Definitions containing cañon of colorado

We've found 250 definitions:

greenie

greenie

A person from Colorado; after the color of the Colorado license plate.

— Wiktionary

pueblo

Pueblo

a city in Colorado to the south of Colorado Springs

— Princeton's WordNet

cnemidophorus velox

plateau striped whiptail, Cnemidophorus velox

having distinct longitudinal stripes: of Colorado Plateau from Arizona to western Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

plateau striped whiptail

plateau striped whiptail, Cnemidophorus velox

having distinct longitudinal stripes: of Colorado Plateau from Arizona to western Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

Cannonical

Cannonical

of or pertaining to a canon; established by, or according to a , canon or canons

— Webster Dictionary

denver

Denver, Mile-High City, capital of Colorado

the state capital and largest city of Colorado; located in central Colorado on the South Platte river

— Princeton's WordNet

mile-high city

Denver, Mile-High City, capital of Colorado

the state capital and largest city of Colorado; located in central Colorado on the South Platte river

— Princeton's WordNet

capital of colorado

Denver, Mile-High City, capital of Colorado

the state capital and largest city of Colorado; located in central Colorado on the South Platte river

— Princeton's WordNet

Centennial State

Centennial State

Colorado

— Wiktionary

potato bug

potato bug

The Colorado beetle

— Wiktionary

potato beetle

potato beetle

the Colorado beetle, Leptinotarsa decimlineata

— Wiktionary

Aspen

Aspen

A ski-resort town in Colorado.

— Wiktionary

Coloradoite

Coloradoite

mercury telluride, an iron-black metallic mineral, found in Colorado

— Webster Dictionary

Ute

Ute

A Native American people of Utah, Colorado and New Mexico.

— Wiktionary

canonist

canonist

a specialist in canon law

— Princeton's WordNet

canonical

canonic, canonical

appearing in a biblical canon

— Princeton's WordNet

canonic

canonic, canonical

appearing in a biblical canon

— Princeton's WordNet

noncanonical

noncanonical

Not part of canon.

— Wiktionary

canonical

canonical

In conformity with canon law.

— Wiktionary

canonical

canonical

In the form of a canon.

— Wiktionary

canonist

canonist

An expert in canon law

— Wiktionary

South Park

South Park

A high intermontane grassland basin in the Rocky Mountains of central Colorado.

— Wiktionary

canon

canon

A eucharistic prayer, particularly, the Roman Canon.

— Wiktionary

prebend

prebend

A stipend paid to a canon of a cathedral.

— Wiktionary

Hibernensis

Hibernensis

Canon law in early medieval Ireland.

— Wiktionary

residentiary

residentiary

A canon who has an official residence

— Wiktionary

canonical

canonical

Present in a canon, religious or otherwise.

— Wiktionary

prebend

prebend

the stipend assigned by a cathedral to a canon

— Princeton's WordNet

Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon

A large national park and gorge, carved by the Colorado River, located in Arizona.

— Wiktionary

prebendary

prebendary

a canon who receives a prebend for serving the church

— Princeton's WordNet

Fluocerite

Fluocerite

a fluoride of cerium, occuring near Fahlun in Sweden. Tynosite, from Colorado, is probably the same mineral

— Webster Dictionary

prebendary

prebendary

An honorary canon of a cathedral or collegiate church.

— Wiktionary

Zunyite

Zunyite

a fluosilicate of alumina occurring in tetrahedral crystals at the Zu/i mine in Colorado

— Webster Dictionary

pom-pom

pom-pom

A rapid-firing small-calibre canon used especially as an anti-aircraft gun

— Wiktionary

Cannon bone

Cannon bone

see Canon Bone

— Webster Dictionary

Anasazi

Anasazi

Any of a Native American people who once lived in cliff-dwellings in Utah and Colorado.

— Wiktionary

Cannon

Cannon

a kind of type. See Canon

— Webster Dictionary

Canonicate

Canonicate

the office of a canon; a canonry

— Webster Dictionary

canonical

canonic, canonical

of or relating to or required by canon law

— Princeton's WordNet

canonic

canonic, canonical

of or relating to or required by canon law

— Princeton's WordNet

Crab canon

Crab canon

A crab canon—also known by the Latin form of the name, canon cancrizans—is an arrangement of two musical lines that are complementary and backward, similar to a palindrome. Originally it is a musical term for a kind of canon in which one line is reversed in time from the other. A famous example is found in J. S. Bach's The Musical Offering, which also contains a canon combining retrogression with inversion, i.e., the music is turned upside down by one player, which is a table canon. The use of the term in non-musical contexts was popularized by Douglas Hofstadter in Gödel, Escher, Bach.

— Freebase

Colorado group

Colorado group

a subdivision of the cretaceous formation of western North America, especially developed in Colorado and the upper Missouri region

— Webster Dictionary

protocanonical

protocanonical

Describing the first (authorized) canon of books of scripture.

— Wiktionary

canonized

canonized

Made part of the canon, made official.

— Wiktionary

Residentiary

Residentiary

having residence; as, a canon residentary; a residentiary guardian

— Webster Dictionary

Colorado Group

Colorado Group

The Colorado Group, also called the Colorado shale, is a stratigraphical unit of Cretaceous age in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. It was first described in the Rocky Mountains front ranges of Colorado by A. Hague and S.E. Emmons in 1877.

— Freebase

canonry

canonry

The office of a canon; a benefice or prebend in a cathedral or collegiate church.

— Wiktionary

amazonstone

amazonstone

A bluish-green variety of microcline feldspar used as a gemstone. The best known occurrences are at Crystal Peak and Pike's Peak in Colorado.

— Wiktionary

recuse

recuse

challenge or except to a judge as being incompetent or interested, in canon and civil law

— Princeton's WordNet

canonical hour

canonical hour

Any of certain times of day at which specified prayers are said according to canon law

— Wiktionary

Denver

Denver

The capital of the US state of Colorado

— Wiktionary

potamodromous

potamodromous

that migrates within fresh water only, one of the best examples is the Colorado pikeminnow of the United States

— Wiktionary

devils advocate

devils advocate

A canon lawyer appointed by the Church to argue against the canonization of the proposed candidate.

— Wiktionary

Avestan

Avestan

An ancient Eastern Old Iranian language that was used to compose the sacred hymns and canon of the Zoroastrian Avesta.

— Wiktionary

rescript

rescript

The official written answer of the Pope upon a question of canon law, or morals.

— Wiktionary

genus leptinotarsa

Leptinotarsa, genus Leptinotarsa

Colorado potato beetles

— Princeton's WordNet

leptinotarsa

Leptinotarsa, genus Leptinotarsa

Colorado potato beetles

— Princeton's WordNet

canonisation

canonization, canonisation

(Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Church) the act of admitting a deceased person into the canon of saints

— Princeton's WordNet

canonization

canonization, canonisation

(Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Church) the act of admitting a deceased person into the canon of saints

— Princeton's WordNet

canonical hours

canonical hours

The times of day at which canon law prescribes certain prayers to be said; matins with lauds, prime, tierce, sext, nones, vespers, and complin

— Wiktionary

convalidation

convalidation

In Roman Catholic canon law, the making of a putative marriage valid following the removal of some impediment.

— Wiktionary

Catch

Catch

a humorous canon or round, so contrived that the singers catch up each other's words

— Webster Dictionary

Blue spruce

Blue spruce

The Colorado spruce, blue spruce, green spruce white spruce, or Colorado blue spruce, is a species of pine tree native to the Rocky Mountains of the United States, from Colorado to Wyoming, and introduced as a popular ornamental tree found far beyond its native range.

— Freebase

coloradan

Coloradan

a native or resident of Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

Canonize

Canonize

to rate as inspired; to include in the canon

— Webster Dictionary

fanon

fanon

Elements introduced by fans which are not in the official canon of a fictional world but are widely believed to be or treated as if canonical.

— Wiktionary

Canonicity

Canonicity

the state or quality of being canonical; agreement with the canon

— Webster Dictionary

Berthoud

Berthoud

Berthoud is a Statutory Town in Larimer and Weld counties in the U.S. state of Colorado. Berthoud is situated north of the Little Thompson River, approximately halfway between the cities of Fort Collins, Colorado and Denver, Colorado along the Front Range Urban Corridor. The population of Berthoud was 5,105 at the 2010 census.

— Freebase

Infinito

Infinito

infinite; perpetual, as a canon whose end leads back to the beginning. See Infinite, a., 5

— Webster Dictionary

Navajo

Navajo

An Apachean (Southern Athabaskan) language of the Athabascan language family belonging to the Na-Denu00E9 phylum. It is spoken by 149,000 people in the American Southwest (Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, and Colorado).

— Wiktionary

enigma canon

enigma canon, enigmatic canon, enigmatical canon, riddle canon

a canon in which the entrances of successive parts were indicated by cryptic symbols and devices (popular in the 15th and 16th centuries)

— Princeton's WordNet

enigmatic canon

enigma canon, enigmatic canon, enigmatical canon, riddle canon

a canon in which the entrances of successive parts were indicated by cryptic symbols and devices (popular in the 15th and 16th centuries)

— Princeton's WordNet

enigmatical canon

enigma canon, enigmatic canon, enigmatical canon, riddle canon

a canon in which the entrances of successive parts were indicated by cryptic symbols and devices (popular in the 15th and 16th centuries)

— Princeton's WordNet

riddle canon

enigma canon, enigmatic canon, enigmatical canon, riddle canon

a canon in which the entrances of successive parts were indicated by cryptic symbols and devices (popular in the 15th and 16th centuries)

— Princeton's WordNet

dean

dean

a dignitary or presiding officer in certain church bodies, especially an ecclesiastical dignitary, subordinate to a bishop, in charge of a chapter of canon

— Wiktionary

Extravagant

Extravagant

certain constitutions or decretal epistles, not at first included with others, but subsequently made a part of the canon law

— Webster Dictionary

Fort Collins

Fort Collins

Fort Collins is a Home Rule Municipality situated on the Cache La Poudre River along the Colorado Front Range, and is the county seat and most populous city of Larimer County, Colorado, United States. Fort Collins is located 57 miles north of the Colorado State Capitol in Denver. With a 2010 census population of 143,986, it is the fourth most populous city in Colorado. Fort Collins is a large college town, home to Colorado State University. It was named Money magazine's Best Place to Live in the U.S. in 2006, #2 in 2008, and #6 in 2010.

— Freebase

Greeley

Greeley

Greeley is a Home Rule Municipality that is the county seat and the most populous city of Weld County, Colorado, United States. Greeley is in northern Colorado. Greeley is situated 49 miles north-northeast of the Colorado State Capitol in Denver. According to the 2010 Census, the population of the city is 92,889. Greeley is the 12th most populous city in the State of Colorado. Greeley is a major city of the large Front Range Urban Corridor.

— Freebase

McClintock

McClintock

McClintock is a town in Colorado, United States, named for W.W. McClintock, a San Luis Valley rancher and entrepreneur. The town is located just south of Blanca, Colorado.

— Freebase

Reservation

Reservation

a term of canon law, which signifies that the pope reserves to himself appointment to certain benefices

— Webster Dictionary

anemone canadensis

Canada anemone, Anemone Canadensis

common summer-flowering woodland herb of Labrador to Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

canada anemone

Canada anemone, Anemone Canadensis

common summer-flowering woodland herb of Labrador to Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

Deuterocanonical

Deuterocanonical

pertaining to a second canon, or ecclesiastical writing of inferior authority; -- said of the Apocrypha, certain Epistles, etc

— Webster Dictionary

KDBN

KDBN

KDBN is an American radio station licensed to serve the community of Parachute, Colorado. The station is currently owned by Townsquare Media. KDBN broadcasts an active rock music format that simulcasts KKNN in Delta, Colorado.

— Freebase

mesa verde national park

Mesa Verde National Park

a national park in Colorado containing prehistoric cliff dwellings; semiarid landscape

— Princeton's WordNet

Preface

Preface

the prelude or introduction to the canon of the Mass

— Webster Dictionary

Colorado beetle

Colorado beetle

a yellowish beetle (Doryphora decemlineata), with ten longitudinal, black, dorsal stripes. It has migrated eastwards from its original habitat in Colorado, and is very destructive to the potato plant; -- called also potato beetle and potato bug. See Potato beetle

— Webster Dictionary

Anti-Stratfordian

Anti-Stratfordian

A person who, in the controversy over who wrote the Shakespeare canon, holds that it was likely written by someone other than William Shakespeare of Stratford-upon-Avon.

— Wiktionary

deuterocanonical

deuterocanonical

Being of the second canon of the Old Testament of the Bible, and unaccepted by some Christians. A book which is part of the Apocrypha.

— Wiktionary

mount wilson

Wilson, Mount Wilson

a peak in the San Juan mountains of Colorado (14,246 feet high)

— Princeton's WordNet

san juan mountains

San Juan Mountains

a mountain range in southwestern Colorado that is part of the Rocky Mountains

— Princeton's WordNet

wilson

Wilson, Mount Wilson

a peak in the San Juan mountains of Colorado (14,246 feet high)

— Princeton's WordNet

Rescript

Rescript

the official written answer of the pope upon a question of canon law, or morals

— Webster Dictionary

Canonist

Canonist

a professor of canon law; one skilled in the knowledge and practice of ecclesiastical law

— Webster Dictionary

South Platte River

South Platte River

The South Platte River is one of the two principal tributaries of the Platte River and is itself a major river of the American Midwest and the American Southwest/Mountain West, located in the U.S. states of Colorado and Nebraska. Its drainage basin includes much of the eastern flank of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado; much of the populated region known as the Colorado Front Range and Eastern Plains; and a portion of southeastern Wyoming in the vicinity of the city of Cheyenne. It joins the North Platte River in western Nebraska to form the Platte, which then flows across Nebraska to the Missouri. The river serves as the principal source of water for eastern Colorado. In its valley along the foothills in Colorado, it has permitted agriculture in an area of the Colorado Piedmont and Great Plains that is otherwise arid.

— Freebase

canonization

canonization

The final process or decree (following beatification) by which the name of a deceased person is placed in the catalogue (canon) of saints and commended to perpetual veneration and invocation.

— Wiktionary

Canonicals

Canonicals

the dress prescribed by canon to be worn by a clergyman when officiating. Sometimes, any distinctive professional dress

— Webster Dictionary

Colorado Desert

Colorado Desert

California's Colorado Desert is a part of the larger Sonoran Desert, which extends across southwest North America. The Colorado Desert region encompasses approximately 7 million acres, reaching from Northwest Mexico border regions in the south to the higher-elevation Mojave Desert in the north and from the Colorado River in the east to the Laguna Mountains of the Peninsular Ranges in the west. The area includes the heavily irrigated Coachella and Imperial Valleys. The Colorado Desert is home to many unique flora and fauna, many of which can be found nowhere else on the planet.

— Freebase

Canon law

Canon law

Canon law is the body of laws and regulations made or adopted by ecclesiastical authority, for the government of the Christian organization and its members. It is the internal ecclesiastical law governing the Catholic Church, the Eastern and Oriental Orthodox churches, and the Anglican Communion of churches. The way that such church law is legislated, interpreted and at times adjudicated varies widely among these three bodies of churches. In all three traditions, a canon was originally a rule adopted by a council; these canons formed the foundation of canon law.

— Freebase

Arvada

Arvada

The City of Arvada is a Home Rule Municipality located in Jefferson and Adams counties in the Denver metropolitan area of the U.S. State of Colorado. Olde Town Arvada is located 7 miles northwest of the Colorado State Capitol in Denver. The United States Census Bureau estimated 109,745 residents as of July 1, 2012, making Arvada the seventh most populous city in Colorado.

— Freebase

Longs Peak

Longs Peak

Longs Peak is one of the 54 mountains with summits over 14,000 feet in Colorado. It can be prominently seen from Longmont, Colorado, as well as from the rest of the Colorado Front Range. It is named after Major Stephen Long, who explored the area in the 1820s. Longs Peak is one of the most prominent mountains in Colorado, rising nearly 10,000 feet above the western edge of the Great Plains. Together with the nearby Mount Meeker, the two are sometimes referred to as the Twin Peaks.

— Freebase

Pikes Peak

Pikes Peak

Pikes Peak is a mountain in the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains within Pike National Forest, 10 mi west of Colorado Springs, Colorado, in El Paso County in the United States of America. Originally called "El Capitán" by Spanish settlers, the mountain was renamed Pike's Peak after Zebulon Pike, Jr., an explorer who led an expedition to the southern Colorado area in 1806. The Arapaho name is heey-otoyoo’. At 14,115 feet, it is one of Colorado's 54 fourteeners, mountains that rise more than 14,000 feet above mean sea level, and rises 8,400 feet above the city of Colorado Springs. Pikes Peak is a designated National Historic Landmark.

— Freebase

Round

Round

a short vocal piece, resembling a catch in which three or four voices follow each other round in a species of canon in the unison

— Webster Dictionary

Utes

Utes

an extensive tribe of North American Indians of the Shoshone stock, inhabiting Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, and adjacent regions. They are subdivided into several subordinate tribes, some of which are among the most degraded of North American Indians

— Webster Dictionary

Yucca House National Monument

Yucca House National Monument

Yucca House National Monument is a United States National Monument located in Montezuma County, Colorado between the towns of Towaoc and Cortez, Colorado. Yucca House is a large, unexcavated Ancestral Puebloan archaeological site.

— Freebase

uniate

Uniate

of or relating to former Eastern Christian or Orthodox churches that have been received under the jurisdiction of the Church of Rome but retain their own rituals and practices and canon law

— Princeton's WordNet

checkered whiptail

checkered whiptail, Cnemidophorus tesselatus

markings are darker and more marked than in western whiptail; from southeastern Colorado to eastern Chihuahua

— Princeton's WordNet

cnemidophorus tesselatus

checkered whiptail, Cnemidophorus tesselatus

markings are darker and more marked than in western whiptail; from southeastern Colorado to eastern Chihuahua

— Princeton's WordNet

grand canyon

Grand Canyon

the enormous gorge of the Colorado River in northern Arizona

— Princeton's WordNet

hoover dam

Hoover Dam

a large dam built in 1933 on the Colorado River in Nevada

— Princeton's WordNet

west-central

west-central

of a region of the United States usually including Colorado; Nevada; Utah

— Princeton's WordNet

Colorado

Colorado

Colorado is a U.S. state encompassing most of the Southern Rocky Mountains as well as the northeastern portion of the Colorado Plateau and the western edge of the Great Plains. Colorado is part of the Western United States, the Southwestern United States, and the Mountain States. Colorado is the 8th most extensive and the 22nd most populous of the 50 United States. The United States Census Bureau estimates that the population of Colorado was 5,187,582 on July 1, 2012, an increase of +3.15% since the 2010 United States Census. The state was named for the Colorado River, which early Spanish explorers named the Río Colorado for the red colored silt the river carried from the mountains. On August 1, 1876, U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant signed a proclamation admitting Colorado as the 38th state. Colorado is nicknamed the "Centennial State" because it was admitted to the Union in 1876, the centennial year of the United States Declaration of Independence. Colorado is bordered by the northwest state of Wyoming to the north, the Midwest states of Nebraska and Kansas to the northeast and east, on the south by New Mexico and Oklahoma, on the west by Utah, and Arizona to the southwest. The four states of Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Arizona meet at one common point known as the Four Corners, which is known as the heart of the American Southwest. Colorado is noted for its vivid landscape of mountains, forests, high plains, mesas, canyons, plateaus, rivers, and desert lands.

— Freebase

pike's peak

Pike's Peak

a mountain peak in the Rockies in central Colorado (14,109 feet high)

— Princeton's WordNet

mount sherman

Sherman, Mount Sherman

a peak in the Rocky Mountains in central Colorado (14,036 feet high)

— Princeton's WordNet

yuma

Yuma

a town in southwestern Arizona on the Colorado River and the California border

— Princeton's WordNet

sherman

Sherman, Mount Sherman

a peak in the Rocky Mountains in central Colorado (14,036 feet high)

— Princeton's WordNet

boulder

Boulder

a town in north central Colorado; Rocky Mountains resort center and university town

— Princeton's WordNet

Revelation

Revelation

specifically, the last book of the sacred canon, containing the prophecies of St. John; the Apocalypse

— Webster Dictionary

Coltivirus

Coltivirus

A genus of REOVIRIDAE infecting Ixodidae ticks and transmitted by them to humans, deer, and small animals. The type species is COLORADO TICK FEVER VIRUS.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

walapai

Walapai, Hualapai, Hualpai

a member of a North American people formerly living in the Colorado river valley in Arizona

— Princeton's WordNet

hualpai

Walapai, Hualapai, Hualpai

a member of a North American people formerly living in the Colorado river valley in Arizona

— Princeton's WordNet

hualapai

Walapai, Hualapai, Hualpai

a member of a North American people formerly living in the Colorado river valley in Arizona

— Princeton's WordNet

Maricopa

Maricopa

Native American peoples: The Maricopa belong to the Yuman linguistic stock, a part of the Hokan family. They originate in the Colorado River area, but following an exodus in the 1700s or 1800s, they live amongst the Pima in the vicinity of the Gila and Salt Rivers.

— Wiktionary

republican river

Republican, Republican River

a tributary of the Kansas River that flows from eastern Colorado eastward through Nebraska and Kansas

— Princeton's WordNet

uncompahgre peak

Uncompahgre Peak

the highest peak in the San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado (14,309 feet high)

— Princeton's WordNet

republican

Republican, Republican River

a tributary of the Kansas River that flows from eastern Colorado eastward through Nebraska and Kansas

— Princeton's WordNet

Colorado Springs

Colorado Springs

Colorado Springs is a Home Rule Municipality that is the county seat and most populous city of El Paso County, Colorado, United States. Colorado Springs is located in the center portion of the state. It is situated on Fountain Creek and is located 65 miles south of the Colorado State Capitol in Denver. At 6,035 feet the city stands over one mile above sea level, though some areas of the city are significantly higher and lower. Colorado Springs is situated near the base of one of the most famous American mountains, Pikes Peak, in the eastern edge of the Southern Rocky Mountains. The city is often referred to as "The Springs." With a population of 416,427 as of the 2010 Census, it is the second most populous city in the state of Colorado, behind Denver, and the 41st most populous city in the United States, while the Colorado Springs Metropolitan Statistical Area had an estimated population of 645,613 in 2010. The city covers 194.7 square miles, making it Colorado's largest city in area. Colorado Springs was selected as the No. 1 Best Big City in "Best Places to Live" by Money magazine in 2006, and placed number one in Outside's 2009 list of America's Best Cities.

— Freebase

Holy day of obligation

Holy day of obligation

In the Catholic Church, holy days of obligation or holidays of obligation, less commonly called feasts of precept, are the days on which, as canon 1247 of the Code of Canon Law states: On Sundays and other holy days of obligation, the faithful are obliged to participate in the Mass.

— Freebase

sticky aster

sticky aster, Machaeranthera bigelovii

wild aster having leafy stems and flower heads with narrow bright reddish-lavender or purple rays; western Colorado to Arizona

— Princeton's WordNet

machaeranthera bigelovii

sticky aster, Machaeranthera bigelovii

wild aster having leafy stems and flower heads with narrow bright reddish-lavender or purple rays; western Colorado to Arizona

— Princeton's WordNet

Colorado Plateau

Colorado Plateau

The Colorado Plateau, also called the Colorado Plateau Province, is a physiographic region of the Intermontane Plateaus, roughly centered on the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States. The province covers an area of 337,000 km² within western Colorado, northwestern New Mexico, southern and eastern Utah, and northern Arizona. About 90% of the area is drained by the Colorado River and its main tributaries: the Green, San Juan, and Little Colorado. The Colorado Plateau is largely made up of high desert, with scattered areas of forests. In the southwest corner of the Colorado Plateau lies the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River. Much of the Plateau's landscape is related, in both appearance and geologic history, to the Grand Canyon. The nickname "Red Rock Country" suggests the brightly colored rock left bare to the view by dryness and erosion. Domes, hoodoos, fins, reefs, goblins, river narrows, natural bridges, and slot canyons are only some of the additional features typical of the Plateau. The Colorado Plateau has the greatest concentration of U.S. National Park Service units in the country. Among its ten National Parks are Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce Canyon, Capitol Reef, Canyonlands, Arches, Mesa Verde, and Petrified Forest. Among its 17 National Monuments are Dinosaur, Hovenweep, Wupatki, Sunset Crater Volcano, Grand Staircase-Escalante, Natural Bridges, Canyons of the Ancients, and Colorado.

— Freebase

rocky mountain national park

Rocky Mountain National Park

a national park in Colorado having mountains and lakes and streams and forests

— Princeton's WordNet

arches national park

Arches National Park

a national park in Utah including mountains and the Colorado River gorge and huge rock formations caused by erosion

— Princeton's WordNet

green river

Green, Green River

a river that rises in western Wyoming and flows southward through Utah to become a tributary of the Colorado River

— Princeton's WordNet

southwestern

southwestern

of a region of the United States generally including New Mexico; Arizona; Texas; California; and sometimes Nevada; Utah; Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

green

Green, Green River

a river that rises in western Wyoming and flows southward through Utah to become a tributary of the Colorado River

— Princeton's WordNet

Interstice

Interstice

an interval of time; specifically (R. C. Ch.), in the plural, the intervals which the canon law requires between the reception of the various degrees of orders

— Webster Dictionary

Preponderancy

Preponderancy

the excess of weight of that part of a canon behind the trunnions over that in front of them

— Webster Dictionary

Fairplay

Fairplay

Fairplay is a statutory town that is the county seat and the most populous town of Park County, Colorado, United States. Fairplay is located in South Park at an elevation of 9,953 feet. The town is the fifth-highest incorporated place in the State of Colorado. The population was 679 at the U.S. Census 2010.

— Freebase

southwestern lip fern

southwestern lip fern, Cheilanthes eatonii

lip fern of Texas to Oklahoma and Colorado and Arizona and Mexico having tall erect tufted fronds

— Princeton's WordNet

cheilanthes eatonii

southwestern lip fern, Cheilanthes eatonii

lip fern of Texas to Oklahoma and Colorado and Arizona and Mexico having tall erect tufted fronds

— Princeton's WordNet

gila

Gila, Gila River

a river that rises in western New Mexico and flows westward through southern Arizona to become a tributary of the Colorado River

— Princeton's WordNet

gila river

Gila, Gila River

a river that rises in western New Mexico and flows westward through southern Arizona to become a tributary of the Colorado River

— Princeton's WordNet

Mohave people

Mohave people

Mohave or Mojave are a Native American people indigenous to the Colorado River in the Mojave Desert. The Fort Mojave Indian Reservation includes parts of California, Arizona, and Nevada. The Colorado River Indian Reservation includes parts of California and Arizona and is shared by members of the Chemehuevi, Hopi, and Navajo peoples. The original Colorado River and Fort Mojave reservations were established in 1865 and 1870, respectively. Both reservations include substantial senior water rights in the Colorado River, which are used for irrigated farming. Though the four combined tribes sharing the Colorado River Indian Reservation function today as one geo-political unit, the federally recognized Colorado River Indian Tribes, each continues to maintain and observe its individual traditions, distinct religions, and culturally unique identities. The tribal headquarters, library and museum are in Parker, Arizona, about 40 miles north of I-10. The National Indian Days Celebration is held annually in Parker, from Thursday through Sunday during the last week of September. The All Indian Rodeo is also celebrated annually, on the first weekend in December. RV facilities are available along the Colorado River.

— Freebase

cocopa

Cocopa, Cocopah

a member of a North American Indian people living around the mouth of the Colorado River

— Princeton's WordNet

mount elbert

Mount Elbert

the highest peak in the Rocky Mountains in central Colorado (14,431 feet high)

— Princeton's WordNet

cocopah

Cocopa, Cocopah

a member of a North American Indian people living around the mouth of the Colorado River

— Princeton's WordNet

ute

Ute

a member of the Shoshonean people of Utah and Colorado and New Mexico

— Princeton's WordNet

Canonization

Canonization

the final process or decree (following beatifacation) by which the name of a deceased person is placed in the catalogue (canon) of saints and commended to perpetual veneration and invocation

— Webster Dictionary

Limon

Limon

Limon is a Statutory Town that is the most populous town in Lincoln County, Colorado, United States immediately east of Elbert County. The population was 1,880 at the 2010 census. Limon has been called the "Hub City" of Eastern Colorado because Interstate 70, U.S. Highways 24, 40, and 287, and State Highways 71 and 86 all pass through the town. The Limon Correctional Facility is part of the Colorado Department of Corrections system and is a major employer in the area with employment of roughly 350. Limon is listed as the official AASHTO control city for signs on Interstate 70 between Denver and Hays, Kansas, although westbound signs in both Colorado and Kansas often omit Limon and list the larger city of Denver. Limon is the western terminus of the Kyle Railroad and it is here the shortline interchanges with the Union Pacific Railroad. Trains previously stopped at Limon Railroad Depot.

— Freebase

Sawpit

Sawpit

The Town of Sawpit is a Statutory Town located in San Miguel County, Colorado, United States. The town population was 25 at the 2000 census, making Sawpit the third least populous incorporated town in the state of Colorado. The Telluride Post Office serves Sawpit.

— Freebase

Deuterogamy

Deuterogamy

a second marriage, after the death of the first husband of wife; -- in distinction from bigamy, as defined in the old canon law. See Bigamy

— Webster Dictionary

Canonry

Canonry

a benefice or prebend in a cathedral or collegiate church; a right to a place in chapter and to a portion of its revenues; the dignity or emoluments of a canon

— Webster Dictionary

Infinite

Infinite

capable of endless repetition; -- said of certain forms of the canon, called also perpetual fugues, so constructed that their ends lead to their beginnings, and the performance may be incessantly repeated

— Webster Dictionary

penstemon rydbergii

Rydberg's penstemon, Penstemon rydbergii

plant with whorls of small dark blue-violet flowers; Washington to Wyoming and south to California and Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

rydberg's penstemon

Rydberg's penstemon, Penstemon rydbergii

plant with whorls of small dark blue-violet flowers; Washington to Wyoming and south to California and Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

Canon

Canon

Canon Inc. Kiyanon kabushiki-gaisha is a Japanese multinational corporation specialized in the manufacture of imaging and optical products, including cameras, camcorders, photocopiers, steppers, computer printers and medical equipment. Its headquarters are located in Ōta, Tokyo, Japan. Canon has a primary listing on the Tokyo Stock Exchange and is a constituent of the TOPIX index. It has a secondary listing on the New York Stock Exchange.

— Freebase

narrow-leaf penstemon

narrow-leaf penstemon, Penstemon linarioides

plant having small narrow leaves and blue-violet flowers in long open clusters; Utah and Colorado to New Mexico and Arizona

— Princeton's WordNet

penstemon linarioides

narrow-leaf penstemon, Penstemon linarioides

plant having small narrow leaves and blue-violet flowers in long open clusters; Utah and Colorado to New Mexico and Arizona

— Princeton's WordNet

Colorado Tick Fever

Colorado Tick Fever

A febrile illness characterized by chills, aches, vomiting, leukopenia, and sometimes encephalitis. It is caused by the COLORADO TICK FEVER VIRUS, a reovirus transmitted by the tick Dermacentor andersoni.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

southwest

Southwest, southwestern United States

the southwestern region of the United States generally including New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, Nevada, California, and sometimes Utah and Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

southwestern united states

Southwest, southwestern United States

the southwestern region of the United States generally including New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, Nevada, California, and sometimes Utah and Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

south-west

Southwest, southwestern United States

the southwestern region of the United States generally including New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, Nevada, California, and sometimes Utah and Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

Protocanonical

Protocanonical

of or pertaining to the first canon, or that which contains the authorized collection of the books of Scripture; -- opposed to deutero-canonical

— Webster Dictionary

Decretal

Decretal

an authoritative order or decree; especially, a letter of the pope, determining some point or question in ecclesiastical law. The decretals form the second part of the canon law

— Webster Dictionary

Cascade concrete

Cascade concrete

Wet, heavy and often sticky snow. Cascade concrete gets its name because it is characteristic of the Cascades of the Northwestern United States, in particular the lower-elevation regions of Washington, such as Snoqualmie Pass. Cascade concrete makes skiing and snowboarding difficult, and requires much more strength to handle than the fluffy stuff of, say, Colorado.

— Wiktionary

mitella pentandra

five-point bishop's cap, Mitella pentandra

small plant with leaves in a basal cluster and tiny greenish flowers in slender racemes; northwestern North America to California and Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

five-point bishop's cap

five-point bishop's cap, Mitella pentandra

small plant with leaves in a basal cluster and tiny greenish flowers in slender racemes; northwestern North America to California and Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

eSoft

eSoft

eSoft is a Colorado-based company specializing in integrated security solutions including secure content management and unified threat management appliances. Privately held eSoft, based in the foothills of Broomfield, Colorado, has developed the award-winning InstaGate and ThreatWall security appliances, as well as modular software bundles called ThreatPaks that provide Email and Web security.

— Freebase

grand canyon national park

Grand Canyon National Park

a national park in Arizona including the mile deep canyon of the Colorado River which shows geologic features and fossil plants and animals

— Princeton's WordNet

Hoyt

Hoyt

Hoyt is a small unincorporated community in Morgan County, Colorado, United States. The 1996 feet high Hoyt Radio Tower is located near Hoyt. The guyed radio mast is the tallest tower in Colorado and one of the tallest towers on Earth. It is home to a cemetery, pig farm, and sugar beet dump. The U.S. Post Office at Wiggins now serves Hoyt postal addresses.

— Freebase

alaska rein orchid

Alaska rein orchid, Habenaria unalascensis

similar to coastal rein orchid but with smaller flowers; Alaska to Baja California and east to the Dakotas and Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

habenaria unalascensis

Alaska rein orchid, Habenaria unalascensis

similar to coastal rein orchid but with smaller flowers; Alaska to Baja California and east to the Dakotas and Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

collinsia parviflora

maiden blue-eyed Mary, Collinsia parviflora

small widely branching western plant with tiny blue-and-white flowers; British Columbia to Ontario and south to California and Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

maiden blue-eyed mary

maiden blue-eyed Mary, Collinsia parviflora

small widely branching western plant with tiny blue-and-white flowers; British Columbia to Ontario and south to California and Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

Karg

Karg

The Kargs are a fictional people in Ursula K. Le Guin's Earthsea canon.

— Freebase

desert four o'clock

desert four o'clock, Colorado four o'clock, maravilla, Mirabilis multiflora

wildflower having vibrant deep pink tubular evening-blooming flowers; found in sandy and desert areas from southern California to southern Colorado and into Mexico

— Princeton's WordNet

colorado four o'clock

desert four o'clock, Colorado four o'clock, maravilla, Mirabilis multiflora

wildflower having vibrant deep pink tubular evening-blooming flowers; found in sandy and desert areas from southern California to southern Colorado and into Mexico

— Princeton's WordNet

mirabilis multiflora

desert four o'clock, Colorado four o'clock, maravilla, Mirabilis multiflora

wildflower having vibrant deep pink tubular evening-blooming flowers; found in sandy and desert areas from southern California to southern Colorado and into Mexico

— Princeton's WordNet

maravilla

desert four o'clock, Colorado four o'clock, maravilla, Mirabilis multiflora

wildflower having vibrant deep pink tubular evening-blooming flowers; found in sandy and desert areas from southern California to southern Colorado and into Mexico

— Princeton's WordNet

expanded universe

expanded universe

In fiction, the extension of a media franchise (i.e. a television show, series of feature films, etc.) with other media (generally comics and original novels), often with the result being that the stories described in the other media are not considered canon in the original.

— Wiktionary

arapahoe

Arapaho, Arapahoe

a member of a tribe of Plains Indians formerly inhabiting eastern Colorado and Wyoming (now living in Oklahoma and Wyoming)

— Princeton's WordNet

arapaho

Arapaho, Arapahoe

a member of a tribe of Plains Indians formerly inhabiting eastern Colorado and Wyoming (now living in Oklahoma and Wyoming)

— Princeton's WordNet

Dermacentor

Dermacentor

A widely distributed genus of TICKS, in the family IXODIDAE, including a number that infest humans and other mammals. Several are vectors of diseases such as TULAREMIA; ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER; COLORADO TICK FEVER; and ANAPLASMOSIS.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Title

Title

a section or division of a subject, as of a law, a book, specif. (Roman & Canon Laws), a chapter or division of a law book

— Webster Dictionary

Southwestern United States

Southwestern United States

The geographic area of the southwestern region of the United States. The states usually included in this region are Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

mojave

Mohave, Mojave

a member of the North American Indian people formerly living in the Colorado river valley in Arizona and Nevada and California

— Princeton's WordNet

canyonlands national park

Canyonlands National Park

a national park in Utah having rock formations and ancient cliff dwellings; canyons of the Green River and the Colorado River

— Princeton's WordNet

mohave

Mohave, Mojave

a member of the North American Indian people formerly living in the Colorado river valley in Arizona and Nevada and California

— Princeton's WordNet

Ketuvim

Ketuvim

A subdivision of the Hebrew Testament (Tanakh) that is known in English, as "The Writings." It is composed of Songs (Psalms, and Song of Solomon), Proverbs, and 8 other books of the bible that were written near the close of the canon. These scriptures are viewed as less authoritative than the Torah.

— Wiktionary

anasazi

Anasazi

a Native American who lived in what is now southern Colorado and Utah and northern Arizona and New Mexico and who built cliff dwellings

— Princeton's WordNet

colorado springs

Colorado Springs

a city in east central Colorado on the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountains; popular tourist center and site of the United States Air Force Academy

— Princeton's WordNet

Pitkin

Pitkin

Pitkin is a Statutory Town in Gunnison County, Colorado, United States. The population was 66 at the 2010 census, down from 124 at the 2000 Census. Pitkin was founded in 1879, and is said to be Colorado's first mining camp west of the Continental Divide. Originally named Quartzville, it was renamed to honor Governor Frederick W. Pitkin.

— Freebase

Clementine

Clementine

of or pertaining to Clement, esp. to St. Clement of Rome and the spurious homilies attributed to him, or to Pope Clement V. and his compilations of canon law

— Webster Dictionary

Wheat Ridge

Wheat Ridge

The City of Wheat Ridge is a Home Rule Municipality located in Jefferson County, Colorado, United States. Wheat Ridge is a western suburb of Denver. The Wheat Ridge Municipal Center is approximately 5 miles west-northwest of the Colorado State Capitol in Denver. The city had a population of 30,166 as of the 2010 Census.

— Freebase

austin

Austin, capital of Texas

state capital of Texas on the Colorado River; site of the University of Texas

— Princeton's WordNet

capital of texas

Austin, capital of Texas

state capital of Texas on the Colorado River; site of the University of Texas

— Princeton's WordNet

Dinosaur National Monument

Dinosaur National Monument

Dinosaur National Monument is a National Monument located on the southeast flank of the Uinta Mountains on the border between Colorado and Utah at the confluence of the Green and Yampa Rivers. Although most of the monument area is in Moffat County, Colorado, the Dinosaur Quarry 40°26′29″N 109°18′04″W / 40.44139°N 109.30111°W is located in Utah just to the north of the town of Jensen, Utah. The nearest communities are Vernal, Utah and Dinosaur, Colorado. This park has fossils of dinosaurs including Allosaurus, Abydosaurus and various long-neck, long-tail sauropods. It was declared a National Monument on October 4, 1915.

— Freebase

Osier

Osier

Osier is a populated place in Conejos County, Colorado. It is an old railroad settlement and train stop approximately halfway along the Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad where trains from both ends of the line meet and stop for lunch, making it possible for passengers to either continue in the same direction or return to their point of origin afterwards. This location by the Rio de Los Pinos river was the halfway point on the old toll road from Conejos, Colorado to Chama, New Mexico, and can be reached by Forest Road 103 from Colorado State Highway 17.

— Freebase

clustered lady's slipper

clustered lady's slipper, Cypripedium fasciculatum

clusters of several short stems each having 2 broad leaves and 2-4 drooping brownish to greenish flowers with pouches mottled with purple; British Columbia to central California and northern Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

cypripedium fasciculatum

clustered lady's slipper, Cypripedium fasciculatum

clusters of several short stems each having 2 broad leaves and 2-4 drooping brownish to greenish flowers with pouches mottled with purple; British Columbia to central California and northern Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

Imitation

Imitation

one of the principal means of securing unity and consistency in polyphonic composition; the repetition of essentially the same melodic theme, phrase, or motive, on different degrees of pitch, by one or more of the other parts of voises. Cf. Canon

— Webster Dictionary

Canon

Canon

the collection of books received as genuine Holy Scriptures, called the sacred canon, or general rule of moral and religious duty, given by inspiration; the Bible; also, any one of the canonical Scriptures. See Canonical books, under Canonical, a

— Webster Dictionary

North American Aerospace Defense Command

North American Aerospace Defense Command

North American Aerospace Defense Command is a combined organization of Canada and the United States that provides aerospace warning, air sovereignty, and defense for the two countries. Headquarters NORAD and the NORAD/USNORTHCOM command center are located at Peterson Air Force Base in El Paso County, near Colorado Springs, Colorado. The nearby Cheyenne Mountain nuclear bunker has the Alternative Command Center.

— Freebase

Canyonlands National Park

Canyonlands National Park

Canyonlands National Park is a U.S. National Park located in southeastern Utah near the town of Moab and preserves a colorful landscape eroded into countless canyons, mesas and buttes by the Colorado River, the Green River, and their respective tributaries. The park is divided into four districts: the Island in the Sky, the Needles, the Maze, and the rivers themselves. While these areas share a primitive desert atmosphere, each retains its own character. Two large river canyons are carved into the Colorado Plateau by the Colorado River and Green River. Author Edward Abbey, a frequent visitor, described the Canyonlands as "the most weird, wonderful, magical place on earth—there is nothing else like it anywhere."

— Freebase

Broomfield

Broomfield

The City and County of Broomfield is a suburb of the Denver metropolitan area in the State of Colorado of the United States. Broomfield has a consolidated city and county government which operates under Article XX, Sections 10-13 of the Constitution of the State of Colorado. The United States Census Bureau records stated that the population was 55,889 on April 1, 2010. Broomfield is the 16th most populous city and the 16th most populous county in Colorado. Broomfield is a part of the Denver-Aurora-Broomfield, CO Metropolitan Statistical Area and the Denver-Aurora-Boulder Combined Statistical Area.

— Freebase

eustoma grandiflorum

prairie gentian, tulip gentian, bluebell, Eustoma grandiflorum

one of the most handsome prairie wildflowers having large erect bell-shaped bluish flowers; of moist places in prairies and fields from eastern Colorado and Nebraska south to New Mexico and Texas

— Princeton's WordNet

tulip gentian

prairie gentian, tulip gentian, bluebell, Eustoma grandiflorum

one of the most handsome prairie wildflowers having large erect bell-shaped bluish flowers; of moist places in prairies and fields from eastern Colorado and Nebraska south to New Mexico and Texas

— Princeton's WordNet

prairie gentian

prairie gentian, tulip gentian, bluebell, Eustoma grandiflorum

one of the most handsome prairie wildflowers having large erect bell-shaped bluish flowers; of moist places in prairies and fields from eastern Colorado and Nebraska south to New Mexico and Texas

— Princeton's WordNet

bluebell

prairie gentian, tulip gentian, bluebell, Eustoma grandiflorum

one of the most handsome prairie wildflowers having large erect bell-shaped bluish flowers; of moist places in prairies and fields from eastern Colorado and Nebraska south to New Mexico and Texas

— Princeton's WordNet

La Plata River

La Plata River

La Plata River is a 70-mile-long tributary to the San Juan River in La Plata County, Colorado, and San Juan County, New Mexico, United States. This small river heads at the western foot of Snow Storm Peak in the La Plata Mountains of southwestern Colorado, approximately 35 miles north of the New Mexico State line. It flows in a southerly direction until it joins the San Juan at the western edge of the city of Farmington, New Mexico, about 19 miles south of the Colorado State line. The Navajo name for the river, Tsé Dogoi Nlini translates as "Flowing Over Projecting Rock".

— Freebase

halchidhoma

Halchidhoma

a member of a North American Indian people of the Colorado river valley near the mouth of the Gila river; allied to the Maricopa

— Princeton's WordNet

Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon

The Grand Canyon is a steep-sided canyon carved by the Colorado River in the United States in the state of Arizona. It is contained within and managed by Grand Canyon National Park, the Hualapai Tribal Nation, and the Havasupai Tribe. President Theodore Roosevelt was a major proponent of preservation of the Grand Canyon area, and visited it on numerous occasions to hunt and enjoy the scenery. It is considered one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World. The Grand Canyon is 277 miles long, up to 18 miles wide and attains a depth of over a mile. Nearly two billion years of the Earth's geological history has been exposed as the Colorado River and its tributaries cut their channels through layer after layer of rock while the Colorado Plateau was uplifted. While the specific geologic processes and timing that formed the Grand Canyon are the subject of debate by geologists, recent evidence suggests the Colorado River established its course through the canyon at least 17 million years ago. Since that time, the Colorado River continued to erode and form the canyon to its present-day configuration.

— Freebase

lake mead

Lake Mead

the largest reservoir in the United States; located in southeastern Nevada and northwestern Arizona and formed by the Hoover Dam on the Colorado River; the center of a recreational area

— Princeton's WordNet

hooker's onion

Hooker's onion, Allium acuminatum

a common North American wild onion with a strong onion odor and an umbel of pink flowers atop a leafless stalk; British Columbia to California and Arizona and east to Wyoming and Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

allium acuminatum

Hooker's onion, Allium acuminatum

a common North American wild onion with a strong onion odor and an umbel of pink flowers atop a leafless stalk; British Columbia to California and Arizona and east to Wyoming and Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

Colorado tick fever

Colorado tick fever

Colorado tick fever is a viral infection transmitted from the bite of an infected tick. It should not be confused with the bacterial tick-borne infection, Rocky Mountain spotted fever. The type species of the genus Coltivirus, Colorado tick fever virus infects haemopoietic cells, particularly erythrocytes, which explains how the virus is transmitted by ticks and also accounts for the incidence of transmission via blood transfusion.

— Freebase

Longmont

Longmont

Longmont is a Home Rule Municipality in Boulder and Weld counties in the U.S. state of Colorado. The city is located northeast of the county seat of Boulder and 31 miles north-northwest of the Colorado State Capitol in Denver. Its population was 86,270 at the 2010 census. Longmont is the 13th most populous city in the State of Colorado. The word "Longmont" comes from Longs Peak, a prominent mountain named for explorer Stephen H. Long that is clearly visible from Longmont, and "mont" from the French word for mountain. It is one of the few cities in Colorado to own its electrical power plants, resulting in some of the lowest cost and most reliable electricity in the state. The Longmont City Council, in May of 2013, voted to finance and build out its own municipal gigabit data fiber network to every home and business over a three year period starting in late 2013, early 2014.

— Freebase

New Revised Standard Version

New Revised Standard Version

The New Revised Standard Version of the Christian Bible is an English translation released in 1989. It is an updated revision of the Revised Standard Version, which was itself an update of the Authorized King James Version. The NRSV was intended as a translation to serve devotional, liturgical and scholarly needs of the broadest possible range of religious adherents. The full translation includes the books of the standard Protestant canon as well as the books traditionally included in the canons of Roman Catholicism and Orthodox Christianity. The translation appears in three main formats: an edition including only the books of the Protestant canon, a Roman Catholic Edition with all the books of that canon in their customary order, and The Common Bible, which includes all books that appear in Protestant, Roman Catholic, and Orthodox canons. Special editions of the NRSV employ British spelling and grammar.

— Freebase

Rehabilitate

Rehabilitate

to invest or clothe again with some right, authority, or dignity; to restore to a former capacity; to reinstate; to qualify again; to restore, as a delinquent, to a former right, rank, or privilege lost or forfeited; -- a term of civil and canon law

— Webster Dictionary

Lake Success

Lake Success

Lake Success is a village and a part of Great Neck in Nassau County, New York in the United States. The population was 2,934 at the 2010 census. Lake Success is in the Town of North Hempstead on northwest Long Island. Lake Success was the temporary home of the United Nations from 1946 to 1951, occupying the headquarters of the Sperry Gyroscope Company on Marcus Avenue. It is also the home of Canon U.S.A., Inc., though Canon U.S.A. is due to move its corporate headquarters to Melville, New York.

— Freebase

north platte

North Platte, North Platte River

a river that rises in northern Colorado and flows northward into Wyoming and then eastward and southeastward through Nebraska where it joins the South Platte to form the Platte River

— Princeton's WordNet

north platte river

North Platte, North Platte River

a river that rises in northern Colorado and flows northward into Wyoming and then eastward and southeastward through Nebraska where it joins the South Platte to form the Platte River

— Princeton's WordNet

Cuchara

Cuchara

Cuchara is an unincorporated community in Huerfano County, Colorado, United States. It is located near a former ski resort in the mountains south of the town of La Veta. Its altitude is 8,468 feet. State Highway 12 travels through Cuchara as it approaches Trinidad to the southeast. Cuchara is situated on the eastern slopes of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in south-central Colorado. Cucharas Pass, at almost 10,000 feet, is a few miles south of the town of Cuchara. The Cucharas River flows on the outskirts of town. The San Isabel National Forest surrounds the town.

— Freebase

Apocrypha, The

Apocrypha, The

a literature of sixteen books composed by Jews, after the close of the Hebrew canon, which though without the unction of the prophetic books of the canon, are instinct, for most part, with the wisdom which rests on the fear of God and loyalty to His law. The word Apocrypha means hidden writing, and it was given to it by the Jews to distinguish it from the books which they accepted as canonical.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Natural Cleaners Colorado

Natural Cleaners Colorado

Natural Cleaners Colorado LLC provides dry and wet cleaning services. It offers cleaning services by using CO2 and GreenEarth cleaning technologies. The company was founded in 2005 and is based in Avon, Colorado.

— CrunchBase

Ina Bauer

Ina Bauer

Ina Bauer is a German retired competitive figure skater. She is the 1957-1959 German national champion. She twice placed fourth at the World Figure Skating Championships, once in 1958 and once in 1959. During this time she was training in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Bauer is the inventor of the eponymous skating element. She starred in two movies with Austrian alpine skier Toni Sailer.

— Freebase

Austin

Austin

the capital of Texas, on the Colorado River, named after Stephen Austin, who was chiefly instrumental in annexing Texas to the States.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Gambel's Quail

Gambel's Quail

The Gambel's Quail is a small ground-dwelling bird in the New World quail family. It inhabits the desert regions of Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, Texas, and Sonora; also New Mexico-border Chihuahua and the Colorado River region of Baja California. The Gambel's quail is named in honor of William Gambel, a 19th century naturalist and explorer of the Southwestern United States.

— Freebase

KUUR

KUUR

KUUR is an American FM radio station licensed by the Federal Communications Commission to broadcast on 96.7 MHz serving Carbondale, Colorado. KUUR is part of a simulcast known as Your Radio serving the Aspen, Colorado area including 101.1, 96.7 Carbondale and 107.7. Your Radio describes its programming format as cool contemporary music. The station was founded by Marcos A. Rodriguez. Licensed to Carbondale, Colorado, the station was the first radio station in that area with the ability to do digital broadcasting. The station also serves the Aspen Glenwood Springs area. The station is owned by Colorado Radio Marketing, LLC.. KUUR became the first American radio station to broadcast its programs in Bethlehem when, in December 2012, it was involved in a special arrangement with Radio Mawwal 101.7 FM there, which saw the broadcast of a section of KUUR's Christmas programming on that station throughout the Christmas season.

— Freebase

Illuminati

Illuminati

members of certain associations in Modern Europe, who combined to promote social reforms, by which they expected to raise men and society to perfection, esp. of one originated in 1776 by Adam Weishaupt, professor of canon law at Ingolstadt, which spread rapidly for a time, but ceased after a few years

— Webster Dictionary

arkansas river

Arkansas, Arkansas River

a river that rises in the Rocky Mountains in Colorado and flows southeast through Kansas and Oklahoma and through Arkansas to become a tributary of the Mississippi River

— Princeton's WordNet

arkansas

Arkansas, Arkansas River

a river that rises in the Rocky Mountains in Colorado and flows southeast through Kansas and Oklahoma and through Arkansas to become a tributary of the Mississippi River

— Princeton's WordNet

Vaux

Vaux

Vaux was a six-piece alternative rock band from Denver, Colorado.

— Freebase

Cripple Creek

Cripple Creek

The City of Cripple Creek is a statutory city that is the county seat of Teller County, Colorado, United States. Cripple Creek is a former gold mining camp located 44 miles southwest of Colorado Springs near the base of Pikes Peak. The Cripple Creek Historic District, which received National Historic Landmark status in 1961, includes part or all of city and includes surrounding area. The population was 1,189 at the 2010 census.

— Freebase

Colorado potato beetle

Colorado potato beetle

The Colorado potato beetle, also known as the Colorado beetle, the ten-striped spearman, the ten-lined potato beetle or the potato bug, is an important pest of potato crops. It is approximately 10 millimetres long, with a bright yellow/orange body and five bold brown stripes along the length of each of its elytra. It can easily be confused with its close cousin and look-alike, the false potato beetle.

— Freebase

Avicenna

Avicenna

Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥusayn ibn ʿAbd Allāh ibn Sīnā, commonly known as Ibn Sīnā or by his Latinized name Avicenna, was a Persian polymath, who wrote almost 450 treatises on a wide range of subjects, of which around 240 have survived. In particular, 150 of his surviving treatises concentrate on philosophy and 40 of them concentrate on medicine. His most famous works are The Book of Healing, a vast philosophical and scientific encyclopaedia, and The Canon of Medicine, which was a standard medical text at many medieval universities. The Canon of Medicine was used as a text-book in the universities of Montpellier and Leuven as late as 1650. Ibn Sīnā's Canon of Medicine provides a complete system of medicine according to the principles of Galen. His corpus also includes writing on philosophy, astronomy, alchemy, geology, psychology, Islamic theology, logic, mathematics, physics, as well as poetry. He is regarded as the most famous and influential polymath of the Islamic Golden Age.

— Freebase

Last Chance

Last Chance

Last Chance is an unincorporated community in Washington County, Colorado, United States. Last Chance is situated at the intersection of U.S. Highway 36 and State Highway 71 in a sparsely populated area of eastern Colorado. The town was supposedly so named because it was once the only place for travelers to secure fuel and provisions for many miles in any direction. The U.S. Post Office at Woodrow now serves Last Chance postal addresses.

— Freebase

In Vogue

In Vogue

In Vogue is the debut album of Colorado band Drop Dead, Gorgeous.

— Freebase

mirabilis oblongifolia

mountain four o'clock, Mirabilis oblongifolia

leafy wildflower with lavender-pink flowers that open in the evening and remain through cool part of the next day; found in open woods or brush in mountains of southern Colorado to Arizona and into Mexico

— Princeton's WordNet

mountain four o'clock

mountain four o'clock, Mirabilis oblongifolia

leafy wildflower with lavender-pink flowers that open in the evening and remain through cool part of the next day; found in open woods or brush in mountains of southern Colorado to Arizona and into Mexico

— Princeton's WordNet

Berryite

Berryite

Berryite is a mineral with the formula Pb3(Ag,Cu)5Bi7S16. It occurs as gray to blue-gray monoclinic prisms. It is opaque and has a metallic luster. It has a Mohs hardness of 3.5 and a specific gravity of 6.7. It was first identified in 1965 using X-ray diffraction by mineralogist Leonard Gascoigne Berry. It is found in Park and San Juan counties in Colorado. It occurs in sulfide bearing quartz veins in Colorado and with siderite-rich cryolite in Ivigtut, Greenland.

— Freebase

Mesita

Mesita

Mesita is the musical project of James Cooley, a 24-year-old solo artist from Littleton, Colorado.

— Freebase

KHEN-LP

KHEN-LP

KHEN-LP is a low-power community radio station located in Salida, Colorado, USA.

— Freebase

Cañon of Colorado

Cañon of Colorado

a gorge in Arizona through which the Colorado River flows, the largest and deepest in the world, being 300 m. long, with a wall from 3000 to 6000 ft. in perpendicular height.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Chaffee County Telecom

Chaffee County Telecom

Chaffee County Telecom, LLC, doing business as Colorado Central Telecom, LLC, provides fixed wireless high speed broadband Internet and VoIP phone services to the greater Chaffee County area. The company was founded in 2012 and is based in Crestone, Colorado.

— CrunchBase

Colorado River

Colorado River

The Colorado River is the principal river of the southwestern United States and northwest Mexico. The 1,450-mile river drains an expansive, arid watershed that encompasses parts of seven U.S. and two Mexican states. Rising in the central Rocky Mountains in the U.S., the river flows generally southwest across the Colorado Plateau before reaching Lake Mead on the Arizona–Nevada line, where it turns south towards the international border. After entering Mexico, the Colorado forms a large delta, emptying into the Gulf of California between Baja California and Sonora. Known for its dramatic canyons and whitewater rapids, the Colorado is a vital source of water for agricultural and urban areas in the southwestern desert lands of North America. The river and its tributaries are controlled by an extensive system of dams, reservoirs and aqueducts, which furnish water for irrigation and municipal supplies of almost 40 million people both inside and outside the watershed. The Colorado's steep drop through its gorges is also utilized for the generation of significant hydroelectric power, and its major dams regulate peaking power demands in much of the Intermountain West. Since the mid-20th century, intensive water consumption has dewatered the lower 100 miles of the river such that it no longer reaches the sea except in years of heavy runoff.

— Freebase

Glen Canyon Dam

Glen Canyon Dam

Glen Canyon Dam is a concrete arch dam on the Colorado River in northern Arizona in the United States, near the town of Page. The dam was built to provide hydroelectricity and flow regulation from the upper Colorado River Basin to the lower. Its reservoir is called Lake Powell, and is the second largest artificial lake in the country, extending upriver well into Utah. The dam is named for Glen Canyon, a colorful series of gorges, most of which now lies under the reservoir. The dam was proposed in the 1950s as part of the Colorado River Storage Project, a U.S. Bureau of Reclamation federal water project that would develop reservoir storage on the upper Colorado River and several of its major tributaries. The project's main purpose was to allow the upper basin to better utilize its allocation of river flow as designated in the 1922 Colorado River Compact, and a second purpose was to provide water storage to ensure the delivery of sufficient water to the lower basin during years of drought. However, problems arose when the USBR proposed to build dams in the federally protected Echo Park canyon in Utah. After a long series of legal battles with environmentalist organizations such as the Sierra Club, they settled for a high dam at Glen Canyon.

— Freebase

Wace

Wace

Wace was a Norman poet, who was born in Jersey and brought up in mainland Normandy, ending his career as Canon of Bayeux.

— Freebase

Front Range

Front Range

The Front Range is a mountain range of the Southern Rocky Mountains of North America located in the central portion of the U.S. State of Colorado and southeastern portion of the U.S. State of Wyoming. It is the first mountain range encountered moving west along the 40th parallel north across the Great Plains of North America. The Front Range runs north-south between Casper, Wyoming and Pueblo, Colorado and rises nearly 10,000 feet above the Great Plains. Longs Peak, Mount Evans, and Pikes Peak are its most prominent peaks, visible from the Interstate 25 corridor. The area is a popular destination for mountain biking, hiking, climbing, and camping during the warmer months and for skiing and snowboarding during winter. Millions of years ago the present-day Front Range was home to ancient mountain ranges, deserts, beaches, and even oceans. The name "Front Range" is also applied to the Front Range Urban Corridor, the populated region of Colorado and Wyoming just east of the mountain range and extending from Cheyenne, Wyoming south to Pueblo, Colorado. This urban corridor benefits from the weather-moderating effect of the Front Range mountains, which help block prevailing storms.

— Freebase


The Web's Largest Resource for

Definitions & Translations


A Member Of The STANDS4 Network