Definitions containing cañon of colorado

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Colorado

Colorado

Colorado is a U.S. state encompassing most of the Southern Rocky Mountains as well as the northeastern portion of the Colorado Plateau and the western edge of the Great Plains. Colorado is part of the Western United States, the Southwestern United States, and the Mountain States. Colorado is the 8th most extensive and the 22nd most populous of the 50 United States. The United States Census Bureau estimates that the population of Colorado was 5,187,582 on July 1, 2012, an increase of +3.15% since the 2010 United States Census. The state was named for the Colorado River, which early Spanish explorers named the Río Colorado for the red colored silt the river carried from the mountains. On August 1, 1876, U.S. President Ulysses S. Grant signed a proclamation admitting Colorado as the 38th state. Colorado is nicknamed the "Centennial State" because it was admitted to the Union in 1876, the centennial year of the United States Declaration of Independence. Colorado is bordered by the northwest state of Wyoming to the north, the Midwest states of Nebraska and Kansas to the northeast and east, on the south by New Mexico and Oklahoma, on the west by Utah, and Arizona to the southwest. The four states of Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Arizona meet at one common point known as the Four Corners, which is known as the heart of the American Southwest. Colorado is noted for its vivid landscape of mountains, forests, high plains, mesas, canyons, plateaus, rivers, and desert lands.

— Freebase

canonical

canonical

[very common; historically, ‘according to religious law’] The usual or standard state or manner of something. This word has a somewhat more technical meaning in mathematics. Two formulas such as 9 + x and x + 9 are said to be equivalent because they mean the same thing, but the second one is in canonical form because it is written in the usual way, with the highest power of x first. Usually there are fixed rules you can use to decide whether something is in canonical form. The jargon meaning, a relaxation of the technical meaning, acquired its present loading in computer-science culture largely through its prominence in Alonzo Church's work in computation theory and mathematical logic (see Knights of the Lambda Calculus). Compare vanilla.Non-technical academics do not use the adjective ‘canonical’ in any of the senses defined above with any regularity; they do however use the nouns canon and canonicity (not **canonicalness or **canonicality). The canon of a given author is the complete body of authentic works by that author (this usage is familiar to Sherlock Holmes fans as well as to literary scholars). ‘The canon’ is the body of works in a given field (e.g., works of literature, or of art, or of music) deemed worthwhile for students to study and for scholars to investigate.The word ‘canon’ has an interesting history. It derives ultimately from the Greek κανον (akin to the English ‘cane’) referring to a reed. Reeds were used for measurement, and in Latin and later Greek the word ‘canon’ meant a rule or a standard. The establishment of a canon of scriptures within Christianity was meant to define a standard or a rule for the religion. The above non-techspeak academic usages stem from this instance of a defined and accepted body of work. Alongside this usage was the promulgation of ‘canons’ (‘rules’) for the government of the Catholic Church. The techspeak usages (“according to religious law”) derive from this use of the Latin ‘canon’.Hackers invest this term with a playfulness that makes an ironic contrast with its historical meaning. A true story: One Bob Sjoberg, new at the MIT AI Lab, expressed some annoyance at the incessant use of jargon. Over his loud objections, GLS and RMS made a point of using as much of it as possible in his presence, and eventually it began to sink in. Finally, in one conversation, he used the word canonical in jargon-like fashion without thinking. Steele: “Aha! We've finally got you talking jargon too!” Stallman: “What did he say?” Steele: “Bob just used ‘canonical’ in the canonical way.”Of course, canonicality depends on context, but it is implicitly defined as the way hackers normally expect things to be. Thus, a hacker may claim with a straight face that ‘according to religious law’ is not the canonical meaning of canonical.

— The New Hacker's Dictionary

Colorado Plateau

Colorado Plateau

The Colorado Plateau, also called the Colorado Plateau Province, is a physiographic region of the Intermontane Plateaus, roughly centered on the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States. The province covers an area of 337,000 km² within western Colorado, northwestern New Mexico, southern and eastern Utah, and northern Arizona. About 90% of the area is drained by the Colorado River and its main tributaries: the Green, San Juan, and Little Colorado. The Colorado Plateau is largely made up of high desert, with scattered areas of forests. In the southwest corner of the Colorado Plateau lies the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River. Much of the Plateau's landscape is related, in both appearance and geologic history, to the Grand Canyon. The nickname "Red Rock Country" suggests the brightly colored rock left bare to the view by dryness and erosion. Domes, hoodoos, fins, reefs, goblins, river narrows, natural bridges, and slot canyons are only some of the additional features typical of the Plateau. The Colorado Plateau has the greatest concentration of U.S. National Park Service units in the country. Among its ten National Parks are Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce Canyon, Capitol Reef, Canyonlands, Arches, Mesa Verde, and Petrified Forest. Among its 17 National Monuments are Dinosaur, Hovenweep, Wupatki, Sunset Crater Volcano, Grand Staircase-Escalante, Natural Bridges, Canyons of the Ancients, and Colorado.

— Freebase

Colorado Springs

Colorado Springs

Colorado Springs is a Home Rule Municipality that is the county seat and most populous city of El Paso County, Colorado, United States. Colorado Springs is located in the center portion of the state. It is situated on Fountain Creek and is located 65 miles south of the Colorado State Capitol in Denver. At 6,035 feet the city stands over one mile above sea level, though some areas of the city are significantly higher and lower. Colorado Springs is situated near the base of one of the most famous American mountains, Pikes Peak, in the eastern edge of the Southern Rocky Mountains. The city is often referred to as "The Springs." With a population of 416,427 as of the 2010 Census, it is the second most populous city in the state of Colorado, behind Denver, and the 41st most populous city in the United States, while the Colorado Springs Metropolitan Statistical Area had an estimated population of 645,613 in 2010. The city covers 194.7 square miles, making it Colorado's largest city in area. Colorado Springs was selected as the No. 1 Best Big City in "Best Places to Live" by Money magazine in 2006, and placed number one in Outside's 2009 list of America's Best Cities.

— Freebase

Mohave people

Mohave people

Mohave or Mojave are a Native American people indigenous to the Colorado River in the Mojave Desert. The Fort Mojave Indian Reservation includes parts of California, Arizona, and Nevada. The Colorado River Indian Reservation includes parts of California and Arizona and is shared by members of the Chemehuevi, Hopi, and Navajo peoples. The original Colorado River and Fort Mojave reservations were established in 1865 and 1870, respectively. Both reservations include substantial senior water rights in the Colorado River, which are used for irrigated farming. Though the four combined tribes sharing the Colorado River Indian Reservation function today as one geo-political unit, the federally recognized Colorado River Indian Tribes, each continues to maintain and observe its individual traditions, distinct religions, and culturally unique identities. The tribal headquarters, library and museum are in Parker, Arizona, about 40 miles north of I-10. The National Indian Days Celebration is held annually in Parker, from Thursday through Sunday during the last week of September. The All Indian Rodeo is also celebrated annually, on the first weekend in December. RV facilities are available along the Colorado River.

— Freebase

Crab canon

Crab canon

A crab canon—also known by the Latin form of the name, canon cancrizans—is an arrangement of two musical lines that are complementary and backward, similar to a palindrome. Originally it is a musical term for a kind of canon in which one line is reversed in time from the other. A famous example is found in J. S. Bach's The Musical Offering, which also contains a canon combining retrogression with inversion, i.e., the music is turned upside down by one player, which is a table canon. The use of the term in non-musical contexts was popularized by Douglas Hofstadter in Gödel, Escher, Bach.

— Freebase

greenie

greenie

A person from Colorado; after the color of the Colorado license plate.

— Wiktionary

South Platte River

South Platte River

The South Platte River is one of the two principal tributaries of the Platte River and is itself a major river of the American Midwest and the American Southwest/Mountain West, located in the U.S. states of Colorado and Nebraska. Its drainage basin includes much of the eastern flank of the Rocky Mountains in Colorado; much of the populated region known as the Colorado Front Range and Eastern Plains; and a portion of southeastern Wyoming in the vicinity of the city of Cheyenne. It joins the North Platte River in western Nebraska to form the Platte, which then flows across Nebraska to the Missouri. The river serves as the principal source of water for eastern Colorado. In its valley along the foothills in Colorado, it has permitted agriculture in an area of the Colorado Piedmont and Great Plains that is otherwise arid.

— Freebase

Fort Collins

Fort Collins

Fort Collins is a Home Rule Municipality situated on the Cache La Poudre River along the Colorado Front Range, and is the county seat and most populous city of Larimer County, Colorado, United States. Fort Collins is located 57 miles north of the Colorado State Capitol in Denver. With a 2010 census population of 143,986, it is the fourth most populous city in Colorado. Fort Collins is a large college town, home to Colorado State University. It was named Money magazine's Best Place to Live in the U.S. in 2006, #2 in 2008, and #6 in 2010.

— Freebase

Colorado River

Colorado River

The Colorado River is the principal river of the southwestern United States and northwest Mexico. The 1,450-mile river drains an expansive, arid watershed that encompasses parts of seven U.S. and two Mexican states. Rising in the central Rocky Mountains in the U.S., the river flows generally southwest across the Colorado Plateau before reaching Lake Mead on the Arizona–Nevada line, where it turns south towards the international border. After entering Mexico, the Colorado forms a large delta, emptying into the Gulf of California between Baja California and Sonora. Known for its dramatic canyons and whitewater rapids, the Colorado is a vital source of water for agricultural and urban areas in the southwestern desert lands of North America. The river and its tributaries are controlled by an extensive system of dams, reservoirs and aqueducts, which furnish water for irrigation and municipal supplies of almost 40 million people both inside and outside the watershed. The Colorado's steep drop through its gorges is also utilized for the generation of significant hydroelectric power, and its major dams regulate peaking power demands in much of the Intermountain West. Since the mid-20th century, intensive water consumption has dewatered the lower 100 miles of the river such that it no longer reaches the sea except in years of heavy runoff.

— Freebase

Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon

The Grand Canyon is a steep-sided canyon carved by the Colorado River in the United States in the state of Arizona. It is contained within and managed by Grand Canyon National Park, the Hualapai Tribal Nation, and the Havasupai Tribe. President Theodore Roosevelt was a major proponent of preservation of the Grand Canyon area, and visited it on numerous occasions to hunt and enjoy the scenery. It is considered one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World. The Grand Canyon is 277 miles long, up to 18 miles wide and attains a depth of over a mile. Nearly two billion years of the Earth's geological history has been exposed as the Colorado River and its tributaries cut their channels through layer after layer of rock while the Colorado Plateau was uplifted. While the specific geologic processes and timing that formed the Grand Canyon are the subject of debate by geologists, recent evidence suggests the Colorado River established its course through the canyon at least 17 million years ago. Since that time, the Colorado River continued to erode and form the canyon to its present-day configuration.

— Freebase

Pikes Peak

Pikes Peak

Pikes Peak is a mountain in the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains within Pike National Forest, 10 mi west of Colorado Springs, Colorado, in El Paso County in the United States of America. Originally called "El Capitán" by Spanish settlers, the mountain was renamed Pike's Peak after Zebulon Pike, Jr., an explorer who led an expedition to the southern Colorado area in 1806. The Arapaho name is heey-otoyoo’. At 14,115 feet, it is one of Colorado's 54 fourteeners, mountains that rise more than 14,000 feet above mean sea level, and rises 8,400 feet above the city of Colorado Springs. Pikes Peak is a designated National Historic Landmark.

— Freebase

Glen Canyon Dam

Glen Canyon Dam

Glen Canyon Dam is a concrete arch dam on the Colorado River in northern Arizona in the United States, near the town of Page. The dam was built to provide hydroelectricity and flow regulation from the upper Colorado River Basin to the lower. Its reservoir is called Lake Powell, and is the second largest artificial lake in the country, extending upriver well into Utah. The dam is named for Glen Canyon, a colorful series of gorges, most of which now lies under the reservoir. The dam was proposed in the 1950s as part of the Colorado River Storage Project, a U.S. Bureau of Reclamation federal water project that would develop reservoir storage on the upper Colorado River and several of its major tributaries. The project's main purpose was to allow the upper basin to better utilize its allocation of river flow as designated in the 1922 Colorado River Compact, and a second purpose was to provide water storage to ensure the delivery of sufficient water to the lower basin during years of drought. However, problems arose when the USBR proposed to build dams in the federally protected Echo Park canyon in Utah. After a long series of legal battles with environmentalist organizations such as the Sierra Club, they settled for a high dam at Glen Canyon.

— Freebase

Cannonical

Cannonical

of or pertaining to a canon; established by, or according to a , canon or canons

— Webster Dictionary

Front Range

Front Range

The Front Range is a mountain range of the Southern Rocky Mountains of North America located in the central portion of the U.S. State of Colorado and southeastern portion of the U.S. State of Wyoming. It is the first mountain range encountered moving west along the 40th parallel north across the Great Plains of North America. The Front Range runs north-south between Casper, Wyoming and Pueblo, Colorado and rises nearly 10,000 feet above the Great Plains. Longs Peak, Mount Evans, and Pikes Peak are its most prominent peaks, visible from the Interstate 25 corridor. The area is a popular destination for mountain biking, hiking, climbing, and camping during the warmer months and for skiing and snowboarding during winter. Millions of years ago the present-day Front Range was home to ancient mountain ranges, deserts, beaches, and even oceans. The name "Front Range" is also applied to the Front Range Urban Corridor, the populated region of Colorado and Wyoming just east of the mountain range and extending from Cheyenne, Wyoming south to Pueblo, Colorado. This urban corridor benefits from the weather-moderating effect of the Front Range mountains, which help block prevailing storms.

— Freebase

Longs Peak

Longs Peak

Longs Peak is one of the 54 mountains with summits over 14,000 feet in Colorado. It can be prominently seen from Longmont, Colorado, as well as from the rest of the Colorado Front Range. It is named after Major Stephen Long, who explored the area in the 1820s. Longs Peak is one of the most prominent mountains in Colorado, rising nearly 10,000 feet above the western edge of the Great Plains. Together with the nearby Mount Meeker, the two are sometimes referred to as the Twin Peaks.

— Freebase

Golden

Golden

The City of Golden is a home rule municipality and the county seat of Jefferson County, Colorado, United States. Golden lies along Clear Creek at the edge of the foothills of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. Founded during the Pike's Peak Gold Rush on 16 June 1859, the mining camp was originally named Golden City in honor of Thomas L. Golden. Golden City served as the capital of the provisional Territory of Jefferson from 1860 to 1861, and capital of the official Territory of Colorado from 1862 to 1867. In 1867, the territorial capital was moved about 12 miles east to Denver City. The United States Census Bureau estimates that the city population was 18,867 in 2010. The Colorado School of Mines, offering programs in engineering and science, is located in Golden. Also there are the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the National Earthquake Information Center, the Coors Brewing Company, CoorsTek, Spyderco, the American Mountaineering Center, and the Colorado Railroad Museum. It is the birthplace of the Jolly Rancher, a candy bought out by the Hershey Foods Corporation. Famous western showman William F. "Buffalo Bill" Cody is buried nearby on Lookout Mountain.

— Freebase

Greeley

Greeley

Greeley is a Home Rule Municipality that is the county seat and the most populous city of Weld County, Colorado, United States. Greeley is in northern Colorado. Greeley is situated 49 miles north-northeast of the Colorado State Capitol in Denver. According to the 2010 Census, the population of the city is 92,889. Greeley is the 12th most populous city in the State of Colorado. Greeley is a major city of the large Front Range Urban Corridor.

— Freebase

Longmont

Longmont

Longmont is a Home Rule Municipality in Boulder and Weld counties in the U.S. state of Colorado. The city is located northeast of the county seat of Boulder and 31 miles north-northwest of the Colorado State Capitol in Denver. Its population was 86,270 at the 2010 census. Longmont is the 13th most populous city in the State of Colorado. The word "Longmont" comes from Longs Peak, a prominent mountain named for explorer Stephen H. Long that is clearly visible from Longmont, and "mont" from the French word for mountain. It is one of the few cities in Colorado to own its electrical power plants, resulting in some of the lowest cost and most reliable electricity in the state. The Longmont City Council, in May of 2013, voted to finance and build out its own municipal gigabit data fiber network to every home and business over a three year period starting in late 2013, early 2014.

— Freebase

Colorado Desert

Colorado Desert

California's Colorado Desert is a part of the larger Sonoran Desert, which extends across southwest North America. The Colorado Desert region encompasses approximately 7 million acres, reaching from Northwest Mexico border regions in the south to the higher-elevation Mojave Desert in the north and from the Colorado River in the east to the Laguna Mountains of the Peninsular Ranges in the west. The area includes the heavily irrigated Coachella and Imperial Valleys. The Colorado Desert is home to many unique flora and fauna, many of which can be found nowhere else on the planet.

— Freebase

North Platte River

North Platte River

The North Platte River is a major tributary of the Platte River and is approximately 716 miles long counting its many curves, It travels about 550 miles distance. Its course lies in the U.S. states of Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska before heading to the Atlantic Ocean. The head of the river is essentially all of Jackson County, Colorado whose boundaries are the continental divide on the east and south and the mountain drainage peaks on the east—the north boundary is the state of Wyoming boundary. The rugged Rocky Mountains surrounding Jackson County have at least twelve peaks over 11,000 feet in height. From Jackson County the river flows north about 200 miles out of the Routt National Forest and North Park near what is now Walden, Colorado to Casper, Wyoming. Shortly after passing Casper the river turns to the east-southeast and flows about 350 miles to the city of North Platte, Nebraska. The North Platte and South Platte River join to form the Platte River in western Nebraska near the city of North Platte, Nebraska. The Platte River flows to the Missouri River which joins the Mississippi River to flow to the Gulf of Mexico. The river provides the major avenue of drainage for northern Colorado, eastern Wyoming and western Nebraska. It is only navigable over most of its length at high water by canoes, kayaks and rubber rafts.

— Freebase

KUUR

KUUR

KUUR is an American FM radio station licensed by the Federal Communications Commission to broadcast on 96.7 MHz serving Carbondale, Colorado. KUUR is part of a simulcast known as Your Radio serving the Aspen, Colorado area including 101.1, 96.7 Carbondale and 107.7. Your Radio describes its programming format as cool contemporary music. The station was founded by Marcos A. Rodriguez. Licensed to Carbondale, Colorado, the station was the first radio station in that area with the ability to do digital broadcasting. The station also serves the Aspen Glenwood Springs area. The station is owned by Colorado Radio Marketing, LLC.. KUUR became the first American radio station to broadcast its programs in Bethlehem when, in December 2012, it was involved in a special arrangement with Radio Mawwal 101.7 FM there, which saw the broadcast of a section of KUUR's Christmas programming on that station throughout the Christmas season.

— Freebase

Lizard Head

Lizard Head

Lizard Head is a mountain in Colorado, one of the 637 peaks above 13,000 feet in elevation in the state. It is located in the San Juan Mountains on the border between San Miguel County and Dolores County, within the Lizard Head Wilderness and just southeast of a group of three Colorado fourteeners, Mount Wilson, Wilson Peak, and El Diente Peak. Lizard Head is only the 556th highest peak in Colorado by most standard definitions, but its towering spire-like form makes it one of the most spectacular. Lizard Head looks like an old eroded volcanic plug. However, it is actually composed of extrusive volcanic ash flows, and is one of the most difficult summits in Colorado to climb. The story of the first ascent makes a memorable and harrowing tale. In the words of Albert Ellingwood, Despite the serious and daunting objective hazards, the first ascent team completed the climb and descent safely in a feat of mountaineering skill that was far ahead of its time. This peak was used in a famous logo by the Rio Grande Southern Railroad. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:RGSlogo.png

— Freebase

Limon

Limon

Limon is a Statutory Town that is the most populous town in Lincoln County, Colorado, United States immediately east of Elbert County. The population was 1,880 at the 2010 census. Limon has been called the "Hub City" of Eastern Colorado because Interstate 70, U.S. Highways 24, 40, and 287, and State Highways 71 and 86 all pass through the town. The Limon Correctional Facility is part of the Colorado Department of Corrections system and is a major employer in the area with employment of roughly 350. Limon is listed as the official AASHTO control city for signs on Interstate 70 between Denver and Hays, Kansas, although westbound signs in both Colorado and Kansas often omit Limon and list the larger city of Denver. Limon is the western terminus of the Kyle Railroad and it is here the shortline interchanges with the Union Pacific Railroad. Trains previously stopped at Limon Railroad Depot.

— Freebase

Canon law

Canon law

Canon law is the body of laws and regulations made or adopted by ecclesiastical authority, for the government of the Christian organization and its members. It is the internal ecclesiastical law governing the Catholic Church, the Eastern and Oriental Orthodox churches, and the Anglican Communion of churches. The way that such church law is legislated, interpreted and at times adjudicated varies widely among these three bodies of churches. In all three traditions, a canon was originally a rule adopted by a council; these canons formed the foundation of canon law.

— Freebase

Doryphoros

Doryphoros

The Doryphoros is one of the best known Greek sculptures of the classical era in Western Art and an early example of Greek classical contrapposto. The lost bronze original would have been made at approximately 450-400 BCE. The Greek sculptor Polykleitos designed a work, perhaps this one, as an example of the "canon" or "rule", showing the perfectly harmonious and balanced proportions of the human body in the sculpted form. A solid-built athlete with muscular features carries a spear balanced on his left shoulder. In the surviving Roman marble copies, a marble tree stump is added to support the weight of the marble. A characteristic of Polykleitos' Doryphoros is the classical contrapposto in the pelvis; the figure's stance is such that one leg seems to be in movement while he is standing on the other. Some time in the 2nd century AD, Galen wrote about the Doryphoros as the perfect visual expression of the Greeks' search for harmony and beauty, which is rendered in the perfectly proportioned sculpted male nude: Chrysippos holds beauty to consist not in the commensurability or "symmetria" [ie proportions] of the constituent elements [of the body], but in the commensurability of the parts, such as that of finger to finger, and of all the fingers to the palm and wrist, and of those to the forearm, and of the forearm to the upper arm, and in fact, of everything to everything else, just as it is written in the Canon of Polyclitus. For having taught us in that work all the proportions of the body, Polyclitus supported his treatise with a work: he made a statue according to the tenets of his treatise, and called the statue, like the work, the 'Canon.'

— Freebase

New Revised Standard Version

New Revised Standard Version

The New Revised Standard Version of the Christian Bible is an English translation released in 1989. It is an updated revision of the Revised Standard Version, which was itself an update of the Authorized King James Version. The NRSV was intended as a translation to serve devotional, liturgical and scholarly needs of the broadest possible range of religious adherents. The full translation includes the books of the standard Protestant canon as well as the books traditionally included in the canons of Roman Catholicism and Orthodox Christianity. The translation appears in three main formats: an edition including only the books of the Protestant canon, a Roman Catholic Edition with all the books of that canon in their customary order, and The Common Bible, which includes all books that appear in Protestant, Roman Catholic, and Orthodox canons. Special editions of the NRSV employ British spelling and grammar.

— Freebase

Marcionism

Marcionism

Marcionism was an Early Christian dualist belief system that originated in the teachings of Marcion of Sinope at Rome around the year 144. Marcion believed Jesus Christ was the savior sent by God, and Paul of Tarsus was his chief apostle, but he rejected the Hebrew Bible and the God of Israel. Marcionists believed that the wrathful Hebrew God was a separate and lower entity than the all-forgiving God of the New Testament. This belief was in some ways similar to Gnostic Christian theology; notably, both are dualistic, that is, they posit opposing gods, forces, or principles: one higher, spiritual, and "good", and the other lower, material, and "evil", in contrast to the orthodox Christian view that "evil" has no independent existence, but is a privation or lack of "good", a view shared by the Jewish theologian Moses Maimonides. Marcionism, similar to Gnosticism, depicted the Hebrew God of the Old Testament as a tyrant or demiurge. Marcion was labeled a gnostic by Philip Schaff, while other scholars have rejected that categorization. Marcion's canon consisted of eleven books: A gospel consisting of ten sections from the Gospel of Luke edited by Marcion; and ten of Paul's epistles. All other epistles and gospels of the 27 book New Testament canon were rejected. Paul's epistles enjoy a prominent position in the Marcionite canon, since Paul is credited with correctly transmitting the universality of Jesus' message. Other authors' epistles were rejected since they seemed to suggest that Jesus had simply come to found a new sect within broader Judaism. Religious tribalism of this sort seemed to echo Yahwism, and was thus regarded as a corruption of the "Heavenly Father"'s teaching.

— Freebase

Apocrypha

Apocrypha

The term apocrypha refers most generically to statements or claims that are of dubious authenticity. The word's origin is the medieval Latin adjective apocryphus, "secret, or non-canonical", from the Greek adjective ἀπόκρυφος, "obscure", from verb ἀποκρύπτειν, "to hide away". It is commonly used in Christian religious contexts to refer to certain religious books of ancient origin, most often those over which there is still-current disagreement about biblical canonicity. The pre-Christian-era Jewish translation of holy scriptures known as the Septuagint included these writings. However, the Jewish canon was not finalized until at least 100–200 years into the Christian era, at which time considerations of Greek language and beginnings of Christian acceptance of the Septuagint weighed against some of the texts. Some were not accepted as part of the Hebrew Bible canon. Over several centuries of consideration, the books of the Septuagint were finally accepted into the Christian Old Testament, by 405 CE in the west, and by the end of the fifth century in the east. The Christian canon thus established was retained even after the 11th-century schism that separated the church into the branches known as the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches.

— Freebase

Avicenna

Avicenna

Abū ʿAlī al-Ḥusayn ibn ʿAbd Allāh ibn Sīnā, commonly known as Ibn Sīnā or by his Latinized name Avicenna, was a Persian polymath, who wrote almost 450 treatises on a wide range of subjects, of which around 240 have survived. In particular, 150 of his surviving treatises concentrate on philosophy and 40 of them concentrate on medicine. His most famous works are The Book of Healing, a vast philosophical and scientific encyclopaedia, and The Canon of Medicine, which was a standard medical text at many medieval universities. The Canon of Medicine was used as a text-book in the universities of Montpellier and Leuven as late as 1650. Ibn Sīnā's Canon of Medicine provides a complete system of medicine according to the principles of Galen. His corpus also includes writing on philosophy, astronomy, alchemy, geology, psychology, Islamic theology, logic, mathematics, physics, as well as poetry. He is regarded as the most famous and influential polymath of the Islamic Golden Age.

— Freebase

capital of colorado

Denver, Mile-High City, capital of Colorado

the state capital and largest city of Colorado; located in central Colorado on the South Platte river

— Princeton's WordNet

cnemidophorus velox

plateau striped whiptail, Cnemidophorus velox

having distinct longitudinal stripes: of Colorado Plateau from Arizona to western Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

denver

Denver, Mile-High City, capital of Colorado

the state capital and largest city of Colorado; located in central Colorado on the South Platte river

— Princeton's WordNet

mile-high city

Denver, Mile-High City, capital of Colorado

the state capital and largest city of Colorado; located in central Colorado on the South Platte river

— Princeton's WordNet

plateau striped whiptail

plateau striped whiptail, Cnemidophorus velox

having distinct longitudinal stripes: of Colorado Plateau from Arizona to western Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

pueblo

Pueblo

a city in Colorado to the south of Colorado Springs

— Princeton's WordNet

Colorado beetle

Colorado beetle

a yellowish beetle (Doryphora decemlineata), with ten longitudinal, black, dorsal stripes. It has migrated eastwards from its original habitat in Colorado, and is very destructive to the potato plant; -- called also potato beetle and potato bug. See Potato beetle

— Webster Dictionary

Colorado group

Colorado group

a subdivision of the cretaceous formation of western North America, especially developed in Colorado and the upper Missouri region

— Webster Dictionary

Coloradoite

Coloradoite

mercury telluride, an iron-black metallic mineral, found in Colorado

— Webster Dictionary

Fluocerite

Fluocerite

a fluoride of cerium, occuring near Fahlun in Sweden. Tynosite, from Colorado, is probably the same mineral

— Webster Dictionary

Utes

Utes

an extensive tribe of North American Indians of the Shoshone stock, inhabiting Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Arizona, and adjacent regions. They are subdivided into several subordinate tribes, some of which are among the most degraded of North American Indians

— Webster Dictionary

Zunyite

Zunyite

a fluosilicate of alumina occurring in tetrahedral crystals at the Zu/i mine in Colorado

— Webster Dictionary

Cascade concrete

Cascade concrete

Wet, heavy and often sticky snow. Cascade concrete gets its name because it is characteristic of the Cascades of the Northwestern United States, in particular the lower-elevation regions of Washington, such as Snoqualmie Pass. Cascade concrete makes skiing and snowboarding difficult, and requires much more strength to handle than the fluffy stuff of, say, Colorado.

— Wiktionary

amazonstone

amazonstone

A bluish-green variety of microcline feldspar used as a gemstone. The best known occurrences are at Crystal Peak and Pike's Peak in Colorado.

— Wiktionary

Maricopa

Maricopa

Native American peoples: The Maricopa belong to the Yuman linguistic stock, a part of the Hokan family. They originate in the Colorado River area, but following an exodus in the 1700s or 1800s, they live amongst the Pima in the vicinity of the Gila and Salt Rivers.

— Wiktionary

Navajo

Navajo

An Apachean (Southern Athabaskan) language of the Athabascan language family belonging to the Na-Denu00E9 phylum. It is spoken by 149,000 people in the American Southwest (Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, and Colorado).

— Wiktionary

Aspen

Aspen

A ski-resort town in Colorado.

— Wiktionary

potamodromous

potamodromous

that migrates within fresh water only, one of the best examples is the Colorado pikeminnow of the United States

— Wiktionary

Anasazi

Anasazi

Any of a Native American people who once lived in cliff-dwellings in Utah and Colorado.

— Wiktionary

Denver

Denver

The capital of the US state of Colorado

— Wiktionary

Ute

Ute

A Native American people of Utah, Colorado and New Mexico.

— Wiktionary

potato beetle

potato beetle

the Colorado beetle, Leptinotarsa decimlineata

— Wiktionary

Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon

A large national park and gorge, carved by the Colorado River, located in Arizona.

— Wiktionary

South Park

South Park

A high intermontane grassland basin in the Rocky Mountains of central Colorado.

— Wiktionary

potato bug

potato bug

The Colorado beetle

— Wiktionary

Centennial State

Centennial State

Colorado

— Wiktionary

Arkansas River

Arkansas River

The Arkansas River is a major tributary of the Mississippi River. The Arkansas generally flows to the east and southeast as it traverses the US states of Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas. The river's initial basin starts in the Western United States in Colorado, specifically the Arkansas River Valley, where the headwaters derive from the snowpack in the Collegiate Peaks. Then it flows east into the Midwest via Kansas, and finally into the South through Oklahoma and Arkansas. At 1,469 miles, it is the sixth-longest river in the United States, the second-longest tributary in the Mississippi–Missouri system, and the 45th longest river in the world. Its origin is in the Rocky Mountains in Lake County, Colorado, near Leadville. In 1859, placer gold discovered in the Leadville area brought thousands seeking to strike it rich, but the easily recovered placer gold was quickly exhausted. The Arkansas River's mouth is at Napoleon, Arkansas, and its drainage basin covers nearly 170,000 sq mi. In terms of volume, the river is much smaller than both the Missouri and Ohio Rivers, with a mean discharge of roughly 41,000 cubic feet per second.

— Freebase

La Plata River

La Plata River

La Plata River is a 70-mile-long tributary to the San Juan River in La Plata County, Colorado, and San Juan County, New Mexico, United States. This small river heads at the western foot of Snow Storm Peak in the La Plata Mountains of southwestern Colorado, approximately 35 miles north of the New Mexico State line. It flows in a southerly direction until it joins the San Juan at the western edge of the city of Farmington, New Mexico, about 19 miles south of the Colorado State line. The Navajo name for the river, Tsé Dogoi Nlini translates as "Flowing Over Projecting Rock".

— Freebase

Rocky Mountain National Park

Rocky Mountain National Park

Rocky Mountain National Park is a national park located in the north-central region of the U.S. state of Colorado. It features majestic mountain views, a variety of wildlife, varied climates and environments—from wooded forests to mountain tundra—and easy access to back-country trails and campsites. The park is located northwest of Boulder, Colorado, in the Rockies, and includes the Continental Divide and the headwaters of the Colorado River. The park has five visitor centers. The park headquarters, Beaver Meadows Visitor Center, is a National Historic Landmark, designed by the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture at Taliesin West. The park may be accessed by three roads: U.S. Highway 34, 36, and State Highway 7. Highway 7 enters the park for less than a mile, where it provides access to the Lily Lake Visitor Center which is closed indefinitely. Farther south, spurs from route 7 lead to campgrounds and trail heads around Longs Peak and Wild Basin. Highway 36 enters the park on the east side, where it terminates after a few miles at Highway 34. Highway 34, known as Trail Ridge Road through the park, runs from the town of Estes Park on the east to Grand Lake on the southwest. The road reaches an elevation of 12,183 feet, and is closed by snow in winter.

— Freebase

Elbert

Elbert

Elbert is a census-designated place and the location of a U.S. Post Office in Elbert County, Colorado, United States. The population as of the 2010 Census was 230.The community is named for a past Colorado territorial governor and state Supreme Court Justice Samuel Hitt Elbert. The Elbert Post Office has the ZIP Code 80106. Elbert was a bustling center until May 31, 1935, when Kiowa Creek, a stream next to the community, flooded suddenly and washed away half of the community. It now is the location of only a few stores, churches, and houses. The majority of Elbert residents are involved in the agriculture sector. On June 15, 2009 at 1:46 pm, a large three quarter mile-wide, EF2 tornado touched down in rural fields west of the town. The tornado came within 2 miles of the town at its closest. The tornado destroyed a barn at a farm and damaged an airplane hangar. During the summer, Elbert is much busier due to a nearby Boy Scout Camp, Peaceful Valley Scout Ranch, which has 10,000 visitors annually. Additionally, 2.8 miles south of Elbert lies the JCC Ranch Camp, a Jewish camp owned by the Denver Jewish Community Center. Elbert lies along Elbert Road, which connects the town of Kiowa to U.S. Route 24. The largest nearby city is Castle Rock, which is about 45 minutes away via SH 86, which Elbert Road crosses at Kiowa. Colorado Springs is an hour drive via US 24.

— Freebase

Joes

Joes

Joes is a census-designated place and a U.S. Post Office in Yuma County, Colorado, United States. The population as of the 2010 Census was 80. The Joes Post Office has the ZIP Code 80822. In 1929, the Joes High School basketball team won the Colorado state basketball championship, defeating teams from much larger Colorado towns such as Fort Collins and Denver. The Joes team then traveled to Chicago to participate in a national championship. The smallest school in the tournament, the "Wonder Boys" advanced to the semifinals before losing to Classen High School of Oklahoma City. The success was notable given the small size of the school. Author Nell Propst, in The Boys From Joes noted that the ten-man basketball team represented half of the male enrollment in the school, which in 1929 numbered 20 boys and 16 girls. Their 1921 high school lacked a gymnasium, forcing the team to practice on a gravel court outside. The school's coach, Lane Sullivan, knew little about the sport of basketball and gained most of his knowledge from a book he obtained from a college basketball coach in Kansas. Joes returned in 1930 to win a second state championship.

— Freebase

Canyonlands National Park

Canyonlands National Park

Canyonlands National Park is a U.S. National Park located in southeastern Utah near the town of Moab and preserves a colorful landscape eroded into countless canyons, mesas and buttes by the Colorado River, the Green River, and their respective tributaries. The park is divided into four districts: the Island in the Sky, the Needles, the Maze, and the rivers themselves. While these areas share a primitive desert atmosphere, each retains its own character. Two large river canyons are carved into the Colorado Plateau by the Colorado River and Green River. Author Edward Abbey, a frequent visitor, described the Canyonlands as "the most weird, wonderful, magical place on earth—there is nothing else like it anywhere."

— Freebase

Sugarloaf

Sugarloaf

Sugarloaf was an American rock band in the 1970s, featuring lead vocalist and keyboardist Jerry Corbetta. They originated in Denver, Colorado. Corbetta founded the band with guitarist Bob Webber of the Moonrakers; the other initial bandmembers were drummer Bob MacVittie on drums and rhythm guitarist Veeder Van Dorn III, also from the Moonrakers, plus bassist Bob Raymond. The Moonrakers had previously released 4 singles on Tower; three of their songs are collected on the Colorado garage rock compilation album Highs in the Mid-Sixties, Volume 18, and another was released earlier on the Pebbles Volume 10 LP. The band was originally known as Chocolate Hair. They changed their name to Sugarloaf, named after a mountain outside of Boulder, Colorado, when they received their first recording contract. They are best known for two songs, both of which hit the top 10 charts in the United States: "Green-Eyed Lady" in the autumn of 1970 and "Don't Call Us, We'll Call You" in 1975. Other songs which charted on the Billboard Hot 100 were "Mother Nature's Wine", "Tongue in Cheek", and "Stars In Our Eyes". In addition, "West of Tomorrow" and "Myra Myra" were not hit singles, but received modest airplay at the time of their release on album rock radio stations.

— Freebase

Telluride

Telluride

The town of Telluride is the county seat and most populous town of San Miguel County in the southwestern portion of the U.S. state of Colorado. The town is a former silver mining camp on the San Miguel River in the western San Juan Mountains. The first gold mining claim was made in the mountains above Telluride in 1875 and early settlement of what is now Telluride followed. The town itself was founded in 1878 as "Columbia," but due to confusion with a California town of the same name, was renamed Telluride in 1887, for the gold telluride minerals found in other parts of Colorado. These telluride minerals were never located near Telluride, causing the town to be named for a mineral which never was mined there. However, the area's mines for some years provided zinc, lead, copper, silver, and other gold ores. Telluride sits in a box canyon. Steep forested mountains and cliffs surround it, with Bridal Veil Falls at the head of the canyon. Numerous weathered ruins of old mining operations dot the hillsides. A free gondola connects the town with its companion town, Mountain Village, Colorado, at the base of the ski area. Telluride and the surrounding area have featured prominently in pop culture. It is the subject of several popular songs. It is especially known for its ski resort and slopes during the winter as well as an extensive festival schedule during the summer.

— Freebase

Fourteener

Fourteener

In mountaineering terminology in the United States, a fourteener is a mountain that exceeds 14,000 feet above mean sea level. The importance of fourteeners is greatest in Colorado, which has the majority of such peaks in North America. Climbing all of Colorado's fourteeners is a popular pastime among peak baggers; another popular target is climbing all of the fourteeners in the contiguous United States. Various ski mountaineers have completed ski descents of all the Colorado fourteeners, and the first attempts are being made to complete ski descents of all U.S. fourteeners. Topographic elevation is the vertical distance above the reference geoid, a precise mathematical model of the Earth's sea level as an equipotential gravitational surface. Topographic prominence is the elevation difference between the summit and the highest or key col to a higher summit. Topographic isolation is the minimum great circle distance to a point of higher elevation. All elevations in the 48 states of the contiguous United States include an elevation adjustment from the National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 to the North American Vertical Datum of 1988. If a summit elevation or prominence has a range of values, the arithmetic mean is cited.

— Freebase

Osier

Osier

Osier is a populated place in Conejos County, Colorado. It is an old railroad settlement and train stop approximately halfway along the Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad where trains from both ends of the line meet and stop for lunch, making it possible for passengers to either continue in the same direction or return to their point of origin afterwards. This location by the Rio de Los Pinos river was the halfway point on the old toll road from Conejos, Colorado to Chama, New Mexico, and can be reached by Forest Road 103 from Colorado State Highway 17.

— Freebase

Gilman

Gilman

Gilman is an abandoned mining town in southeastern Eagle County, Colorado, United States. The U.S. Post Office at Minturn now serves Gilman postal addresses. Founded in 1886 during the Colorado Silver Boom, the town later became a center of lead and zinc mining in Colorado, centered around the now-flooded Eagle Mine. It was abandoned in 1984 by order of the Environmental Protection Agency because of toxic pollutants, including contamination of the ground water, as well as unprofitability of the mines. It is currently a ghost town on private property and is strictly off limits to the public. At the time of the abandonment, the mining operations were owned by Viacom International. As of 2007, The Ginn Company has plans to build a private ski resort with private home sites across Battle Mountain --- including development at the Gilman townsite. On February 27, 2008 the Minturn Town Council unanimously approved annexation and development plans for 4,300 acres of Ginn Resorts’ 1,700-unit Battle Mountain residential ski and golf resort; Ginn's Battle Mountain development includes much of the old Gilman townsite. On May 20, 2008 the town of Minturn approved the annexation in a public referendum with 87% of the vote.

— Freebase

Dinosaur National Monument

Dinosaur National Monument

Dinosaur National Monument is a National Monument located on the southeast flank of the Uinta Mountains on the border between Colorado and Utah at the confluence of the Green and Yampa Rivers. Although most of the monument area is in Moffat County, Colorado, the Dinosaur Quarry 40°26′29″N 109°18′04″W / 40.44139°N 109.30111°W is located in Utah just to the north of the town of Jensen, Utah. The nearest communities are Vernal, Utah and Dinosaur, Colorado. This park has fossils of dinosaurs including Allosaurus, Abydosaurus and various long-neck, long-tail sauropods. It was declared a National Monument on October 4, 1915.

— Freebase

Arvada

Arvada

The City of Arvada is a Home Rule Municipality located in Jefferson and Adams counties in the Denver metropolitan area of the U.S. State of Colorado. Olde Town Arvada is located 7 miles northwest of the Colorado State Capitol in Denver. The United States Census Bureau estimated 109,745 residents as of July 1, 2012, making Arvada the seventh most populous city in Colorado.

— Freebase

United States Air Force Academy

United States Air Force Academy

The United States Air Force Academy is a military school for officer candidates for the United States Air Force. Its campus is located immediately north of Colorado Springs in El Paso County, Colorado, United States. The Academy's stated mission is "to educate, train, and inspire men and women to become officers of character, motivated to lead the United States Air Force in service to our nation." It is the youngest of the five United States service academies, having graduated its first class in 1959. Graduates of the Academy's four-year program receive a Bachelor of Science degree, and most are commissioned as second lieutenants in the United States Air Force. The Academy is also one of the largest tourist attractions in Colorado, attracting more than a million visitors each year. Candidates for admission are judged on their academic achievement, demonstrated leadership, athletics and character. To gain admission, candidates must also pass a fitness test, undergo a thorough medical examination, and secure a nomination, which usually comes from the member of Congress in the candidate's home district. Recent incoming classes have had about 1,200 cadets; historically just under 1,000 of those will graduate. Tuition along with room and board are all paid for by the U.S. government. Cadets receive a monthly stipend, but incur a commitment to serve a number of years of military service after graduation.

— Freebase

Colorado Group

Colorado Group

The Colorado Group, also called the Colorado shale, is a stratigraphical unit of Cretaceous age in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin. It was first described in the Rocky Mountains front ranges of Colorado by A. Hague and S.E. Emmons in 1877.

— Freebase

Berthoud

Berthoud

Berthoud is a Statutory Town in Larimer and Weld counties in the U.S. state of Colorado. Berthoud is situated north of the Little Thompson River, approximately halfway between the cities of Fort Collins, Colorado and Denver, Colorado along the Front Range Urban Corridor. The population of Berthoud was 5,105 at the 2010 census.

— Freebase

Mount Elbert

Mount Elbert

Mount Elbert is the highest peak in the Rocky Mountains of North America, at 14,440 feet, the second-highest mountain in the contiguous United States, the highest of the fourteeners in Colorado, the fourteenth-highest mountain in the United States, and the highest point of the Sawatch Range. It is located in Lake County, approximately 10 miles southwest of Leadville. It lies within the San Isabel National Forest near Twin Lakes. The mountain was named after Colorado statesman Samuel Hitt Elbert, who was active in the formative period of the State and was territorial governor of Colorado in 1873. H. W. Stuckle of the Hayden Survey was the first to record an ascent of the peak in 1874. The mountain terrain has a varying level of difficulties and permits any enthusiast fit enough to attempt to reach the peak. Mount Elbert is fondly referred to as the “gentle giant” that tops all others in the Rocky Mountains. The northeast ridge is reported as the gentlest and the most classic.

— Freebase

Broomfield

Broomfield

The City and County of Broomfield is a suburb of the Denver metropolitan area in the State of Colorado of the United States. Broomfield has a consolidated city and county government which operates under Article XX, Sections 10-13 of the Constitution of the State of Colorado. The United States Census Bureau records stated that the population was 55,889 on April 1, 2010. Broomfield is the 16th most populous city and the 16th most populous county in Colorado. Broomfield is a part of the Denver-Aurora-Broomfield, CO Metropolitan Statistical Area and the Denver-Aurora-Boulder Combined Statistical Area.

— Freebase

Southwestern United States

Southwestern United States

The Southwestern United States is a region defined in different ways by different sources. Broad definitions include nearly a quarter of the United States, including Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas and Utah. Narrowly defined, the "core" Southwest is centered around the Four Corner states, with parts of the other states making up the beginnings and endings of the Southwest. The five main southwestern states; Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, and Nevada are also all considered part of the Mountain West, as well as the southwest. The total population of these states is roughly 19 million people. Most of it was a part of the Viceroyalty of New Spain, in the Spanish Empire, during the Modern Era. What is now California, Arizona, Nevada, Utah, New Mexico, and portions of Colorado, Wyoming, Oklahoma and Kansas were part of Mexico before the Mexican-American War and the Gadsden Purchase of 1853. Portions of some of the areas in the "divided" states, and including western parts of Texas, were those in dispute after the Texas Revolution.

— Freebase

Nunn

Nunn

Nunn is a Statutory Town in Weld County, Colorado, United States. The population was 471 at the 2000 census. The town is small rural agricultural community located on the Colorado Eastern Plains north of Greeley. Somewhat isolated, it is surrounded by flat cultivated countryside of the Colorado Piedmont in area historically known for raising cattle, sheep, sugar beets, beans and potatoes. The town was founded as a shipping point on the Denver Pacific Railroad in the late 19th century and today sits along the western side of U.S. Highway 85 between Greeley and Cheyenne, Wyoming. It consists of a small grid of single-family homes on gravel streets. The town suffered a decline in both its economy and population beginning in the middle 20th century, and today the former storefronts along Logan Street parallel to the highway are largely boarded up. The remaining industry in town consists of a grain elevator and a cafe, as well as several industrial farm facilities on the outskirts of town. A major landmark is a large water tower emblazoned with the words "watch Nunn grow". The remaining economic activity has largely shifted southward to the towns of Pierce and Ault. The town also has a town park and a municipal hall.

— Freebase

Blue spruce

Blue spruce

The Colorado spruce, blue spruce, green spruce white spruce, or Colorado blue spruce, is a species of pine tree native to the Rocky Mountains of the United States, from Colorado to Wyoming, and introduced as a popular ornamental tree found far beyond its native range.

— Freebase

John Denver

John Denver

Henry John Deutschendorf, Jr., known professionally as John Denver, was an American singer, songwriter, activist, and humanitarian. After traveling and living in numerous locations while growing up in his military family, Denver began his music career in folk music groups in the late 1960s. His greatest commercial success was as a solo singer, starting in the 1970s. Throughout his life, Denver recorded and released approximately 300 songs, about 200 of which he composed. He performed primarily with an acoustic guitar and sang about his joy in nature, his enthusiasm for music, and his relationship trials. Denver's music appeared on a variety of charts, including country and western, the Billboard Hot 100, and adult contemporary, in all earning him twelve gold and four platinum albums with his signature songs "Take Me Home, Country Roads", "Annie's Song", "Rocky Mountain High", and "Sunshine on My Shoulders". Denver further starred in films and several notable television specials in the 1970s and 1980s. In the following decades, he continued to record, but also focused on calling attention to environmental issues, lent his vocal support to space exploration, and testified in front of Congress to protest against censorship in music. He was known for his love of the state of Colorado, which he sang about numerous times. He lived in Aspen, Colorado, for much of his life, and influenced the governor to name him Poet Laureate of the state in 1974. The Colorado state legislature also adopted "Rocky Mountain High" as one of its state songs in 2007. Denver was an avid pilot, and died in his personal aircraft at the age of 53. He was one of the most popular acoustic artists of the 1970s.

— Freebase

Four Corners

Four Corners

The Four Corners is a region of the United States consisting of the southwestern corner of Colorado, northwestern corner of New Mexico, northeastern corner of Arizona and southeastern corner of Utah. The Four Corners area is named after the quadripoint where the boundaries of the four states meet, where the Four Corners Monument is located. It is the only location in the United States where four states meet. The majority of the Four Corners region belongs to semi-autonomous Native American nations, the largest of which is the Navajo Nation, followed by Hopi, Ute, and Zuni tribal reserves and nations. The Four Corners region is part of a larger region known as the Colorado Plateau and is mostly rural, rugged and arid. In addition to the monument, commonly visited areas within Four Corners include Monument Valley, Mesa Verde National Park, and Canyon de Chelly National Monument. The most populous city in the Four Corners region is Farmington, New Mexico, followed by Durango, Colorado.

— Freebase

Matheson

Matheson

Matheson is an unincorporated community and a U.S. Post Office in Elbert County, Colorado, United States. The Matheson Post Office has the ZIP Code 80830. Established in the mid-1880s by Duncan Matheson a native of Scotland. Mr. Matheson came to Elbert County Colorado with his wife Jessie and their six children, Donald, Robert, John, William, Norman, and Janet. As a farming and ranching community with a sideline industry of soft coal mining and the desire of personal independence, many from the east gathered in Matheson, Colorado. Early businesses in Matheson included a depot, lumber yard, hotel, bank, blacksmith, general store, livery, drug store, and of course a saloon. Dr. Lewis White was an early physician. A community church was constructed in 1918, and the St. Agnes Catholic Church at the west edge of town was built in 1921. It served until 1973. Matheson now has the Community Church of Matheson and holds services each Sunday for the town members and the surrounding community. A large brick school atop the hill south of town was constructed in 1920 and closed in 1969. The building still stands as a landmark of Matheson, along with St. Agnes Catholic Church at the west end of town.

— Freebase

canonical

canonic, canonical

appearing in a biblical canon

— Princeton's WordNet

canonical

canonic, canonical

of or relating to or required by canon law

— Princeton's WordNet

canonic

canonic, canonical

appearing in a biblical canon

— Princeton's WordNet

canonic

canonic, canonical

of or relating to or required by canon law

— Princeton's WordNet

canonisation

canonization, canonisation

(Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Church) the act of admitting a deceased person into the canon of saints

— Princeton's WordNet

canonist

canonist

a specialist in canon law

— Princeton's WordNet

canonization

canonization, canonisation

(Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Church) the act of admitting a deceased person into the canon of saints

— Princeton's WordNet

enigma canon

enigma canon, enigmatic canon, enigmatical canon, riddle canon

a canon in which the entrances of successive parts were indicated by cryptic symbols and devices (popular in the 15th and 16th centuries)

— Princeton's WordNet

enigmatical canon

enigma canon, enigmatic canon, enigmatical canon, riddle canon

a canon in which the entrances of successive parts were indicated by cryptic symbols and devices (popular in the 15th and 16th centuries)

— Princeton's WordNet

enigmatic canon

enigma canon, enigmatic canon, enigmatical canon, riddle canon

a canon in which the entrances of successive parts were indicated by cryptic symbols and devices (popular in the 15th and 16th centuries)

— Princeton's WordNet

prebendary

prebendary

a canon who receives a prebend for serving the church

— Princeton's WordNet

prebend

prebend

the stipend assigned by a cathedral to a canon

— Princeton's WordNet

recuse

recuse

challenge or except to a judge as being incompetent or interested, in canon and civil law

— Princeton's WordNet

riddle canon

enigma canon, enigmatic canon, enigmatical canon, riddle canon

a canon in which the entrances of successive parts were indicated by cryptic symbols and devices (popular in the 15th and 16th centuries)

— Princeton's WordNet

uniate

Uniate

of or relating to former Eastern Christian or Orthodox churches that have been received under the jurisdiction of the Church of Rome but retain their own rituals and practices and canon law

— Princeton's WordNet

canon

canon

A eucharistic prayer, particularly, the Roman Canon.

— Wiktionary

canonization

canonization

The final process or decree (following beatification) by which the name of a deceased person is placed in the catalogue (canon) of saints and commended to perpetual veneration and invocation.

— Wiktionary

dean

dean

a dignitary or presiding officer in certain church bodies, especially an ecclesiastical dignitary, subordinate to a bishop, in charge of a chapter of canon

— Wiktionary

Hibernensis

Hibernensis

Canon law in early medieval Ireland.

— Wiktionary

noncanonical

noncanonical

Not part of canon.

— Wiktionary

canonical

canonical

Present in a canon, religious or otherwise.

— Wiktionary

canonical

canonical

In conformity with canon law.

— Wiktionary

canonical

canonical

In the form of a canon.

— Wiktionary

canonical hours

canonical hours

The times of day at which canon law prescribes certain prayers to be said; matins with lauds, prime, tierce, sext, nones, vespers, and complin

— Wiktionary

Avestan

Avestan

An ancient Eastern Old Iranian language that was used to compose the sacred hymns and canon of the Zoroastrian Avesta.

— Wiktionary

devils advocate

devils advocate

A canon lawyer appointed by the Church to argue against the canonization of the proposed candidate.

— Wiktionary

prebendary

prebendary

An honorary canon of a cathedral or collegiate church.

— Wiktionary

pom-pom

pom-pom

A rapid-firing small-calibre canon used especially as an anti-aircraft gun

— Wiktionary

Anti-Stratfordian

Anti-Stratfordian

A person who, in the controversy over who wrote the Shakespeare canon, holds that it was likely written by someone other than William Shakespeare of Stratford-upon-Avon.

— Wiktionary

Ketuvim

Ketuvim

A subdivision of the Hebrew Testament (Tanakh) that is known in English, as "The Writings." It is composed of Songs (Psalms, and Song of Solomon), Proverbs, and 8 other books of the bible that were written near the close of the canon. These scriptures are viewed as less authoritative than the Torah.

— Wiktionary

fanon

fanon

Elements introduced by fans which are not in the official canon of a fictional world but are widely believed to be or treated as if canonical.

— Wiktionary

prebend

prebend

A stipend paid to a canon of a cathedral.

— Wiktionary

canonical hour

canonical hour

Any of certain times of day at which specified prayers are said according to canon law

— Wiktionary

canonized

canonized

Made part of the canon, made official.

— Wiktionary

deuterocanonical

deuterocanonical

Being of the second canon of the Old Testament of the Bible, and unaccepted by some Christians. A book which is part of the Apocrypha.

— Wiktionary

convalidation

convalidation

In Roman Catholic canon law, the making of a putative marriage valid following the removal of some impediment.

— Wiktionary

rescript

rescript

The official written answer of the Pope upon a question of canon law, or morals.

— Wiktionary

canonry

canonry

The office of a canon; a benefice or prebend in a cathedral or collegiate church.

— Wiktionary

expanded universe

expanded universe

In fiction, the extension of a media franchise (i.e. a television show, series of feature films, etc.) with other media (generally comics and original novels), often with the result being that the stories described in the other media are not considered canon in the original.

— Wiktionary

canonist

canonist

An expert in canon law

— Wiktionary

protocanonical

protocanonical

Describing the first (authorized) canon of books of scripture.

— Wiktionary

residentiary

residentiary

A canon who has an official residence

— Wiktionary

Infamy

Infamy

Infamy, in common usage, is notoriety gained from a negative incident or reputation. The word stems from the Latin infamia, antonym of fama. Infamy is a term of art in Roman Catholic Canon Law. The remainder of this article discusses infamy as defined by Canon Law. According to the Catholic Encyclopedia of 1913, infamy in the canonical sense is defined as the privation or lessening of one's good name as the result of the bad rating which he has, even among prudent men. It constitutes an irregularity, i.e. a canonical impediment which prevents one being ordained or exercising such orders as he may have already received. There are two types of infamy, infamy of law and infamy of fact.

— Freebase

Canon

Canon

Canon Inc. Kiyanon kabushiki-gaisha is a Japanese multinational corporation specialized in the manufacture of imaging and optical products, including cameras, camcorders, photocopiers, steppers, computer printers and medical equipment. Its headquarters are located in Ōta, Tokyo, Japan. Canon has a primary listing on the Tokyo Stock Exchange and is a constituent of the TOPIX index. It has a secondary listing on the New York Stock Exchange.

— Freebase

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is a Christian primitivist church that considers itself to be a restoration of the church founded by Jesus Christ. The church is headquartered in Salt Lake City, Utah, and has established congregations and built temples worldwide. According to the church, it has approximately 69,000 missionaries worldwide and claims a membership of over 14.7 million. It is ranked by the National Council of Churches as the fourth largest Christian denomination in the United States. It is the largest denomination in the Latter Day Saint movement started by Joseph Smith during the period of religious revival known as the Second Great Awakening. Adherents, sometimes referred to as Latter-day Saints or, more informally, Mormons, view faith in Jesus Christ and his atonement as the central tenet of their religion. LDS theology includes the Christian doctrine of salvation only through Jesus Christ, though LDS doctrines regarding the nature of God and the potential of mankind differ significantly from mainstream Christianity. The church has an open canon which includes four scriptural texts: the Bible, the Book of Mormon, the Doctrine and Covenants, and the Pearl of Great Price. Other than the Bible, the majority of the LDS canon constitutes revelation dictated by Joseph Smith and includes commentary and exegesis about the Bible, texts described as lost parts of the Bible, and other works believed to be written by ancient prophets.

— Freebase

Classicism

Classicism

Classicism, in the arts, refers generally to a high regard for a classical period, classical antiquity in the Western tradition, as setting standards for taste which the classicists seek to emulate. The art of classicism typically seeks to be formal and restrained: of the Discobolus Sir Kenneth Clark observed, "if we object to his restraint and compression we are simply objecting to the classicism of classic art. A violent emphasis or a sudden acceleration of rhythmic movement would have destroyed those qualities of balance and completeness through which it retained until the present century its position of authority in the restricted repertoire of visual images." Classicism, as Clark noted, implies a canon of widely accepted ideal forms, whether in the Western canon that he was examining in The Nude, or the literary Chinese classics or Chinese art, where the revival of classic styles is also recurring feature. Classicism is a force which is often present in post-medieval European and European influenced traditions; however, some periods felt themselves more connected to the classical ideals than others, particularly the Age of Enlightenment.

— Freebase

Holy day of obligation

Holy day of obligation

In the Catholic Church, holy days of obligation or holidays of obligation, less commonly called feasts of precept, are the days on which, as canon 1247 of the Code of Canon Law states: On Sundays and other holy days of obligation, the faithful are obliged to participate in the Mass.

— Freebase

Archy

Archy

Archy is a software system whose user interface poses a radically different approach for interacting with computers with respect to traditional graphical user interfaces. Designed by human-computer interface expert Jef Raskin, it embodies his ideas and established results about human-centered design described in his book The Humane Interface. These ideas include content persistence, modelessness, a nucleus with commands instead of applications, navigation using incremental text search, and a zooming user interface. The system was being implemented at the Raskin Center for Humane Interfaces under Raskin's leadership. Since his death in February 2005 the project was continued by his team, which later shifted focus to the Ubiquity extension for the Firefox browser. Archy in large part builds on Raskin's earlier work with the Apple Macintosh, Canon Cat, SwyftWare, and Ken Perlin's Pad ZUI system. It can be described as a combination of Canon Cat's text processing functions with a modern ZUI. Archy is more radically different from established systems than are Sun Microsystems' Project Looking Glass and Microsoft Research's "Task Gallery" prototype. While these systems build upon the WIMP desktop paradigm, Archy has been compared as similar to the Emacs text editor, although its design begins from a clean slate.

— Freebase

Book of Ruth

Book of Ruth

The Book of Ruth is a book of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. In the Jewish canon it is included in the third division, or the Writings; in the Christian canon it is treated as a history book and placed between Judges and 1 Samuel. It is named after its central figure, Ruth the Moabitess, the great-grandmother of David, and, according to the Gospel of Matthew, an ancestress of Jesus. The book tells of Ruth's accepting the God of the Israelites as her God and the Israelite people as her own. In Ruth 1:16 and 17 Ruth tells Naomi, her Israelite mother in law, "Where you go I will go, and where you stay I will stay. Your people will be my people and your God my God. Where you die I will die, and there I will be buried. May the Lord deal with me, be it ever so severely, if even death separates you and me." The book is held in esteem by Jews who fall under the category of Jews-by-choice, as is evidenced by the considerable presence of Boaz in rabbinic literature. As well, the "Book of Ruth" functions liturgically, being read during the Jewish holiday of Shavuot. The book is traditionally ascribed to the prophet Samuel, but does not name its author. A date during the monarchy is suggested by the book's interest in the ancestry of David, but Ruth's identity as a non-Israelite and the stress on the need for an inclusive attitude towards foreigners suggest an origin in the 5th century BCE, when intermarriage had become controversial.

— Freebase

Auxiliary bishop

Auxiliary bishop

An auxiliary bishop, in the Roman Catholic Church, is an additional bishop assigned to a diocese because the diocesan bishop is unable to perform his functions, the diocese is so extensive that it requires more than one bishop to administer, or the diocese is attached to a royal or imperial office needing the diocesan bishop's protracted location at court. According to canon law, no bishop can be ordained without title to a certain and distinct episcopal see which he governs either actually or potentially, therefore auxiliary bishops are titular bishops to sees that no longer exist. Canon law requires that the diocesan bishop appoints each auxiliary bishop as vicar general or episcopal vicar of the diocese.

— Freebase

Inkjet printing

Inkjet printing

Inkjet printing is a type of computer printing that creates a digital image by propelling droplets of ink onto paper. Inkjet printers are the most commonly used type of printer, and range from small inexpensive consumer models to very large professional machines that can cost tens of thousands of dollars. The concept of inkjet printing originated in the 19th century, and the technology was first extensively developed in the early 1950s. Starting in the late 1970s inkjet printers that could reproduce digital images generated by computers were developed, mainly by Epson, Hewlett-Packard, and Canon. In the worldwide consumer market, four manufacturers account for the majority of inkjet printer sales: Canon, HP, Epson, and Lexmark, a 1991 spin-off from IBM. The emerging ink jet material deposition market also uses inkjet technologies, typically printheads using piezoelectric crystals, to deposit materials directly on substrates. There are two main technologies in use in contemporary inkjet printers: continuous and Drop-on-demand.

— Freebase

Trucco

Trucco

Trucco is an Italian and later English lawn game played with heavy balls, large-headed cues called tacks, rings, and sometimes an upright pin. The game was popular from at least the 17th century to the early 20th century. It was a forerunner of croquet, and itself probably evolved from ground billiards, which predates trucco, but uses very similar equipment. Enquire Within Upon Everything, a "vast congregation of useful hints and receipts" published in the Victorian era, describes the game thus: Canons are made by the player striking two balls successively with his own ball fairly delivered from his spoon. Thus ... a clever player may make a large number of points — five, seven, or more at a stroke: two the first canon, two for a second canon, and three for the ring. This, however, is very seldom accomplished. The oldest name in English seems to be "trucks" or "truck" from the Italian trucco and Spanish troco, meaning "billiard". Trucco was popular as a country house pastime in the 19th century. Under the name "lawn billiards", it appears as an alternative to croquet in a number of books of games and pastimes of the period. Trucco was also played at pubs with large lawns, but apparently died out by the time of World War II.

— Freebase

CompactFlash

CompactFlash

CompactFlash is a mass storage device format used in portable electronic devices. The format was first specified and produced by SanDisk in 1994. It is now used for a variety of devices; most contain flash memory but some, such as the Microdrive, contain a hard disk. CompactFlash became the most successful of the early memory card formats, surpassing Miniature Card, SmartMedia, and PC Card Type I in popularity. Subsequent formats, such as MMC/SD, various Memory Stick formats, and xD-Picture Card offered stiff competition. Most of these cards are smaller than CompactFlash while offering comparable capacity and speed. Proprietary memory card formats for use in professional audio and video, such as P2 and SxS, are physically larger, faster, and costlier. CompactFlash remains popular and is supported not only in many high end consumer devices, but in some professional applications as well. As of 2012, both Canon and Nikon use CompactFlash as storage medium for their flagship digital still cameras. Canon also chose CompactFlash as the recording medium for its professional high-definition tapeless video cameras. Ikegami professional video cameras can record digital video onto CompactFlash cards through an adaptor.

— Freebase

Fan fiction

Fan fiction

Fan fiction is a broadly-defined fan labor term for stories about characters or settings written by fans of the original work, rather than by the original creator. Works of fan fiction are rarely commissioned or authorized by the original work's owner, creator, or publisher; also, they are almost never professionally published. Because of this, stories often contain a disclaimer stating that the creator of the work owns none of the characters. Fan fiction, therefore, is defined by being both related to its subject's canonical fictional universe and simultaneously existing outside the canon of that universe. Most fan fiction writers assume that their work is read primarily by other fans, and therefore tend to presume that their readers have knowledge of the canon universe in which their works are based. Media scholar Henry Jenkins explains the correlation between transmedia storytelling and fan fiction:

— Freebase

Tathāgata

Tathāgata

Tathāgata is a Pali and Sanskrit word that the Buddha of the Pali Canon uses when referring to himself. The term is often thought to mean either "one who has thus gone" or "one who has thus come". This is interpreted as signifying that the Tathagata is beyond all coming and going – beyond all transitory phenomena. However there are other interpretations and the precise original meaning of the word is not certain. The Buddha is quoted on numerous occasions in the Pali Canon as referring to himself as the Tathagata instead of using the pronouns me, I or myself. This may be meant to emphasize by implication that the teaching is uttered by one who has transcended the human condition, one beyond the otherwise endless cycle of rebirth and death, i.e. beyond suffering. Monks, in the world with its devas, Mara and Brahma, in this generation with its ascetics and brahmins, devas and humans, whatever is seen, heard, sensed and cognized, attained, searched into, pondered over by the mind—all that is fully understood by the Tathagata. That is why he is called the Tathagata. The term also occurs as a synonym for arahant, identifying one who has attained the ultimate in the holy life. There is even a sense in which such a one is no longer human... "a tathāgata, a superior state of being".

— Freebase

Lake Success

Lake Success

Lake Success is a village and a part of Great Neck in Nassau County, New York in the United States. The population was 2,934 at the 2010 census. Lake Success is in the Town of North Hempstead on northwest Long Island. Lake Success was the temporary home of the United Nations from 1946 to 1951, occupying the headquarters of the Sperry Gyroscope Company on Marcus Avenue. It is also the home of Canon U.S.A., Inc., though Canon U.S.A. is due to move its corporate headquarters to Melville, New York.

— Freebase

Kanon

Kanon

Kanon is a Japanese adult visual novel developed by Key released on June 4, 1999 for Windows PCs. Key later released versions of Kanon without the erotic content, and the game was ported to the Dreamcast, PlayStation 2 and PlayStation Portable. The story follows the life of Yuichi Aizawa, a high school student who returns to a city he last visited seven years prior, and he has little recollection of the events from back then. He meets several girls and slowly regains his lost memories. The gameplay in Kanon follows a branching plot line which offers pre-determined scenarios with courses of interaction, and focuses on the appeal of the five female main characters by the player character. The game once ranked as the second best-selling PC game sold in Japan, and charted in the national top 50 several more times afterwards. Kanon has sold over 300,000 units across several platforms. Following the game's release, Kanon made several transitions into other media. Two manga series were serialized in Dengeki Daioh and Dragon Age Pure. Comic anthologies, light novels and art books were also published, as were audio dramas and several music albums. Toei Animation produced a 13-episode anime television series in 2002 and an original video animation episode in 2003. Kyoto Animation produced a 24-episode anime series in 2006. The 2006 anime is licensed by Funimation who releases it in North America. The 2006 anime plays on the association between Kanon and the musical term canon by using Pachelbel's Kanon D-dur, or Canon in D major, as a background piece at certain instances throughout the series.

— Freebase

Femslash

Femslash

Femslash is a subgenre of slash fan fiction which focuses on romantic and/or sexual relationships between female fictional characters. Typically, characters featured in femslash are heterosexual in the canon universe; however, similar fan fiction about lesbian characters is commonly labeled as femslash for convenience. The term is generally applied only to fanworks based on Western fandoms; the nearest anime/manga equivalents are more often called yuri and shōjo-ai fanfiction. "Saffic" is a portmanteau of Sapphic and fiction. "Altfic" as a term for fanfiction about loving relationships between women was popularized by Xena fans. As of 2006, femslash is enjoying increasing popularity and is the "dominant form" of slash in some fandoms. There is less femslash than there is slash based on male couples; for example, in the Lord of the Rings fandom, only a small number of femslash stories are written about the Arwen/Éowyn pairing in comparison to slash between the male characters. It has been suggested that heterosexual female slash authors generally do not write femslash, and that it is rare to find a fandom with two sufficiently engaging female characters. Janeway/Seven is the main Star Trek femslash pairing, as only they have "an on-screen relationship fraught with deep emotional connection and conflict". Although it is debated whether fanfiction about canon lesbians such as Willow and Tara of Buffy the Vampire Slayer counts as "slash", their relationship storylines are more coy than heterosexual ones, which entices Willow/Tara femslash authors to fill in the gaps in the known relationship storyline. It is "relatively recently" that male writers have begun writing femslash, and this entry of males into femslash has occurred within Buffy femslash. The femslash authorship is mostly female.

— Freebase

Didache

Didache

The Didache or The Teaching of the Twelve Apostles is a brief early Christian treatise, dated by most scholars to the late first or early 2nd century. The first line of this treatise is "Teaching of the Lord to the Gentiles by the Twelve Apostles" The text, parts of which constitute the oldest surviving written catechism, has three main sections dealing with Christian ethics, rituals such as baptism and Eucharist, and Church organization. It is considered the first example of the genre of the Church Orders. The work was considered by some of the Church Fathers as part of the New Testament but rejected as spurious or non-canonical by others, eventually not accepted into the New Testament canon. The Ethiopian Orthodox Church "broader canon" includes the Didascalia, a work which draws on the Didache. Lost for centuries, a Greek manuscript of the Didache was rediscovered in 1873 by Philotheos Bryennios, Metropolitan of Nicomedia in the Codex Hierosolymitanus. A Latin version of the first five chapters was discovered in 1900 by J. Schlecht. The Didache is considered part of the category of second-generation Christian writings known as the Apostolic Fathers.

— Freebase

Cannon

Cannon

a kind of type. See Canon

— Webster Dictionary

Cannon bone

Cannon bone

see Canon Bone

— Webster Dictionary

Canon

Canon

the collection of books received as genuine Holy Scriptures, called the sacred canon, or general rule of moral and religious duty, given by inspiration; the Bible; also, any one of the canonical Scriptures. See Canonical books, under Canonical, a

— Webster Dictionary

Canonicals

Canonicals

the dress prescribed by canon to be worn by a clergyman when officiating. Sometimes, any distinctive professional dress

— Webster Dictionary

Canonicate

Canonicate

the office of a canon; a canonry

— Webster Dictionary

Canonicity

Canonicity

the state or quality of being canonical; agreement with the canon

— Webster Dictionary

Canonist

Canonist

a professor of canon law; one skilled in the knowledge and practice of ecclesiastical law

— Webster Dictionary

Canonization

Canonization

the final process or decree (following beatifacation) by which the name of a deceased person is placed in the catalogue (canon) of saints and commended to perpetual veneration and invocation

— Webster Dictionary

Canonize

Canonize

to rate as inspired; to include in the canon

— Webster Dictionary

Canonry

Canonry

a benefice or prebend in a cathedral or collegiate church; a right to a place in chapter and to a portion of its revenues; the dignity or emoluments of a canon

— Webster Dictionary

Catch

Catch

a humorous canon or round, so contrived that the singers catch up each other's words

— Webster Dictionary

Clementine

Clementine

of or pertaining to Clement, esp. to St. Clement of Rome and the spurious homilies attributed to him, or to Pope Clement V. and his compilations of canon law

— Webster Dictionary

Decretal

Decretal

an authoritative order or decree; especially, a letter of the pope, determining some point or question in ecclesiastical law. The decretals form the second part of the canon law

— Webster Dictionary

Deuterocanonical

Deuterocanonical

pertaining to a second canon, or ecclesiastical writing of inferior authority; -- said of the Apocrypha, certain Epistles, etc

— Webster Dictionary

Deuterogamy

Deuterogamy

a second marriage, after the death of the first husband of wife; -- in distinction from bigamy, as defined in the old canon law. See Bigamy

— Webster Dictionary

Extravagant

Extravagant

certain constitutions or decretal epistles, not at first included with others, but subsequently made a part of the canon law

— Webster Dictionary

Illuminati

Illuminati

members of certain associations in Modern Europe, who combined to promote social reforms, by which they expected to raise men and society to perfection, esp. of one originated in 1776 by Adam Weishaupt, professor of canon law at Ingolstadt, which spread rapidly for a time, but ceased after a few years

— Webster Dictionary

Imitation

Imitation

one of the principal means of securing unity and consistency in polyphonic composition; the repetition of essentially the same melodic theme, phrase, or motive, on different degrees of pitch, by one or more of the other parts of voises. Cf. Canon

— Webster Dictionary

Infinite

Infinite

capable of endless repetition; -- said of certain forms of the canon, called also perpetual fugues, so constructed that their ends lead to their beginnings, and the performance may be incessantly repeated

— Webster Dictionary

Infinito

Infinito

infinite; perpetual, as a canon whose end leads back to the beginning. See Infinite, a., 5

— Webster Dictionary

Interstice

Interstice

an interval of time; specifically (R. C. Ch.), in the plural, the intervals which the canon law requires between the reception of the various degrees of orders

— Webster Dictionary

Preface

Preface

the prelude or introduction to the canon of the Mass

— Webster Dictionary

Preponderancy

Preponderancy

the excess of weight of that part of a canon behind the trunnions over that in front of them

— Webster Dictionary

Protocanonical

Protocanonical

of or pertaining to the first canon, or that which contains the authorized collection of the books of Scripture; -- opposed to deutero-canonical

— Webster Dictionary

Purgation

Purgation

the clearing of one's self from a crime of which one was publicly suspected and accused. It was either canonical, which was prescribed by the canon law, the form whereof used in the spiritual court was, that the person suspected take his oath that he was clear of the matter objected against him, and bring his honest neighbors with him to make oath that they believes he swore truly; or vulgar, which was by fire or water ordeal, or by combat. See Ordeal

— Webster Dictionary

Rehabilitate

Rehabilitate

to invest or clothe again with some right, authority, or dignity; to restore to a former capacity; to reinstate; to qualify again; to restore, as a delinquent, to a former right, rank, or privilege lost or forfeited; -- a term of civil and canon law

— Webster Dictionary

Rescript

Rescript

the official written answer of the pope upon a question of canon law, or morals

— Webster Dictionary

Reservation

Reservation

a term of canon law, which signifies that the pope reserves to himself appointment to certain benefices

— Webster Dictionary

Residentiary

Residentiary

having residence; as, a canon residentary; a residentiary guardian

— Webster Dictionary

Revelation

Revelation

specifically, the last book of the sacred canon, containing the prophecies of St. John; the Apocalypse

— Webster Dictionary

Round

Round

a short vocal piece, resembling a catch in which three or four voices follow each other round in a species of canon in the unison

— Webster Dictionary

Title

Title

a section or division of a subject, as of a law, a book, specif. (Roman & Canon Laws), a chapter or division of a law book

— Webster Dictionary

Apocrypha, The

Apocrypha, The

a literature of sixteen books composed by Jews, after the close of the Hebrew canon, which though without the unction of the prophetic books of the canon, are instinct, for most part, with the wisdom which rests on the fear of God and loyalty to His law. The word Apocrypha means hidden writing, and it was given to it by the Jews to distinguish it from the books which they accepted as canonical.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Colorado Tick Fever

Colorado Tick Fever

A febrile illness characterized by chills, aches, vomiting, leukopenia, and sometimes encephalitis. It is caused by the COLORADO TICK FEVER VIRUS, a reovirus transmitted by the tick Dermacentor andersoni.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Dermacentor

Dermacentor

A widely distributed genus of TICKS, in the family IXODIDAE, including a number that infest humans and other mammals. Several are vectors of diseases such as TULAREMIA; ROCKY MOUNTAIN SPOTTED FEVER; COLORADO TICK FEVER; and ANAPLASMOSIS.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Encephalitis, Tick-Borne

Encephalitis, Tick-Borne

Encephalitis caused by neurotropic viruses that are transmitted via the bite of TICKS. In Europe, the diseases are caused by ENCEPHALITIS VIRUSES, TICK-BORNE, which give rise to Russian spring-summer encephalitis, central European encephalitis, louping ill encephalitis, and related disorders. Powassan encephalitis occurs in North America and Russia and is caused by the Powassan virus. ASEPTIC MENINGITIS and rarely encephalitis may complicate COLORADO TICK FEVER which is endemic to mountainous regions of the western United States. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp14-5)

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Southwestern United States

Southwestern United States

The geographic area of the southwestern region of the United States. The states usually included in this region are Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Coltivirus

Coltivirus

A genus of REOVIRIDAE infecting Ixodidae ticks and transmitted by them to humans, deer, and small animals. The type species is COLORADO TICK FEVER VIRUS.

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Filgrastim

Filgrastim

A hematopoietic growth factor which promotes proliferation and maturation of neutrophil granulocytes. Clinically it is effective in decreasing the incidence of febrile neutropenia in patients with non-myeloid malignancies receiving myelosuppressive therapy or in reducing the duration of neutropenia and neutropenia-related clinical sequelae in patients with non-myeloid malignancies undergoing myeloblastive chemotherapy followed by BMT. It has also been used in AIDS patients with CMV retinitis being treated with GANCICLOVIR. (Gelman CR, Rumack BH & Hess AJ (eds): DRUGDEX(R) System. MICROMEDEX, Inc., Englewood, Colorado (Edition expires 11/30/95))

— U.S. National Library of Medicine

Parker

Parker

The Town of Parker is a Home Rule Municipality in Douglas County, Colorado, United States. As a self-declared "Town" under the Home Rule Statutes, Parker is the second most populous town in the county; Castle Rock is the most populous. In recent years, Parker has become a commuter town at the southeasternmost corner of the Denver Metropolitan Area. As of the 2010 census, the town population was 45,297, over 145 times the population of 285 when Parker incorporated in 1981. Parker is now the 19th most populous municipality in the State of Colorado.

— Freebase

Austin

Austin

Austin is the capital city of the U.S. state of Texas and the seat of Travis County. Located in Central Texas on the eastern edge of the American Southwest, Austin is the 11th most populous city in the United States of America and the fourth most populous city in the state of Texas. It was the third-fastest-growing large city in the nation from 2000 to 2006. Austin is also the second largest state capital in the United States after Phoenix. Austin has a population of 842,592. The city is the cultural and economic center of the Austin–Round Rock–San Marcos metropolitan area, which had an estimated population 1,783,519, making it the 34th-largest metropolitan statistical area in the United States. In the 1830s, pioneers began to settle the area in central Austin along the Colorado River. After Republic of Texas Vice President Mirabeau B. Lamar visited the area during a buffalo-hunting expedition between 1837 and 1838, he proposed that the republic's capital then located in Houston, Texas, be relocated to the area situated on the north bank of the Colorado River near the present-day Ann W. Richards Congress Avenue Bridge. In 1839, the site was officially chosen as the republic's new capital and was incorporated under the name Waterloo. Shortly thereafter, the name was changed to Austin in honor of Stephen F. Austin, the "Father of Texas" and the republic's first secretary of state.

— Freebase

Denver

Denver

The City and County of Denver is the largest city and the capital of the U.S. state of Colorado. Denver is also the second most populous county in Colorado after El Paso County. Denver is a consolidated city and county located in the South Platte River Valley on the western edge of the High Plains just east of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. The Denver downtown district is located immediately east of the confluence of Cherry Creek with the South Platte River, approximately 12 miles east of the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. Denver is nicknamed the Mile-High City because its official elevation is exactly one mile or 5,280 feet above sea level, making it one of the highest major cities in the United States. The 105th meridian west of Greenwich passes through Union Station and is the temporal reference for the Mountain Time Zone. The 2011 estimated population of Denver was 619,968 which ranks it as the 23rd most populous U.S. city. The 10-county Denver-Aurora-Broomfield, CO Metropolitan Statistical Area had an estimated 2011 population of 2,599,504 and ranked as the 21st most populous U.S. metropolitan statistical area. The 12-county Denver-Aurora-Boulder Combined Statistical Area had an estimated 2011 population of 3,157,520, which ranks as the 16th most populous U.S. metropolitan area. Denver is the center and the most populous city of the Front Range Urban Corridor, an oblong urban region stretching across 18 counties in two states with an estimated 2011 population of 4,423,936. Denver is the most populous city within a 500-mile radius and the third most populous city in the Mountain West and the Southwestern United States after Phoenix, Arizona and El Paso, Texas.

— Freebase

Zephyr

Zephyr

Zephyr was a blues-based hard rock band formed in 1969 in Boulder, Colorado by guitarist Tommy Bolin, keyboardist John Faris, David Givens on bass guitar, Robbie Chamberlin on drums and Candy Givens on vocals. Although the charismatic performances by Candy Givens were originally the focal point for the band, it was the flashy guitar work of Tommy Bolin that the band is best remembered for. After Bolin left, he was replaced by Jock Bartley, and the band recorded the album Sunset Ride, their second for Warner Brothers Records. The album is still in print and is much loved by a small but loyal following. On Sunset Ride, Candy Givens displayed her gifts as a singer, composer, and harmonica player. The album was produced by David Givens who also authored the majority of the tunes. As a result of his stint with Zephyr, Bartley went on to a successful career with Gram Parsons and Firefall and drummer, Michael Wooten, went on to play for several years with Carole King. Various versions of Zephyr continued to play in Colorado until Candy's death in 1984. The release of "Heartbeat" in 1982 was promoted by a video that incorporated very early examples of analog computer animation combined with live action.

— Freebase

Mack

Mack

Mack is an unincorporated town and a U.S. Post Office located about 10 miles east of the Colorado/Utah border in Mesa County, Colorado, United States. The Mack Post Office has the ZIP Code 81525. Mack is part of the Grand Junction Metropolitan Statistical Area. The town was named after the president of Mack Motor Company, because it was chosen to build the line from the remote Uintah Basin to the railroad, to transport Gilsonite. Mack is a community that is 22 miles west of Grand Junction just north of Interstate 70. The Country Jam Ranch is located near the town of Mack and is known for being a Music Festival Destination. This is a permanent festival site created for music festivals, including Country Jam, an event that has been held since 1992 and one that draws thousands of country music fans to the area.

— Freebase

Cimarron River

Cimarron River

The Cimarron River extends 698 miles across New Mexico, Oklahoma, Colorado, and Kansas. The headwaters flow from Johnson Mesa west of Folsom in northeastern New Mexico. The river enters the Oklahoma Panhandle near Kenton, crosses the southeastern corner of Colorado into Kansas, re-enters the Oklahoma Panhandle, re-enters Kansas, and finally returns to Oklahoma where it joins the Arkansas River at Keystone Reservoir west of Tulsa, Oklahoma. The river's name comes from the early Spanish name, Río de los Carneros Cimarrón, which is usually translated as River of the Wild Sheep. Early American explorers also called it the Red Fork of the Arkansas because of water's red color. In New Mexico and extreme western Oklahoma the river is known as the Dry Cimarron River. This is by contrast to a wetter Cimarron River located further west. The Dry Cimarron River is not completely dry but sometimes its water disappears entirely under the sand in the river bed. The Dry Cimarron Scenic Byway follows the river from Folsom to the Oklahoma border. In Oklahoma the river flows along the southern edges of Black Mesa, the highest point in that state. As it first crosses the Kansas border, the river flows through the Cimarron National Grassland.

— Freebase

Aurora

Aurora

The City of Aurora is a Home Rule Municipality in the U.S. state of Colorado, spanning Arapahoe and Adams counties, with the extreme southeastern portion of the city extending into Douglas County. Aurora is one of the principal cities of the Denver-Aurora-Broomfield, CO Metropolitan Statistical Area. The city's population was 325,078 in the 2010 Census, which makes it the third most populous city in the state of Colorado and the 56th most populous city in the United States. Denver and Aurora are the principal cities of the Denver Metropolitan Area, which in 2007 had an estimated population of 2,464,866. However, Denver and Aurora combined make up less than half of the Metro Denver Area's population and Aurora has approximately half the population of Denver. The estimated population of Metropolitan Denver was 2,998,878 in 2007.

— Freebase

Leadville

Leadville

Leadville is a statutory city that is the county seat of, and the only municipality in, Lake County, Colorado, United States. Situated at an elevation of 10,152 feet, Leadville is the highest incorporated city and the second highest incorporated municipality in the United States. A former silver mining town that lies near the headwaters of the Arkansas River in the heart of the Rocky Mountains, the city includes the Leadville Historic District, which preserves many historic structures and sites from Leadville's dynamic mining era. In the late 19th century, Leadville was the second most populous city in Colorado, after Denver. The United States Census Bureau reported an official count of 2,602 inhabitants in the 2010 census.

— Freebase

Salton Sea

Salton Sea

The Salton Sea is a shallow, saline, endorheic rift lake located directly on the San Andreas Fault, predominantly in California's Imperial and Coachella Valleys. The lake occupies the lowest elevations of the Salton Sink in the Colorado Desert of Imperial and Riverside counties in Southern California. Like Death Valley, it is below sea level. Currently, its surface is 226 ft below sea level. The deepest point of the sea is 5 ft higher than the lowest point of Death Valley. The sea is fed by the New, Whitewater, and Alamo rivers, as well as agricultural runoff, drainage systems, and creeks. The Sea was created by a flood in 1905, in which water from the Colorado River flowed into the area. While it varies in dimensions and area with fluctuations in agricultural runoff and rainfall, the Salton Sea averages 15 mi by 35 mi. With an average area of roughly 525 sq mi, the Salton Sea is the largest lake in California. Average annual inflow is 1,360,000 acre·ft, which is enough to maintain a maximum depth of 52 ft and a total volume of about 7,500,000 acre·ft. The lake's salinity, about 44 g/L, is greater than that of the waters of the Pacific Ocean, but less than that of the Great Salt Lake. The concentration increases by about 1 percent annually.

— Freebase

North American Aerospace Defense Command

North American Aerospace Defense Command

North American Aerospace Defense Command is a combined organization of Canada and the United States that provides aerospace warning, air sovereignty, and defense for the two countries. Headquarters NORAD and the NORAD/USNORTHCOM command center are located at Peterson Air Force Base in El Paso County, near Colorado Springs, Colorado. The nearby Cheyenne Mountain nuclear bunker has the Alternative Command Center.

— Freebase

Gila River

Gila River

The Gila River is a 649-mile tributary of the Colorado River flowing through New Mexico and Arizona in the United States. The river drains an arid watershed of nearly 60,000 square miles that lies mainly within the U.S. but also extends into northern Sonora, Mexico. Indigenous peoples have lived along the river for at least 2,000 years, establishing complex agricultural societies before European exploration of the region began in the 1500s. However, Euro-Americans did not permanently settle the Gila River watershed until the mid-19th century. During the twentieth century, human development of the Gila River watershed necessitated the construction of large diversion and flood control structures on the river and its tributaries, and consequently the Gila now contributes only a small fraction of its historic flow to the Colorado. The natural discharge of the river is around 1900 cfs, and is now only 247 cfs. These engineering projects have transformed much of the river valley and its surrounds from arid desert to irrigated land, and supply water to over five million people that live in the watershed.

— Freebase

San Juan Mountains

San Juan Mountains

The San Juan Mountains are a high and rugged mountain range in the Rocky Mountains in southwestern Colorado. The area is highly mineralized and figured in the gold and silver mining industry of early Colorado. Major towns, all old mining camps, include Creede, Lake City, Silverton, Ouray, and Telluride. Large scale mining has ended in the region, although independent prospectors still work claims throughout the range. The last large scale mines were the Sunnyside Mine near Silverton, which operated until late in the 20th century and the Idarado Mine on Red Mountain Pass that closed down in the 1970s. Famous old San Juan mines include the Camp Bird and Smuggler Union mines, both located between Telluride and Ouray. The Summitville mine was the scene of a major environmental disaster in the 1990s when the liner of a cyanide-laced tailing pond began leaking heavily. Summitville is in the Summitville caldera, one of many extinct volcanoes making up the San Juan volcanic field. One, La Garita Caldera, is 35 miles in diameter. Large beds of lava, some extending under the floor of the San Luis Valley, are characteristic of the eastern slope of the San Juans.

— Freebase

Rolling Stock

Rolling Stock

Rolling Stock was a newspaper of ideas and a chronicle of the 1980s published in Boulder, Colorado by Ed Dorn and Jennifer Dunbar Dorn. The paper had a regional motif, but featured correspondents covering the world, including Woody Haut on Labor, John Daley on Law, Roger Echo-Hawk on Native American Affairs, Nick Sedgwick on Golf, Stan Brakhage on Film, Jane Brakhage on Lump Gulch, Dick Dillof in Montana, Lucía Berlin in California, Tom Raworth, London & Cambridge, Fielding Dawson, New York; Jeremy Prynne, English Letters, Marilyn Krysl in China, James Inskeep, Southern Colorado, Tom Clark, Southern California, and Bob Lewis, Akron, Ohio & Abroad. Graphics were regularly supplied by Tom Clark, John Dunbar and Ann Mikolowski among many others.

— Freebase

Amazonite

Amazonite

Amazonite is a green variety of orthoclase feldspar. The name is taken from that of the Amazon River, from which certain green stones were formerly obtained, but it is doubtful whether green feldspar occurs in the Amazon area. Amazonite is a mineral of limited occurrence. Formerly it was obtained almost exclusively from the area of Miass in the Ilmen mountains, 50 miles southwest of Chelyabinsk, Russia, where it occurs in granitic rocks. More recently, high-quality crystals have been obtained from Pike's Peak, Colorado, where it is found associated with smoky quartz, orthoclase, and albite in a coarse granite or pegmatite. Crystals of amazonite can also be found in Crystal Park, El Paso County, Colorado. Other localities in the United States which yield amazonite include the Morefield Mine in Amelia, Virginia. It is also found in pegmatite in Madagascar and in Brazil. Because of its bright green color when polished, amazonite is sometimes cut and used as a gemstone, although it is easily fractured. For many years, the source of amazonite's color was a mystery. Naturally, many people assumed the color was due to copper because copper compounds often have blue and green colors. More recent studies suggest that the blue-green color results from small quantities of lead and water in the feldspar.

— Freebase

Sawpit

Sawpit

The Town of Sawpit is a Statutory Town located in San Miguel County, Colorado, United States. The town population was 25 at the 2000 census, making Sawpit the third least populous incorporated town in the state of Colorado. The Telluride Post Office serves Sawpit.

— Freebase

Gould

Gould

Gould is a small unincorporated community in southeastern Jackson County, Colorado, United States. It is located on State Highway 14, southeast of Walden in North Park. The community is situated in the valley of the Middle Fork of the Michigan River between Owl Mountain and Gould Mountain. The landscape is a patchwork of wetlands, pine forest, aspen groves, and sagebrush. A tavern, campgrounds, community center, and several other businesses cater to local residents and sportsmen. The largest public attraction is the Colorado State Forest Headquarters and Moose Visitor Center. Located at 40.526°N, 106.026°W, the community lies at an elevation of 8913 feet.

— Freebase

Thornton

Thornton

The city of Thornton is a Home Rule Municipality in Adams and Weld counties in the U.S. state of Colorado and a suburb of the Denver-Aurora-Broomfield, CO Metropolitan Statistical Area. Thornton is 10 miles northeast of the state's capital, Denver. The United States Census Bureau that the city population was 118,772 on April 1, 2010, a 44.2% increase from the 2000 Census population of 82,384. Thornton is the sixth most populous city in the state of Colorado and the 213th most populous city in the United States.

— Freebase

Ralphie the Buffalo

Ralphie the Buffalo

Ralphie the Buffalo is the name of the live mascot of the University of Colorado Buffaloes. Ralphie has been called one of the best live mascots in sports, and she is often erroneously labeled male. The team of "Ralphie Handlers," who are varsity student-athletes, run Ralphie around Folsom Field, the University of Colorado's football field, in a horse shoe pattern before each half of each home game. It takes five Ralphie Handlers to run her around the field: two up front on each side to steer her around the field, two in the back on each side to help guide her, and one in far back to control her speed, called the "loop" position. Ralphie can reach speeds of 25 miles per hour. Female bison are used because they are smaller and less aggressive, as well as for insurance reasons, although Ralphie has knocked over her handlers on more than one occasion. Because of this, whether or not Ralphie runs is at the sole discretion of her handlers, and her run may be canceled if she is unusually nervous or upset.

— Freebase

Siderophyllite

Siderophyllite

Siderophyllite is a rare member of the mica group of silicate minerals with formula KFe2+2AlO10(F,OH)2. The mineral occurs in nepheline syenite pegmatites and granite and aplite greisens. It is associated with microcline and astrophyllite at Pikes Peak, Colorado. It is also found in the alkali pegmatites of Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec. It was first described in 1880 for an occurrence near Pikes Peak, Colorado. The name derives from the Greek sideros, iron, and phyllon, leaf, in reference to its iron rich composition and perfect basal cleavage.

— Freebase

Berryite

Berryite

Berryite is a mineral with the formula Pb3(Ag,Cu)5Bi7S16. It occurs as gray to blue-gray monoclinic prisms. It is opaque and has a metallic luster. It has a Mohs hardness of 3.5 and a specific gravity of 6.7. It was first identified in 1965 using X-ray diffraction by mineralogist Leonard Gascoigne Berry. It is found in Park and San Juan counties in Colorado. It occurs in sulfide bearing quartz veins in Colorado and with siderite-rich cryolite in Ivigtut, Greenland.

— Freebase

Cripple Creek

Cripple Creek

The City of Cripple Creek is a statutory city that is the county seat of Teller County, Colorado, United States. Cripple Creek is a former gold mining camp located 44 miles southwest of Colorado Springs near the base of Pikes Peak. The Cripple Creek Historic District, which received National Historic Landmark status in 1961, includes part or all of city and includes surrounding area. The population was 1,189 at the 2010 census.

— Freebase

Rorschach Test

Rorschach Test

Rorschach Test is an American industrial band from Denver, Colorado, formed by James Baker after he was expelled from the church. Baker was a young priest based in Denver until being defrocked in the early 1990s for his allegedly heretical questioning of church doctrine. He began writing music and lyrics after leaving the church. Soon after, he met guitarist Benjamin Anderson, from Yuma, Arizona, and the two began writing songs together. Baker and band members began composing "metallic, industrial songs with a definite debt to Ministry and Skinny Puppy but including elements of conventional metal." Rorschach Test formed in Denver, Colorado, and later relocated to Seattle where they were signed to the now defunct label Slip Disc Records out of Chicago, Illinois. They enjoyed a successful career during Seattle's lively music scene in the 90's. They toured North America playing shows with the likes of Korn, Type O Negative, Genitorturers, and Queensrÿche. After breaking up in the early 2000s, the band has reformed, and is in the works recording a new album, American EyeDull.

— Freebase

Ina Bauer

Ina Bauer

Ina Bauer is a German retired competitive figure skater. She is the 1957-1959 German national champion. She twice placed fourth at the World Figure Skating Championships, once in 1958 and once in 1959. During this time she was training in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Bauer is the inventor of the eponymous skating element. She starred in two movies with Austrian alpine skier Toni Sailer.

— Freebase

Terrain park

Terrain park

A terrain park is an outdoor recreation area containing terrain that allows skiers, snowboarders and snowbikers to perform tricks. Terrain parks have their roots in skateparks and many of the features are common to both. From their inception to as recently as the 1980s, ski areas generally banned jumping and any kind of aerial maneuvers, usually under penalty of revoking the offender's lift ticket. By the 1990s, most areas provided snow features specifically catering to aerial snowsports. One of the first in-bounds terrain parks was the snowboard park built in 1990 at Vail's resort. The park was copied soon in other resorts. Today most resorts have terrain parks, with many having multiple parks of various difficulty. Some resorts are almost exclusively terrain parks such as Echo Mountain Park in Idaho Springs, Colorado and Snow Park in Wanaka, New Zealand. In Colorado there has been a recent trend for defunct resorts such as Squaw Pass to be reopened, catering to terrain park users.

— Freebase

Gambel's Quail

Gambel's Quail

The Gambel's Quail is a small ground-dwelling bird in the New World quail family. It inhabits the desert regions of Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, Texas, and Sonora; also New Mexico-border Chihuahua and the Colorado River region of Baja California. The Gambel's quail is named in honor of William Gambel, a 19th century naturalist and explorer of the Southwestern United States.

— Freebase

Colorado tick fever

Colorado tick fever

Colorado tick fever is a viral infection transmitted from the bite of an infected tick. It should not be confused with the bacterial tick-borne infection, Rocky Mountain spotted fever. The type species of the genus Coltivirus, Colorado tick fever virus infects haemopoietic cells, particularly erythrocytes, which explains how the virus is transmitted by ticks and also accounts for the incidence of transmission via blood transfusion.

— Freebase

Colorado potato beetle

Colorado potato beetle

The Colorado potato beetle, also known as the Colorado beetle, the ten-striped spearman, the ten-lined potato beetle or the potato bug, is an important pest of potato crops. It is approximately 10 millimetres long, with a bright yellow/orange body and five bold brown stripes along the length of each of its elytra. It can easily be confused with its close cousin and look-alike, the false potato beetle.

— Freebase

Coffinite

Coffinite

Coffinite is a uranium-bearing silicate mineral with formula: U(SiO4)1-x(OH)4x. It occurs as black incrustations, dark to pale-brown in thin section. It has a grayish black streak. It has a brittle to conchoidal fracture. The hardness of coffinite is between 5 and 6. It was first described in 1954 for an occurrence at the La Sal No. 2 Mine, Beaver Mesa, Mesa County, Colorado, USA, and named for American geologist Reuben Clare Coffin. It has widespread global occurrence in Colorado Plateau-type uranium ore deposits of uranium and vanadium. It replaces organic matter in sandstone and in hydrothermal vein type deposits. It occurs in association with uraninite, thorite, pyrite, marcasite, roscoelite, clay minerals and amorphous organic matter.

— Freebase

Criss-Cross

Criss-Cross

Criss-Cross was an artist's cooperative that formed in Colorado in the early 1970s. Having evolved out of Drop City, the 1960s artists' community, C-C focused on issues surrounding "pattern and structure" and became associated with the 70's art movement "P&D". In 1974, the five founders, Gene Bernofsky, JoAnn Bernofsky, Richard Kallweit, Charles DiJulio and Clark Richert, artists and filmmakers from Drop City, regrouped in Boulder, Colorado to start the new artist's cooperative, Criss-Cross. C-C's purpose, like Drop City's, was to function in a "synergetic" interaction between peers to create experimental artistic innovation. Between 1974 and 1980 the participants in Criss-Cross expanded to include filmmaker Fred Worden, University of Arkansas painter/printmaker Marilyn Nelson, and New York artists Gloria Klein, George Woodman and others. ⁕Between 1974 and 1980 published the nationally distributed avant garde art periodical "Criss-Cross Art Communications" curated national and international art exhibitions focused on "pattern and structure". ⁕Criss-Cross constructed the first "61-Zone System" at the Art Research Center in Kansas City.

— Freebase

Desert tortoise

Desert tortoise

The desert tortoises are species of tortoise native to the Mojave desert and Sonoran desert of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico and the Sinaloan thornscrub of northwestern Mexico. Gopherus agassizii is distributed in western Arizona, southeastern California, southern Nevada, and southwestern Utah. The species name agassizii is in honor of Swiss-American zoologist Jean Louis Rodolphe Agassiz. Recently, on the basis of DNA, geographic, and behavioral differences between desert tortoises east and west of the Colorado River, it was decided that two species of desert tortoises exist: the Agassiz's desert tortoise and Morafka's desert tortoise. Gopherus morafkai occurs east of the Colorado River in Arizona as well as in the states of Sonora, Sinaloa, Mexico. This species may be a composite of two species. The desert tortoises live approximately 30 to 50 years; they grow slowly and generally have low reproductive rates. They spend most of time in burrows, rock shelters, and pallets to regulate body temperature and reduce water loss. They are most active after seasonal rains and are inactive during most of the year. This inactivity helps reducing water loss during hot periods, whereas winter hibernation facilitates survival during freezing temperatures and low food availability. Desert tortoises can tolerate water, salt, and energy imbalances on a daily basis, which increases their lifespan.

— Freebase

McClintock

McClintock

McClintock is a town in Colorado, United States, named for W.W. McClintock, a San Luis Valley rancher and entrepreneur. The town is located just south of Blanca, Colorado.

— Freebase

Picacho

Picacho

Picacho is an unincorporated community in Imperial County, California. It is located on the Colorado River 29 miles south-southeast of Palo Verde, at an elevation of 203 feet. Picacho, now a ghost town, was an early mining town on the Colorado River. It was named Picacho after a nearby mountain of the same name. The original townsite itself is beneath Imperial Reservoir, but remains of some of the ore mills are above the lake level. The area is within Picacho State Recreation Area. The site is now registered as California Historical Landmark #193.

— Freebase

Wheat Ridge

Wheat Ridge

The City of Wheat Ridge is a Home Rule Municipality located in Jefferson County, Colorado, United States. Wheat Ridge is a western suburb of Denver. The Wheat Ridge Municipal Center is approximately 5 miles west-northwest of the Colorado State Capitol in Denver. The city had a population of 30,166 as of the 2010 Census.

— Freebase

Windom Peak

Windom Peak

Windom Peak is a fourteener in the Needle Mountains, a subrange of the San Juan Mountains in the U.S. state of Colorado. It is located in the Weminuche Wilderness in La Plata County approximately 13 miles south of Silverton. Windom Peak is one of three fourteeners in the Needle Mountains; the other two are Mount Eolus and Sunlight Peak. Windom and Sunlight lie on the east side of Twin Lakes, in upper Chicago Basin, while Eolus lies on the west side. All three peaks are relatively remote by Colorado standards, and have a strong wilderness character; however they can be popular in summer.

— Freebase

if_then_else

if_then_else

if_then_else is the sixth album by the Dutch alternative rock band The Gathering. The album was released on 25 July 2000 through Century Media. It was recorded at the Koeienverhuurbedrijf Studio, Purmerend, and at S&K Studio, Doetinchem between January and March, 2000, under the bands own guidance with Zlaya Hadzich as co-producer. The album was engineered by Zlaya Hadzich and Dick Kemper, mixed and mastered on Pro Tools by Attie Bauw at Bauwhaus Studio, Amsterdam in April 2000. The album furthered the band's shift from gothic metal to progressive/experimental rock textures. It was released in Europe in 2000 by Century Media Records. Its title combines two frequently used computer programming notations: ⁕The if, then, else conditional statement ⁕The use of all lowercase, underscore-separated words "Colorado Incident" is about a real-life experience of having to cancel a gig in Colorado because of overbooking, exhaustion and the band members' illnesses. Fans were frustrated, and the band was later very apologetic about this "incident". An excerpt of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland is heard between "Analog Park" and "Herbal Movement".

— Freebase

Lake Powell

Lake Powell

Lake Powell is a reservoir on the Colorado River, straddling the border between Utah and Arizona. It is a major vacation spot that around 2 million people visit every year. It is the second largest man-made reservoir, by maximum water capacity, in the United States behind Lake Mead, storing 24,322,000 acre feet of water when full. Lake Powell was created by the flooding of Glen Canyon by the controversial Glen Canyon Dam, which also led to the creation of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, a popular summer destination. The reservoir is named for explorer John Wesley Powell, a one-armed American Civil War veteran who explored the river via three wooden boats in 1869. In 1972, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area was established. It is public land managed by the National Park Service, and available to the public for recreational purposes. It lies in parts of Garfield, Kane, and San Juan counties in southern Utah, and Coconino County in northern Arizona. The northern limits of the lake extend at least as far as the Hite Crossing Bridge. A map centered at the confluence of the Escalante River 37°17′22″N 110°52′20″W / 37.28944°N 110.87222°W with the Colorado River gives a good view of the extent of the lake.³

— Freebase

Last Chance

Last Chance

Last Chance is an unincorporated community in Washington County, Colorado, United States. Last Chance is situated at the intersection of U.S. Highway 36 and State Highway 71 in a sparsely populated area of eastern Colorado. The town was supposedly so named because it was once the only place for travelers to secure fuel and provisions for many miles in any direction. The U.S. Post Office at Woodrow now serves Last Chance postal addresses.

— Freebase

Yucca House National Monument

Yucca House National Monument

Yucca House National Monument is a United States National Monument located in Montezuma County, Colorado between the towns of Towaoc and Cortez, Colorado. Yucca House is a large, unexcavated Ancestral Puebloan archaeological site.

— Freebase

Zebulon Pike

Zebulon Pike

Zebulon Montgomery Pike was an American brigadier general and explorer for whom Pikes Peak in Colorado is named. As a United States Army captain in 1806–1807, he led the Pike Expedition to explore and document the southern portion of the Louisiana territory and to find the headwaters of the Red River, during which he recorded the discovery of what later was called Pikes Peak. Captured by the Spanish while wandering in present-day Colorado after his party got confused in its travels, Pike and his men were taken to Chihuahua, present-day Mexico and questioned by the governor. They were released later in 1807 at the border of Louisiana. In 1810 Pike published an account of his expeditions, a book so popular that it was translated into French, German and Dutch for publication in Europe. He later achieved the rank of brigadier general in the Army, serving during the War of 1812. He was killed during the Battle of York, which the United States won.

— Freebase

Aquilegia caerulea

Aquilegia caerulea

Aquilegia caerulea is a species of Aquilegia flower native to the Rocky Mountains from Montana south to New Mexico and west to Idaho and Arizona. Its common name is Colorado Blue Columbine; sometimes it is called "Rocky Mountain Columbine", but this properly refers to Aquilegia saximontana. It is a herbaceous perennial plant growing to 20–60 cm tall. The flowers are very variable in color, from pale blue to white, pale yellow and pinkish; very commonly the flowers are bicolored, with the sepals a different shade to the petals. Aquilegia caerulea is the state flower of Colorado. It is also an ornamental plant in gardens, with numerous cultivars selected for different flower colors. There are five varieties: ⁕Aquilegia caerulea var. alpina ⁕Aquilegia caerulea var. caerulea ⁕Aquilegia caerulea var. daileyae ⁕Aquilegia caerulea var. ochroleuca ⁕Aquilegia caerulea var. pinetorum

— Freebase

Pitkin

Pitkin

Pitkin is a Statutory Town in Gunnison County, Colorado, United States. The population was 66 at the 2010 census, down from 124 at the 2000 Census. Pitkin was founded in 1879, and is said to be Colorado's first mining camp west of the Continental Divide. Originally named Quartzville, it was renamed to honor Governor Frederick W. Pitkin.

— Freebase

Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment

Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment

The Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment is a NASA-sponsored satellite mission that provides state-of-the-art measurements of incoming X-ray, ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared, and total solar radiation. The measurements provided by SORCE specifically address long-term climate change, natural variability and enhanced climate prediction, and atmospheric ozone and UV-B radiation. These measurements are critical to studies of the Sun; its effect on our Earth system; and its influence on humankind. SORCE measures the Sun's output with the use of state-of-the-art radiometers, spectrometers, photodiodes, detectors, and bolometers engineered into instruments mounted on a satellite observatory. The SORCE satellite orbits around the Earth accumulating solar data. Spectral measurements identify the irradiance of the Sun by characterizing the Sun's energy and emissions in the form of color that can then be translated into quantities and elements of matter. Data obtained by the SORCE experiment can be used to model the Sun's output and to explain and predict the effect of the Sun's radiation on the Earth's atmosphere and climate. The SORCE spacecraft launched on January 25, 2003 on a Pegasus XL launch vehicle to provide NASA's Earth Science Enterprise with precise measurements of solar radiation. It launched into a 645-km, 40-degree orbit and is operated by the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics at the University of Colorado at Boulder, Colorado, USA. It will continue the precise measurements of total solar irradiance that began with the ERB instrument in 1979 and has continued to the present with the ACRIM series of measurements. SORCE will also provide the measurements of the solar spectral irradiance from 1 nm to 2000 nm, accounting for 95% of the spectral contribution to the total solar irradiance. SORCE carries four instruments including the Total Irradiance Monitor, Solar Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment, Spectral Irradiance Monitor, and the XUV Photometer System.

— Freebase

Wiggins

Wiggins

Wiggins is a Statutory Town in Morgan County, Colorado, United States. The population was 893 at the 2010 census. The community was established in 1882 as the Burlington railroad depot of Corona. Around 1900, Corona was renamed in honor of Oliver P. Wiggins, who served as a guide and scout for Captain John C. Frémont, on some of his explorations through northern Colorado in the 1840s. He also accompanied Kit Carson for 12 years on his expeditions. Technically, there is still a portion of the town which is Corona. It is the north side of the railroad tracks. The part to the east was named after Oliver P. Wiggins, and that is Wiggins. The whole thing was never officially renamed.

— Freebase

Hart InterCivic

Hart InterCivic

Hart InterCivic Inc. is a privately held United States company that provides elections, and print solutions to jurisdictions nationwide. While headquartered in Austin, Texas, Hart products are used by hundreds of jurisdictions nationwide, including as of October 2012, all counties of Texas, the entire states of Hawaii and Oklahoma, half of Washington and Colorado, and certain counties in Ohio, California, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia and Washington. Hart entered the elections industry in 1912, printing ballots for Texas counties. The company, formerly a division of Hart Graphics, Inc., was established as a subsidiary called Hart Forms & Services in 1989. In 1995, to better communicate its full scope of document management services, Hart Forms & Services changed its name to Hart Information Services, Inc. During the next five years, Hart Information Services rapidly expanded its market presence through the acquisition of three major election services providers: Texas County Printing & Services, Computer Link Corporation, and Worldwide Election Systems. Worldwide was the developer of the eSlate, Hart's direct recording electronic voting solution. The eSlate was specifically designed to accommodate the needs of voter with disabilities. It is not a touch-screen solution, but uses a Select Wheel and digital push-button interface.

— Freebase

SunEdison

SunEdison

Sun Edison LLC owns and operates power plants in North America and provides solar-generated energy to commercial, government, and utility customers. The company provides solar energy services, which include renewable power, monitoring, marketing, renewable portfolio standards, and solar tariff services. Sun Edison LLC was founded in 2003 by Jigar Shah and is headquartered in Beltsville, Maryland with additional offices in Denver, Colorado and San Clemente, Sacramento, and Ontario, California. In January 2008 SunEdison started construction of seven megawatts of photovoltaic solar power plants in Spain. In December 2007, SunEdison completed an 8.22 MW, 80-acre solar power system in Colorado. SunEdison has over 52 MW of hands-on installation experience and over 31 MW under management. In November of 2009, SunEdison was purchased for $200 million by MEMC Electronic Materials, with potential for an additional $123 million earnout in stock and cash based on business performance. In October 2011, SunEdison moved their headquarters from Maryland to Belmont, California.

— Freebase

eSoft

eSoft

eSoft is a Colorado-based company specializing in integrated security solutions including secure content management and unified threat management appliances. Privately held eSoft, based in the foothills of Broomfield, Colorado, has developed the award-winning InstaGate and ThreatWall security appliances, as well as modular software bundles called ThreatPaks that provide Email and Web security.

— Freebase

Nobodys

Nobodys

The Nobodys were an American Punk rock from Colorado Springs, Colorado. Mixing four-chord Ramones-inspired rock anthems with an unadulterated pornography fixation, their 1996 debut album on Hopeless Records, Short Songs for Short Attention Spans was produced by Joe Queer of The Queers. They toured extensively for Short Songs around the US, Europe and Canada. In 1997 they released a second full length LP, Smell of Victory. Appearances on the Hopelessly Devoted to You II and Cinema Beer Nuts compilations as well as tours with The Queers, Chixdiggit and Guttermouth won more fans. With vinyl splits and EPs, the band made it easy to find this material by compiling it on their third full length release, Greatasstits. They continued into the early 2000s before calling it quits.

— Freebase

Cuchara

Cuchara

Cuchara is an unincorporated community in Huerfano County, Colorado, United States. It is located near a former ski resort in the mountains south of the town of La Veta. Its altitude is 8,468 feet. State Highway 12 travels through Cuchara as it approaches Trinidad to the southeast. Cuchara is situated on the eastern slopes of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains in south-central Colorado. Cucharas Pass, at almost 10,000 feet, is a few miles south of the town of Cuchara. The Cucharas River flows on the outskirts of town. The San Isabel National Forest surrounds the town.

— Freebase

Fairplay

Fairplay

Fairplay is a statutory town that is the county seat and the most populous town of Park County, Colorado, United States. Fairplay is located in South Park at an elevation of 9,953 feet. The town is the fifth-highest incorporated place in the State of Colorado. The population was 679 at the U.S. Census 2010.

— Freebase

University of Colorado Boulder Ralphie the Buffalo

University of Colorado Boulder Ralphie the Buffalo

Ralphie the Buffalo is the name of the live mascot of the University of Colorado Buffaloes. Ralphie has been called one of the best live mascots in sports, and she is often erroneously labeled male. The team of "Ralphie Handlers," who are varsity student-athletes, run Ralphie around Folsom Field, the University of Colorado's football field, in a horse shoe pattern before each half of each home game. It takes five Ralphie Handlers to run her around the field: two up front on each side to steer her around the field, two in the back on each side to help guide her, and one in far back to control her speed, called the "loop" position. Ralphie can reach speeds of 25 miles per hour. Female bison are used because they are smaller and less aggressive, as well as for insurance reasons, although Ralphie has knocked over her handlers on more than one occasion. Because of this, whether or not Ralphie runs is at the sole discretion of her handlers, and her run may be canceled if she is unusually nervous or upset.

— Freebase

KDBN

KDBN

KDBN is an American radio station licensed to serve the community of Parachute, Colorado. The station is currently owned by Townsquare Media. KDBN broadcasts an active rock music format that simulcasts KKNN in Delta, Colorado.

— Freebase

Hoyt

Hoyt

Hoyt is a small unincorporated community in Morgan County, Colorado, United States. The 1996 feet high Hoyt Radio Tower is located near Hoyt. The guyed radio mast is the tallest tower in Colorado and one of the tallest towers on Earth. It is home to a cemetery, pig farm, and sugar beet dump. The U.S. Post Office at Wiggins now serves Hoyt postal addresses.

— Freebase

Sand Creek massacre

Sand Creek massacre

The Sand Creek Massacre was an atrocity in the Indian Wars that occurred on November 29, 1864, when a 700-man force of Colorado Territory militia attacked and destroyed a peaceful village of Cheyenne and Arapaho encamped in southeastern Colorado Territory, killing and mutilating an estimated 70–163 Indians, about two-thirds of whom were women and children. The location has been designated the Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site and is administered by the National Park Service.

— Freebase

iYogi

iYogi

iYogi is a leading provider of online subscription-based technical support services offered directly to consumers and small businesses across a wide range of computing and communications devices and software. Leveraging its proprietary iMantra software technology platform, iYogi delivers on-demand support services to over two million customers globally. The company also provides thousands of single incident sessions every day and its services are available on a 24/7 basis 365 days a year. iYogi's services are currently available in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and the GCC countries. Cited as the leading provider of remote tech support services, iYogi recently also launched on-ground support services in the United States.High Levels of Customer Satisfaction - iYogi offers incident-based services for tech support and long-term unlimited subscription plans from one to three years. To connect to iYogi tech experts, customers can choose from various channels that include web-based, real-time phone, chat, e-mail, or on-site engineers support. It offers a comprehensive suite of service offerings, including diagnosis, repair, installation, and maintenance services for multiple devices that include PCs, laptops, tablets, smartphones, digital cameras, MP3 players, printers, routers, and other peripherals. iYogi also provides support for Apple devices. One-stop-shop - The wide range of service offerings by iYogi is brand-agnostic, which makes it a "one stop shop" for many customers' technology support needs. Customers can rely on iYogi to address many of their technical support needs and avoid the complexities of working with multiple support providers associated with each individual device or software application they purchase. iYogi provides computer repair services for desktops, laptops & tablets and troubleshooting of printers, routers, Operating Systems, drivers, monitors, MACs, iPads / androids, etc. iYogi covers all major brands, including Apple, Microsoft, HP, Lenovo, Dell, Sony, Toshiba, Canon, etc. Unmatched Platform-as-a-Service - iYogi's proprietary technology platform, called iMantra gets smarter with every customer interaction. It documents every problem, solution, and relevant hardware and software specs while capturing each customer's demographic information, and creates a behavioral profile. All this information is available at the fingertips of iYogi Tech Experts, combining a powerful knowledge base with a comprehensive set of tools and technology expertise that can be accessed on demand to deliver quality tech support any time of the day and any time of the year.

— CrunchBase

PFSweb

PFSweb

PFSweb develops and deploys comprehensive end-to-end eCommerce solutions for Fortune 1000, Global 2000 and brand name companies, including interactive marketing services, global fulfillment and logistics and high-touch customer care. The company serves a multitude of industries and company types, including such clients as P&G, LEGO, AAFES, Riverbed, InfoPrint Solutions Company (a joint venture company owned by Ricoh and International Business Machines), Hawker Beechcraft Corp., Roots Canada Ltd. and Xerox.Through its wholly owned eCOST.com subsidiary, PFSweb also serves as a leading multi-category online discount retailer of high-quality new, “close-out” and manufacturer recertified brand-name merchandise for consumers and small to medium size business buyers. The eCOST.com brand markets approximately 275,000 different products from leading manufacturers such as Sony, Hewlett-Packard, Denon, JVC, Canon, Nikon, Panasonic, Toshiba, Microsoft, Dyson, Kitchen Aid, Braun, Black & Decker, Cuisinart, Coleman, and Citizen primarily over the Internet and through direct marketing.

— CrunchBase

PresenterNet

PresenterNet

Most Web Conferencing systems really do nothing more that allow you to show others what your computer desktop looks like. PresenterNet connects you with your audience in real time and allows everyone to participate in the conversation by interacting with the information being presented. Whether you’re making an important sales call, or training a new staff member or conducting a marketing webinar, no system is easier to use and has more flexibility than PresenterNet.We have over 25 years’ experience designing, producing and delivering world-class interactive multimedia presentations for some of the world’s largest companies such as Toshiba, Compaq, NEC, Sharp, Epson, Canon, AT&T and Philips. We have now brought that expertise to remote audiences by elevating Web Conferencing to new heights.If you want to create real impact with your web conference using interactivity, animation, motion graphics, video and sound, then desktop sharing simply won’t work. With PresenterNet’s proprietary InterActor(TM) technology, your presentation materials act as data-gathering work-horses collecting opinions, choices and preferences demonstrated by your audience members. You can conduct real-time surveys, solicit input on any topic or even conduct a test at the end of a training session.

— CrunchBase

Steelwedge Software

Steelwedge Software

Founded in 2000, Steelwedge supercharges sales and operations planning (S&OP) and integrated business planning (IBP) with the power of automated collaboration and analytics. The Steelwedge platform builds consensus among sales, marketing, finance, and the supply chain so that companies can understand fluctuating demand, balance sales and capacity trade-offs, connect S&OP with financial planning, and measure performance against strategic revenue and customer service targets. The company has more software-as-a-service (SaaS) S&OP deployments than all of its competitors combined. Steelwedge serves industry leaders including Applied Materials, Canon, Hospira, Emerson, NVIDIA, Sara Lee, Sony and Syngenta.

— CrunchBase

uBid Holdings

uBid Holdings

Since 1997, uBid.com has been a top auction and fixed price marketplace offering new, overstock, closeout and recertified products covering more than 25 categories. Our 6 million members love us because they know they’ll find bargains on everything from Toys to Televisions - great merchandise that comes only from approved manufacturers and other certified sellers.One area uBid.com excels in is being able to offer BIG DEALS on some of the coolest technology and electronics around. You'll find products from Apple, HP, Lenovo, Dell, Sony, Samsung, Microsoft, NEC, Epson, Phillips, Kodak, Panasonic, Canon, LG and more.We’ve got great partnerships with top manufacturers and certified resellers and our dream team of merchandising whizzes uncovering the best bargains for our customers!uBid.com also powers a sister site called RedTag.com, where we feature a Daily Deal, Flash Sales and other fixed price promotions.“Like” us on Facebook and Follow us on Twitter and Pinterest at uBidDeals! SpecialtiesOnline Retail Marketplace, Auction Style Listings, Fixed Price Merchandise

— CrunchBase

All Copy Products

All Copy Products

All Copy Products, LLC provides document solutions to small-to-medium businesses. The company offers technology products for copying, scanning, faxing, postage metering, data archiving, electronic filing, and storage solutions, as well as equipment, service, support, and supplies. Its products include printers, wide format printers, scanners, fax machines, consumables/print media, copiers, digital presses, address imagers, envelope openers, folder/inserters, mailing systems, mailroom furniture, postal scales, tabber and labelers, office systems, production print systems, and finishing accessories, as well as multifunction products and mailroom software. The company also provides supplies for inkjet printers, fax and office machines, color imaging and laser printers, and copiers. In addition, it offers data storage and accessories, cleaning equipment and supplies, ribbons and bar code supplies, and computer peripherals and accessories, as well as paper, labels, and transparencies. All Copy Products, LLC was founded in 1975 and is based in Denver, Colorado with additional offices in Denver, Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Fort Collins, Colorado; and Tempe, Arizona.

— CrunchBase

alaska rein orchid

Alaska rein orchid, Habenaria unalascensis

similar to coastal rein orchid but with smaller flowers; Alaska to Baja California and east to the Dakotas and Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

allium acuminatum

Hooker's onion, Allium acuminatum

a common North American wild onion with a strong onion odor and an umbel of pink flowers atop a leafless stalk; British Columbia to California and Arizona and east to Wyoming and Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

anasazi

Anasazi

a Native American who lived in what is now southern Colorado and Utah and northern Arizona and New Mexico and who built cliff dwellings

— Princeton's WordNet

anemone canadensis

Canada anemone, Anemone Canadensis

common summer-flowering woodland herb of Labrador to Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet

arapahoe

Arapaho, Arapahoe

a member of a tribe of Plains Indians formerly inhabiting eastern Colorado and Wyoming (now living in Oklahoma and Wyoming)

— Princeton's WordNet

arapaho

Arapaho, Arapahoe

a member of a tribe of Plains Indians formerly inhabiting eastern Colorado and Wyoming (now living in Oklahoma and Wyoming)

— Princeton's WordNet

arches national park

Arches National Park

a national park in Utah including mountains and the Colorado River gorge and huge rock formations caused by erosion

— Princeton's WordNet

arkansas

Arkansas, Arkansas River

a river that rises in the Rocky Mountains in Colorado and flows southeast through Kansas and Oklahoma and through Arkansas to become a tributary of the Mississippi River

— Princeton's WordNet

arkansas river

Arkansas, Arkansas River

a river that rises in the Rocky Mountains in Colorado and flows southeast through Kansas and Oklahoma and through Arkansas to become a tributary of the Mississippi River

— Princeton's WordNet

austin

Austin, capital of Texas

state capital of Texas on the Colorado River; site of the University of Texas

— Princeton's WordNet

bluebell

prairie gentian, tulip gentian, bluebell, Eustoma grandiflorum

one of the most handsome prairie wildflowers having large erect bell-shaped bluish flowers; of moist places in prairies and fields from eastern Colorado and Nebraska south to New Mexico and Texas

— Princeton's WordNet

boulder

Boulder

a town in north central Colorado; Rocky Mountains resort center and university town

— Princeton's WordNet

canada anemone

Canada anemone, Anemone Canadensis

common summer-flowering woodland herb of Labrador to Colorado

— Princeton's WordNet


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