concern science and scientific activities. Besides full length research articles and shorter research communications, the journal publishes review articles, scientific correspondence and commentaries, news and views, comments on recently published research papers, opinions on scientific activity, articles on universities, Indian laboratories and institutions, interviews with scientists, personal information, book reviews, etc. It is also a forum to discuss issues and problems faced by science and scientists and an effective medium of interaction among scientists in the country and abroad. Current Science is read by a large community of scientists and the circulation has been continuously going up. Current Science publishes special sections on diverse and topical themes of interest and this has served as a platform for the scientific fraternity to get their work acknowledged and highlighted. Some of the special sections in the recent past include remote sensing, waves and symmetry, seismology in India, nanomaterials, AIDS, Alzheimer's disease, molecular biology of ageing, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, Indian monsoon, water, transport, and mountain weather forecasting in India.

— Freebase

Iowa

Iowa

A Capital: Des Moines.

— Wiktionary

Salon des Refusu00E9s

Salon des Refusu00E9s

An exhibition held in Paris from 1863 to 1886, showing works that had been rejected by the Acadu00E9mie des Beaux-Arts when submitted for display at the Paris Salon

— Wiktionary

Valkyrie

Valkyrie

Any of the female attendants, or handmaidens of Odin, minor female deities said to guide fallen warriors from the battlefield to Valhalla. Often in reference to Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen (published 1853).

— Wiktionary

mirliton

mirliton

The title of a movement in w:The Nutcracker Ballet, Danse Des Mirlitons, referring either to the flute trio in the music or to the reed-pipes (or perhaps eunuch flute) that the depicted shepherdesses might have played to their flocks. The term is often used to refer to the role of the shepherdess dancer. A further pun might refer to the marzipan that the dance represents and the almonds used in Mirliton pastries.

— Wiktionary

Dis-

Dis-

a prefix from the Latin, whence F. des, or sometimes de-, dis-. The Latin dis-appears as di-before b, d, g, l, m, n, r, v, becomes dif-before f, and either dis-or di- before j. It is from the same root as bis twice, and duo, E. two. See Two, and cf. Bi-, Di-, Dia-. Dis-denotes separation, a parting from, as in distribute, disconnect; hence it often has the force of a privative and negative, as in disarm, disoblige, disagree. Also intensive, as in dissever

— Webster Dictionary

Port-royalist

Port-royalist

one of the dwellers in the Cistercian convent of Port Royal des Champs, near Paris, when it was the home of the Jansenists in the 17th century, among them being Arnauld, Pascal, and other famous scholars. Cf. Jansenist

— Webster Dictionary

Girardin, François Saint-Marc

Girardin, François Saint-Marc

a French professor and littérateur, born at Paris; in 1827 was professor in the College Louis-le-Grand, and in 1834 was nominated to the chair of Literature in the Sorbonne; as leader-writer in the Journal des Débats he vigorously opposed the Democrats, and sat in the Senate from 1834 to 1848; in 1869, as Saint-Beuve's successor, he took up the editorship of the Journal des Savants, and in 1871 became a member of the National Assembly; he published his collected essays and also his popular literary lectures (1801-1873).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Institute of France

Institute of France

was established by the Directory in 1795, to take the place of the four academies suppressed by the Convention two years previously. In 1816 Louis XVIII. gave back the old names to its four sections, viz. L'Académie Française, L'Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-lettres, L'Académie des Sciences, and L'Académie des Beaux Arts. In 1832 was added L'Académie des Sciences Morales et Politiques. Each academy has its own separate organisation and work, and participates besides in the advantages of the common library, archives, and funds. Election, which is in every case subject to government confirmation, is by ballot, and every member receives an annual salary of at least 1500 francs. Government votes a sum of money annually to the Institute. Members of the French Academy have special duties and privileges, and in some cases special remuneration. They allot every year prizes for eloquence and poetry; a prize "to the poor Frenchman who has done the most virtuous action throughout the year," and one to the Frenchman "who has written and published the book most conducive to good morals." Membership in the Académie Française is strictly limited to 40 Frenchmen. The others have, besides, from 40 to 70 members each, also Associate, foreign and corresponding, members. The Institute centralises the pursuit of all branches of knowledge and art, and has been the model of similar national institutes in Madrid, Lisbon, Stockholm, and St. Petersburg.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Published Erratum

Published Erratum

Work consisting of an acknowledgment of an error, issued by a publisher, editor, or author. It customarily cites the source where the error occurred, giving complete bibliographic data for retrieval. In the case of books and monographs, author, title, imprint, paging, and other helpful references will be given; in the case of journal articles, the author, title, paging, and journal reference will be shown. An erratum notice is variously cited as Errata or Corrigenda.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Molière

Molière

Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, known by his stage name Molière, was a French playwright and actor who is considered to be one of the greatest masters of comedy in Western literature. Among Molière's best-known works are Le Misanthrope, L'École des Femmes, Tartuffe ou L'Imposteur, L'Avare, Le Malade Imaginaire, and Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme. Born into a prosperous family and having studied at the Collège de Clermont, Molière was well suited to begin a life in the theatre. Thirteen years as an itinerant actor helped him polish his comic abilities while he began writing, combining Commedia dell'arte elements with the more refined French comedy. Through the patronage of a few aristocrats, including Philippe I, Duke of Orléans – the brother of Louis XIV – Molière procured a command performance before the King at the Louvre. Performing a classic play by Pierre Corneille and a farce of his own, Le Docteur Amoureux, Molière was granted the use of salle du Petit-Bourbon near the Louvre, a spacious room appointed for theatrical performances. Later, Molière was granted the use of the Palais-Royal. In both locations he found success among the Parisians with plays such as Les Précieuses ridicules, L'École des Maris and L'École des Femmes. This royal favor brought a royal pension to his troupe and the title "Troupe du Roi". Molière continued as the official author of court entertainments.

— Freebase

Saint-Germain-des-Prés

Saint-Germain-des-Prés

Saint-Germain-des-Prés is an area of the 6th arrondissement of Paris, France, located around the church of the former Abbey of Saint-Germain-des-Prés. Home to a number of famous cafés, such as Les Deux Magots and Café de Flore, the Saint-Germain-des-Prés area was the center of the existentialist movement.

— Freebase

Dollard-Des Ormeaux

Dollard-Des Ormeaux

Dollard-des-Ormeaux is a predominantly English-speaking on-island suburb on the Island of Montreal in southwestern Quebec, Canada. The town was named after French martyr Adam Dollard des Ormeaux. The town was merged with the city of Montreal for several years, but its residents elected to reinstate the city as its own separate entity in 2006. In 2001, the official Commission de toponymie du Québec ruled that the correct way to write the city's name was Dollard-Des Ormeaux. However, this was not widely accepted and is rarely used in practice. In particular, as of 2010, the city's own website does not use this way of writing the city's name.

— Freebase

François Blondel

François Blondel

Nicolas-François Blondel was a soldier, engineer of fortifications, diplomat, civil engineer and military architect, called "the Great Blondel", to distinguish him in a dynasty of French architects. He is remembered for his Cours d'architecture which remained a central text for over a century. His precepts placed him in opposition with Claude Perrault in the larger culture war known under the heading Querelle des anciens et des modernes. If François Blondel was not the most highly reputed among the académiciens of his day, his were the writings that most generally circulated among the general public, the Cours de Mathématiques, the Art de jetter les Bombes, the Nouvelle manière de fortifier les places and, above all his Cours d'Architecture. He was well educated in languages as a youth, and participated for a time in the Thirty Years' War In 1640 the Cardinal de Richelieu entrusted him with diplomatic missions in Portugal, Spain and Italy, which gave him an opportunity to study at first hand the fortification systems of those nations. Richelieu named him sub-lieutenant of one of his galleys, La Cardinale, aboard which he participated in the attack on the port of Tarragona and served for a time as governor at Palamos. In 1647 Blondel commanded the artillery of the naval expedition against the Spanish at Naples. With the peace he finished his military career with the brevet of maréchal des camps.

— Freebase

Gambetta

Gambetta

Gambetta is a station of the Paris Métro. It serves Line 3 and is the southern terminus of Line 3bis. It was opened on 25 January 1905 when the line was extended from Père Lachaise and was the eastern terminus of the line until 27 November 1921, when the line was extended to Porte des Lilas. In 1969, the former Martin Nadaud station—which was only 232 metres west of Gambetta—was combined with Gambetta by linking Martin Nadaud's closed platforms with Gambetta by tunnel. On 23 March 1971 the line to Porte des Lilas was separated from line 3 and became Line 3bis. The beginning of the old tunnel to Porte des Lilas now connects the platforms of lines 3 and 3bis. On 2 April 1971 line 3 was extended to Gallieni. The station is in the Avenue Gambetta, which is named after the statesman Léon Gambetta, Prime Minister for 66 days in 1881 and 1882.

— Freebase

diary

diary

a book for writing about what happens to you each day; = journal

— Kernerman English Learner's Dictionary

Diabetes

Diabetes

Diabetes is a monthly peer-reviewed medical journal published since 1952 by the American Diabetes Association. It covers research about the physiology and pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus including any aspect of laboratory, animal or human research. Emphasis is on investigative reports focusing on areas such as the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications, normal and pathologic pancreatic islet function and intermediary metabolism, pharmacological mechanisms of drug and hormone action, and biochemical and molecular aspects of normal and abnormal biological processes. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 8.889, ranking it 5th out of 116 journals in the category "Endocrinology & Metabolism".

— Freebase

Art Journal

Art Journal

Art Journal, established in New York in 1941, is a publication of the College Art Association of America. As a peer-reviewed, professionally moderated scholarly journal, its concentrations include: art practice, art production, art making, art history, visual studies, art theory, and art criticism. The main contributors are artists, scholars, critics, art historians, and other writers in the arts. It is both national and international in scope, and in recent years focusing on 20th- and 21st-century art, although for its first decades it concentrated more on traditional art history. Membership in CAA includes subscription to Art Journal. But single issues can be purchased. Back issues are available on JSTOR and ProQuest. The 'text only' of most articles are available free online at www.findarticles.com.

— Freebase

Letter to the editor

Letter to the editor

A letter to the editor is a letter sent to a publication about issues of concern from its readers. Usually, letters are intended for publication. In many publications, letters to the editor may be sent either through conventional mail or electronic mail. Letters to the editor are most frequently associated with newspapers and newsmagazines. However, they are sometimes published in other periodicals, and radio and television stations. In the latter instance, letters are sometimes read on the air. In academic publishing, letters to the editor of an academic journal are usually open postpublication reviews of a paper, often critical of some aspect of the original paper. The authors of the original paper sometimes respond to these with a letter of their own. Controversial papers in mainstream journals often attract numerous letters to the editor. Good citation indexing services list the original papers together with all replies. Depending on the length of the letter and the journal's style, other types of headings may be used, such as peer commentary. There are some variations on this practice. Some journals request open commentaries as a matter of course, which are published together with the original paper, and any authors' reply, in a process called open peer commentary. The introduction of the "epub ahead of print" practice in many journals now allows unsolicited letters to the editor to appear in the same print issue of the journal, as long as they are sent in the interval between the electronic publication of the original paper and its appearance in print.

— Freebase

Psychological Medicine

Psychological Medicine

Psychological Medicine is a peer-reviewed medical journal in the field of psychiatry and related aspects of psychology and basic sciences. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 6.159.

— Freebase

Axiology

Axiology

Cultura: International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology Axiology is the philosophical study of value. It is either the collective term for ethics and aesthetics—philosophical fields that depend crucially on notions of value—or the foundation for these fields, and thus similar to value theory and meta-ethics. The term was first used by Paul Lapie, in 1902, and Eduard von Hartmann, in 1908. Axiology studies mainly two kinds of values: ethics and aesthetics. Ethics investigates the concepts of "right" and "good" in individual and social conduct. Aesthetics studies the concepts of "beauty" and "harmony." Formal axiology, the attempt to lay out principles regarding value with mathematical rigor, is exemplified by Robert S. Hartman's Science of Value. Cultura: International Journal of Philosophy of Culture and Axiology http://www.international-journal-of-axiology.net/

— Freebase

Nuytsia

Nuytsia

Nuytsia is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Western Australian Herbarium. It publishes papers on systematic botany, giving preference to papers related to the flora of Western Australia. Nearly twenty percent of Western Australia's plant taxa have been published in Nuytsia. The journal was established in 1970 and has appeared irregularly since. The editor-in-chief is Kevin Thiele. Nuytsia is named after the monospecific genus Nuytsia, whose only species is Nuytsia floribunda, the well known Western Australian Christmas tree. Occasionally, the journal has published special issues, such as an issue in 2007 substantially expanding described species from Western Australia.

— Freebase

Speculum

Speculum

Speculum: A Journal of Medieval Studies is a quarterly academic journal published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Medieval Academy of America. It was established in 1926. The journal's primary focus is on the time period from 500-1500 in Western Europe, but also on related subjects such as Byzantine, Hebrew, Arabic, and Slavic studies. The editor-in-chief is Jacqueline Brown.

— Freebase

Geriatric psychiatry

Geriatric psychiatry

Geriatric psychiatry, also known as geropsychiatry, psychogeriatrics or psychiatry of old age, is a subspecialty of psychiatry dealing with the study, prevention, and treatment of mental disorders in humans with old age. After a 4-year residency in psychiatry, a psychiatrist can complete a one-year fellowship in geriatric psychiatry. As the population ages, particularly in developing countries, this field is becoming more needed. The diagnosis, treatment and management of dementia and depression are two areas of this field. The American Association For Geriatric Psychiatry is the national organization representing health care providers specializing in late life mental disorders. The International Psychogeriatric Association is an international community of scientists and healthcare geriatric professionals working for mental health in aging. International Psychogeriatrics is the official journal of the International Psychogeriatric Association. Many fellowships in geriatric psychiatry exist. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry is the official journal of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and the American Osteopathic Board of Neurology and Psychiatry both issue a board certification in geriatric psychiatry. Geriatric psychiatry is an official subspeciality in psychiatry with a defined curriculum of study and core competencies. Geropsychiatric Unit, the term for a hospital-based geriatric psychiatry program, was introduced in 1984 by Norman White MD, when he opened New England's first specialized program of this sort at a community hospital in Rochester NH. Dr. White is a pioneer in geriatric psychiatry, being among the first psychiatrists nationally to achieve board certification in the field. The prefix "psycho" had been proposed for the geriatric program but Dr. White, knowing New Englanders aversion to anything "psycho", lobbied successfully for "Geropsychiatric" rather than "psychogeriatrics."

— Freebase

Social Problems

Social Problems

Social Problems is the official publication of the The Society for the Study of Social Problems. It is a quarterly peer-reviewed journal published by University of California Press. It was established in 1953. Some of the areas covered by the journal include: conflict, social action, and change; crime and juvenile delinquency; drinking and drugs; health, health policy, and health services; mental health poverty, class, and inequality; racial and ethnic minorities; sexual behavior, politics, and communities; youth, aging, and the life course. Among Sociology journals ranked by the Journal Citation Reports, Social Problems was ranked 5th, with an impact factor of 1.796.

— Freebase

TELOS

TELOS

Telos is an academic journal published in the United States. It was founded in May 1968 to provide the New Left with a coherent theoretical perspective. It sought to expand the Husserlian diagnosis of "the crisis of European sciences" to prefigure a particular program of social reconstruction relevant for the US. In order to avoid the high level of abstraction typical of Husserlian phenomenology, the journal began introducing the ideas of Western Marxism and of the critical theory of the Frankfurt School. With the disintegration of the New Left and the gradual integration of what remained of the American Left within the Democratic Party, Telos became increasingly critical of the Left in general. It subsequently undertook a reevaluation of 20th century intellectual history, focusing primarily on forgotten and repressed authors and ideas, beginning with Carl Schmitt and American populism. Eventually the journal rejected the traditional divisions between Left and Right as a legitimating mechanism for new class domination and an occlusion of new, post-Fordist political conflicts. This led to a reevaluation of the primacy of culture and to efforts to understand the dynamics of cultural disintegration and reintegration as a precondition for the constitution of that autonomous individuality critical theory had always identified as the telos of Western civilization.

— Freebase

Biomacromolecules

Biomacromolecules

Biomacromolecules is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published since 2000 by the American Chemical Society. It is abstracted and indexed in Chemical Abstracts Service, Scopus, EBSCOhost, PubMed, and Science Citation Index Expanded. As of 2010, the editor in chief is Ann-Christine Albertsson. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2011 impact factor of 5.479.

— Freebase

Neural Networks

Neural Networks

Neural Networks is the official journal of the three oldest societies dedicated to research in neural networks: International Neural Network Society, European Neural Network Society and Japanese Neural Network Society, published by Elsevier. The journal is issued 10 times annually and available in electronic form via Science Direct. The journal covers a broad range of topics in both artificial neural networks and biological neural networks, "ranging from behavioral and brain modeling, through mathematical and computational analyses, to engineering and technological applications of systems that significantly use neural network concepts and algorithms." Founded by Stephen Grossberg, the current editors-in-chief are DeLiang Wang

— Freebase

NeuroImage

NeuroImage

NeuroImage is a peer-reviewed scientific journal covering research on neuroimaging, including functional neuroimaging and functional human brain mapping. When Karl J. Friston took over as editor-in-chief, the journal was divided into four sections: Anatomy and Physiology, Methods and Modelling, Systems Neuroscience, and Cognitive Neuroscience. Abstracts from the annual meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping have been published as supplements to the journal. Members of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping are eligible for reduced subscription rates.

— Freebase

Etruscology

Etruscology

Etruscology is the study of the ancient Italian civilization of the Etruscans, which was incorporated into an expanding Roman Empire during the period of Rome's Middle Republic. Since the Etruscans were politically and culturally influential in pre-Republican Rome, many Etruscologists are also scholars of the history, archaeology, and culture of Rome. The premier scholarly journal of Etruscan Studies is Studi Etruschi. A recent edition to the scholarly literature is the American journal, Etruscan Studies: Journal of the Etruscan Foundation, which began publication in 1994. A more informal organ is Etruscan News and the accompanying cyber-publication Etruscan News Online. Thomas Dempster, Scottish scholar and historian, is perhaps the godfather of Etruscology. Under the patronage of Grand Duke Cosimo II of Etruria, Dempster researched and wrote De Etruria Regali Libri Septem in Latin. Prominent Etruscologists, past and present, include Ranuccio Bianchi Bandinelli, Massimo Pallottino, Mauro Cristofani, Giovanni Colonna, Giulio Giglioli, Giovannangelo Camporeale, L. Bouke van der Meer, George Dennis, Nancy T. DeGrummond, and Larissa Bonfante. Other scholars who focus more on the Etruscan influence on Rome include, R. E. A. Palmer, John F. Hall, and H. H. Scullard.

— Freebase

Law review

Law review

A law review is a scholarly journal focusing on legal issues, normally published by an organization of students at a law school or through a bar association. The term is also used to describe the extracurricular activity at law schools of publishing the journal. Law reviews should not be confused with non-scholarly publications such as the New York Law Journal or The American Lawyer, which are independent, professional newspapers and news-magazines that cover the daily practice of law.

— Freebase

Protistology

Protistology

Protistology is a scientific discipline devoted to the study of protists, a highly diverse group of eukaryotic microorganisms. Its field of study overlaps with more traditional disciplines of phycology, mycology, and protozoology, just as protists, which, being a paraphyletic group embrace algae, some organisms regarded previously as primitive fungi, and protozoa. Dedicated academic journals include European Journal of Protistology, International Journal of Protistology,Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology, Protist, and Protistology.

— Freebase

Praksis

Praksis

Praksis is a Marxist interdisciplinary academic journal related to social sciences that has been published in Turkey since 2001. The name of the journal is taken from the Turkish pronunciation of the word "praxis". The journal supports historical materialism in theory. Among the most discussed topics are class struggle, contemporary Marxist currents, intellectuals, Turkish politics, and international developments.

— Freebase

Sintaksis

Sintaksis

Sintaksis: publitsistika, kritika, polemika, was a journal published in Paris in 1978–2001 with Maria Rozanova as chief editor. A total of 37 issues of the journal were published before the journal was discontinued. According to Rozanova, there are no plans to resume publication.

— Freebase

Trials

Trials

Trials is an open access peer-reviewed online journal regarding performance and outcomes of randomized controlled trials. The journal is published by BioMed Central and the editors-in-chief are Doug Altman, Curt Furberg, Jeremy Grimshaw, and Peter Rothwell. The journal encourages both authors and peer reviewers to make use of the CONSORT and QUOROM checklists for randomized trials and systematic reviews, respectively.

— Freebase

John Woolman

John Woolman

John Woolman was a North American merchant, tailor, journalist, and itinerant Quaker preacher, and an early abolitionist in the colonial era. Based in Mount Holly, New Jersey, near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he traveled through frontier areas of British North America to preach Quaker beliefs, and advocate against slavery and the slave trade, cruelty to animals, economic injustices and oppression, and conscription; from 1755 during the French and Indian War, he urged tax resistance to deny support to the military. In 1772, Woolman traveled to England, where he urged Quakers to support abolition of slavery. Woolman published numerous essays, especially against slavery. He kept a journal throughout his life; it was published posthumously, entitled The Journal of John Woolman. Included in Volume I of the Harvard Classics since 1909, it is considered a prominent American spiritual work. The Journal has been continuously in print since 1774, published in numerous editions; the most recent scholarly edition was published in 1989.

— Freebase

Rhetorica

Rhetorica

Rhetorica is the official publication of the International Society for the History of Rhetoric. It is a peer-reviewed quarterly academic journal published University of California Press, in Berkeley, California. The journal includes articles, book reviews and bibliographies that examine the theory and practice of rhetoric in all periods and languages and their relationship with poetics, philosophy, religion and law. The official languages of the Society and of the journal are English, French, German, Italian, Latin, and Spanish, with articles and features corresponding.

— Freebase

Fénélon, François de Salignac de la Mothe

Fénélon, François de Salignac de la Mothe

a famous French prelate and writer, born in the Château de Fénélon, in the prov. of Périgord; at the age of 15 came to Paris, and, having already displayed a remarkable gift for preaching, entered the Plessis College, and four years later joined the Seminary of St. Sulpice, where he took holy orders in 1675; his directorship of a seminary for female converts to Catholicism brought him into prominence, and gave occasion to his well-known treatise "De l'Éducation des Filles"; in 1685, after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, he conducted a mission for the conversion of the Huguenots of Saintonge and Poitou, and four years later Louis XIV. appointed him tutor to his grandson, the Duke of Burgundy, an appointment which led to his writing his "Fables," "Dialogues of the Dead," and "History of the Ancient Philosophers"; in 1694 he became abbé of St. Valery, and in the following year archbishop of Cambrai; soon after this ensued his celebrated controversy with Bossuet (q. v.) regarding the doctrines of Quietism (q. v.), a dispute which brought him into disfavour with the king and provoked the Pope's condemnation of his "Explication des Maximes des Saints sur la Vie intérieure"; the surreptitious publication of his most famous work "Télémache," the MS. of which was stolen by his servant, accentuated the king's disfavour, who regarded it as a veiled attack on his court, and led to an order confining the author to his own diocese; the rest of his life was spent in the service of his people, to whom he endeared himself by his benevolence and the sweet piety of his nature; his works are extensive, and deal with subjects historical and literary, as well as philosophical and theological (1651-1715).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Guignes, Joseph de

Guignes, Joseph de

an eminent French Orientalist, and Sinologist especially; was author of "Histoire Générale des Huns, des Turcs, des Moguls, &c.," a work of vast research (1721-1800).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

blog

web log, blog

a shared on-line journal where people can post diary entries about their personal experiences and hobbies

— Princeton's WordNet

blog

blog

read, write, or edit a shared on-line journal

— Princeton's WordNet

daybook

daybook, ledger

an accounting journal as a physical object

— Princeton's WordNet

diarist

diarist, diary keeper, journalist

someone who keeps a diary or journal

— Princeton's WordNet

diary

diary

a personal journal (as a physical object)

— Princeton's WordNet

diary keeper

diarist, diary keeper, journalist

someone who keeps a diary or journal

— Princeton's WordNet

garrison

Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison

United States abolitionist who published an anti-slavery journal (1805-1879)

— Princeton's WordNet

gazette

gazette

a newspaper or official journal

— Princeton's WordNet

hotbox

hotbox

a journal bearing (as of a railroad car) that has overheated

— Princeton's WordNet

journal bearing

journal bearing

the bearing of a journal

— Princeton's WordNet

journal box

journal box

metal housing for a journal bearing

— Princeton's WordNet

journalist

diarist, diary keeper, journalist

someone who keeps a diary or journal

— Princeton's WordNet

ledger

daybook, ledger

an accounting journal as a physical object

— Princeton's WordNet

pillow block

pillow block

a cast-iron or steel block for supporting a journal or bearing

— Princeton's WordNet

think piece

think piece

an article in a newspaper or magazine or journal that represents opinions and ideas and discussion rather than bare facts

— Princeton's WordNet

web log

web log, blog

a shared on-line journal where people can post diary entries about their personal experiences and hobbies

— Princeton's WordNet

william lloyd garrison

Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison

United States abolitionist who published an anti-slavery journal (1805-1879)

— Princeton's WordNet

article

article

A story, report, or opinion piece in a newspaper, magazine, journal, internet etc.

— Wiktionary

diurnal

diurnal

A diary or journal.

— Wiktionary

paper

paper

A written document that reports scientific or academic research and is usually subjected to peer review before publication in a scientific journal or in the proceedings of a scientific or academic meeting (such as a conference, a workshop or a symposium).

— Wiktionary

annual

annual

An annual publication; a book, periodical, journal, report, comic book, yearbook, etc., which is published serially once a year, which may or may not be in addition to regular weekly or monthly publication.

— Wiktionary

accounting cost

accounting cost

The total amount of money or goods expended in an endeavour. It is money paid out at some time in the past and recorded in journal entries and ledgers.

— Wiktionary

blog

blog

A website that allows users to reflect, share opinions, and discuss various topics in the form of an online journal while readers may comment on posts. Most blogs are written in a slightly informal tone (personal journals, news, businesses, etc.) Entries typically appear in reverse chronological order.

— Wiktionary

meme

meme

A quiz or survey that is copied from one webpage or online journal to another, each participant filling in his or her personal answers.

— Wiktionary

axle box

axle box

The journal box of a rotating axle, especially a railway axle.

— Wiktionary

blogger

blogger

A contributor to a blog or online journal.

— Wiktionary

gazette

gazette

A newspaper; a printed sheet published periodically; especially, the official journal published by the British government, and containing legal and state notices.

— Wiktionary

commit point

commit point

In a DBMS, a point in time at which all updates to a database, or group of records in a database, are guaranteed to have been written to disk, and the journal or log records of that action have also been so committed. Future updates may be undone to that point if necessary.

— Wiktionary

weblog

weblog

A website in the form of an ongoing journal; a blog.

— Wiktionary

journalist

journalist

The keeper of a person journal, who writes in it regularly

— Wiktionary

art journal

art journal

A collection of words and images in a diary that chronicles the ideas, memories, and thoughts of an artist. Pages within an art journal include words, pictures and even embellishments.

— Wiktionary

offprint

offprint

A reproduction of a single article from a journal or similar publication

— Wiktionary

commonplace book

commonplace book

a personal notebook or journal in which memorabilia, quotations etc were written

— Wiktionary

scrapbook

scrapbook

a book, similar to a notebook or journal, in which personal or family memorabilia and photos are collected and arranged

— Wiktionary

J

J

Journal

— Wiktionary

Neuron

Neuron

title of a peer reviewed journal established in 1988 by publisher Cell Press

— Wiktionary

refereed

refereed

said of a journal whose articles are submitted to peer review

— Wiktionary

peer-reviewed journal

peer-reviewed journal

an academic journal, the content of which has been subjected to an independent peer review process

— Wiktionary

peer review

peer review

The scholarly process whereby manuscripts intended to be published in an academic journal are reviewed by independent researchers (referees) to evaluate the contribution, i.e. the importance, novelty and accuracy of the manuscript's contents.

— Wiktionary

ephemeris

ephemeris

A journal or diary.

— Wiktionary

pillowbook

pillowbook

A journal-type book kept to record sexual dreams and escapades. It is usually for the reader's eyes only.

— Wiktionary

law review

law review

: A scholarly journal focusing on legal issues, normally published by an organization of students at a law school or through a bar association.

— Wiktionary

law review

law review

: An article published in such a journal.

— Wiktionary

law review

law review

: The student organization responsible for publishing such a scholarly journal.

— Wiktionary

prozine

prozine

A professional magazine; a journal

— Wiktionary

bibliome

bibliome

The complete set of biological journal articles and associated information.

— Wiktionary

preprint

preprint

A preliminary form of a scientific paper that has not yet been published in a journal.

— Wiktionary

unrefereed

unrefereed

Referring to a journal article that isn't reviewed before being printed.

— Wiktionary

journaling

journaling

The activity of keeping a diary, also known as journal.

— Wiktionary

bibliographic database

bibliographic database

An electronic index to journal or magazine articles, containing citations, abstracts and often either the full text of the articles, or links to the full text.

— Wiktionary

journalize

journalize

To record in a journal

— Wiktionary

journalize

journalize

To keep a journal

— Wiktionary

daybook

daybook

A ledger; an accounting journal.

— Wiktionary

Ternes

Ternes

Ternes is a station on Paris Métro Line 2, under the Place des Ternes on the border of the 8th and 17th arrondissement of Paris. The station was opened on 7 October 1902 as part of the extension of line 2 from Étoile to Anvers. The name of the street derives from Villa Externa, a medieval farm and residence of the Bishop of Paris outside the city, that became the name of the locality, which was originally part of Saint-Denis, then Neuilly, and was finally annexed by Paris in 1860. The Barrière des Ternes was a gate at the same location built for the collection of taxation as part of the Wall of the Farmers-General; the gate was built between 1784 and 1788 and demolished in 1859.

— Freebase

Pau, Pyrénées-Atlantiques

Pau, Pyrénées-Atlantiques

Pau is a commune on the northern edge of the Pyrenees, capital of the Pyrénées-Atlantiques département in France. It was also the capital of the Béarn region. It forms the communauté d'agglomération of Pau-Pyrénées with 13 neighbouring communes to carry out local tasks together. The Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour, founded in 1972, accounts for a large student population. The Boulevard des Pyrénées is 1.8 km from the Château de Pau to the Parc Beaumont, with views of the mountains. Alphonse de Lamartine said: "Pau has the world's most beautiful view of the earth just as Naples has the most beautiful view of the sea."

— Freebase

Grimes

Grimes

Grimes is a city in Dallas and Polk counties in the U.S. state of Iowa. The population was 8,246 at the 2010 census. Grimes is part of the Des Moines–West Des Moines Metropolitan Statistical Area.

— Freebase

Turbine

Turbine

A turbine is a rotary mechanical device that extracts energy from a fluid flow and converts it into useful work. A turbine is a turbomachine with at least one moving part called a rotor assembly, which is a shaft or drum with blades attached. Moving fluid acts on the blades so that they move and impart rotational energy to the rotor. Early turbine examples are windmills and waterwheels. Gas, steam, and water turbines usually have a casing around the blades that contains and controls the working fluid. Credit for invention of the steam turbine is given both to the British engineer Sir Charles Parsons, for invention of the reaction turbine and to Swedish engineer Gustaf de Laval, for invention of the impulse turbine. Modern steam turbines frequently employ both reaction and impulse in the same unit, typically varying the degree of reaction and impulse from the blade root to its periphery. The word "turbine" was coined in 1822 by the French mining engineer Claude Burdin from the Latin turbo, or vortex, in a memoir, "Des turbines hydrauliques ou machines rotatoires à grande vitesse", which he submitted to the Académie royale des sciences in Paris. Benoit Fourneyron, a former student of Claude Burdin, built the first practical water turbine.

— Freebase

DEAL

DEAL

In cryptography, DEAL is a block cipher derived from the Data Encryption Standard. The design was proposed in a report by Lars Knudsen in 1998, and was submitted to the AES contest by Richard Outerbridge. DEAL is a Feistel network which uses DES as the round function. It has a 128-bit block size and a variable key size of either 128, 192, or 256 bits. For key sizes of 128 and 192 bits, the cipher uses 6 rounds, increasing to 8 for the 256-bits size. The scheme has a comparable performance to Triple DES, and was relatively slow compared to many other AES candidates.

— Freebase

Sorbonne

Sorbonne

The Sorbonne is an edifice of the Latin Quarter, in Paris, France, which has been the historical house of the former University of Paris. Nowadays, it houses several higher education and research institutions such as Panthéon-Sorbonne University, Sorbonne Nouvelle University, Paris-Sorbonne University, Paris Descartes University, the École Nationale des Chartes and the École pratique des hautes études. The name is commonly used to refer to the historic University of Paris or one of its successor institutions, but this is a recent usage, and "Sorbonne" has actually been used with different meanings over the centuries. For information on the historic University of Paris and the present universities, which are its successor institutions or the Collège de Sorbonne, please refer to the relevant articles.

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Metric system

Metric system

The metric system is an internationally agreed decimal system of measurement that was originally based on the mètre des Archives and the kilogramme des Archives introduced by France in 1799. Over the years, the definitions of the metre and kilogram have been refined and the metric system has been extended to incorporate many more units. Although a number of variants of the metric system emerged in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries the term is now often used as a synonym for "SI" or the "International System of Units"—the official system of measurement in almost every country in the world. The metric system has been officially sanctioned for use in the United States since 1866, but it remains the only industrialised country that has not adopted the metric system as its official system of measurement. Many sources also cite Liberia and Burma as the only other countries not to have done so. Although the United Kingdom uses the metric system for most official purposes, the use of the imperial system of measure, particularly in unregulated sectors such as journalism, is widespread. Although the originators intended to devise a system that was equally accessible to all, it proved necessary to use prototype units under the custody of government or other approved authorities as standards. Control of the prototype units of measure was maintained by the French government until 1875 when it passed to an inter-governmental organisation—the General Conference on Weights and Measures. It is now hoped that the last of these prototypes can be retired by 2014.

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Garcin de Tassy

Garcin de Tassy

Joseph Héliodore Sagesse Vertu Garcin de Tassy was a French orientalist. He studied under Silvestre de Sacy oriental languages and was awarded professorship for Indology at the School for Living Oriental Languages, that was founded for him. In 1838 he was elected to the Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres. and was one of the founders and later president of the Société Asiatique. Garcin first received prominence through general works on Islam and translations from the Arabic, namely L'Islamisme d'aprés le Coran, La poésie philosophique et religieuse chez les Persans and the Allégories, récits poétiques etc.. Later, he devoted himselft to the study of the Hindi language, where he was reputed as Europe's first capacity. His major works in this area are; Mémoires sur les particularités de la religion musulmane dans l'Inde; Les aventures de Kamrup; translations of works by the poet Wali; the Histoire de la littérature hindoue e hindoustani; Rudiments de la langue hindouie; Rhétorique et prosodie des langues de l'Orient musulman; Chrestomathie hindie et hindouie; La doctrine de l'amour; Cours d'hindoustani and La langue et la littérature hindoustanies 1850-69, to which he added since 1870 a yearly revue under the same title.

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Fontainebleau

Fontainebleau

Fontainebleau is a commune in the metropolitan area of Paris, France. It is located 55.5 kilometres south-southeast of the centre of Paris. Fontainebleau is a sub-prefecture of the Seine-et-Marne department, and it is the seat of the arrondissement of Fontainebleau. The commune has the largest land area in the Île-de-France region; it is the only one to cover a larger area than Paris itself. Fontainebleau, together with the neighbouring commune of Avon and three other smaller communes, form an urban area of 39,713 inhabitants. This urban area is a satellite of Paris. Fontainebleau is renowned for the large and scenic forest of Fontainebleau, a favourite weekend getaway for Parisians, as well as for the historical château de Fontainebleau, which once belonged to the kings of France. It is also the home of INSEAD, one of the world's most elite business schools; of the École supérieure d'ingénieurs en informatique et génie des télécommunications, one of France's grandes écoles; and of a branch of the École nationale supérieure des mines de Paris, the Paris School of Mines, also one of the elite grandes écoles. Inhabitants of Fontainebleau are called Bellifontains.

— Freebase

Salman Rushdie

Salman Rushdie

Sir Ahmed Salman Rushdie is a British Indian novelist and essayist. His second novel, Midnight's Children, won the Booker Prize in 1981. Much of his fiction is set on the Indian subcontinent. He is said to combine magical realism with historical fiction; his work is concerned with the many connections, disruptions and migrations between East and West. His fourth novel, The Satanic Verses, was the centre of a major controversy, provoking protests from Muslims in several countries, some violent. Death threats were made against him, including a fatwā issued by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, the Supreme Leader of Iran, on 14 February 1989. Rushdie was appointed Commandeur de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres of France in January 1999. In June 2007, Queen Elizabeth II knighted him for his services to literature. In 2008, The Times ranked him thirteenth on its list of the fifty greatest British writers since 1945. Since 2000, Rushdie has lived in the United States, where he has worked at Emory University and was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters. In 2012, he published Joseph Anton: A Memoir, an account of his life in the wake of the controversy over The Satanic Verses.

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Jacquard loom

Jacquard loom

The Jacquard loom is a mechanical loom, invented by Joseph Marie Jacquard, first demonstrated in 1801, that simplifies the process of manufacturing textiles with complex patterns such as brocade, damask and matelasse. The loom was controlled by a "chain of cards", a number of punched cards, laced together into a continuous sequence. Multiple rows of holes were punched on each card and each row of punched holes corresponded to one row of the design. Several such paper cards, generally white in color, can be seen in the images below. Chains, like the much later paper tape, allowed sequences of any length to be constructed, not limited by the size of a card. It is based on earlier inventions by the Frenchmen Basile Bouchon, Jean Baptiste Falcon and Jacques Vaucanson A static display of a Jacquard loom is the centrepiece of the Musée des Tissus et des Arts Décoratifs in Lyon. Live displays of a Jacquard loom are available at a few private museums around Lyon.

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Des Plaines

Des Plaines

Des Plaines is a city in Cook County, Illinois, United States. It has adopted the official nickname of "City of Destiny". As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 58,364. It is a suburb of Chicago and is next to O'Hare International Airport. The Des Plaines River runs through the city, just east of its downtown area.

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Sandre

Sandre

Sandre stands for Service d’administration nationale des données et des référentiels sur l’eau, or National Service for Water Data and Common Repositories Management of France. The Sandre service establishes the common water data language of the French national Water Information System. Sandre is a division of the National Agency of Water and Aquatic Environments. Its technical secretariat is entrusted to the International Office for Water.

— Freebase

Mass grave

Mass grave

A mass grave is a grave containing multiple number of human corpses, which may or may not be identified prior to burial. There is no strict definition of the minimum number of bodies required to constitute a mass grave, although the United Nations defines a mass grave as a burial site which contains three or more victims of execution. Mass graves are an infamous variation on common burial, still occasionally practiced today under normal circumstances. Mass or communal burial was a common practice before the development of a dependable crematory chamber by an Italian named Brunetti in 1873. In Paris, the practice of mass burial, and in particular, the condition of the infamous Cimetière des Innocents, led Louis XVI to eliminate Parisian cemeteries. The remains were removed and placed in the Paris underground forming the early Catacombs. La Cimetière des Innocents alone had 6,000,000 dead to remove. Burial commenced outside of the city limits in what is now Père Lachaise Cemetery. Mass graves are usually created after a large number of people die or are killed, and there is a desire to bury the corpses quickly for sanitation concerns. In disasters, mass graves are used for infection and disease control.

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Jacques Lipchitz

Jacques Lipchitz

Jacques Lipchitz was a Cubist sculptor. Jacques Lipchitz was born Chaim Jacob Lipchitz, in a Litvak family, son of a building contractor in Druskininkai, Lithuania, then within the Russian Empire. At first, under the influence of his father, he studied engineering, but soon after, supported by his mother he moved to Paris to study at the École des Beaux-Arts and the Académie Julian. It was there, in the artistic communities of Montmartre and Montparnasse, that he joined a group of artists that included Juan Gris and Pablo Picasso as well as where his friend, Amedeo Modigliani, painted Jacques and Berthe Lipchitz. Living in this environment, Lipchitz soon began to create Cubist sculpture. In 1912 he exhibited at the Salon de la Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts and the Salon d'Automne with his first solo show held at Léonce Rosenberg's Galerie L’Effort Moderne in Paris in 1920. In 1922 he was commissioned by the Barnes Foundation in Merion, Pennsylvania to execute five bas-reliefs. With artistic innovation at its height, in the 1920s he experimented with abstract forms he called transparent sculptures. Later he developed a more dynamic style, which he applied with telling effect to bronze compositions of figures and animals.

— Freebase

Bertrand de Molleville

Bertrand de Molleville

Comte Antoine François Bertrand de Molleville was a French politician. He was considered a fiery partisan of royalty, and surnamed the enfant terrible of the monarchy. He was first conseiller to the Parlement de Toulouse in 1766, then maîtres des requêtes in 1774 and finally Intendant de Bretagne, in 1784. Bertrand de Molleville was then charged in 1788 with the difficult task of dissolving the Parliament of Brittany. Favourable to the gathering of the estates general in 1789, he advised Louis XVI after the dissolution of the Assemblée. Made ministre de la Marine et des Colonies from 1790 to 1792, he organised the mass emigration of officers. Due to numerous denunciations, he retired from his functions and became chief of the royal secret police. Before and after the 10 August 1792, he tried to organise an escape for the king, but he was eventually forced to resolve to flee to England himself. Despite his dedication and his friendship for, he was one of his most untalented servants.

— Freebase

Ankeny

Ankeny

Ankeny is a city in Polk County, Iowa, United States. The population was 45,562 in the 2010 census, an increase of 68% from the 27,117 population in the 2000 census. It is part of the Des Moines–West Des Moines Metropolitan Statistical Area.

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Tantieme

Tantieme

Tantième was a French Thoroughbred horse racing champion and prominent sire who twice won the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe, France's most prestigious horse race. He also won several other important conditions races including the Grand Critérium in 1949, the Poule d'Essai des Poulains, Prix Lupin and his first Arc de Triomphe in 1950. Racing as a four-year-old, in 1951 Tantième won the Prix Ganay plus his second Arc de Triomphe and in England he captured the Coronation Cup. After winning twelve of his fifteen races, Tantième was retired to stand at stud at François Dupre's Haras d'Ouilly where he became the Champion French Sire of 1962 and 1965. A few of the horses Tantième sired are: ⁕Tanerko - In France won Grand Prix de Saint-Cloud, Prix Juigne, Prix Noailles, Prix Lupin, Prix du Prince d'Orange, Prix Ganay, Prix d'Harcourt. ⁕Reliance - In France won the 1965 Prix du Jockey Club, Grand Prix de Paris, Prix Royal-Oak. ⁕Match II - In France won the 1961 Prix Royal-Oak, 1962 Grand Prix de Saint-Cloud. In England: 1962 King George VI and Queen Elizabeth Stakes and in the United States, the 1962 Washington, D.C. International. ⁕La Sega - In France won the Prix de Diane, Poule d'Essai des Pouliches, Prix Saint-Alary, Prix d'Ispahan, Prix de la Grotte.

— Freebase

Bouton

Bouton

Bouton is a city in Dallas County, Iowa, United States. The population was 129 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Des Moines–West Des Moines Metropolitan Statistical Area.

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Jacques Charles

Jacques Charles

Jacques Alexandre César Charles was a French inventor, scientist, mathematician, and balloonist. Charles and the Robert brothers launched the world's first hydrogen-filled balloon in August 1783; then in December 1783, Charles and his co-pilot Nicolas-Louis Robert ascended to a height of about 1,800 feet in a manned balloon. Their pioneering use of hydrogen for lift led to this type of balloon being named a Charlière. Charles's law, describing how gases tend to expand when heated, was formulated by Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac in 1802, but he credited it to unpublished work by Jacques Charles. Charles was elected to the Académie des Sciences, in 1793, and subsequently became professor of physics at the Conservatoire des Arts et Métiers.

— Freebase

Fields of Honor

Fields of Honor

Fields of Honor is an annual Game convention held in Des Moines, Iowa. The last few years the convention has been held at the Hotel Fort Des Moines in the downtown area. Fields of Honor 2009 will be held at the Stoney Creek Inn from September 25–27, 2009. The convention is a mixture of miniature wargaming, board games, role playing, collectible card games and live action role playing. The event is sponsored by a non-profit organization called 'History in Miniature'. More information can be found at fields-of-honor.org

— Freebase

Academy figure

Academy figure

An academy figure is a drawing, painting or sculpture in a literal manner, of the nude human body using a live model, typically at half life size. It is a common exercise required of students at art schools and academies, both in the past and present, hence the name. ⁕ Young Student Drawing, Jean Siméon Chardin, ca. 1738. ⁕ École des beaux-arts. ⁕ Christian Krohg, seated center, lecturing a class at Statens kunstakademi in Oslo. ⁕ The Anatomy Class at the Ecole des Beaux Arts, François Sallé, 1888. ⁕ Edouard Manet, Academy, ca. 1875. ⁕ Pedro Américo, Academy, ca. 1870. ⁕ Pablo Gargallo, Academy, 1934. ⁕ Manuel Teixeira da Rocha Modelo de Academia.

— Freebase

François Villon

François Villon

François Villon was a French poet, thief, killer, barroom brawler, and vagabond. He is perhaps best known for his Testaments and his Ballade des Pendus, written while in prison. The question "Mais où sont les neiges d'antan?", taken from the Ballade des dames du temps jadis and translated by Dante Gabriel Rossetti as "Where are the snows of yesteryear?", is one of the most famous lines of translated secular poetry in the English-speaking world.

— Freebase

Deaflympics

Deaflympics

The Deaflympics are an International Olympic Committee-sanctioned event at which deaf athletes compete at an elite level. However, unlike the athletes in other IOC-sanctioned events, the Deaflympians cannot be guided by sounds. The games have been organized by the Comité International des Sports des Sourds since the first event.

— Freebase

Johnny Bright

Johnny Bright

Johnny D. Bright was a professional Canadian football player in the Canadian Football League. He played college football at Drake University. He is a member of the Canadian Football Hall of Fame, the National Football Foundation's College Football Hall of Fame, the Missouri Valley Conference Hall of Fame, the Edmonton Eskimos Wall of Honour, the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame, and the Des Moines Register's Iowa Sports Hall of Fame. In 1951, Bright was named a First Team College Football All-American, and was awarded the Nils V. "Swede" Nelson Sportsmanship Award. In 1969, Bright was named Drake University's greatest football player of all time. Bright is the only Drake football player to have his jersey number retired by the school, and in June 2006, received honorable mention from ESPN.com senior writer Ivan Maisel as one of the best college football players to ever wear No. 43. In February 2006, the football field at Drake Stadium, in Des Moines, Iowa, was named in his honor. In November 2006, Bright was voted one of the CFL's Top 50 players of the league's modern era by Canadian sports network TSN. In addition to his outstanding professional and college football careers, Bright is perhaps best known for his role as the victim of an intentional, most likely racially motivated, on-field assault by an opposing college football player from Oklahoma A&M on October 20, 1951, that was captured in a widely disseminated and Pulitzer Prize winning photo sequence, and eventually came to be known as the "Johnny Bright Incident."

— Freebase

Eugène Carrière

Eugène Carrière

Eugène Anatole Carrière was a French Symbolist artist of the Fin de siècle period. His paintings are best known for their brown monochrome palette. He was a close friend of the sculptor Rodin and his work influenced Picasso. Some see traces of Carrière's monochrome style in Picasso's Blue Period. He was born at Gournay-sur-Marne. He studied at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris and later under Cabanel. During the Franco-Prussian War he passed some time as a prisoner in Dresden, where the art of Rubens made a lasting impression on him, as may be seen in the glowing colors of his early paintings. About 1890 he adopted the gray, misty-color scheme with contrasts of light and shadow, so characteristic of his art, but which no other artist has been able to imitate without affectation. His themes usually are scenes of his domestic life, and he repeatedly introduced the likeness of his wife in his paintings. The first of these, The Young Mother, is now in the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Rouen. It was followed by, The Sick Child, The First Communion, and the highly praised 1887 portrait of the sculptor Louis-Henri Devillez.

— Freebase

Days of Wonder

Days of Wonder

Days of Wonder is a board game publisher based in the United States and France. Founded in 2002, Days of Wonder distributes its games to 25 countries. It specialises in German-style board games and have branched out to include some online games. Days of Wonder has published games in English, French, German and Korean. Days of Wonder was co-founded by Eric Hautemont and vice president Mark Kaufman. In 2004, Days of Wonder received the Spiel des Jahres for their board game, Ticket to Ride, by Alan R. Moon. It was the youngest publisher ever to take that award. Ticket to Ride is the company's best selling series according to Boardgamegeek.com. Shadows Over Camelot won a special Spiel des Jahres award as Best Fantasy Game in 2006. In 2009, Smallworld received three awards including "Best Game of the Year", "Best Family Game", and "Best Game Artwork" from the Dice Tower Gaming Awards. Below are just some of the games published by Days of Wonder: ⁕Card games: ⁕Gang of Four ⁕Terra ⁕Ticket to Ride: The Card Game; 2008 ⁕'Small box' games ⁕Fist of Dragonstones ⁕Queen's Necklace

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Katsuhiro Otomo

Katsuhiro Otomo

Katsuhiro Otomo is a Japanese manga artist, screenwriter and film director. He is best known as the creator of the manga Akira and its animated film adaptation. He was decorated a member of the French Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in 2005, became the fourth manga artist ever inducted into the American Eisner Award Hall of Fame in 2012, and was awarded the Purple Medal of Honor from the Japanese government in 2013. Otomo later received the Winsor McCay Award at the 41st Annie Awards in 2014.

— Freebase

Volontaires

Volontaires

Volontaires is a station on line 12 of the Paris Métro in the 15th arrondissement. It is located at the junction of the Rue des Volontaires with the Rue de Vaugirard. The station opened on 5 November 1910 as part of the original section of the Nord-Sud Company's line A between Porte de Versailles and Notre-Dame-de-Lorette. On 27 March 1931 line A became line 12 of the Métro. It is named after the Rue des Volontaires.

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Institut national des sciences appliquées

Institut national des sciences appliquées

The Institut National des Sciences Appliquées is a grande école – a French engineering university. There are 6 INSA establishments organised as a network and located in major French regional cities Lyon, Rennes, Rouen, Strasbourg, Toulouse, Blois and Bourges. All INSAs share the same philosophy, at the same time preserving an individual identity based on their respective histories, origins, economic environments and on poles of excellence developed from specific competences. The INSA network represents the largest engineer training group in France: 12% of all engineers who obtain their degree in France each year, graduate from one of the INSA establishments. To date, almost 50,000 INSA engineers contribute to the social and economic fabric worldwide. The INSA are public establishments with a scientific, cultural and professional orientation. They are under the aegis of the Ministry of Higher Education and are accredited by the "Commission des Titres" to deliver Engineering Degrees. INSA Lyon INSA Rennes INSA Rouen INSA Strasbourg INSA Toulouse INSA Centre Val de Loire

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intelligence journal

intelligence journal

A chronological log of intelligence activities covering a stated period, usually 24 hours. It is an index of reports and messages that have been received and transmitted, important events that have occurred, and actions taken. The journal is a permanent and official record.

— Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms

Axle box

Axle box

the journal box of a rotating axle, especially a railway axle

— Webster Dictionary

Bearing

Bearing

the part of an axle or shaft in contact with its support, collar, or boxing; the journal

— Webster Dictionary

Bearing

Bearing

the part of the support on which a journal rests and rotates

— Webster Dictionary

Cap

Cap

the removable cover of a journal box

— Webster Dictionary

Cartoon

Cartoon

a large pictorial sketch, as in a journal or magazine; esp. a pictorial caricature; as, the cartoons of "Puck."

— Webster Dictionary

Diary

Diary

a register of daily events or transactions; a daily record; a journal; a blank book dated for the record of daily memoranda; as, a diary of the weather; a physician's diary

— Webster Dictionary

Diurnal

Diurnal

a daybook; a journal

— Webster Dictionary

Ephemeris

Ephemeris

a diary; a journal

— Webster Dictionary

Gazette

Gazette

a newspaper; a printed sheet published periodically; esp., the official journal published by the British government, and containing legal and state notices

— Webster Dictionary

Hanger

Hanger

a part that suspends a journal box in which shafting runs. See Illust. of Countershaft

— Webster Dictionary

Housing

Housing

a frame or support for holding something in place, as journal boxes, etc

— Webster Dictionary

Journalism

Journalism

the keeping of a journal or diary

— Webster Dictionary

Journalist

Journalist

one who keeps a journal or diary

— Webster Dictionary

Journalize

Journalize

to enter or record in a journal or diary

— Webster Dictionary

Journalize

Journalize

to conduct or contribute to a public journal; to follow the profession of a journalist

— Webster Dictionary

Keep

Keep

to record transactions, accounts, or events in; as, to keep books, a journal, etc. ; also, to enter (as accounts, records, etc. ) in a book

— Webster Dictionary

Keep

Keep

a cap for retaining anything, as a journal box, in place

— Webster Dictionary

Ledger

Ledger

a book in which a summary of accounts is laid up or preserved; the final book of record in business transactions, in which all debits and credits from the journal, etc., are placed under appropriate heads

— Webster Dictionary

Neck

Neck

a reduction in size near the end of an object, formed by a groove around it; as, a neck forming the journal of a shaft

— Webster Dictionary

Noctuary

Noctuary

a record of what passes in the night; a nightly journal; -- distinguished from diary

— Webster Dictionary

Paper

Paper

a printed sheet appearing periodically; a newspaper; a journal; as, a daily paper

— Webster Dictionary

Pedestal

Pedestal

a casting secured to the frame of a truck and forming a jaw for holding a journal box

— Webster Dictionary

Pin

Pin

a short shaft, sometimes forming a bolt, a part of which serves as a journal

— Webster Dictionary

Post

Post

to carry, as an account, from the journal to the ledger; as, to post an account; to transfer, as accounts, to the ledger

— Webster Dictionary

Posting

Posting

the act of transferring an account, as from the journal to the ledger

— Webster Dictionary

Puff

Puff

an exaggerated or empty expression of praise, especially one in a public journal

— Webster Dictionary

Stud

Stud

a short rod or pin, fixed in and projecting from something, and sometimes forming a journal

— Webster Dictionary

Subeditor

Subeditor

an assistant editor, as of a periodical or journal

— Webster Dictionary

Toe

Toe

the journal, or pivot, at the lower end of a revolving shaft or spindle, which rests in a step

— Webster Dictionary

Wastebook

Wastebook

a book in which rough entries of transactions are made, previous to their being carried into the journal

— Webster Dictionary

Wrist

Wrist

a stud or pin which forms a journal; -- also called wrist pin

— Webster Dictionary

Anaphylatoxins

Anaphylatoxins

Serum peptides derived from certain cleaved COMPLEMENT PROTEINS during COMPLEMENT ACTIVATION. They induce smooth MUSCLE CONTRACTION; mast cell HISTAMINE RELEASE; PLATELET AGGREGATION; and act as mediators of the local inflammatory process. The order of anaphylatoxin activity from the strongest to the weakest is C5a, C3a, C4a, and C5a des-arginine.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

New Caledonia

New Caledonia

A group of islands in Melanesia constituting a French overseas territory. The group includes New Caledonia (the main island), Ile des Pins, Loyalty Island, and several other islet groups. The capital is Noumea. It was discovered by Captain Cook in 1774 and visited by various navigators, explorers, and traders from 1792 to 1840. Occupied by the French in 1853, it was set up as a penal colony 1864-94. In 1946 it was made a French overseas territory. It was named by Captain Cook with the 5th and 6th century A.D. Latin name for Scotland, Caledonia. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p830 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p375)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Complement C3a

Complement C3a

The smaller fragment generated from the cleavage of complement C3 by C3 CONVERTASE. C3a, a 77-amino acid peptide, is a mediator of local inflammatory process. It induces smooth MUSCLE CONTRACTION, and HISTAMINE RELEASE from MAST CELLS and LEUKOCYTES. C3a is considered an anaphylatoxin along with COMPLEMENT C4A; COMPLEMENT C5A; and COMPLEMENT C5A, DES-ARGININE.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Complement C5a, des-Arginine

Complement C5a, des-Arginine

A derivative of complement C5a, generated when the carboxy-terminal ARGININE is removed by CARBOXYPEPTIDASE B present in normal human serum. C5a des-Arg shows complete loss of spasmogenic activity though it retains some chemotactic ability (CHEMOATTRACTANTS).

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Peste-des-petits-ruminants virus

Peste-des-petits-ruminants virus

A species of MORBILLIVIRUS causing a severe, often fatal enteritis and pneumonia (PESTE-DES-PETITS-RUMINANTS) in sheep and goats.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Peste-des-Petits-Ruminants

Peste-des-Petits-Ruminants

A highly fatal contagious disease of goats and sheep caused by PESTE-DES-PETITS-RUMINANTS VIRUS. The disease may be acute or subacute and is characterized by stomatitis, conjunctivitis, diarrhea, and pneumonia.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Penis captivus

Penis captivus

Penis captivus describes a rare occurrence in heterosexual intercourse when the muscles in the vagina clamp down on the penis much more firmly than usual, making it impossible for the penis to withdraw from the vagina. According to a 1979 article in the British Medical Journal, this condition was unknown in the twentieth century, but a subsequent letter to the same journal reported an apparent case of penis captivus in 1947. Penis captivus should not be confused with vaginismus, though a relation between the supposed event of penis captivus and the occurrence of vaginismus is assumed in the existing descriptions.

— Freebase

ORDO

ORDO

ORDO — Jahrbuch für die Ordnung von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft is a peer-reviewed academic journal established in 1948 by the German economists Walter Eucken and Franz Böhm. The journal focuses on the economic and political institutions governing modern society.

— Freebase

Sunday school

Sunday school

A Sunday school, also known as a Sabbath School, is an institution designed to teach people, usually children, about Christianity, named such because most Christian churches meet on Sunday. Some Seventh-day Adventist communities hold their Sabbath Schools on Saturdays. Sunday schools were first set up in the 1780s to provide education to working children on their one day off from the factory. It was proposed by Robert Raikes, editor of the Gloucester Journal in an article in his Journal and supported by many clergymen. It aimed to teach the youngsters reading, writing and cyphering and a knowledge of the Bible. It was 90 years, in 1870, before children could attend schools during the week. In 1785 it was reported that 250,000 children were attending Sunday School. There were 5,000 in Manchester alone. By 1895, the 'Society for the Establishment and Promotion of Sunday Schools' had distributed 91,915 spelling books, 24,232 Testaments and 5,360 Bibles. The Sunday School movement was cross-denominational, and through subscription built large buildings that could host public lectures as well as classrooms. In the early days, adults would attend the same classes as the infants, as each were instructed in basic reading. In some towns the Methodists withdrew from the Large Sunday School and built their own. The Anglicans set up their own 'National' schools that would act as Sunday Schools and day schools. These schools were the precursors to a national system of education.

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Cabeza de Vaca

Cabeza de Vaca

Cabeza de Vaca is a 1991 Mexican film about the adventures of Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, an early Spanish explorer, as he traversed what later became the American Southeast. He was one of four survivors of the Narvaez expedition and shipwreck. He became known as a shaman among the Native American tribes he encountered, which helped him survive. His journey of a number of years began in 1528. After his return to Spain, he published his journal in 1542. The screenplay by Guillermo Sheridan and Nicolás Echevarríais is based on this journal. Directed by Nicolás Echevarría and starring Juan Diego, the film was entered into the 41st Berlin International Film Festival. A DVD version was released in 2012.

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DETAIL

DETAIL

DETAIL is the international professional journal for architecture and construction details produced by Detail publishers. Each issue deals with a specific aspect of building, such as concrete construction, roof structures or refurbishment, whereby emphasis is placed on the quality of the building details. Up-to-date examples are selected from schemes around the world, and these are illustrated with plans and details drawn to a consistent scale as well as with photographs. The journal focuses on the depiction of new developments in the form of descriptive texts, constructional drawings and photos. The target group comprises above all architects, engineers and other specialists from the field of construction.

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Primates

Primates

Primates is a quarterly peer-reviewed scientific journal of primatology. It publishes original papers that cover all aspects of the study of primates. The journal publishes original research articles, reviews, short communications, book reviews, and notes. It was established in 1957. Although the first volume contained only articles written in Japanese, subsequent volumes were published in English, thanks to a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation. It is now published by Springer Science+Business Media and the current editor-in-chief is Juichi Yamagiwa.

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Hyperdramatic

Hyperdramatic

Hyperdramatic is the second studio album by Canadian singer Damhnait Doyle, released in 2000 on EMI Music Canada, four years after her debut album, Shadows Wake Me. The album was produced by Dave Hodge. Doyle spent three years developing her songwriting skills and working on material for the album. Much of the material came from her personal journal entries that initially she had not intended to be lyrics. In contrast to her previous album, in which she co-wrote most of the lyrics but not the music, on Hyperdramatic she co-wrote all of the music as well. Songwriting collaborators included the album's producer, Dave Hodge, as well as Christopher Ward and Craig Northey. The lead single, "Tattooed", charted in Canada, and its video was played in rotation on MuchMusic, MusiquePlus, and MuchMoreMusic. The Calgary Herald's album review called Doyle "moodier, more experienced, more focussed" compared to her first album, and said that "her voice soothes, slices, soars, all the while quaking with feeling." Ben Rayner of the Toronto Star praised the title track as well as Doyle's "nicely sharp-edged voice", but said that on the whole the album is "hampered by generic songwriting and dutifully stylized overproduction that's trying hard not to sound equally generic." Similarly, a review in the Edmonton Journal called the album "beautiful but creatively boring".

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American Dental Association

American Dental Association

The American Dental Association is an American professional association established in 1859 which has more than 155,000 members. Based in the American Dental Association Building in the Near North Side of Chicago, the ADA is the world's largest and oldest national dental association and promotes good oral health to the public while representing the dental profession. The ADA publishes a monthly journal of dental related articles named the Journal of the American Dental Association.

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Psychosomatic Medicine

Psychosomatic Medicine

Psychosomatic Medicine is a peer-reviewed medical journal published nine times per year by the American Psychosomatic Society. It covers "experimental and clinical studies dealing with various aspects of the relationships among social, psychological, and behavioral factors and bodily processes in humans and animals." It was established in 1939.The journal is widely cited – the 2010 Impact Factor was 3.974. The 5-year Impact Factor is 4.690.

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Folklife

Folklife

Folklife is an extension of, and often an alternate term for the subject of, folklore. The term gained usage in the United States in the 1960s from its use by such folklore scholars as Don Yoder and Warren Roberts, who wished to recognize that the study of folklore goes beyond oral genres to include all aspects of everyday life including material culture. In Europe, especially Great Britain, Ireland and the Scandinavian countries, the study of folklife, called European ethnology, manifests itself in folk museums. The journal 'Ulster Folklife' first appeared in 1955. 'Folk Life: Journal of Ethnological Studies' was first published in 1963 and is now issued twice a year. In the United States, the term is often used in the title of research-based folklife festivals presenting the full range of traditional culture including music, dance, storytelling, crafts, costume, foodways, holidays, life-cycle rituals, and occupational skills. Folklife also includes the study of belief systems, including folk religion, folk medicine, and popular beliefs. When the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, was created in 1976, the United States Congress used the following definition:

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Educate~

Educate~

Educate~, The Journal of Doctoral Research in Education, is a peer-reviewed academic journal published by the Institute of Education of the University of London.

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Preternatural

Preternatural

The preternatural or praeternatural is that which appears outside or beside the natural. In contrast to the supernatural, preternatural phenomena are presumed to have rational explanations that are unknown. The term is often used to distinguish from the divine while maintaining a distinction from what is known and understood. In 2011, Penn State Press began publishing a learned journal entitled Preternature: Critical and Historical Studies on the Preternatural. Edited by Kirsten Uszkalo and Richard Raiswell, the journal is dedicated to publishing articles, reviews and short editions of original texts that deal with conceptions and perceptions of the preternatural in any culture and in any historical period.

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Fathering

Fathering

Fathering: A Journal of Theory, Research, and Practice about Men as Fathers, is a peer-reviewed academic journal established in 2003 as the third of four published by Men's Studies Press and the first worldwide to focus specifically on fatherhood. Editor-in-Chief is Andrea Doucet.

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Analytical Review

Analytical Review

The Analytical Review was a periodical established in London in 1788 by the publisher Joseph Johnson and the writer Thomas Christie. Part of the Republic of Letters, it was a gadfly publication, which offered readers summaries and analyses of the many new publications issued at the end of the eighteenth century. Perhaps most important, the Analytical Review provided a forum for radical political and religious ideas. Although it aimed at impartiality, its articles were often critical of the British government and supportive of the French revolutionaries. While the journal had low circulation numbers for its day, it still influenced popular opinion and was feared by the conservative Pitt administration. In late 1797, the Anti-Jacobin Review, the self-styled nemesis of the Analytical Review, was founded by supporters of the government and other reactionary interests; it criticized the radical politics of the Analytical and monitored it for unpatriotic and irreligious sentiments. Organized into separate departments, each with its own chief reviewer, the Analytical Review focused on politics, philosophy, natural history, and literature. To promote a disinterested air, its reviewers were anonymous, signing their work with pseudonymous initials. Nevertheless, the journal recruited several prominent writers, such as the poet William Cowper, the moralist William Enfield, the physician John Aikin, and the polemicist Mary Wollstonecraft.

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Pediatric Nursing

Pediatric Nursing

Pediatric Nursing is a peer-reviewed nursing journal published bimonthly by Jannetti Publications, Inc. Its focus is professional pediatric nursing in clinical practice, education, research, and administration. The editor in chief is Judy A. Rollins. The journal sponsors the Annual Pediatric Nursing Conference.

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Cancer Cell

Cancer Cell

Cancer Cell is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by Cell Press. It focuses on all aspects of cancer research at the cellular-level. The journal was established in February 2002 and the current editor-in-chief is Li-Kuo Su.

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Clinical Medicine

Clinical Medicine

Clinical Medicine is a peer-reviewed medical journal published bimonthly by the Royal College of Physicians. It was established in 1966 as the Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of London. It was doubly named between 1998 and 2000, and since 2001 it has appeared as Clinical Medicine. Its present editor-in-chief is Humphrey Hodgson.

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Palaeontology

Palaeontology

Palaeontology is one of the two scientific journals of the Palaeontological Association. It was established in 1957 and is published on behalf of the Association by Wiley-Blackwell. The editor-in-chief is S. Stouge. Palaeontology publishes articles on a range of palaeontological topics, including taphonomy, systematics, and biostratigraphy. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2011 impact factor of 1.570, ranking it 14th out of 49 journals in the category "Paleontology".

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Antichthon

Antichthon

Antichthon is the peer-reviewed academic journal of the Australasian Society for Classical Studies. The focus of the journal is ancient Greece and Rome, however, its scope is broadly defined so as to embrace the ancient Near East and the Mediterranean from the beginnings of civilisation to the Early Middle Ages.

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Zoological Science

Zoological Science

Zoological Science is a peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Zoological Society of Japan covering the broad field of zoology. The journal was established in 1984 as a result of the merger of Zoological Magazine and Annotationes Zoologicae Japonenses, the former official journals of the Zoological Society of Japan. Zoological Science has been a BioOne member since 2007.

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Psychological Science

Psychological Science

Psychological Science, the flagship journal of the Association for Psychological Science, is a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by SAGE Publications. It is one of the most influential journals in psychology and ranked among the top 10 general psychology journals for impact by the Institute for Scientific Information.

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Anti-Germans

Anti-Germans

Anti-German is the generic name applied to a variety of theoretical and political tendencies within the radical left mainly in Germany and Austria. The Anti-Germans emerged as a distinct political tendency as a response to German reunification, and the anti-American "anti-imperialist left". The term does not generally refer to any one specific radical left tendency, but rather a wide variety of distinct currents, ranging from the so-called "hardcore" Anti-Germans such as the quarterly journal Bahamas to "softcore" Anti-Germans such as the circle around the radical left journal Phase 2, originally conceived as a federal discussion bulletin for the Antifa movement in the wake of the dissolution of the Antifaschistische Aktion/Bundesweite Organisation. Some Anti-German ideas have also exerted an influence on the broader radical leftist milieu, such as the monthly magazine konkret and the weekly newspaper Jungle World. Furthermore, the most common practical and theoretical position commonly associated with the anti-Germans, that of solidarity with the state of Israel, is not a position exclusive to the Anti-Germans. The groups Krisis and Exit around the publicist Robert Kurz, as well as many Antifa groups in Germany also hold Israel-sympathetic opinions, while rejecting any identification with the Anti-German current.

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Maledicta

Maledicta

Maledicta, The International Journal of Verbal Aggression, is an academic journal dedicated to the study of offensive and negatively valued words and expressions, also known as maledictology. Its main areas of interest are the origin, etymology, meaning, use, and influence of vulgar, obscene, aggressive, abusive, and blasphemous language. It was published from 1977 till 2005. The publisher, founder, and editor-in-chief is Reinhold Aman.

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WSJ.

WSJ.

WSJ., which was originally intended to be a monthly magazine named Pursuits, is a glossy news and lifestyle magazine by the publishers of The Wall Street Journal. It features luxury consumer products advertisements and is distributed to subscribers in large United States markets as well as throughout Europe and Asia. It began in September 2008 as a quarterly with plans to become a monthly magazine in 2009. With its tagline "The Luxury of Choice", the magazine operates with an advertising business model that allows for free delivery to select readers. It follows a trend of new luxury magazines many of which are also delivered as part of free subscriptions that supplement other subscriptions or memberships. Since it is leveraging a high-end subset of The Wall Street Journal with favorable demographics, many expect the magazine to be successful.

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Homo Oeconomicus

Homo Oeconomicus

Homo Oeconomicus is an interdisciplinary peer reviewed academic journal publishing studies in classical and neoclassical economics, public choice and social choice theory, law and economics, and philosophy of economics. It has published articles from fields beyond economics, and was once listed as a "Heterodox journal".

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Charles Taze Russell

Charles Taze Russell

Charles Taze Russell, or Pastor Russell, was a prominent early 20th century Christian restorationist minister from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, and founder of what is now known as the Bible Student movement, from which Jehovah's Witnesses and numerous independent Bible Student groups emerged after his death. Beginning in July 1879 he began publishing a monthly religious journal, Zion's Watch Tower and Herald of Christ's Presence. The journal is now published by Jehovah's Witnesses on a semi-monthly basis under the name, The Watchtower Announcing Jehovah's Kingdom. In 1881 he co-founded Zion's Watch Tower Tract Society and in 1884 the corporation was officially registered, with Russell as president. Russell wrote many articles, books, tracts, pamphlets and sermons, totaling approximately 50,000 printed pages. From 1886 to 1904, he published a six-volume Bible study series originally entitled Millennial Dawn, later renamed Studies in the Scriptures, nearly 20 million copies of which were printed and distributed around the world in several languages during his lifetime. The Watch Tower Society ceased publication of Russell's writings in 1927, though his books are still published by several independent groups.

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Bilingualism: Language and Cognition

Bilingualism: Language and Cognition

Bilingualism: Language and Cognition is a peer-reviewed academic journal of linguistics, focusing on the study of multilingualism, including bilingual language competence, perception and production, bilingual language acquisition in children and adults, neurolinguistics of bilingualism, and non-linguistic cognitive processes in bilinguals. The journal is currently published by Cambridge University Press and was cofounded by François Grosjean in 1998.

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Phytomedicine

Phytomedicine

Phytomedicine is a peer-reviewed scientific journal publishing in the fields of phytopharmacology, phytotherapy and phytotoxicology. The journal was first published in 1994. Its editor-in-chief is Hildebert Wagner.

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Bone Marrow Transplantation

Bone Marrow Transplantation

Bone Marrow Transplantation is a peer-reviewed medical journal covering transplantation of bone marrow in humans. It is published monthly by the Nature Publishing Group. The scope of the journal includes stem cell biology, transplantation immunology, translational research, and clinical results of specific transplant protocols.

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Left and Right: A Journal of Libertarian Thought

Left and Right: A Journal of Libertarian Thought

Left and Right: A Journal of Libertarian Thought was a libertarian journal published between 1965 and 1968. Founded by Murray N. Rothbard, Karl Hess, George Resch, and Leonard P. Liggio, it was edited and largely written by Murray Rothbard.

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Kadro

Kadro

Kadro was a leftist journal published in Turkey between 1932 and 1934. The journal believed that a Turkish revolution would occur in two stages: the battle to achieve political sovereignty, achieved in the Turkish War of Independence, and an ongoing battle to "liberate" the economy and society from "imperialist" influence. To this end, the Kadro theorists borrowed heavily from Marxist theory, particularly elements of Soviet central planning, and also to a limited extent from south-west European fascism. Importantly, the Kadro theorists never accepted either of these ideologies, believing that they were creating a third development theory that would be essentially Turkish. The theorists advocated absolute state control of the economy, believing that Turkey could overcome the problem of class conflict if the state never developed a middle and upper class. If the state was in charge of development, class conflict would not arise, as capital would be in the hands of the state, not specific classes. Kadro was important as it tried to provide Kemalist Turkey with a solid theoretical underpinning. Although Kadro policies were never absolutely adapted, Turkey did pursue a state-centered development strategy.

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Conjunctions

Conjunctions

Conjunctions, is a biannual American literary journal based at Bard College. It was founded in 1981 and is currently edited by Bradford Morrow. Morrow received the PEN/Nora Magid Award for Magazine Editing in 2007. The journal publishes innovative fiction, poetry, criticism, drama, art and interviews by both emerging and established writers. It provides a forum for nearly 1,000 writers and artists "whose work challenges accepted forms and modes of expression, experiments with language and thought, and is fully realized art", according to the "Letter From the Editor" on its website. It aims to maintain consistently high editorial and production quality with the intention of attracting a large and varied audience. The project is meant to present a wide variety of individual voices. The publication is unusually thick, often containing about 400 pages per issue. Conjunctions' editorial approach is often collaborative. Both the editor and the distinguished staff of active contributing editors — including Walter Abish, Chinua Achebe, John Ashbery, Mei-mei Berssenbrugge, Mary Caponegro, Elizabeth Frank, William H. Gass, Peter Gizzi, Jorie Graham, Robert Kelly, Ann Lauterbach, Norman Manea, W.S. Merwin, Rick Moody, Joanna Scott, Peter Straub, William Weaver and John Edgar Wideman — rely on the advice of fellow writers across the country. Final selection of the material is made by the editor.

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Billiken

Billiken

The Billiken was a charm doll created by an American art teacher and illustrator, Florence Pretz of St. Louis, Missouri, who is said to have seen the mysterious figure in a dream. In 1908, she obtained a design patent on the ornamental design of the Billiken, who was elf-like with pointed ears, a mischievous smile and a tuft of hair on his pointed head. His arms were short and he was generally sitting with his legs stretched out in front of him. To buy a Billiken was said to give the purchaser luck, but to have one given would be better luck. The image was copyrighted and a trademark was put on the name. After a few years of popularity, like other fad toys, the Billiken faded into obscurity. The Billiken should not be confused with baby-like Kewpie figures that debuted in the December 1909 Ladies' Home Journal. Today, the Billiken is the official mascot of Saint Louis University and St. Louis University High School, both Jesuit institutions, and both located in St. Louis. The Billiken is also the official mascot of the Royal Order of Jesters, an invitation only Shriner group, affiliated with Freemasonry. Many current on-line articles about the Billikens are based on an article by anthropologist Dorothy Jean Ray that first appeared in Alaska Sportsman in 1960, with an updated version in Alaska Journal in 1973.

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Tichodroma

Tichodroma

Tichodroma is an ornithological journal published and distributed by the Slovak Ornithological Society/BirdLife Slovakia in cooperation with the Institute of Forest Ecology of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Zvolen. The journal is issued once per year and publishes ornithological papers and short news in Slovak, Czech and English language with English or German abstracts. The papers are peer reviewed.

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Semiotica

Semiotica

Semiotica is an academic journal covering semiotics. It is the official journal of the International Association for Semiotic Studies.

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Freewoman

Freewoman

The Freewoman was a feminist weekly published between November 23, 1911 and October 10, 1912 and edited by Dora Marsden and Mary Gawthorpe. Although The Freewoman published articles on women's waged work, housework, motherhood, the suffrage movement, and literature, its notoriety and influence rested on its frank discussions of sexuality, morality, and marriage. The Freewoman urged tolerance for male homosexuality, advocated for free love, and encouraged women to remain unmarried. The Freewoman's editorial stance distinguished it sharply from the attitude of suffragists like Millicent Fawcett who was so disturbed at the journal's approach to sexuality that she tore the first issue into little pieces. In March 1912 Gawthorpe resigned due to poor health and disagreements with Marsden. In September 1912, W H Smith refused to carry The Freewoman and in October 1912, the journal folded. Although its circulation probably never exceeded 200, it had a significant influence in Modernist circles. Among its contributors were Rebecca West, H. G. Wells, Edward Carpenter, and Guy Aldred. In June 1913 Marsden started The New Freewoman which was more concerned with literary modernism than feminism and was funded by Harriet Shaw Weaver. In 1914, The New Freewoman became The Egoist.

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Multitudes

Multitudes

Multitudes is a French philosophical, political and artistic monthly journal founded in 2000 by Yann Moulier-Boutang. It is thematically situated in the theoretical framework of the seminal work Empire by Antonio Negri and Michael Hardt. The journal, like the book, focuses on the further elaboration of the philosophical and political thought of the Italian operaismo, but seems also to rest on Foucault, Althusser, and Deleuze's thought. It is a successor to the review Futur Antérieur edited by Jean-Marie Vincent and Toni Negri, at the dep. of political science - University Vincennes Paris 8. It is a member of the Eurozine network. Multitudes's name comes from the Spinozist eponymic concept. It has been thought by Toni Negri as an alternative to the classic conception of the people, class consciousness, or nation-state. It publishes a lot on themes relating to the information society and the knowledge economy, supporting in particular the thesis of a "cognitive labour" and "affective labour" which can not be measured by standard means of labor-time, and also insists on the cooperative aspects of production in modern society. For this reason and others, it tends to argue in favour of a guaranteed minimum income.

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Environmental Values

Environmental Values

Environmental Values is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal closely associated with the ecological economics movement, but also firmly based in applied ethics. Subjects covered are philosophy, economics, politics, sociology, geography, anthropology, ecology, and other disciplines, which relate to the present and future environment of human beings and other species. The journal was established in 1992 and edited by Alan Holland until 2007 when Clive L. Spash became editor-in-chief. Topics covered include biodiversity loss and management, synthetic biology, ethical treatment of animals, future generations, human induced climate change, geoengineering, economic valuation, market economics, preferences, rights, responsibilities, risk and uncertainty.

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Sensors

Sensors

Sensors is a monthly peer-reviewed open access scientific journal that is published by MDPI. It was established in June 2001. The editors-in-chief are Vittorio M.N. Passaro, Assefa M. Melesse, Mohamed F. Younis, W. Rudolf Seitz, and Alexander Star. Sensors covers research on all aspects of sensors and biosensors. The journal publishes original research articles, short notes, review articles, book reviews, product reviews, and announcements related to academia.

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Joseph Dennie

Joseph Dennie

Joseph Dennie was an American author and journalist who was one of the foremost men of letters of the Federalist Era. A Federalist, Dennie is best remembered for his series of essays entitled The Lay Preacher and as the founding editor of Port Folio, a journal espousing classical republican values. Port Folio was the most highly regarded and successful literary publication of its time, and the first important political and literary journal in the United States. Timothy Dwight IV once referred to Dennie as "the Addison of America" and "the father of American Belles-Lettres."

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Modern Language Notes

Modern Language Notes

Modern Language Notes is an academic journal established in 1886 at the Johns Hopkins University, where it is still edited and published, with the intention of introducing continental European literary criticism into American scholarship. Each year, one issue is devoted to each of the four languages of concern. The fifth issue focuses on comparative literature. The journal is published five times each year in January, March, April, September, and December. Circulation is 1,173 and the average length of an issue is 240 pages.

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Interlibrary loan

Interlibrary loan

Interlibrary loan is a service whereby a user of one library can borrow books or receive photocopies of documents that are owned by another library. The user makes a request with their local library, which, acting as an intermediary, identifies owners of the desired item, places the request, receives the item, makes it available to the user, and arranges for its return. The lending library usually sets the due date and overdue fees of the material borrowed. Although books and journal articles are the most frequently requested items, some libraries will lend audio recordings, video recordings, maps, sheet music, and microforms of all kinds. In many cases, nominal fees accompany interlibrary loan services. The term document delivery may also be used for a related service, namely the supply of journal articles and other copies on a personalized basis, whether these come from other libraries or direct from publishers. The end user is usually responsible for any fees, such as costs for postage or photocopying. Commercial document delivery services will borrow on behalf of any customer willing to pay their rates.

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Articulo – Journal of Urban Research

Articulo – Journal of Urban Research

Articulo – Journal of Urban Research is a peer-reviewed academic journal covering urban issues and publishes both theoretical and empirical articles. It is abstracted and indexed in several online directories, including Intute. Articulo is hosted by Revues.org, a platform for journals in the humanities and social sciences run by the Centre for Open Electronic Publishing and several academic institutions in France. Articulo publishes thematic issues, book reviews and conference proceedings. Papers are published in English or French.

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Constellations

Constellations

Constellations: An International Journal of Critical and Democratic Theory is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal of critical and democratic theory and successor of Praxis International. It is edited by Andrew Arato, Amy Allen, and Andreas Kalyvas. Seyla Benhabib is a co-founding former editor and Nancy Fraser a former co-editor.

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John Peter Zenger

John Peter Zenger

John Peter Zenger was a German American printer, publisher, editor and journalist in New York City. Zenger printed The New York Weekly Journal. He was a defendant in a landmark legal case in American jurisprudence, known as "The Zenger Trial", which established that truth is a defense against charges of libel. In late 1733, Zenger began printing The New Weekly Journal to voice his opinions critical of the colonial governor, William Cosby. In November 1734 Zenger was arrested by the sheriff on the orders of Cosby and after a grand jury refused to indict him was charged with libel in January 1735 by the attorney general Richard Bradley.

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VIX

VIX

VIX is a trademarked ticker symbol for the Chicago Board Options Exchange Market Volatility Index, a popular measure of the implied volatility of S&P 500 index options. Often referred to as the fear index or the fear gauge, it represents one measure of the market's expectation of stock market volatility over the next 30 day period. The idea of a volatility index, and financial instruments based on such an index, was first developed and described by Prof. Menachem Brenner and Prof. Dan Galai in 1986. Professors Brenner and Galai published their research in the academic article "New Financial Instruments for Hedging Changes in Volatility," which appeared in the July/August 1989 issue of Financial Analysts Journal. In a subsequent paper, Professors Brenner and Galai proposed a formula to compute the volatility index. Professors Brenner and Galai wrote "Our volatility index, to be named Sigma Index, would be updated frequently and used as the underlying asset for futures and options... A volatility index would play the same role as the market index play for options and futures on the index." In 1992, the CBOE retained Prof. Robert Whaley to create a tradeable stock market volatility index based on index option prices. In a January 1993 news conference, Prof. Whaley reported his findings. Subsequently, the CBOE has computed VIX on a real-time basis. Based on the history of index option prices, Prof. Whaley computed daily VIX levels in a data series commencing January 1986, available on the CBOE website. Prof. Whaley's research for the CBOE appeared in the Journal of Derivatives.

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Tintin

Tintin

Tintin magazine, or Le journal de Tintin or Kuifje, was a weekly Franco-Belgian comics magazine of the second half of the 20th century. Subtitled "The Journal for the Youth from 7 to 77", it was one of the major publications of the Franco-Belgian comics scene and published such notable series such as Blake and Mortimer, Alix, and the principal title The Adventures of Tintin. Originally published by Le Lombard, the first issue was released in 1946, and it ceased publication in 1993. Tintin magazine was part of an elaborate publishing scheme. The magazine's primary content focused on a new page or two from several forthcoming comic albums that had yet to be published as a whole, thus drawing weekly readers who could not bear to wait until later for entire albums. There were several ongoing stories at any given time, giving wide exposure to lesser-known artists. Tintin was also available bound as a hardcover or softcover collection. The content always included filler material, some of which was of considerable interest to fans, for example alternate versions of pages of the Tintin stories, and interviews with authors and artists. Not every comic appearing in Tintin was later put into book form, which was another incentive to subscribe to the magazine. If the quality of Tintin printing was high compared to American comic books through the 1970s, the quality of the albums was superb, utilizing expensive paper and printing processes.

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Kritika

Kritika

Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History is an academic journal published quarterly since 2000 by Slavica publishers, a division of Indiana University. The journal currently publishes a mixture of reviews and original research, in contrast to its predecessor Kritika: A Review of Current Soviet Books on Russian History, published as a collection of reviews by Harvard University between 1964 and 1984. This original "Kritika" was the brainchild of Harvard history professor, Richard Pipes, who conceived it as an outlet for his numerous graduate students to review recent Soviet books on Russian history.

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TrueCar

TrueCar

TrueCar, Inc. is an automotive pricing and information website for new and used car buyers and dealers. TrueCar is designed to provide a transparent car buying experience for auto dealers and consumers. In 2012, TrueCar was recognized as one of L.A. County’s 10 fastest growing private companies by the LA Business Journal, and named to Deloitte’s Technology Fast 500 for companies in North America. News outlets, including CNN, Bloomberg, Newsweek, JD Power & Associates, Wall Street Journal, New York Times and U.S. News & World Report, have referenced TrueCar in reports and articles. TrueCar’s national network includes 7,000 automobile dealers across the United States, the company, headquartered in Santa Monica, California, has helped its dealer-partners sell over 600,000 vehicles to date and shoppers used TrueCar’s no-haggle pricing service in 2011 to buy 235,640 new and used vehicles. It had a hand in 2 percent of sales in the nearly 13-million-car auto market in the U.S. in 2011 and the company claims it has saved people $1 billion so far, with the average consumer saving $4,154 off the car’s suggested retail price.

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Ravgen

Ravgen

Ravgen Inc., is a privately owned biotech company founded by Chairman and C.E.O. Dr. Ravinder Dhallan. Ravgen Inc. is known for its research in the prenatal diagnostic field and its development of non-invasive prenatal diagnosis testing which was published in The Lancet, the Journal of the American Medical Association., and the New England Journal of Medicine. These publications received world wide press in The Times, The Washington Post, CNN Fortune Small Business, and The New York Times Ravgen was founded in 2000 in Columbia, Maryland by Dr. Ravinder Dhallan. Dr. Dhallan received doctorates in medicine and biomedical engineering at The Johns Hopkins University as well as a MBA from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. The CEO and founder of the company held residency positions in oncology at Massachusetts General Hospital and in emergency medicine at York Hospital in York, PA before becoming an attending physician in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring, MD. Dr. Dhallan left his position at Holy Cross in 2000 in order to start his own company, Ravgen, with the pursuit of developing a safer prenatal diagnostic exam. At the time the only options available to patients were invasive with a chance of miscarriage or lacked in accuracy. Since its start in 2000, Ravgen has developed and patented a variety of safe, accurate prenatal diagnostic tests that simply require a blood draw from the mother. The company's core technology is based on its ability to increase the percentage of fetal DNA that is found in the maternal bloodstream, something that scientists have attempted to do for decades with little success. With this breakthrough in medicine, Ravgen is able to offer safe, noninvasive, pre-birth testing alternatives for expectant mothers and give them the knowledge they need to prepare for their pregnancies.

— Freebase

Academic journal

Academic journal

An academic journal is a peer-reviewed periodical in which scholarship relating to a particular academic discipline is published. Academic journals serve as forums for the introduction and presentation for scrutiny of new research, and the critique of existing research. Content typically takes the form of articles presenting original research, review articles, and book reviews. The term academic journal applies to scholarly publications in all fields; this article discusses the aspects common to all academic field journals. Scientific journals and journals of the quantitative social sciences vary in form and function from journals of the humanities and qualitative social sciences; their specific aspects are separately discussed.

— Freebase

Kennebec Journal

Kennebec Journal

The Kennebec Journal is a seven-day morning daily newspaper published in Augusta, Maine. It is owned by MaineToday Media, which also publishes the state's largest newspaper, the Portland Press Herald. The newspaper covers the capital area and southern Kennebec County. For much of the 20th century, the Journal was part of Guy Gannett Communications, a family-owned media company based in Maine. In 1998, Guy Gannett's newspapers were sold to Blethen Maine Newspapers, a subsidiary of The Seattle Times Company. The group was sold to MaineToday Media in 2009. James G. Blaine, a U.S. secretary of state and 1884 Republican presidential candidate, once edited the newspaper.

— Freebase

Cook, Eliza

Cook, Eliza

a writer of tales, verses, and magazine articles; born in Southwark; daughter of a merchant; conducted, from 1849 to 1854, a journal called by her name, but gave it up from failing health; enjoyed a pension of £100 on the Civil List till her death; was the authoress of "The Old Arm-Chair" and "Home in the Heart," both of which were great favourites with the public, and did something for literature and philanthropy by her Journal (1818-1889).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Hall, Samuel Carter

Hall, Samuel Carter

founder and editor of the Art Journal, born at Geneva Barracks, co. Waterford; was for a time a gallery reporter; succeeded Campbell, the poet, as editor of the New Monthly Magazine, and after other journalistic work started in 1839 the well-known periodical the Art Journal, which he continued to edit for upwards of 40 years; in 1880 he received a civil-list pension (1800-1889); his wife, Anna Maria Fielding, was in her day a popular and voluminous writer of novels and short tales (1800-1881).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia


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