Definitions containing c'est la vie*

We've found 224 definitions:

Non est factum

Non est factum

Non est factum is a doctrine in contract law that allows a signing party to escape performance of the agreement. A claim of non est factum means that the signature on the contract was signed by mistake, without knowledge of its meaning, but was not done so negligently. A successful plea would make the contract void ab initio. Non est factum is difficult to claim as it does not allow for negligence on the part of the signatory, i.e. failure to read a contract before signing it will not allow for non est factum. In a successful case, the fundamental basis of the signed contract must be completely different from what was intended. In Lloyds Bank v Waterhouse a father acted as a guarantor to his son's debt when purchasing a farm. The father was illiterate and signed the bank document under the belief that he was acting as the guarantor for the farm only, when the contract was actually for all the debt accumulated by the son. As he was illiterate, this was a mistake as to the document signed and the father was successful in claiming non est factum. Another notable case on non est factum is Foster v Mackinnon LR 4 CP 704 where an elderly man signed a bill of exchange but was only shown the back of it. He was granted a new trial.

— Freebase

Eau de vie

Eau de vie

An eau de vie is a clear, colorless fruit brandy that is produced by means of fermentation and double distillation. The fruit flavor is typically very light. In English speaking countries, eau de vie refers to a distilled beverage made from fruit other than grapes. Similar terms may be local translations or may specify the fruit used to produce it. Although eau de vie is a French term, similar beverages are produced in other countries. In French speaking countries, however, there is also the term eau-de-vie de vin, which refers to eaux de vie from grapes, more precisely those that are not made in the Armagnac or Cognac regions of France. These alcoholic beverages are known as French brandy in the English speaking world.

— Freebase

Forest

Forest

for′est, n. a large uncultivated tract of land covered with trees and underwood: woody ground and rude pasture: a preserve for large game, as a deer forest: a royal preserve for hunting, governed by a special code called the Forest Law.—adj. pertaining to a forest: silvan: rustic.—v.t. to cover with trees.—n. For′estage, an ancient service paid by foresters to the king: the right of foresters.—adjs. For′estal; For′est-born (Shak.), born in a wild.—ns. For′ester, one who has charge of a forest: an inhabitant of a forest; For′est-fly, a dipterous insect sometimes called Horse-fly, from the annoyance it causes horses.—adj. For′estine.—ns. For′est-mar′ble, a fissile limestone belonging to the middle division of the Jurassic System, so called because the typical beds are found in Wychwood Forest, Oxfordshire; For′est-oak, the timber of the Australian beefwood trees; For′estry, the art of cultivating forests; For′est-tree, a timber-tree. [O. Fr. forest (Fr. forêt)—Low L. forestis (silva), the outside wood, as opposed to the parcus (park) or walled-in wood—L. foris, out of doors.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Melt!

Melt!

"Melt" / "Il Est Né Le Divin Enfant" is a double A-sided single by British rock band Siouxsie and the Banshees released in 1982. It was released as the second and final single from the band's fifth album A Kiss in the Dreamhouse; "Il Est Ne Le Divin Enfant" does not appear on that album. The sensual lyrics of "Melt!" compare an intense sexual interlude with a lover to dying. Its lyrics can also allude to a S&M encounter. "The Baudelairean imagery of 'Melt' evokes claustrophobic scents of opium, sex and sickly flowers, and lapses into morbidity with lines like, 'You are the melting man and, as you melt, you are beheaded,'" observed Dave Morrison in a review of Twice Upon a Time: The Singles. "OK, it's a touch ludicrous, but a great pop song nevertheless." "Il Est Né Le Divin Enfant" is an adaptation of a traditional French Christmas carol. This track was exclusive to this single, and remained unreleased on album or CD for many years, until the appearance of the Siouxsie and the Banshees box set Downside Up in 2004. Released in late 1982, "Melt!"/"Il Est Né Le Divin Enfant" peaked as a double A-side at number 49 in the UK Singles Chart.

— Freebase

Scientia potentia est

Scientia potentia est

The phrase "scientia potentia est" is a Latin aphorism often claimed to mean organized "knowledge is power". It is commonly attributed to Sir Francis Bacon, where the expression "ipsa scientia potestas est" occurs in Bacon's Meditationes Sacrae. The phrase "scientia potentia est" was written in the 1658 work De Homine by Thomas Hobbes, who was secretary to Bacon as a young man. The related phrase "sapientia est potentia" is often translated as "wisdom is power".

— Freebase

Knowledge is power

Knowledge is power

The phrase "scientia potentia est" is a Latin aphorism often claimed to mean organized "knowledge is power". It is commonly attributed to Sir Francis Bacon, although there is no known occurrence of this precise phrase in Bacon's English or Latin writings. However, the expression "ipsa scientia potestas est" occurs in Bacon's Meditationes Sacrae. The exact phrase "scientia potentia est" was written for the first time in the 1651 work Leviathan by Thomas Hobbes, who was secretary to Bacon as a young man. The related phrase "sapientia est potentia" is often translated as "wisdom is power".

— Freebase

Est, Netherlands

Est, Netherlands

Est is a town in the Dutch province of Gelderland. It is a part of the municipality of Neerijnen, and lies about 8 km west of Tiel. In 2001, the town of Est had 600+ inhabitants. The built-up area of the town was 0.065 km², and contained 108 residences. The statistical area "Est", which also can include the peripheral parts of the village, as well as the surrounding countryside, has a population of around 610.

— Freebase

superlative

superlative

The form of an adjective that expresses which of more than two items has the highest degree of the quality expressed by the adjective; in English, formed by appending "-est" to the end of the adjective (for some short adjectives only) or putting "most" before it.

— Wiktionary

least

least

Used for forming superlatives of adjectives, especially those that do not form the superlative by adding -est.

— Wiktionary

contend

contend

to strive in opposition; to contest; to dispute; to vie; to quarrel; to fight.

— Wiktionary

love triangle

love triangle

A situation in which two people vie for the love of a third.

— Wiktionary

superlative degree

superlative degree

adverbial or adjectival forms modified by most or ending in -est, used when comparing three or more things

— Wiktionary

jostle

jostle

To contend or vie in order to acquire something.

— Wiktionary

curau00E7ao

curau00E7ao

A liqueur, made from eau-de-vie, sugar and, as flavor, dried peel of sweet and sour oranges.

— Wiktionary

-most

-most

Furthest; -est; used to form superlatives of certain adjectives, especially directional and inherently-comparative ones.

— Wiktionary

Wallen

Wallen

Nawell Azzouz better known as Wallen is a French R&B singer. Her stage name comes from the rearrangement of the letters of her first name. She is in no way connected to the Wallen family of the United States. She was born in Saint-Denis, France, to Moroccan parents. As a child, she learned to play the violin and developed a passion for singing. She grew up listening to Funk, Hip hop, and R&B. She decided to become a singer after seeing Lauryn Hill in the movie Sister Act 2. Influenced by Aaliyah, Wallen made her recording debut with producer Sullee B Wax, and female rapper Sté Strass. In 1998, she was featured on the French RnB compilation "24 Carats", with "Je ne pleurs pas". Her first hit came with Celle Qui Dit Non with the rapper Shurik'n. In 2004, she released the album Avoir La Vie Devant Soi which includes the singles Bouge Cette Vie, L'Olivier, and Donna. She also sang with Usher on the French version of U Got It Bad. She is married to the French rapper Abd al Malik. With Abd al Malik and a few other rappers she created a group called Beni Snassen, who recorded an album under that name. In 2008, she released her 3rd album "Misericorde".

— Freebase

Elision

Elision

Elision is the omission of one or more sounds in a word or phrase, producing a result that is easier for the speaker to pronounce. Sometimes, sounds may be elided for euphonic effect. In Native English, elision comes naturally, and it is often described as "slurred" or "muted." Often, elision is deliberate. It is a common misconception that contractions automatically qualify as elided words, which comes from slack definitions. Not all elided words are contractions and not all contractions are elided words. In French, elision is mandatory in certain contexts, as in the clause C'est la vie. In Spanish, elision occurs less frequently but is common in certain dialects. It is never marked by an apostrophe in writing. Of particular interest is the word para, which becomes pa. Multiple words can be elided together, as in pa trabajar for para trabajar and pa delante or even pa lante for para adelante. An example of deliberate elision occurs in Latin poetry as a stylistic device. Under certain circumstances, such as one word ending in a vowel and the following word beginning in a vowel, the words may be elided together. Elision was a common device in the works of Catullus. For example, the opening line of Catullus 3 is: Lugete, O Veneres Cupidinesque, but would be read as Lugeto Veneres Cupidinesque.

— Freebase

Luxury Liner

Luxury Liner

Luxury Liner is an album by country music artist Emmylou Harris, released in 1977. The album was Harris' second successive #1 country album on the Billboard Music Charts, although, unlike the preceding Elite Hotel, there were no #1 hits from this album. The highest charting singles were the #6 Chuck Berry cover " C'est la Vie" and the #8 "Making Believe".

— Freebase

Shit happens

Shit happens

"Shit happens" is a common slang phrase, used as a simple existential observation that life is full of imperfections and unforeseeable events, either "Así es la vida" or "C'est la vie". The phrase is an acknowledgment that bad things happen to people for no particular reason. Phrases with similar meaning are such as "stuff happens" or "it happens" and are considered minced oath forms. In the October 14, 1941 episode of the long-running radio show Vic and Sade, "Vic Declines a Cornet Lesson," Sade remarks wearily, "Stuff happens, don't it? Stuff happens." The origin or earliest use of the phrase is uncertain. In a review of The Yale Book of Quotations by Fred Shapiro, The New Yorker critic Louis Menand observed that it was "extremely interesting to know, for instance, that the phrase 'Shit happens' was introduced to print by one Connie Eble, in a publication identified as UNC–CH Slang, in 1983."

— Freebase

French Style

French Style

French Style is Dean Martin's first LP for Reprise Records. Recorded during February 1962, it features French-themed popular songs and Chansons arranged by Neal Hefti. Among them "C'est si bon", which frequently appears on Dean Martin compilation albums, a rendition of Edith Piaf's classic La Vie En Rose, the title song from the MGM classic Gigi and two classic Cole Porter tunes. Originally released as Reprise LP R-6021, the album's tracks made their CD debut as part of the chronologically sequenced Bear Family box set "Everybody Loves Somebody". A subsequent two-on-one CD by Collectors' Choice restored the original running order.

— Freebase

Khaled

Khaled

Khaled Hadj Ibrahim, better known as Khaled, is an Algerian raï singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist born in Sidi El Houari in Oran Province of Algeria. He began recording in his early teens under the name Cheb Khaled and has become the most internationally famous Algerian singer in the Arab world and across many continents. His popularity has earned him the unofficial title "King of Raï". His most famous songs are "Didi", "Aïcha" and "C'est la vie".

— Freebase

Joinville, Jean, Sire de

Joinville, Jean, Sire de

French chronicler, seneschal of Champagne, born in Châlons-sur-Marne; author of the "Vie de St. Louis"; followed Louis IX. in the crusade of 1248, but refused to join in that of 1270; he lived through six reigns, and his biography of his sovereign is one of the most remarkable books of the Middle Ages; his "Vie de St. Louis" deals chiefly with the Crusade, and is, says Prof. Saintsbury, "one of the most circumstantial records we have of mediæval life and thought"; it is gossipy, and abounds in digressions (1224-1319).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

TGV

TGV

The TGV is France's high-speed rail service, operated by SNCF Voyages, the long-distance rail branch of SNCF, the national rail operator. It was developed during the 1970s by GEC-Alsthom and SNCF. Originally designed to be powered by gas turbines, the prototypes evolved into electric trains with the petrol crisis of 1973. Following the inaugural TGV service between Paris and Lyon in 1981 on the LGV Sud-Est, the TGV network, centred on Paris, has expanded to connect cities across France and in adjacent countries on both high-speed and conventional lines. A TGV test train set the record for the fastest wheeled train, reaching 574.8 km/h on 3 April 2007. In mid-2011, scheduled TGV trains operated at the highest speeds in conventional train service in the world, regularly reaching 320 km/h on the LGV Est and the LGV Méditerranée. A TGV service held the record for the fastest scheduled rail journey with a start to stop average speed of 279.4 km/h, surpassed by the Chinese CRH service Harmony express on the Wuhan–Guangzhou High-Speed Railway from December 2009 until July 2011.

— Freebase

Acrophony

Acrophony

Acrophony is the naming of letters of an alphabetic writing system so that a letter's name begins with the letter itself. For example, Greek letter names are acrophonic: the names of the letters α, β, γ, δ, are spelled with the respective letters: ἄλφα, βῆτα, γάμμα, δέλτα. The paradigm for acrophonic alphabets is the Phoenician alphabet, in which the letter A, representing the sound, is thought to have derived from an Egyptian hieroglyph representing an ox, and is called "ox", ʾalp, which starts with the glottal stop sound the letter represents. The Latin alphabet is descended from the Phoenician, and the stylized head of an ox can still be seen if the letter A is turned upside-down: ∀. The second letter of the Phoenician alphabet is bet representing the sound, and from ālep-bēt we have the word "alphabet" - another case where the beginning of a thing gives the name to the whole, which was in fact common practice in the ancient Near East. The Glagolitic and early Cyrillic alphabets, although not consisting of ideograms, also have letters named acrophonically. The letters representing /a, b, v, g, d, e/ are named Az, Buky, Vedi, Glagol, Dobro, Est. Naming the letters in order, one recites a poem, a mnemonic which helps students and scholars learn the alphabet: Az buky vedi, glagol’ dobro est’ means "I know letters, [the] word is good" in Old Church Slavonic.

— Freebase

Bahaï

Bahaï

Bahaï is the capital of the Ennedi Est department of Chad. It is located in the Ennedi Region, which was formed in 2008 from the Ennedi Est and Ennedi Ouest departments of the former Bourkou-Ennedi-Tibesti region. Bahaï has been affected by the ongoing Darfur conflict, and the town's United Nations humanitarian forces were reduced to a "minimum presence" in early December 2006 due to the danger posed to workers.

— Freebase

Air rights

Air rights

Air rights are a type of development right in real estate, referring to the empty space above a property. Generally speaking, owning or renting land or a building gives one the right to use and develop the air rights. This legal concept is encoded in the Latin phrase Cuius est solum, eius est usque ad caelum et ad inferos, which appears in medieval Roman law and is credited to 13th century glossator Accursius; it was notably popularized in common law in Commentaries on the Laws of England by William Blackstone; see origins of phrase for details.

— Freebase

Nightline

Nightline

Nightline, or ABC News Nightline is a late-night news program broadcast by ABC in the United States, and has a franchised formula to other networks and stations elsewhere in the world. Created by Roone Arledge, the program featured Ted Koppel as its main anchor from March 1980 until his retirement from the program in November 2005. Nightline airs weeknights at 12:35 a.m. EST, after Jimmy Kimmel Live!. It originally ran for 31 minutes, but in 2011 was reduced to 25 minutes. When the program moved to 12:35 a.m. EST, the program was expanded to 30 minutes. ABC announced that on January 8, 2013, the show's start time would be moved to 12:35 a.m., following Jimmy Kimmel Live!, and would run for 30 minutes. As part of this move, the Nightline staff also produces The Lookout, a one-hour news magazine program on Wednesdays at 10:00pm Eastern/9:00pm Central, starting on May 29, 2013. In 2002, Nightline was ranked 23rd on TV Guide's 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time.

— Freebase

Your Money

Your Money

Your Money, formerly known as Your $$$$$, is a one-hour news show was hosted by Ali Velshi broadcast by CNN from the Time Warner Center studios in New York City. The show breaks down the business news of the week and shows viewers how it impacts their bottom line. It is the only program on the network devoted to in depth financial coverage. The program is shown on Saturdays at 1 PM EST and Sundays at 3 PM EST.

— Freebase

Kittim

Kittim

Kittim was a settlement in present-day Larnaca on the west coast of Cyprus, known in ancient times as Kition, or Citium. On this basis, the whole island became known as "Kittim" in Hebrew, including the Hebrew Bible. However the name seems to have been employed with some flexibility in Hebrew literature. It was often applied to all the Aegean islands and even to "the W[est] in general, but esp[ecially] the seafaring W[est]". Flavius Josephus records in his Antiquities of the Jews that The expression "isles of Kittim", found in the Book of Jeremiah 2:10 and Ezekiel 27:6, indicates that, some centuries prior to Josephus, this designation had already become a general descriptor for the Mediterranean islands. Sometimes this designation was further extended to apply to Romans, Macedonians or Seleucid Greeks. The Septuagint translates the occurrence of "Kittim" in the Book of Daniel 11:30 as ῥωμαῖοι. 1 Maccabees 1:1 states that "Alexander the Great the Macedonian" had come from the "land of Kittim". In the War of the Sons of Light Against the Sons of Darkness from the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Kittim are referred to as being "of Asshur". Eleazar Sukenik argued that this reference to Asshur should be understood to refer to the Seleucid Empire which controlled the territory of the former Assyrian Empire at that time, but his son Yigael Yadin interpreted this phrase as a veiled reference to the Romans.

— Freebase

A cause

A cause

"A cause" is the third and last single released in France from Céline Dion's French album D'elles. It was sent to the radio stations on January 21, 2008. At the same time "Alone" was released to promote Dion's English album Taking Chances. Both tracks were included on the "A cause" promotional single. "A cause" was written by Françoise Dorin and Jacques Veneruso, who also produced this track. Céline Dion performed it during the French TF1 TV special dedicated to the issue of her album D'elles, in May 2007. She also performed "A cause" on Vivement Dimanche during her visit in France, in November 2007. The performance was supposed to be broadcast on France 2 in May 2008, during the French leg of the Taking Chances Tour, but it was cancelled. "A cause" was remixed by Dj Rien - French producer, composer and remixer. There was no music video made for this track. D'elles includes also another version of "A cause," called "On s'est aimé à cause." It was recorded with music by Marc Dupré and Jean-François Breau, and produced by Tino Izzo. This version includes the original lyrics written by Françoise Dorin, which were modified to fit the danceable arrangement of "A cause." In August 2007, "On s'est aimé à cause" was released as a radio single in Quebec. Radio stations in France started to play it at the end of January 2008, together with "A cause."

— Freebase

Compare

Compare

to inflect according to the degrees of comparison; to state positive, comparative, and superlative forms of; as, most adjectives of one syllable are compared by affixing "- er" and "-est" to the positive form; as, black, blacker, blackest; those of more than one syllable are usually compared by prefixing "more" and "most", or "less" and "least", to the positive; as, beautiful, more beautiful, most beautiful

— Webster Dictionary

I. e.

I. e.

abbreviation of Latin id est, that is

— Webster Dictionary

Quiddity

Quiddity

the essence, nature, or distinctive peculiarity, of a thing; that which answers the question, Quid est? or, What is it?

— Webster Dictionary

Superlative

Superlative

expressing the highest or lowest degree of the quality, manner, etc., denoted by an adjective or an adverb. The superlative degree is formed from the positive by the use of -est, most, or least; as, highest, most pleasant, least bright

— Webster Dictionary

Compare

Compare

to vie; to assume a likeness or equality

— Webster Dictionary

Contend

Contend

to strive in opposition; to contest; to dispute; to vie; to quarrel; to fight

— Webster Dictionary

Contest

Contest

to engage in contention, or emulation; to contend; to strive; to vie; to emulate; -- followed usually by with

— Webster Dictionary

Emulate

Emulate

to strive to equal or to excel in qualities or actions; to imitate, with a view to equal or to outdo, to vie with; to rival; as, to emulate the good and the great

— Webster Dictionary

Emulous

Emulous

ambitiously desirous to equal or even to excel another; eager to emulate or vie with another; desirous of like excellence with another; -- with of; as, emulous of another's example or virtues

— Webster Dictionary

Envie

Envie

to vie; to emulate; to strive

— Webster Dictionary

Revie

Revie

to vie with, or rival, in return

— Webster Dictionary

Strive

Strive

to vie; to compete; to be a rival

— Webster Dictionary

Vied

Vied

of Vie

— Webster Dictionary

Vying

Vying

of Vie

— Webster Dictionary

Vying

Vying

a. & n. from Vie

— Webster Dictionary

Anagram

Anagram

an′a-gram, n. a word or sentence formed by rewriting (in a different order) the letters of another word or sentence: as, 'live' = 'evil,' 'Quid est veritas? = 'Est vir qui adest,' and 'Florence Nightingale' = 'Flit on, cheering angel.'—Many pseudonyms are merely anagrams, as 'Voltaire' = 'Arouet l. i.'—that is, 'Arouet le jeune (the younger).'—adjs. Anagrammat′ic, Anagrammat′ical.—adv. Anagrammat′ically.—v.t. Anagram′matīse, to transpose, so as to form an anagram.—ns. Anagram′matism, the practice of making anagrams; Anagram′matist, a maker of anagrams. [Gr. ana, again, graph-ein, to write.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Non est

Non est

non est, adj. for absent, being a familiar shortening of the legal phrase non est inventus=he has not been found (coll).

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Louis XIV.

Louis XIV.

the "Grand Monarque," son of the preceding, was only nine when his father died, and the government was in the hands of his mother, Anne of Austria, and Cardinal Mazarin, her minister; under the regency the glory of France was maintained in the field, but her internal peace was disturbed by the insubordination of the parlement and the troubles of the Fronde; by a compact on the part of Mazarin with Spain before he died Louis was married to the Infanta Maria Theresa in 1659, and in 1660 he announced his intention to rule the kingdom alone, which he did for 54 years with a decision and energy no one gave him credit for, in fulfilment of his famous protestation L'état, c'est moi, choosing Colbert to control finance, Louvois to reorganise the army, and Vauban to fortify the frontier towns; he sought to be as absolute in his foreign relations as in his internal administration, and hence the long succession of wars which, while they brought glory to France, ended in exhausting her; at home he suffered no one in religious matters to think otherwise than himself; he revoked the Edict of Nantes, sanctioned the dragonnades in the Cévennes, and to extirpate heresy encouraged every form of cruelty; yet when we look at the men who adorned it, the reign of Louis XIV. was one of the most illustrious in letters and the arts in the history of France: Corneille, Racine, and Molière eminent in the drama, La Fontaine and Boileau in poetry, Bossuet in oratory, Bruyère and Rochefoucauld in morals, Pascal in philosophy, Saint-Simon and Retz in history, and Poussin, Lorraine, Lebrun, Perault, &c., in art (1636-1715).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Sully, Maximilien de Béthune, Duke of

Sully, Maximilien de Béthune, Duke of

celebrated minister of Henry IV. of France, born at the Château of Rosny, near Mantes, whence he was known at first as the Baron de Rosny; at first a ward of Henry IV. of Navarre, he joined the Huguenot ranks along with him, and distinguished himself at Coutras and Ivry, and approved of Henry's policy in changing his colours on his accession to the throne, remaining ever after by his side as most trusted adviser, directing the finances of the country with economy, and encouraging the peasantry in the cultivation of the soil; used to say, "Labourage et pasteurage, voilà les deux mamelles dont La France est alimentée, les vraies mines et trésors de Pérou," "Tillage and cattle-tending are the two paps whence France sucks nourishment; these are the true mines and treasures of Peru;" on the death of the king he retired from court, and occupied his leisure in writing his celebrated "Memoirs," which, while they show the author to be a great statesman, give no very pleasant idea of his character (1560-1611).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide

Carbon dioxide is a naturally occurring chemical compound composed of two oxygen atoms covalently bonded to a single carbon atom. It is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and exists in Earth's atmosphere in this state, as a trace gas at a concentration of 0.039 per cent by volume. As part of the carbon cycle, plants, algae, and cyanobacteria use light energy to photosynthesize carbohydrate from carbon dioxide and water, with oxygen produced as a waste product. However, photosynthesis cannot occur in darkness and at night some carbon dioxide is produced by plants during respiration. Carbon dioxide is produced by combustion of coal or hydrocarbons, the fermentation of sugars in beer and winemaking and by respiration of all living organisms. It is exhaled in the breath of humans and land animals. It is emitted from volcanoes, hot springs, geysers and other places where the earth's crust is thin and is freed from carbonate rocks by dissolution. CO2 is also found in lakes at depth under the sea, and commingled with oil and gas deposits. The environmental effects of carbon dioxide are of significant interest. Carbon dioxide is an important greenhouse gas, warming the Earth's surface to a higher temperature by reducing outward radiation. Atmospheric carbon dioxide is the primary source of carbon in life on Earth and its concentration in Earth's pre-industrial atmosphere since late in the Precambrian eon has been regulated by photosynthetic organisms. Burning of carbon-based fuels since the industrial revolution has rapidly increased concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, increasing the rate of global warming and causing anthropogenic climate change. It is also a major source of ocean acidification since it dissolves in water to form carbonic acid, which is a weak acid as its ionization in water is incomplete.

— Freebase

Mountain Ash

Mountain Ash

Mountain Ash is a town and community in the Cwm Cynon, Rhondda Cynon Taf, Wales. Mountain Ash has a population of around 7,039. Mountain Ash lies near the villages of Penrhiwceiber, Cefnpennar, Cwmpennar, Darranlas, Fernhill, Glenboi and Newtown and Miskin. Mountain Ash lies within the historic county boundaries of Glamorgan.

— Freebase

Livermore

Livermore

Livermore is a city in Alameda County. The estimated population as of 2011 was 82,039. Livermore is located on the eastern edge of California's San Francisco Bay Area. Livermore was founded by William Mendenhall and named after Robert Livermore, his friend and a local rancher who settled in the area in the 1840s. Livermore is the home of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, for which the chemical element livermorium is named. Its south side, home to local vineyards, has developed several executive subdivisions near Ruby Hill. The city has also redeveloped its downtown district. The city is considered part of the Tri-Valley area, including Amador, Livermore and San Ramon Valleys.

— Freebase

Wenzhou

Wenzhou

Wenzhou is a prefecture-level city in southeastern Zhejiang province, People's Republic of China. As of the 2010 census, about 3,039,500 live in the Wenzhou city proper; the area under its jurisdiction, which includes two satellite cities and six counties, had a population of 9,122,100. The prefectural area borders Lishui to the west, Taizhou to the north, and looks out to the East China Sea on its eastern coast. Wenzhou was a prosperous foreign treaty port, which remains well-preserved today. It is situated in a mountainous region and, as a result, has been isolated for most of its history from the rest of the country, making the local culture and language very distinct not only from the rest of China but from neighbouring areas as well. It is also known for its emigrants who leave their native land for Europe and the United States, with a reputation for being entrepreneurs who start restaurants, retail and wholesale businesses in their adopted countries. People of Wenzhou origin make up a large number of ethnic Chinese residents of Italy, the Netherlands, France, and Africa.

— Freebase

Recife

Recife

Recife is the fifth-largest metropolitan area in Brazil with 3,743,854 inhabitants, the largest metropolitan area of the North/Northeast Regions, the 5th-largest metropolitan influence area in Brazil, and the capital and largest city of the state of Pernambuco. The population of the city proper was 1,555,039 in 2012. Recife is located where the Beberibe River meets the Capibaribe River to flow into the Atlantic Ocean. It is a major port on the Atlantic Ocean. Its name is an allusion to the coral reefs that are present by the city's shores. The many rivers, small islands and over 50 bridges found in Recife city center characterize its geography and gives it the moniker of the "Brazilian Venice." The Metropolitan Region of Recife is the main industrial zone of the State of Pernambuco; most relevant products are those derived from cane, electronics, food, and others; thanks to the fiscal incentives of government, many industrial enterprises were started in the 1970s and 1980s. Recife has a tradition of being the most important commercial center of the North/Northeastern region of Brazil with more than 52,500 business enterprises in Recife itself plus 32,500 in the Metro Area which totals more than 85,000.

— Freebase

Chantilly

Chantilly

Chantilly is an unincorporated community located in western Fairfax County of Northern Virginia. Recognized by the U.S. Census Bureau as a census designated place, the community population was 23,039 as of the 2010 census -- down from 41,041 in 2000, due to the splitting off of parts of it to form new CDP's including Greenbriar and Fair Lakes. It is named after an early 19th-century mansion and farm. Chantilly is part of the Washington metropolitan area and is approximately 24 miles from Washington, D.C. Chantilly is home to Washington Dulles International Airport, which serves Washington, D.C. It is also the location of the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center annex of the National Air and Space Museum and the headquarters of the National Reconnaissance Office. Chantilly was also home to the annual Bilderberg summit in 2008 and 2012.

— Freebase

Bangor

Bangor

Bangor is a city in and the county seat of Penobscot County, Maine, United States, and the major commercial and cultural center for eastern and northern Maine. It is the principal city of the Bangor, Maine Metropolitan Statistical Area, which encompasses all of Penobscot County. As of 2008, Bangor is the third most-populous city in Maine, as it has been for more than a century. The population of the city was 33,039 at the 2010 census; the Bangor Metropolitan Statistical Area, 153,923. Bangor is the largest market town, distribution center, transportation hub, and media center in a five-county area whose population tops 330,000 and which includes Penobscot, Piscataquis, Hancock, Aroostook, and Washington counties. Bangor is about 30 miles from Penobscot Bay up the Penobscot River at its confluence with the Kenduskeag Stream. It is connected by bridge to the neighboring city of Brewer. Nearby towns include Orono, Hampden, Hermon, Old Town, Glenburn, and Veazie.

— Freebase

Decathlon

Decathlon

The decathlon is a combined event in athletics consisting of ten track and field events. The word decathlon is of Greek origin, from δέκα and ἄθλος. Events are held over two consecutive days and the winners are determined by the combined performance in all. Performance is judged on a points system in each event, not by the position achieved. The decathlon is contested mainly by male athletes, while female athletes typically compete in the heptathlon. Traditionally, the title of "World's Greatest Athlete" has been given to the man who wins the Olympic decathlon. This began when King Gustav V of Sweden told Jim Thorpe, "You, sir, are the world's greatest athlete" after Thorpe won the decathlon at the Stockholm Olympics in 1912. The current decathlon world record holder is American Ashton Eaton, who scored 9,039 points at the 2012 United States Olympic Trials. The event developed from the ancient pentathlon. Pentathlon competitions were held at the ancient Greek Olympics. Pentathlons involved five disciplines – long jump, discus throw, javelin throw, sprint and a wrestling match. Introduced in Olympia during 708 BC, the competition was extremely popular for many centuries. By the 6th century BC, pentathlons had become part of religious games. The Amateur Athletic Union held "all around events" from the 1880s and a decathlon first appeared on the Olympic athletics program at the 1904 Games.

— Freebase

Patmos

Patmos

Patmos is a small Greek island in the Aegean Sea. One of the northernmost islands of the Dodecanese complex, it has a population of 2,998 and an area of 34.05 km². The highest point is Profitis Ilias, 269 metres above sea level. The Municipality of Patmos, which includes the offshore islands of Arkoi, Marathos, and several uninhabited islets, has a total population of 3,047 and a combined land area of 45.039 square kilometres. It is part of the Kalymnos regional unit. Patmos' main communities are Chora, and Skala, the only commercial port. Other settlements are Grikou and Kampos. The churches and communities on Patmos are of the Eastern Orthodox tradition. In 1999, the island's historic center Chora, along with the Monastery of Saint John the Theologian and the Cave of the Apocalypse, were declared World Heritage Sites by UNESCO. The monastery was founded by Saint Christodulos. Patmos is also home to the Patmian School, a notable Greek seminary. Patmos is mentioned in the Christian scriptural Book of Revelation. The book's introduction states that its author, John, was on Patmos when he was given a vision from Jesus. Early Christian tradition identified this writer John of Patmos as John the Apostle, though some modern scholars are uncertain. As such, Patmos is a destination for Christian pilgrimage. Visitors can see the cave where John is said to have received his Revelation, and several monasteries on the island are dedicated to Saint John.

— Freebase

Parage

Parage

Parage is a village located in the Bačka Palanka municipality, in the South Bačka District of Serbia. It is situated in the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina. The village has a Serb ethnic majority and its population numbering 1,039 people.

— Freebase

Murmansk

Murmansk

Murmansk is a port city and the administrative center of Murmansk Oblast, Russia, located in the extreme northwest part of Russia, on the Kola Bay, 12 kilometers from the Barents Sea on the northern shore of the Kola Peninsula, not far from Russia's borders with Norway and Finland. Population: 307,257; 336,137; 468,039. Despite its rapidly declining population, Murmansk remains the largest city north of the Arctic Circle.

— Freebase

Diadema

Diadema

Diadema is a municipality in São Paulo state, Brazil. Belonging to the ABC Region of Greater São Paulo, it is 17 km distant from São Paulo's central point. Initially part of São Bernardo do Campo, Diadema became a city of its own in 1959. The city has an area of 30.65 square kilometres and a population of 386,039, the 14th largest in the state. Entirely urbanised, the annual mean temperature in the city is 19,6°C. Its HDI is 0.790. Although located in the heart of a traditionally industrial region, its main source of income is the service sector, featuring 77 healthcare installations. Diadema is still home to a butterfly zoo, a botanical garden, an art museum and an observatory.

— Freebase

Ayan

Ayan

Ayan is a rural locality and the administrative center of Ayano-Maysky District of Khabarovsk Krai, Russia, located on the shore of a well-protected bay of the Sea of Okhotsk, 1,447 kilometers from Khabarovsk and 631 kilometers by sea from Nikolayevsk-on-Amur. Population: 967; 1,325; 2,039.

— Freebase

Karaman

Karaman

Karaman is a town in south central Turkey, located in Central Anatolia, north of the Taurus Mountains, about 100 km south of Konya. It is the capital district of the Karaman Province. According to 2000 census, the population of the province is 231,872 of which 132,064 live in the town of Karaman. The district covers an area of 3,686 km², and the town lies at an average elevation of 1,039 m. The Karaman Museum is one of the major sights.

— Freebase

Changwon

Changwon

Changwon is the capital city of Gyeongsangnam-do, South Korea. Changwon is the 8th most populated city in South Korea, with an established population of 1,089,039 people in 2010. It encompasses a land area of 743 square kilometres on the southeastern coast of South Korea. The population of southeastern Korea, including the city of Busan, is more than 6,478,000. Changwon is known as a heavy industrial city. The city only covers 7% of Gyeongsangnam-do province, also known as Gyeongnam, but holds 33.6% of its population; it also accounted for 38.5% of the total 2.1821 trillion won budget of the Gyeongnam province. In 209 AD, during the Three Kingdoms period, Changwon was named Gulja-gun, a province of the Silla kingdom. In 757 Changwon was renamed Uian-gun during the reorganization of all Silla provinces. In 1408 during the Joseon period, King Taejong established Changwon-bu. In 1415, King Taejong renamed Changwon-bu to Changwon-dohobu and it became the capital of the Gyeongnam province. On April 1, 1974 Changwon was designated 'Industrial Base Development Area No. 92.' As a result, the city was developed and significantly expanded.

— Freebase

Newnan

Newnan

Newnan is a city in Metro Atlanta, and the county seat of Coweta County, Georgia, about 40 miles southwest of Atlanta. The population was 33,039 at the 2010 census, up from 16,242 at the 2000 census, for a growth rate of 103.4% over that decade.

— Freebase

Bauru

Bauru

Bauru is a Brazilian municipality in midwestern region of the state of São Paulo. It is also the capital of the micro-region of Bauru. The population in 2010 is 344 039, the area of the municipality is 675.2 km² and the population density is 464.56/km². Established in 1896, its boundaries are Reginópolis to the north, Arealva to the northeast, Pederneiras to the east, Agudos and Piratininga to the south and Avaí to the west. The presence of a strong service sector, many college campuses - including the University of São Paulo and Universidade Estadual Paulista - and the city's location at the junction of three railroads and three highways make Bauru a major urban center of the State of São Paulo. It is the hometown of Marcos César Pontes, the first Brazilian in space. It is also the town where Pelé grew up and learned his football skills. The city is served by two airports: the older Bauru Airport, and the newer Bauru-Arealva Airport, officially known as Moussa Nakhl Tobias Airport, located in the adjoining municipality of Arealva.

— Freebase

Takagi

Takagi

Takagi is a village located in Shimoina District, Nagano Prefecture, Japan. As of 2003, the village has an estimated population of 7,039 and a density of 105.66 persons per km². The total area is 66.62 km².

— Freebase

Pindorama

Pindorama

Pindorama is the Tupi word for Land of the Palms, the natives' name for Brazil. Pindorama is also a municipality in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The population of the city is 15,039 and the area is 184.8 km². Pindorama belongs to the Mesoregion of São José do Rio Preto.

— Freebase

Atmosphere of Earth

Atmosphere of Earth

The atmosphere of Earth is the layer of gases surrounding the planet Earth that is retained by Earth's gravity. The atmosphere protects life on Earth by absorbing ultraviolet solar radiation, warming the surface through heat retention, and reducing temperature extremes between day and night. The common name air is given to the atmospheric gases used in breathing and photosynthesis. By volume, dry air contains 78.09% nitrogen, 20.95% oxygen, 0.93% argon, 0.039% carbon dioxide, and small amounts of other gases. Air also contains a variable amount of water vapor, on average around 1% at sea level, and 0.4% over the entire atmosphere. Air content and atmospheric pressure vary at different layers, and air suitable for the survival of terrestrial plants and terrestrial animals is found only in Earth's troposphere and artificial atmospheres. The atmosphere has a mass of about 5.15×10^ kg, three quarters of which is within about 11 km of the surface. The atmosphere becomes thinner and thinner with increasing altitude, with no definite boundary between the atmosphere and outer space.

— Freebase

Ghana

Ghana

A country in Western Africa, bordering the North Atlantic Ocean, between Cote d'Ivoire and Togo, with Burkina Faso bordering on the north, with a population of 17,698,271 (July 1996 est), and a total area of 238,540 sq km. The government is a constitutional democracy, and the capital city is Accra.

— GCIDE

BaubleBar

BaubleBar

BaubleBar is a one-stop retailer for affordable fashion jewelry with aspirational and accessible luxury looks fit for any occasion. BaubleBar has been curated by data collected from a series of online and offline tests to showcase an array of the most in-demand styles, original editorial content and personalized customer attention from BaubleBar's customer experience team. With a dedicated in-house editorial and merchandising team, BaubleBar is a true trend maker, delivering on the latest runway looks and forecasting trends based on real-time analytics about customer shopping behavior. BaubleBar was founded by Amy Jain and Daniella Yacobovsky in 2011 and is funded by such investors as Accel Partners and Greycroft Partners. The company is headquartered in New York, NY. WE’RE SERIOUSLY INTO STYLING: We debut new shoppable trends every Monday at 11am EST, featuring the latest have-to-have styles. Handpicked by our Fashion Team, each Trend Collection comes complete with styling tips to help you get the look.WE KEEP IT FRESH: We introduce new products to the site five days a week, so you’ll always find something new to discover. Facebook Fans get in on the action with our Newbie Knockout every Tuesday, where they pick their favorite new arrival to unlock a special treat.WE MAKE IT FUN: Every Friday and every Monday is a treasure hunt to find a secret bauble our team has secretly marked down to $10 and $20, respectively. Check your email for clues to help you spot the Buried Bauble.WE LOVE GREAT DESIGN: Every Thursday we highlight our favorite Designers by showcasing their signature pieces and the inspiration behind them. Even better, each Designer purchase comes complete with a free gift selected by the designer!WE COLLABORATE: Occasionally, we partner with major brands for limited-time and limited-piece collections, created exclusively with you, our customer, in mind.WE'RE SOCIAL: We love to keep in touch on Facebook and Twitter - and our Blog is the place to hear about special promos, unlock treats, and stay ahead of all things BaubleBar. We especially love when you #showusyoursparkle

— CrunchBase

RegulatoryBinder

RegulatoryBinder

RegulatoryBinder saves hospitals time and money spent on research documentation.RegulatoryBinder developed a non-beta, non-MVP, functioning product with multiple paying contracts. RegulatoryBinder is raising capital to generate more revenue faster.Clinical research is an essential driver of medicine, economic growth, and hope for the sick and ill. The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative and Institute of Medicine, however, have recently said that clinical research is a “paper-based, slow, & costly” “burden” on hospitals already under increasing cost-constraints.The average physician spends approximately three weeks annually managing hundreds of printed pages of regulatory documentation stored in three-ring regulatory binders. Each physician recreates their own documents as there is no standard on how to keep regulatory documentation. Physicians are using post-its, fax, and mail to communicate. This represents a $50B documentation opportunity cost, that if used to perform procedures, would roughly double the total hospital net income. RegulatoryBinder has developed a novel SaaS solution that enables staff to reduce the time spent on research documentation by 33%, resulting $15B in potential annual savings. Only RegulatoryBinder is designed for hospital regulatory binders - not industry. Only RegulatoryBinder bundles compliance services to ensure that users’ online binders are compliant with FDA eRecord regulations from their very first login. Existing software can take $3-5M and over 1 year to customize, validate, and implement.RegulatoryBinder is collaborating with academic leaders to simultaneously release the first open hospital standard on how to store a regulatory binder. Academic leaders have already presented on this concept nationally to great reception.This solution will enable hospital sites to store regulatory documentation 33% more efficiently (est. from current users) and increase their funding from differentiating the quality of their site. Not all studies are required to submit to the FDA, but the initial studies in our system that do, have met FDA electronic (i.e. eCopy) requirements. RegulatoryBinder’s target market is the 350 US academic hospitals, representing a $1B market, based on our existing $3-5k annual user subscription fees (assumes 1,000 users per hospital, estimated from current customers). A larger market exists in US urban hospitals as well as the research sites of industry and contract research organizations (CRO) globally.RegulatoryBinder’s target clients are hospital clinical research offices that consist of a core group of 5-20 clinical research staff end-users whose primary job is to manage regulatory binders. RegulatoryBinder has been reaching Midwest offices directly through customer referrals, conferences, and cold-calls/emails. RegulatoryBinder is targeting a national audience through academic publication of non-proprietary aspects of our regulatory binder standard. RegulatoryBinder will also release a limited number and duration of public, hospital-regulated, basic user promotional subscriptions to drive interest. A similar software, REDCap, has reached 800 research centers in just 4 years. By continuing to provide value, we will then convert these centers into much larger enterprise hospital clients, to increase revenue and profitability. RegulatoryBinder has a strong team led by a serial entrepreneur and developing eRecord regulation expert, currently on sabbatical from a dual MD and PhD program for clinical research to pursue this full-time. RegulatoryBinder has minority founders and an advisory board with extensive experience in starting, growing, and exiting early-stage startups, particularly in healthcare IT subject to 21 CFR Part 11 regulations.

— CrunchBase

Yekra

Yekra

Yekra’s central functionality is a dynamic, lightweight, embeddable player that allows content rights-holders to display a trailer as well as sell VOD, EST, physical merchandise and digital gifts to consumers (with our without DRM, depending on the customers preference) from within it via any connected device around the world.In addition to the player, Yekra has built the first digital marketing suite that empowers an ever-growing network of resellers to curate, embed and offer any content uploaded into the Yekra platform to their own users from within their own websites or through their own social media profiles, in exchange for a distribution percentage of all revenue they generate.Yekra helps rights-holders break through the noise in a cost efficient way, targeting consumers who care most about their productWe like to call this Social Distribution and we believe it is the future.

— CrunchBase

Aqua-fortis

Aqua-fortis

ā′kwa-for′tis, n. nitric acid, a powerful solvent, hence used figuratively.—ns. Aquafort′ist, one who prepares etchings or engravings by means of aqua-fortis; A′qua-mirab′ilis, a preparation distilled from cloves, nutmeg, ginger, and spirit of wine; A′qua-rē′gia, a mixture of nitric and hydrochloric acids, so called because it dissolves the royal metal, gold; A′qua Tofa′na, a poisonous fluid (prepared from arsenic) made in Palermo in the 17th cent. by a woman Tofana; A′qua-vi′tæ, an old name for alcohol, used of brandy, whisky, &c.; cf. Fr. eau de vie, and usquebaugh. [L. aqua, water, fortis, strong.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Cope

Cope

kōp, v.i. to contend.—v.t. to vie with, esp. on equal terms or successfully: to match.—n. Copes′mate (Shak.), a companion. [Fr. couper—L. colaphus, a blow with the fist.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Corrival

Corrival

kor-rī′val, n. a fellow-rival: a competitor: an equal.—adj. contending: emulous.—v.i. and v.t. to rival: to vie with.—ns. Corrī′valry; Corrī′valship. [L. con, with, and Rival.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Eau

Eau

ō, n. the French word for water, used in English in various combinations.—Eau Créole, a fine Martinique liqueur, made by distilling the flowers of the mammee-apple with spirit of wine; Eau de Cologne (see under Cologne-earth); Eau de vie, brandy.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Revie

Revie

rē-vī′, v.t. to vie with, or rival: to stake a larger sum at cards: to outdo.—v.i. to exceed an adversary's wager in card-playing: to retort.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Shavie

Shavie

shā′vi, n. (Scot.) a trick or prank.—Also Skā′vie. [Perh. Dan. skæv, crooked; cf. Ger. schief, oblique.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Vie

Vie

vī, v.i. to strive for superiority.—v.t. to contend about: (Shak.) to offer as a stake or wager:—pr.p. vy′ing; pa.t. and pa.p. vīed.—n. (obs.) a contest. [M. E. vien, by aphæresis from envien, to vie, through Fr. from L. invitāre, to invite.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Vying

Vying

vī′ing, pr.p. of vie.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Brandy

Brandy

Brandy is a spirit produced by distilling wine. Brandy generally contains 35–60% alcohol by volume and is typically taken as an after-dinner drink. Some brandies are aged in wooden casks, some are coloured with caramel colouring to imitate the effect of aging, and some brandies are produced using a combination of both aging and colouring. Brandy is also produced from fermented fruits other than grapes, but these products are typically named eaux-de-vie, especially in French. In some countries, fruit flavouring or some other flavouring may be added to a spirit that is called "brandy".

— Freebase

Dolly

Dolly

Dolly is a rock band from Nantes, France. The group is popular in France but less well-known elsewhere. Dolly's vocalist Emmanuelle Monet has appeared in many collaborations, including a song together with Apocalyptica on the single "Wie weit/How far/En Vie". Dolly stopped their activity indefinitely after the death of Mickaël Chamberlin in a car accident on 25 May 2005.

— Freebase

Couscous

Couscous

Couscous is a traditional Berber dish of semolina which is cooked by steaming. It is traditionally served with a meat or vegetable stew spooned over it. Couscous is a staple food throughout the North African cuisines of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Mauritania and Libya. Couscous was voted as the third favourite dish of French people in 2011 in a study by TNS Sofres for magazine Vie Pratique Gourmand and the first in East of France.

— Freebase

Muscadet

Muscadet

Muscadet is a white French wine. It is made at the western end of the Loire Valley, near the city of Nantes in the Pays de la Loire region neighboring the Brittany Region. More Muscadet is produced than any other Loire wine. It is made from the Melon de Bourgogne grape, often referred to simply as melon. As a rule in France, Appellation d'origine contrôlée wines are named either after their growing region or after their variety. The name 'Muscadet' is therefore an exception. The name seems to refer to a characteristic of the wine produced by the melon grape variety: vin qui a un goût musqué - 'wine with a musk-like taste'. Though wine expert Tom Stevenson notes that Muscadet wines do not have much, if any, "muskiness" or Muscat-like flavors or aromas. The sole variety used to produce Muscadet, Melon de Bourgogne, was initially planted in the region sometime in or before the 17th century. It became dominant after a hard freeze in 1709 killed most of the region's vines. Dutch traders who were major actors in the local wine trade encouraged the planting of this variety and distilled much of the wine produced into eau de vie for sale in Northern Europe. The generic 'Muscadet' appellation, officially established in 1937, contains three regional sub-appellations: Muscadet-Sèvre et Maine, officially established in 1936, covering 20,305 acres with 21 villages in the Loire-Atlantique department and 2 in the Maine-et-Loire department. This appellation produces 80% of all Muscadets. Muscadet-Coteaux de la Loire, officially established in 1936, covering 467 acres with 24 villages spread across the Loire-Atlantique and Maine-et-Loire departments. Muscadet-Côtes de Grandlieu, officially established in 1994, benefits from the Grandlieu lake's microclimate. This sub appellation covers 717 hectares with 17 villages in the Loire-Atlantique department and 2 villages in the Vendée department.

— Freebase

Vie

Vie

Vie, is a district, of Oradea, a city in Bihor, Romania. The name means vineyard in Romanian.

— Freebase

Grog

Grog

The word grog refers to a variety of alcoholic beverages. The word originally referred to a drink made with water or "small beer" and rum, which British Vice Admiral Edward Vernon introduced into the Royal Navy on 21 August 1740. Vernon wore a coat of grogram cloth and was nicknamed Old Grogram or Old Grog. Modern versions of the drink are often made with hot or boiling water, and sometimes include lemon juice, lime juice, cinnamon or sugar to improve the taste. Rum with water, sugar and nutmeg was known as bumbo and was more popular with pirates and merchantmen. By contrast, in Australia and New Zealand the word has come to mean any alcoholic drink. In Sweden and some subcultures within the English-speaking world, grog is a common description of drinks not made to a recipe, but by mixing various kinds of alcohol and soda, fruit juice or similar ingredients. The difference between the Swedish definition of grog and long drinks, mixed drinks or punches is the number of ingredients. The number of ingredients in drinks may vary, but grog typically has just one kind of liquor and one kind of a non-alcoholic beverage. Grosshandlargrogg refers to a mix of Eau de vie and Trocadero.

— Freebase

ADEPS

ADEPS

'ADEPS is an administrative service of the Ministry of the French Community of Belgium charged with the promotion of sport and physical education amongst the population of the French-speaking community. Its name is an acronym for "Administration de l'Éducation physique, du Sport et de la Vie en Plein Air". Its equivalent in the Flemish Community is Bloso. Created in 1969, these two entities were formerly a single service, INEPS, created in 1956 from the Ministry of National Education and Culture. ADEPS and BLOSO are charged with all aspects of sport development in their own territory, from the training of coaches, growth of sporting clubs, events, and communal sporting functions.

— Freebase

Noli me tangere

Noli me tangere

Noli me tangere, meaning "don't touch me" / "touch me not", is the Latin version of words spoken, according to John 20:17, by Jesus to Mary Magdalene when she recognized him after his resurrection. The original Koine Greek phrase, Μή μου ἅπτου, is better represented in translation as "cease holding on to me" or "stop clinging to me". The biblical scene of Mary Magdalene's recognizing Jesus Christ after his resurrection became the subject of a long, widespread and continuous iconographic tradition in Christian art from late antiquity to the present. So Pablo Picasso for example used the painting Noli me tangere by Antonio da Correggio, stored in the Museo del Prado, as an iconographic source for his famous painting La Vie from the so-called Blue Period.

— Freebase

SubSpace

SubSpace

SubSpace is a two-dimensional space shooter computer game published in 1997 by Virgin Interactive Entertainment which was a finalist for the Academy of Interactive Arts & Sciences Online Game of the Year Award in 1998. SubSpace incorporates quasi-realistic zero-friction physics into a massively multiplayer online game. It is no longer operated by VIE; instead, fans and players of the game provide servers and technical updates. The action is viewed from above, which presents challenges very different from those of a three-dimensional game. The game has no built-in story or set of goals; players may enter a variety of servers, each of which have differing objectives, maps, sounds, and graphics. SubSpace is widely considered an early entry in the massively multiplayer online genre due to its unprecedented player counts.

— Freebase

Guernica

Guernica

Guernica is a painting by Pablo Picasso. It was created in response to the bombing of Guernica, a Basque Country village in northern Spain by German and Italian warplanes at the behest of the Spanish Nationalist forces, on 26 April 1937, during the Spanish Civil War. The Spanish Republican government commissioned Picasso to create a large mural for the Spanish display at the Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne at the 1937 World's Fair in Paris. Guernica shows the tragedies of war and the suffering it inflicts upon individuals, particularly innocent civilians. This work has gained a monumental status, becoming a perpetual reminder of the tragedies of war, an anti-war symbol, and an embodiment of peace. Upon completion Guernica was displayed around the world in a brief tour, becoming famous and widely acclaimed. This tour helped bring the Spanish Civil War to the world's attention.

— Freebase

Borgo

Borgo

Borgo, is the 14th historic district of Rome, Italy. It lies on the west bank of the Tiber, and has a trapezoidal shape. Its coat of arms shows a lion, lying in front of three mounts and a star. These - together with a lion rampant - are also part of the coat of arms of Pope Sixtus V who annexed Borgo as fourteenth rione to the city of Rome. The Borgo borders the Vatican City to the west, the Tiber to the east, Prati to the north, the quartiere Aurelio to the southwest and Trastevere to the south. The territory of the quarter includes a level part, which is made of the alluvial sands of Tiber, and a hilly zone, which coincides with the clay-laden slopes of the Vatican hill. In administrative terms, the Borgo, unlike Trastevere, does not belong to the Center, but to the XVII Municipio, together with the rione of Prati and the quartieri Trionfale and Della Vittoria. The main roads run east-west and are not named Vie, but Borghi. Although heavily transformed during the first half of the 20th century, the Borgo maintains its historical importance as a forecourt to Saint Peter's Basilica and the Vatican Palace.

— Freebase

Life estate

Life estate

In common law and statutory law, a life estate is the ownership of land for the duration of a person's life. In legal terms it is an estate in real property that ends at death when there is a "reversion" to the original owner. The owner of a life estate is called a "life tenant". Although the ownership of a life estate is of limited duration because it ends at the death of the person who is the "measuring life", the owner has the right to enjoy the benefits of ownership of the property, including income derived from rent or other uses of the property, during his or her possession. Because a life estate ceases to exist at the death of the measuring person's life, this temporary ownership agreement cannot be left to heirs or devisees, and the life estate cannot normally be inherited. At death, the property involved in a life estate typically falls into the ownership of the remainderman named in the life estate agreement. A land owner of an estate cannot give a "greater interest" in the estate than he or she owns. That is, a life estate owner cannot give complete and indefinite ownership to another person because the life tenant's ownership in the property ends when the person who is the measuring life dies. For instance, if Bob conveyed to Ashley for the life of Ashley, and Ashley conveys a life estate to another person, Brenda, for Brenda's life [an embedded life estate], then Brenda's life estate interest would last only until whoever dies first, Brenda or Ashley. Then Brenda's interest conveys to the remainder interest or reverts to the original grantee. Once Ashley dies, however, whoever possesses the land loses it. This is a life estate pur autre vie, or the life of another. Such a life estate can also be conveyed originally, such as "to A until B dies".

— Freebase

Intraspecific competition

Intraspecific competition

Intraspecific competition is a particular form of competition in which members of the same species vie for the same resource in an ecosystem. This can be contrasted with interspecific competition, in which different species compete. For example, two trees of the same species growing close together will compete for light, water and nutrients in the soil. Getting less resources, they will perform more poorly than if they grew by themselves. Trees have therefore adapted to grow taller or develop larger root systems through natural selection. Grasshoppers provide an animal example. By eating grass, individual grasshoppers deprive their fellow conspecifics of food. This is an example of exploitation competition, which means that the grasshoppers do not interact directly with each other, but rather have a negative effect on others' growth and reproduction by their effect on a resource. In other cases, intraspecific competition may be a case of interference competition, in which the animals interact directly. This is the case, most notably, in territorial animals: some individuals actively prevent others from exploiting a given resource, usually food or space.

— Freebase

Opéra bouffe

Opéra bouffe

Opéra bouffe is a genre of late 19th-century French operetta, closely associated with Jacques Offenbach, who produced many of them at the Théâtre des Bouffes-Parisiens that gave its name to the form. Opéras bouffes are known for elements of comedy, satire, parody and farce. The most famous examples are La belle Hélène, Barbe-bleue, La vie parisienne, La Périchole and La Grande-Duchesse de Gérolstein.

— Freebase

Cenogram

Cenogram

A cenogram is a graphical comparison of the average adult weight of mammalian species within a terrestrial area. In studying ancient communities, it is used to draw conclusions about biome, including whether a biome is species rich, its relative humidity and level of forestation. Cenograms were introduced in 1964 by J.A. Valverde in Terre et Vie and have become common in the study of prehistoric fauna of the northern hemisphere.

— Freebase

Octosyllable

Octosyllable

The octosyllable or octosyllabic verse is a line of verse with eight syllables. It is equivalent to tetrameter verse in iambs or trochees in languages with a stress accent. Its first occurrence is in a 10th-century Old French saint's legend, the Vie de Saint Leger; another early use is in the early 12th-century Anglo-Norman Voyage de saint Brendan. It is often used in French, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese poetry. While commonly used in couplets, typical stanzas using octosyllables are: décima, some quatrains, redondilla. In Spanish verse, an octosyllable is a line that has its seventh syllable stressed, on the principle that this would normally be the penultimate syllable of a word. If the final word of a line does not fit this pattern, the line could have eight or seven or nine syllables, thus - In Medieval French literature, the octosyllable rhymed couplet was the most common verse form used in verse chronicles, romances, lais and dits. The meter reached Spain in the 14th century, although commonly with a more varied rhyme scheme than the couplet. The French octosyllablic verse came to England via the Anglo-Norman poets from the 12th-13th centuries and influenced 4 stress tetrameter verse used in narration.

— Freebase

Aqua vitae

Aqua vitae

Aqua vitae or aqua vita is an archaic name for a concentrated aqueous solution of ethanol. The term was in wide use during the Middle Ages, although its origin is undoubtedly much earlier, having been used by Saint Patrick and his fellow monks to refer to both the alcohol and the waters of baptism. This Latin term appears in a wide array of dialectical forms throughout all lands and people conquered by ancient Rome. Generally, the term is a generic name for all types of distillates, and eventually came to refer specifically to distillates of alcoholic beverages and liquors. Aqua vitae was typically prepared by distilling wine; it was sometimes called "spirits of wine" in English texts, a name for brandy that had been repeatedly distilled. A local translation of aqua vitae was often applied to an important, locally produced distilled spirits. This gave rise to terms such as whisky, eau de vie in France, acquavite in Italy, and akvavit in Scandinavia, okowita in Poland, оковита in Ukraine, акавіта in Belarus, and яковита' in southern Russian dialects.

— Freebase

Murga

Murga

Murga is a form of popular musical theatre performed in Argentina and in Uruguay during the Carnival season. Murga groups operate in Montevideo and at the Buenos Aires Carnival, though to a lesser extent than in Montevideo; the Argentine murga is more centred on dancing and less on vocals than the Uruguayan one. Uruguayan murga has a counterpart in Cadiz, Spain from which it is derived, the chirigota, but over time the two have diverged into distinct forms. The Murga is performed by a group of a maximum of 17 people, usually men. In the months prior to Carnival, which takes place from late January to early March in Uruguay, each group will prepare a musical play consisting of a suite of songs and recitative lasting around 45 minutes. This suite will be performed on popular stages in the various neighbourhoods, known as tablados, throughout the Carnival period. Groups also vie against one another in a prestigious official competition. Lyrical content is based on a particular theme, chosen by the group, which serves to provide commentary on events in Uruguay or elsewhere over the preceding year. Consequently, murga lends itself well to being used as a form of popular resistance. For example, during the dictatorship in Uruguay in the 1970s, groups like Araca La Cana became known for their left-wing tendencies, subversive commentary and oppositional stance.

— Freebase

Édith Piaf

Édith Piaf

Édith Piaf, born Édith Giovanna Gassion, was a French singer who became widely regarded as France's national diva, as well as being one of France's greatest international stars. Her singing reflected her life, with her specialty being of Chanson and ballads, particularly of love, loss and sorrow. Among her songs are "La Vie en rose", "Non, je ne regrette rien", "Hymne à l'amour", "Milord", "La Foule", "l'Accordéoniste", and "Padam ... Padam ...".

— Freebase

Paul Vidal de la Blache

Paul Vidal de la Blache

Paul Vidal de la Blache was a French geographer. He is considered to be the founder of modern French geography and also the founder of the French School of Geopolitics. He conceived the idea of genre de vie, which is the belief that the lifestyle of a particular region reflects the economic, social, ideological and psychological identities imprinted on the landscape.

— Freebase

Pierre de Marivaux

Pierre de Marivaux

Pierre Carlet de Chamblain de Marivaux, commonly referred to as Marivaux, was a French novelist and dramatist. He is considered one of the most important French playwrights of the 18th century, writing numerous comedies for the Comédie-Française and the Comédie-Italienne of Paris. His most important works are Le Triomphe de l'amour, Le Jeu de l'amour et du hasard and Les Fausses Confidences. He also published a number of essays and two important but unfinished novels, La Vie de Marianne and Le Paysan parvenu.

— Freebase

Banon cheese

Banon cheese

Banon is a French cheese made in the region around the town of Banon in Provence, south-east France. Also known as Banon à la feuille, it is an unpasteurized cheese made from goat's milk and is circular in shape, around 7 cm in diameter and 2.5 cm in height, and weighing around 100 g. This pungent uncooked, unpressed cheese consists of a fine soft white pâte that is wrapped in chestnut leaves and tied with raffia prior to shipping. The Provençal specialty fromage fort du Mont Ventoux is made by placing a young banon in an earthenware jar. The cheese is then seasoned with salt and pepper, doused in vinegar and eau-de-vie and left in a cool cellar to ferment. The concoction will last for many years becoming increasingly fierce in taste.

— Freebase

Cestui que

Cestui que

Cestui que, also cestuy que, is a shortened version of cestui a que use le feoffment fuit fait, literally, "The person for whose use the feoffment was made." It is a Law French phrase of medieval English invention, which appears in the legal phrases cestui que trust, cestui que use, or cestui que vie. In contemporary English the phrase is also commonly pronounced "setty-kay" or "sesty-kay". According to Roebuck, Cestui que use is pronounced "setticky yuce". Cestui que use and cestui que trust are more or less interchangeable terms. In some medieval materials, the phrase is seen as cestui a que. The cestui que use is the person for whose benefit the trust is created. The cestui que trust is the person entitled to an equitable, as opposed to a legal, estate. Thus, if land is granted to the use of A in trust for B, B is cestui que trust, and A trustee, or use. The term, principally owing to its cumbersome nature, has been virtually superseded in modern law by that of "beneficiary", and general law of trusts. The cestui que use and trust were rooted in medieval law, and became a legal method to avoid the feudal incidents to an overlord, while leaving the land for the use of another, who owed nothing to the lord. The law of cestui que tended to defer jurisdiction to courts of equity as opposed to common law courts. The cestui que was often utilized by persons who might be absent from the kingdom for an extended time, and who held tenancy to the land, and owed feudal incidents to a lord. The land could be left for the use of a third party, who did not owe the incidents to the lord.

— Freebase

La bohème

La bohème

La bohème is an opera in four acts, composed by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, based on Scènes de la vie de bohème by Henri Murger. The world premiere performance of La bohème was in Turin on 1 February 1896 at the Teatro Regio, conducted by the young Arturo Toscanini. Since then, La bohème has become part of the standard Italian opera repertory and is one of the most frequently performed operas worldwide. In 1946, fifty years after the opera's premiere, Toscanini conducted a performance of it on radio with the NBC Symphony Orchestra. This performance was eventually released on records and on Compact Disc. It is the only recording of a Puccini opera by its original conductor.

— Freebase

Neosocialism

Neosocialism

Neosocialism was a political trend of socialism, represented in France during the 1930s and in Belgium, which included several revisionist tendencies in the French Section of the Workers' International. In the wake of the Great Depression, a group of right-wing members, led by Henri de Man in Belgium, founder of planisme, and in France Marcel Déat, Pierre Renaudel, René Belin, the "neo-Turks" of the Radical-Socialist Party, opposed themselves both to Marxism and to gradual reformism. Instead, influenced by Henri de Man's planisme, they promoted a "constructive revolution" headed by the state and technocrats, through economic planification. Such ideas also influenced the Non-Conformist Movement in the French right-wing. Marcel Déat published in 1930 Perspectives socialistes, a revisionist work closely influenced by Henri de Man's planisme. Along with over a hundred articles written in La Vie Socialiste, the review of the SFIO's right-wing, Perspective socialistes marked the shift of Déat from classical Socialism to Neo-Socialism. Déat replaced class struggle by collaboration of classes and national solidarity, advocated corporatism as a social organization model, replaced the notion of "Socialism" by "anti-Capitalism" and supported an authoritarian state which would plan the economy and from which parliamentarism would be repealed.

— Freebase

Essex Junto

Essex Junto

The Essex Junto was a powerful group of New England Federalist Party lawyers, merchants, and politicians, so named because many of the original group were from Essex County, Massachusetts. The term was coined by John Hancock in 1778 to describe the main opponents of a proposed constitution for the state of Massachusetts. The proposed constitution was rejected by the people; the state adopted its constitution in 1780. John Adams is also frequently credited with disseminating the name. Over the following years the group expanded to include politicians from other New England states who were opposed to Democratic-Republican Party policies that dominated national politics. They supported Alexander Hamilton and the Massachusetts radicals. When Hamilton was offered a place in the plot to secede New England from the Union, he denied the offer. Consequently, the Essex Junto tried to vie support from Aaron Burr, who accepted the offer from the Junto. The first attempt to break off New England from the Union failed since it was unable to gain support from the major power brokers in the state of New York. After Hamilton's death, they became even more extreme. During the War of 1812, they were called "Blue Lights" because of the common belief and reports from the United States Navy that they would shine blue lights to alert the British blockading ships of escaping American ships, or to alert British ships to come ashore and carry out illegal trade. They supported the Hartford Convention's disaffection with the War of 1812 and proposed secession of New England. Some members of the Essex Junto were Timothy Pickering, George Cabot, Fisher Ames, Francis Dana, Nathan Dane, Benjamin Goodhue, Stephen Higginson, Jonathon Jackson, John Lowell, Israel Thorndike, Nathaniel Tracy, and Theophilus Parsons.

— Freebase

Walkups

Walkups

Walkups is the debut novella by the Canadian author Lance Blomgren, published by Conundrum Press. The first printing quickly sold out following its release, having already been excerpted in various magazines and on the internet. It was followed by a companion piece, Corner Pieces in 2004. The novel has since been translated into French by Éditions Adage, translated by Elizabeth Robert, and published as Walkups: Scènes de la vie Montréalaise. A second printing of the novella was released by conundrum press in May 2009. The title evokes the typical street-side apartment living of large eastern North American cities in general, and the winding staircases typical to Montreal in particular.

— Freebase

L5

L5

L5 was a French girl group playing pop music. The group is known for their participation in the French Popstars TV programme in its first season in 2001. L5 reached the 50th position in the list of French best-selling singles and 48th position in the list of French number-one hits of 2001 with their song "Toutes les femmes de ta vie". They toured in France with Jérémy Chatelain in 2003 and with Billy Crawford in 2006. "Make a Change", on the album Destiny by No Angels, is an English-language remake of L5's single "Reste Encore".

— Freebase

30 Days

30 Days

30 Days is a reality television show on the FX cable network in the United States, created and hosted by Morgan Spurlock. In each episode, Spurlock, or some other person or group of people, spend 30 days immersing themselves in a particular lifestyle with which they are unfamiliar, while discussing related social issues. As in Spurlock's film, Super Size Me, there are a number of rules unique to each situation which must be followed during each such experiment. At least one episode each season has featured Spurlock as the person spending the month in the particular lifestyle. Season one premiered on June 15, 2005, and its respective DVD set was released July 11, 2006. The second season premiered on July 26, 2006. Season 3 of 30 Days premiered on June 3, 2008. FX said on November 6 that it would not be renewing the series for a fourth season, effectively canceling the show. The show has recently been picked up for re-air by Planet Green, though no new episodes have been ordered. In the United Kingdom, the program is broadcast on More4 and Channel 4. In Australia, the program is broadcast on Network Ten and Lifestyle Channel. It currently airs in Canada on Independent Film Channel and Canal Vie. It also airs on FX in Latin America. In Norway it airs on TV 2. In Sweden it airs on TV4 and Kanal 9.

— Freebase

Marthe

Marthe

Marthe, histoire d'une fille was the first novel by the French writer Joris-Karl Huysmans, published in 1876. The book is autobiographical in inspiration and tells the story of the love affair between a young journalist called Léo and the heroine of the title, a would-be actress who works in a factory for artificial pearls as well as in a licensed brothel. The love affair breaks up and Marthe goes to live with the alcoholic actor-manager Ginginet. After his death, she is reduced to living on the streets. Huysmans was worried about the response to the book's controversial subject matter, since the author Jean Richepin had recently been imprisoned for a month and fined for writing a book on the theme of prostitution. In spite of this, Marthe is not pornographic. Huysmans intended its squalid realism as an attack on the overidealised view of Bohemian life in Paris he found in such Romantic writers as Henri Murger, whose famous Scènes de la vie bohème had appeared in 1848. Huysmans' style in Marthe owes a great deal to his literary hero at the time, Edmond de Goncourt. To avoid prosecution, Huysmans travelled to Brussels to have Marthe issued by the Belgian publisher Jean Gay, who had considerable experience smuggling contraband books across the French border. The novel appeared for sale in Belgium on October 1, 1876. Huysmans decided against smuggling it into France but when he attempted to take 400 copies through French customs, all but a handful were impounded. Huysmans decided to send some of the few remaining copies to leading figures of the literary scene in Paris. Edmond de Goncourt offered qualified praise but Émile Zola was most enthusiastic. Zola, the head of the new Naturalist school of French fiction, soon became a friend and mentor to the young Huysmans, whose association with the Naturalist group would last until his most famous novel, A rebours, took Huysmans' writing in a completely different direction.

— Freebase

The Amazing Race

The Amazing Race

The Amazing Race is an American reality game show in which typically eleven teams of two race around the world. The race is split into roughly twelve legs interspersed with physical and mental challenges, and require teams to deduce clues, navigate themselves in foreign areas, interact with locals, perform physical and mental challenges, and vie for airplane, boat, taxi, and other public transportation options on a limited budget provided by the show. Teams are progressively eliminated at the end of most legs; with the final leg's grand prize of US$1 million. As the original version of the Amazing Race franchise, the CBS program has been running since 2001. Season 25 premiered on September 26, 2014. Numerous international versions have been developed following the same core structure, while the U.S. version is also broadcast to several other markets. The show was created by Elise Doganieri and Bertram van Munster, who, along with Jonathan Littman, serve as executive producers. The show is produced by Earthview Inc., Bruckheimer Television for CBS Television Studios and ABC Studios.

— Freebase

Rock the Cradle

Rock the Cradle

Rock the Cradle is an MTV reality show in which the offspring of R&B, pop, and rock stars from the 1980s and 1990s vie in a six-week singing competition. The show debuted on Thursday, April 3, 2008.

— Freebase

Giacomo Casanova

Giacomo Casanova

Giacomo Girolamo Casanova was an Italian adventurer and author from the Republic of Venice. His autobiography, Histoire de ma vie, is regarded as one of the most authentic sources of the customs and norms of European social life during the 18th century. As was not uncommon at the time, Casanova, depending on circumstances, used more or less fictitious names such as baron or count of Farussi or Chevalier de Seingalt. He often signed his works Jacques Casanova de Seingalt after he began writing in French following his second exile from Venice. He has become so famous for his often complicated and elaborate affairs with women that his name is now synonymous with "womanizer". He associated with European royalty, popes and cardinals, along with luminaries such as Voltaire, Goethe, and Mozart. He spent his last years in Bohemia as a librarian in Count Waldstein's household, where he also wrote the story of his life.

— Freebase

Fénélon, François de Salignac de la Mothe

Fénélon, François de Salignac de la Mothe

a famous French prelate and writer, born in the Château de Fénélon, in the prov. of Périgord; at the age of 15 came to Paris, and, having already displayed a remarkable gift for preaching, entered the Plessis College, and four years later joined the Seminary of St. Sulpice, where he took holy orders in 1675; his directorship of a seminary for female converts to Catholicism brought him into prominence, and gave occasion to his well-known treatise "De l'Éducation des Filles"; in 1685, after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, he conducted a mission for the conversion of the Huguenots of Saintonge and Poitou, and four years later Louis XIV. appointed him tutor to his grandson, the Duke of Burgundy, an appointment which led to his writing his "Fables," "Dialogues of the Dead," and "History of the Ancient Philosophers"; in 1694 he became abbé of St. Valery, and in the following year archbishop of Cambrai; soon after this ensued his celebrated controversy with Bossuet (q. v.) regarding the doctrines of Quietism (q. v.), a dispute which brought him into disfavour with the king and provoked the Pope's condemnation of his "Explication des Maximes des Saints sur la Vie intérieure"; the surreptitious publication of his most famous work "Télémache," the MS. of which was stolen by his servant, accentuated the king's disfavour, who regarded it as a veiled attack on his court, and led to an order confining the author to his own diocese; the rest of his life was spent in the service of his people, to whom he endeared himself by his benevolence and the sweet piety of his nature; his works are extensive, and deal with subjects historical and literary, as well as philosophical and theological (1651-1715).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Mürger, Henri

Mürger, Henri

French novelist and poet, born at Paris; is chiefly distinguished as the author of "Scènes de la Vie de Bohême," from his own experiences, and instinct with pathos and humour, sadness his predominant tone; wrote lyrics as well as novels and stories, the chief "La Chanson de Musette," "a tear," says Gautier, "which has become a pearl of poetry" (1822-1861).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Ohnet, Georges

Ohnet, Georges

French novelist, born in Paris; author of a series of novels in a social interest, entitled "Les Batailles de la Vie;" b. 1848.

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Quinet, Edgar

Quinet, Edgar

a French man of letters, born at Bourg, in the department of Ain; was educated at Bourg and Lyons, went to Paris in 1820, and in 1823 produced a satire called "Les Tablettes du Juif-Errant," at which time he came under the influence of Herder (q. v.) and executed in French a translation of his "Philosophy of Humanity," prefaced with an introduction which procured him the friendship of Michelet, a friendship which lasted with life; appointed to a post in Greece, he collected materials for a work on Modern Greece, and this, the first fruit of his own view of things as a speculative Radical, he published in 1830; he now entered the service of the Revue des Deux Mondes, and in the pages of it his prose poem "Ahasuérus" appeared, which was afterwards published in a book form and soon found a place in the "Index Expurgatorius" of the Church; this was followed by other democratic poems, "Napoleon" in 1835 and "Prometheus" in 1838; from 1838 to 1842 he occupied the chair of Foreign Literature in Lyons, and passed from it to that of the Literature of Southern Europe in the College of France; here, along with Michelet, he commenced a vehement crusade against the clerical party, which was brought to a head by his attack on the Jesuits, and which led to his suspension from the duties of the chair in 1846; he distrusted Louis Napoleon, and was exiled in 1852, taking up his abode at Brussels, to return to Paris again only after the Emperor's fall; through all these troubles he was busy with his pen, in 1838 published his "Examen de la Vie de Jésus," his "Du Genie des Religions," "La Révolution Religieuse au xixe Siècle," and other works; he was a disciple of Herder to the last; he believed in humanity, and religion as the soul of it (1803-1875).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Renan, Ernest

Renan, Ernest

Orientalist and Biblical scholar, born in Brittany, son of a sailor, who, dying, left him to the care of his mother and sister, to both of whom he was warmly attached; destined for the Church, he entered the seminary of St. Sulpice, where his studies threw him out of the relation with the Church and obliged him to abandon all thoughts of the clerical profession; accomplished in Hebrew, he was appointed professor of that language in the College of France in 1861, though not installed till 1870, and made a member of the French Academy in 1878; having distinguished himself by his studies in the Semitic languages, and in a succession of essays on various subjects of high literary merit, he in 1863 achieved a European reputation by the publication of his "Vie de Jésus," the first of a series bearing upon the origin of Christianity and the agencies that contributed to its rise and development; he wrote other works bearing more immediately on modern life and its destiny, but it is in connection with his views of Christ and Christianity that his name will be remembered; he entertained at last an overweening faith in science and scientific experts, and looked to the latter as the elect of the earth for the redemption of humanity (1823-1893).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Sand, George

Sand, George

the assumed name of Aurore Dupin, notable French novelist, born in Paris; married Baron Dudevant, a man of means, but with no literary sympathies; became the mother of two children, and after nine years effected a separation from him (1831) and went to Paris to push her way in literature, and involved herself in some unhappy liaisons, notably with Alfred de Musset (q. v.) and Chopin; after 1848 she experienced a sharp revulsion from this Bohemian life, and her last twenty-five years were spent in the quiet "Châtelaine of Nohant" (inherited) in never-ceasing literary activity, and in entertaining the many eminent littérateurs of all countries who visited her; her voluminous works reflect the strange shifts of her life; "Indiana," "Lélia," and other novels reveal the tumult and revolt that mark her early years in Paris; "Consuelo," "Spiridion," &c., show her engaged with political, philosophical, and religious speculation; "Elle et Lui" and "Lucrezia Floriani" are the outcome of her relations with Musset and Chopin; the calm of her later years is reflected in "La Petite Fadette," "François le Champi," and other charming studies of rustic life; her "Histoire de ma Vie" and posthumous letters also deserve notice; her work is characterised by a richly flowing style, an exuberant imagination, and is throughout full of true colour and vivid emotion (1804-1876).

— The Nuttall Encyclopedia

Meadowlands

Meadowlands

Cape Wrath is a British drama television series produced by Ecosse Films which focuses on a family trying to escape its past while confronting an even more uncertain future. The series opens with Danny and Evelyn Brogan along with their two teenage children Zoe and Mark entering a witness protection programme, moving to a bucolic neighbourhood, Meadowlands, to begin a new life. Picturesque and crime-free, Meadowlands appears to be a suburban paradise where the Brogan family can start a new life. However they soon realise that it is not so easy to escape the past and their safe haven becomes a world of paranoia and psychological intrigue with surprises around every corner. The series is produced by Ecosse Films for Channel 4 in the UK and Showtime in the US, and premièred in the United States on 17 June 2007 at 22:00 EST, on Showtime. The United Kingdom première was on 10 July 2007 at 22:00 BST on Channel 4. Meadowlands itself is actually two locations: the titles, overhead "establishing shots" and the main characters homes were filmed at The Lakes, a new housing development next to Leybourne Lakes Country Park near New Hythe in Kent, south east England. Samantha Campbell's "headquarters" as well as the doctor's surgery were filmed in a warehouse close to Maidstone Studios., The post production was carried out in London at St Anne's post production house.

— Freebase

Superlative

Superlative

In grammar, the superlative is the form of an adverb or adjective that expresses a degree of the adverb or adjective being used that is greater than any other possible degree of the given descriptor. English superlatives are typically formed with the suffix -est or the word most.

— Freebase

Memorandum

Memorandum

A memorandum was from the Latin verbal phrase memorandum est, the gerundive form of the verb memoro, "to mention, call to mind, recount, relate", which means "It must be remembered...". It is therefore a note, document or other communication that helps the memory by recording events or observations on a topic, such as may be used in a business office. The plural form of the Latin noun memorandum so derived is properly memoranda, but if the word is deemed to have become a word of the English language, the plural memorandums, abbreviated to memos, may be used. A memorandum may have any format, or it may have a format specific to an office or institution. In law specifically, a memorandum is a record of the terms of a transaction or contract, such as a policy memo, memorandum of understanding, memorandum of agreement, or memorandum of association. Alternative formats include memos, briefing notes, reports, letters or binders. They could be one page long or many. If the user is a cabinet minister or a senior executive, the format might be rigidly defined and limited to one or two pages. If the user is a colleague, the format is usually much more flexible. At its most basic level, a memorandum can be a handwritten note to one's supervisor. In business, a memo is typically used by firms for internal communication, as opposed to letters which are typically for external communication.

— Freebase

Omega Centauri

Omega Centauri

Omega Centauri or NGC 5139, is a globular cluster in the constellation of Centaurus, discovered by Edmond Halley in 1677 who listed it as a nebula. Omega Centauri had been listed in Ptolemy's catalog 2000 years ago as a star on the horse's back "Quae est in principio scapulae", though the name "Omega Centauri" is a later Bayer star designation, even though the object was later identified as a star cluster. Lacaille also included it in his catalog as a nebula, giving it the catalogue number L I.5. It was first recognized as a globular cluster by the James Dunlop in 1826. Orbiting the Milky Way, it is both the brightest and the largest known globular cluster associated with our galaxy. Of all the globular clusters in the Local Group of galaxies, only Mayall II in the Andromeda Galaxy is brighter and more massive. ω Centauri is so different from other galactic globular clusters that it is thought to be of different origin. It is located about 15,800 light-years from Earth and contains several million Population II stars. The stars in its center are so crowded that they are estimated to average only 0.1 light years away from each other. It is about 12 billion years old.

— Freebase

Sanjay Gupta MD

Sanjay Gupta MD

Sanjay Gupta MD is a medical-centric news program hosted by CNN's in-house physician, Sanjay Gupta. It typically airs on weekends at 7:30 am EST.

— Freebase

Habanera

Habanera

Habanera is the popular name for the aria "L'amour est un oiseau rebelle" from Georges Bizet's 1875 opera Carmen. It is the entrance aria of the title character, a mezzo-soprano role, in scene 5 of the first act. The vocal range covers D4 to F♯5 with a tessitura from D4 to D5. The score of this aria was adapted from the habanera "El Arreglito", originally composed by the Spanish musician Sebastián Yradier. Bizet thought it to be a folk song; when others told him he had used something that had been written by a composer who had died only ten years earlier, he had to add a note to the vocal score of Carmen, acknowledging its source. The French libretto was written by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy. It is based on a descending chromatic scale followed by variants of the same phrase in first the minor and then the major key, corresponding to the vicissitudes of love expressed in the lyrics.

— Freebase

Ungava

Ungava

Ungava is a provincial electoral district in the Nord-du-Québec region of Quebec, Canada that elects members to the National Assembly of Quebec. It includes all of the Nord-du-Québec region except for the Naskapi village municipality of Kawawachikamach. It covers the Ungava Peninsula of northern Quebec and includes the municipalities of Matagami, Chibougamau and Chapais as well as the hydroelectric dams near James Bay, numerous First Nations reserves including the Cree communities of Eeyou Istchee, and the Inuit communities of Nunavik. It was created for the 1981 election from Abitibi-Est and Abitibi-Ouest electoral districts. In the change from the 2001 to the 2011 electoral map, it lost the unorganized territories of Caniapiscau and Lac-Juillet to Duplessis electoral district.

— Freebase

Abitibi

Abitibi

Abitibi was a former provincial electoral district in Quebec, Canada which elected members to the Legislative Assembly of Quebec. It was located in the general area of the modern-day Abitibi-Témiscamingue region in Western Quebec. It was created for the 1923 election from parts of the Témiscamingue electoral district. Its last election was in 1939. It disappeared in the 1944 election and was split into Abitibi-Ouest and Abitibi-Est.

— Freebase

Inhumanity

Inhumanity

Inhumanity is the debut album of Finnish melodic death metal band Mors Principium Est. It was first released in 2003 and later reissued in 2006 with new artwork and three bonus tracks.

— Freebase

Bambino

Bambino

Bambino was Dalida's first major hit, released as a single in 1956, and on the album Son Nom Est Dalida in 1957. It is a cover of the Italian song Guaglione, written and sung by Aurelio Fierro. The song was high on the French singles charts for months, scoring 45 weeks in the Top 10. It also appeared in OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies, in 2006, sung in Arabic by Jean Dujardin.

— Freebase

Remus

Remus

Remus is the inner and smaller moon of the main-belt asteroid 87 Sylvia. It follows an almost-circular close-to-equatorial orbit around the parent asteroid. In this respect it is similar to the other moon Romulus. Remus was discovered several years after Romulus on images taken starting on August 9, 2004, and announced on August 10, 2005. It was discovered by Franck Marchis of UC Berkeley, and Pascal Descamps, Daniel Hestroffer, and Jérôme Berthier of the Observatoire de Paris, France, using the Yepun telescope of the European Southern Observatory in Chile. Marchis, the project leader, was waiting for the completion of the image acquisition programme before starting to process the data. Just as he was set to go on vacation in March 2005, Descamps sent him a brief note entitled "87 Sylvia est triple ?" pointing out that he could see two moonlets on several images of Sylvia. The entire team then focused quickly on analysis of the data, wrote a paper, submitted an abstract to the August meeting in Rio de Janeiro and submitted a naming proposal to the IAU. Its full designation is Sylvia II Remus; before receiving its name, it was known as S/2004 1. The moon is named after Remus, twin of the mythological founder of Rome, one of the children of Rhea Silvia raised by a wolf.

— Freebase

Addendum

Addendum

An addendum, in general, is an addition required to be made to a document by its author subsequent to its printing or publication. It comes from the Latin verbal phrase addendum est, being the gerundive form of the verb addo, addere, addidi, additum, "to give to, add to", meaning " must be added". Addenda is from the plural form addenda sunt, " which must be added"..

— Freebase

Cheering

Cheering

Cheering is the uttering or making of sounds encouraging, stimulating or exciting to action, indicating approval or acclaiming or welcoming persons, announcements of events and the like. The word cheer meant originally face, countenance, expression, and came through Old French into Middle English in the 13th century from Low Latin cara, head; this is generally referred to the Greek καρα;. Cara is used by the 6th-century poet Flavius Cresconius Corippus, Postquam venere verendam Caesilris ante caram. Cheer was at first qualified with epithets, both of joy and gladness and of sorrow; compare She thanked Dyomede for ale ... his gode chere with If they sing ... tis with so dull a cheere. An early transference in meaning was to hospitality or entertainment, and hence to food and drink, good cheer. The sense of a shout of encouragement or applause is a late use. Defoe speaks of it as a sailor's word, and the meaning does not appear in Johnson. Of the different words or rather sounds that are used in cheering, "hurrah", though now generally looked on as the typical British form of cheer, is found in various forms in German, Scandinavian, Russian, French. It is probably onomatopoeic in origin; From the Norse battle cry "Huer Av", meaning "Heads Off", but some connect it with such words as hurry, whirl ; the meaning would then be haste, to encourage speed or onset in battle. The English hurrah was preceded by huzza, stated to be a sailors word, and generally connected with heeze, to hoist, probably being one of the cries that sailors use when hauling or hoisting. The German hoch, seen in full in Hoch lebe der Kaiser, &c., the French vive, Italian and Spanish viva, evviva, are cries rather of acclamation than encouragement. The Japanese shout banzai became familiar during the Russo-Japanese War. In reports of parliamentary and other debates the insertion of cheers at any point in a speech indicates that approval was shown by members of the House by emphatic utterances of hear hear. Cheering may be tumultuous, or it may be conducted rhythmically by prearrangement, as in the case of the Hip-hip-hip by way of introduction to a simultaneous hurrah. The saying "hip hip hurrah" is alleged to have roots going back to the crusaders, then meaning "Jerusalem is lost to the infidel, and we are on our way to paradise. The abbreviation HEP would then stand for Hierosolyma est perdita, "Jerusalem is lost" in Latin.

— Freebase

Stella

Stella

Stella was a short-lived television series that originally ran from June 28, 2005 to August 30, 2005 on the American television channel Comedy Central, created by and starring Michael Ian Black, Michael Showalter, and David Wain, the three members of the sketch comedy troupe of the same name and former cast members of MTV's The State. Stella, as a comedy troupe, has existed since 1997. It has a cult following and plays to sold out shows across the USA. The show aired on Tuesdays at 10:30 PM, EST. In September, after 10 episodes, Stella's timeslot was filled by Mind of Mencia. On March 8, 2006, the following message was posted on Stella's official website: "The STELLA series was on Comedy Central last summer. The network has officially decided not to renew it for a second season," thus effectively cancelling the series. The first season DVD was released on September 12, 2006. Episodes have also been available on iTunes and Hulu and some episodes on Joost. Stella premiered in Australia on The Comedy Channel on May 3, 2007.

— Freebase

Testees

Testees

Testees is a Canadian television series, created by Kenny Hotz and written and produced by Kenny Hotz and Derek Harvie. Testees originally aired on Thursdays at 10:30 PM EST on FX and ran from October 9, 2008 to December 18, 2008. and debuted on October 14, 2008 on Showcase in Canada. The show is filmed in Toronto and Hamilton, Ontario. Testees is now showing on FX in the UK, I.Sat in Brazil and Comedy Central in Germany, Austria and the Netherlands. After one season, Testees was not renewed by FX.

— Freebase

Rubicon

Rubicon

The Rubicon is a shallow river in northeastern Italy, about 80 kilometres long, running from the Apennine Mountains to the Adriatic Sea through the southern Emilia-Romagna region, between the towns of Rimini and Cesena. The Latin word rubico comes from the adjective "rubeus", meaning "red". The river was so named because its waters are colored red by mud deposits. It was key to protecting Rome from civil war. The idiom "Crossing the Rubicon" means to pass a point of no return, and refers to Julius Caesar's army's crossing of the river in 49 BC, which was considered an act of insurrection. Because the course of the river has changed much since then, it is impossible to confirm exactly where the Rubicon flowed when Caesar and his legions crossed it, even though most evidence links it to the river officially so named. The river is perhaps most known as the place where Julius Caesar uttered the famous phrase "alea iacta est" - the die is cast.

— Freebase

Hypallage

Hypallage

Hypallage is a literary device that is the reversal of the syntactic relation of two words. One kind of hypallage, also known as a transferred epithet, is the trope or rhetorical device in which a modifier, usually an adjective, is applied to the "wrong" word in the sentence. The word whose modifier is thus displaced can either be actually present in the sentence, or it can be implied logically. The effect often stresses the emotions or feelings of the individual by expanding them on to the environment. For example: ⁕"On the idle hill of summer/Sleepy with the flow of streams/Far I hear..." — idle hill... sleepy is a hypallage: it is the narrator, not the hill, who exhibits these features. ⁕"Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time" — Wilfred Owen, "Dulce et Decorum est" ⁕"restless night" — The night was not restless, but the person who was awake through it was. ⁕"happy morning" — Mornings have no feelings, but the people who are awake through them do. Hypallage is often used strikingly in Ancient Greek and Latin poetry. We find such examples of transferred epithets as "the winged sound of whirling", meaning "the sound of whirling wings", and Horace's "angry crowns of kings". Virgil was given to hypallage beyond the transferred epithet, as "give the winds to the fleets", meaning "give the fleets to the winds."

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Prodelision

Prodelision

Prodelision is a form of elision in which the latter word loses its first vowels. Example: "Namqu etsi nullum memorabile nomen femine in poena st, habet haec victoria laudem, exstinxisse nefas." The "e" of "est" elides in the second line, rather than the "a" of "poena." This is very common in Latin with forms of the verb "esse."

— Freebase

Read Out!

Read Out!

Read Out! was a Canadian English language talk show. Read Out! premiered on April 18, 2003 at 7:30 pm EST on Canadian digital cable specialty channel, PrideVision, now known as OUTtv.

— Freebase

Eteocretan language

Eteocretan language

Eteocretan is the non-Greek language of a few alphabetic inscriptions of ancient Crete. In eastern Crete about half a dozen inscriptions have been found which, though written in Greek alphabets, are clearly not Greek. These inscriptions date from the late 7th or early 6th century down to the 3rd century BC. The language, which is not understood, is probably a survival of a language spoken on Crete before the arrival of Greeks and may well be derived from the Minoan language preserved in the Linear A inscriptions of a millennium earlier. But as that language still remains to be deciphered, we cannot say for sure that Eteocretan and Minoan are related. Ancient testimony suggests that the language is that of the Eteocretans, i.e. "True Cretans." Unfortunately, the term 'Eteocretan' is sometimes applied to the Minoan language written more than a millennium earlier in so-called Cretan 'hieroglyphics' and in the Linear A script. But as Yves Duhoux, who is probably the leading authority on Eteocretan today, wrote: 'il est essentiel de séparer rigoureusement l'étude de l'étéocrétois de celle des inscriptions ″hiéroglyphiques″ et linéaires A'.

— Freebase

Golden shiner

Golden shiner

The golden shiner is a cyprinid fish native to eastern North America. It is the sole member of its genus. Much used as a bait fish, it is probably the most widely pond-cultured fish in the United States. It can be found in Quebec and its French name is "Mené jaune" or "Chatte de l'Est".

— Freebase

TTC

TTC

TTC is an alternative hip hop band from Paris, France. It is composed of MCs Tido Berman, Teki Latex and Cuizinier, DJ Orgasmic and producers Tacteel and Para One. Their first album, Ceci N'est Pas Un Disque, was released on Big Dada in 2002. They released the second album, Batards Sensibles, in 2005. It features vocal contributions from Busdriver and Radioinactive. Their thid album, 3615 TTC, was released in 2007.

— Freebase

Automaniac

Automaniac

Automaniac was a TV show hosted by former professional wrestler Bill Goldberg. In each episode, Goldberg told the story of a particular type of vehicle: its origins, its designers, etc. The show aired on Wednesdays at 11 PM EST/10 PM CST on The History Channel and was canceled in August 2005.

— Freebase

Pointe-aux-Trembles

Pointe-aux-Trembles

Pointe-aux-Trembles is a provincial electoral district in the Montreal region of Quebec, Canada that elects members to the National Assembly of Quebec. The district is located at the north-east point of the Island of Montreal and comprises the city of Montréal-Est and part of the Rivière-des-Prairies–Pointe-aux-Trembles borough of Montreal. It was created for the 1989 election from parts of Anjou, Bourget and LaFontaine electoral districts. In the change from the 2001 to the 2011 electoral map, its territory was unchanged. In the 1995 Quebec referendum it voted 63% for Quebec to separate.

— Freebase

Wilfred Owen

Wilfred Owen

Wilfred Edward Salter Owen MC was an English poet and soldier, one of the leading poets of the First World War. His shocking, realistic war poetry on the horrors of trenches and gas warfare was heavily influenced by his friend and mentor Siegfried Sassoon, and stood in stark contrast both to the public perception of war at the time and to the confidently patriotic verse written by earlier war poets such as Rupert Brooke. Among his best-known works – most of which were published posthumously – are "Dulce et Decorum Est", "Insensibility", "Anthem for Doomed Youth", "Futility" and "Strange Meeting".

— Freebase

Derib

Derib

Derib is a Swiss francophone comics creator, one of the most famous in Europe, who started his professional career at Peyo's studio. He is probably best known for his Western comics such as the children's comic Yakari, and the more mature works Buddy Longway and Celui-qui-est-né-deux-fois. He draws in both a realistic style, and a cartoon style, with a fondness for drawing majestic landscapes of the American West. Many of his major works feature Sioux Native Americans in leading roles, and he has stated in interviews that he holds great admiration for the tribe.

— Freebase

Fada, Chad

Fada, Chad

Fada is the capital of the Ennedi Ouest department of Chad. It is located in the Ennedi Region, which was formed in 2008 from the Ennedi Ouest and Ennedi Est departments of the former Bourkou-Ennedi-Tibesti region. Lying in the Ennedi Plateau, it has a population of 23,786. It is known for the surrounding cave paintings and rock formations, while the Guelta d'Archei and a wood growing in a wadi are local attractions. It is the birthplace of the current President of Chad, Idriss Déby. The town is served by Fada Airport.

— Freebase

Zotto

Zotto

Zotto was the military leader of the Lombards in the Mezzogiorno. He is generally considered the founder of the Duchy of Benevento in 571 and its first duke : “…Fuit autem primus Langobardorum dux in Benevento nomine Zotto, qui in ea principatus est per curricula viginti annorum…”. With his troops, he penetrated Campania in August 570, confronting the Byzantines, whom he defeated consistently. He fixed his camp in Benevento, which became the capital of the new duchy. He tried to take Naples, but failed and had to lift the siege. As a duke he was quasi-independent, the north of the peninsula being under the control of the Lombard king Authari, who had little influence in the south. He finally submitted to royal authority in 589. He died in 591 and was succeeded by Arechis.

— Freebase

Stage diving

Stage diving

Stage diving is the act of leaping from a concert stage onto the crowd below. It is often the precursor to crowd surfing. Initially seen as confrontational and extreme, stage diving has become common at hardcore punk and thrash metal performances. Many musicians have made stage diving a part of their stage act. Iggy Pop is often credited with popularising stage diving in popular rock music. Jim Morrison was another early performer known for having jumped into the crowd at several concerts. Stage diving can cause serious injuries. One example is when Peter Gabriel of Genesis stage dived during the end of their song "The Knife", landing on his foot, thus breaking his ankle. On 20 August 2010, Charles Haddon, the lead singer of English synthpop band Ou Est Le Swimming Pool, died after a performance at Pukkelpop, Belgium. He committed suicide by jumping from a telecommunications mast in the backstage artists' parking area. Haddon was reported to have been distressed after he feared he had seriously injured a young girl earlier after a stagedive. In 2012, singer Randy Blythe of American heavy metal band Lamb of God was indicted on charges of manslaughter relating to the death of a fan in the Czech Republic after the fan was injured after being pushed off the stage.

— Freebase

Auscultare

Auscultare

In regard to the reading of prayers with a graceful tone or accent, so to make an impression on the hearers, there was a person appointed, in monasteries, to hear the monks read, who instructed them how to perform it, before they were admitted to read publicly in the church, or before the people. This was called auscultare, q.d. to hear, listen. "Quicunque Lecturus vel Cantaturus est aliquid in Monasterio; si necesse babeat ab eo, viz. Cantore, priusquam incipiat debet Auscultare." — Lanfranc in Decreta pro ordinis S. Benedicti.

— Freebase

Lunatique

Lunatique

Lunatique is the name of the third studio album recorded by French singer Jenifer Bartoli. It was released on November 5, 2007 and contains the hit singles "Tourner ma page", "Comme un hic" and "Si c'est une île". The album topped the chart in France, and was also a success in Belgium, earning a Gold certification. The music of this album was composed by Jenifer and her husband, Maxim Nucci. However, it also contained collaborations with lyricist David Verlant, who wrote almost all the songs. Matthieu Chedid participated in the song "Touche-moi" and other titles, playing the guitar and the French actor Guillaume Canet participated in "Nos futurs". The strings and brass were arranged by Simon Hale and recorded at the Angel studio in London. The mixing of the album was done by Bob Clearmountain.

— Freebase

Paramedics

Paramedics

Paramedics was a medical-based television reality show that ran on TLC from 1999 to 2001 and now runs infrequently on Discovery Health Channel. A spin-off of Trauma: Life in the E.R., Paramedics followed the activities of teams of EMTs and paramedics in a number of large urban centers in the United States. The series was never as popular in its original run on TLC as its parent show Trauma, but it has found a home on Discovery Health Channel, serving in a four-show rotation in the 1800-2000 EST/EDT time block with Code Blue: New Orleans, Code Blue: Savannah, and Trauma: Life in the ER. The show had no regular cast; every week featured a different city and a different group of paramedics. Actor Michael McGlone narrated the series. Composer Chuck Hammer scored the series. The excitement as well as the occasional tedium of being a member of a paramedic team is evident, as cases ranging from life-and-death to broken wrists to false calls are all featured. The show differed from Trauma: Life in the E.R. in that it did not show surgeries and hospital discharges. Instead, it focused on the importance of a paramedic's immediate care and social skills in dealing with a variety of people.

— Freebase

FERT

FERT

FERT, the motto of the Royal House of Italy, the House of Savoy, was adopted by King Vittorio Amedeo II. It appeared for the first time on the collar of the Supreme Order of the Most Holy Annunciation or Ordine Supremo della Santissima Annunziata, the primary dynastic order of the kingdom. This ceased to be a national order when Italy became a republic in 1946. The order remains under the jurisdiction of the head of the House of Savoy, however, as hereditary Sovereign and Grand Master. The meaning of the letters has been a matter of some controversy, to which a number of interpretations have been offered. The motto is believed an acronym of:— ⁕Foedere et Religione Tenemur; although others have suggested:— ⁕Fortitudo Eius Rhodum Tenuit, referring to the victory of Amadeus V, Count of Savoy, who fought against the Saracens at the 1310 siege of Rhodes; or either ⁕Fortitudo Eius Republicam Tenet; or ⁕Fides Est Regni Tutela.

— Freebase

Assia

Assia

Assia is an Algerian-born French singer with Kabyle origins. Her albums mixed French variety, rhythm and blues, and Oriental music. She had great success with her hit singles "Elle est à toi" and "Là-bas".

— Freebase

Liberal nationalism

Liberal nationalism

Liberal nationalism, also known as civic nationalism or civil nationalism, is a kind of nationalism identified by political philosophers who believe in a non-xenophobic form of nationalism compatible with liberal values of freedom, tolerance, equality, and individual rights. Ernest Renan and John Stuart Mill are often thought to be early liberal nationalists. Liberal nationalists often defend the value of national identity by saying that individuals need a national identity in order to lead meaningful, autonomous lives and that democratic polities need national identity in order to function properly. Liberal nationalism is the form of nationalism where the state derives political legitimacy from the active participation of its citizenry, to the degree that it represents the "general will". It is often seen as originating with Jean-Jacques Rousseau and especially the social contract theories which take their name from his 1762 book The Social Contract. Liberal nationalism lies within the traditions of rationalism and liberalism, but as a form of nationalism it is contrasted with ethnic nationalism. Membership of the civic nation is considered voluntary, as in Ernest Renan's classical definition in "Qu'est-ce qu'une nation?" of the nation as a "daily referendum" characterized by the "will to live together". Civic-national ideals influenced the development of representative democracy in countries such as the United States and France.

— Freebase

Challengers

Challengers

Challengers is a shōnen-ai manga by the Japanese manga artist Hinako Takanaga, who also authored Little Butterfly and The Devil's Secret. The first volume of this series was originally called Goukaku kigan before the series was retitled Challengers. Challengers is licensed in German by Tokyopop Germany under the title Küss mich, Student! and in French by Taifu Comics under the title Rien n'est impossible. A spin off series to Challengers, which follows Tomoe's older brother Souichi, is titled The Tyrant Falls in Love.

— Freebase

Gitanas

Gitanas

Gitanas is a Mexican telenovela which aired in 2004. It was largely based on the Chilean telenovela Romané, and was co-produced by the Mexican company Argos Comunicación and Telemundo. It aired at 9PM EST and PST from late 2004 until mid-2005. On September 26, 2007 at 10:00 am, Gitanas aired once again.This telenovela was aired in 6 countries around the world.

— Freebase

Dulce et Decorum est

Dulce et Decorum est

"Dulce et Decorum est" is a poem written by poet Wilfred Owen in 1917 during World War I, and published posthumously in 1920. The Latin title roughly translates to "it is sweet and honorable...", which, in the following line, is followed by a phrase translating to "to die for the fatherland". Owen's poem is known for its horrific imagery and condemnation of war. It was drafted at Craiglockhart in the first half of October 1917 and later revised, probably at Scarborough but possibly Ripon, between January and March 1918. The earliest surviving manuscript is dated 8 October 1917 and addressed to his mother, Susan Owen, with the message "Here is a gas poem done yesterday,."

— Freebase

Jamil

Jamil

Jamil Azzaoui, also known as just Jamil is a Canadian humorous artist / comedian, musician and an artist agent of Moroccan origin living in Montreal and well known in France and the francophone countries. Being born to a Muslim Moroccan father and a Québécoise Catholic mother, he lived his childhood in various countries including Egypt, France where he studied at École royale militaire de Sorèze, and Morocco, he returned to Canada and studied at Promédia, an arts school in Montreal. After graduation, in 1981 he became a morning radio personality at CIBL-FM and later on CINQ-FM Radio Centre-Ville. In 1985, he married Catherine Karnas. Catherine, a singer, was promoted by her husband. They were divorced later. He became an agent for many artists through his company "Pépé Inc". He also has his own series of recordings. His album Pitié pour les femmes was a big success. The follow-up Pitie pour les bums was a similar success. His song "Un signe de toi" featured in the hit parades of several stations including Rythme FM. Other humorous songs followed including "Pitié pour les femmes", "Fuck, faut qu'tu changes", "C'est pas moi ça".

— Freebase

In Dulce Decorum

In Dulce Decorum

"In Dulce Decorum" was a single released by The Damned in 1987. The song was originally recorded for the Anything album, but was issued as a single to promote the MCA retrospective Light at the End of the Tunnel. The track was inspired by Wilfred Owen's poem Dulce et Decorum Est, and began with an excerpt from a speech by Winston Churchill. The single, The Damned's last to break into the UK charts, made #72. An instrumental version was included in the Miami Vice II original television soundtrack, being featured in the third season episode "Walk Alone". MCA also issued the single in Germany. Here is the speech: Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, "This was their finest hour." -Excerpt of Speech given by Winston Churchill to the House of Commons as the The Battle of Britain Begins, 18 June 1940

— Freebase

Estrie

Estrie

The Estrie is an administrative region of Quebec that mostly overlaps the Eastern Townships. Estrie, a French neologism, was coined as a derivative of est, "east". The region has a land area of 10,214.34 km² and a 2011 census population of 310,733 inhabitants. Its largest population centre is the city of Sherbrooke. Estrie also has a large number of natural parks.

— Freebase

Fool Around With

Fool Around With

Fool Around With is a British reality TV show, where four women or men are locked up together with a single person, who tries to determine which of the four contestants is also single; the other three contestants have boyfriends or girlfriends. If the lone single person figures out which of the four contestants is also single, the person wins £10,000. The series airs on Channel 4, and every episode has a unique name, such as "Fool Around With the Cheeky Girls", "Fool Around With Fran", "Fool Around With Nadia", "Fool Around with John Nettles", "Fool Around With Humple Dennis", etc. One of the more memorable contestants on the show were The Cheeky Girls, who failed to find out who was the true single. The show has also been broadcast in Sweden on TV400. Channel4 planned new episodes of Fool Around With during 2007 after the successful first season. The show has also been shown on Hungarian CoolTV as Szinglicsapda, a French version called Jouer n'est pas Tromper had two seasons in 2006/2007 and there was a short lived Spanish version on Telecinco entitled Engano. It has also aired on Japanese reality TV.

— Freebase

Duckie

Duckie

Duckie is a collective of performance artists that describes itself as “a post-gay independent arts outfit.” They produce a mix of so-called "cultural interventions", such as club nights, new-mode pop, burlesque and performance events, as well as anti-theatre experimentation. They have described their work as "mixing the arthouse with the dosshouse" and putting "highbrow performance in backstreet pubs and lowbrow performance in posh theatres". Supported by grants from the British Council and Arts Council England, Duckie is based in London but has played in Berlin, Germany, Greece and Tokyo as well as the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, Blackpool Tower Ballroom and the Sydney Opera House. It continues to run cabaret and club nights every Saturday at the Royal Vauxhall Tavern and counts an Olivier Award for its show C’est Barbican amongst its accolades. Duckie’s work is characterised by its engagement with the queer lifestyle and community, showcasing queer performers and performance art at its weekly Saturday club night and providing “a creative forum for alternative gay and lesbian performance and culture”.

— Freebase

Syssarcose

Syssarcose

Lien musculaire entre deux pièces osseuses. Ce n'est pas une articulation, mais un lien musculaire !

— Editors Contribution

Cellule

Cellule

Unité structurelle du vivant. Une cellule est ce qui constitue le minimum irréductible à partir duquel un individu peut exister.

— Editors Contribution

organ transplantation

organ transplantation

The moving of an organ from one body to another; or from a donor site to another location on the patient's own body, for the purpose of replacing the recipient's damaged or absent organ.

— Editors Contribution

loo

loo

A toilet facility, 'restroom', men or ladies lounge in Great Britain; This term can is used globally:

— Editors Contribution

verandering

verandering

'Change' in Dutch

— Editors Contribution

Afforest

Afforest

af-for′est, v.t. to turn land into forest.—n. Afforestā′tion. [Low L. afforestāre—L. ad, to, and foresta. See Forest.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Aftermost

Aftermost

aft′ėr-mōst, adj. hindmost. [A.S. æftemest; Goth. af-tuma, -tuma, being equiv. to L. -tumus in op-tumus, best. Goth. has also af-tum-ists = A.S. æf-tem-est, which is thus a double superlative.—Thus in aftermost, r is intrusive and -most is not the adv. most.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Alder-liefest

Alder-liefest

awl-dėr-lēf′est, adj. (Shak.) most beloved of all. [The M. E. gen. pl. forms alra, alre, aller, alder, survived till about 1600; for liefest, see Lief.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Annoy

Annoy

an-noi′, v.t. to trouble: to vex: to tease: to harm, esp. in military sense:—pr.p. annoy′ing; pa.p. annoyed′.—ns. Annoy (now poetic only), Annoy′ance, that which annoys.—adv. Annoy′ingly. [O. Fr. anoier (It. annoiare); noun, anoi (mod. ennui), acc. to Diez from L. phrase, in odio, as in 'est mihi in odio' = 'it is to me hateful.']

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Arbalest

Arbalest

är′bal-est, n. a crossbow of steel or horn used in war and the chase—also Ar′balist, Ar′blast, Arcū′balist.—ns. Ar′balister, Ar′balester, one armed with an arbalest. [O. Fr. arbaleste—L. arcuballistaarcus, bow, and ballista, engine for throwing missiles.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Celestial

Celestial

sel-est′yal, adj. heavenly: dwelling in heaven: in the visible heavens.—n. an inhabitant of heaven.—adv. Celest′ially.—The Celestial Empire, a name for China. [Through Fr. from L. cœlestiscœlum, heaven.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Comestibles

Comestibles

kom-est′i-blz, n.pl. eatables. [Fr.,—L. comedĕre, to eat up.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Deforest

Deforest

de-for′est, v.t. to disforest: to deprive of forests.—n. Deforestā′tion.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Disafforest

Disafforest

dis-af-for′est, v.t. to deprive of the privilege of forest laws: to bring into the condition of common land.—ns. Disafforestā′tion, Disaffor′estment (see Disforest). [L. dis, neg., and Low L. afforestāre, to make into a forest. See Forest.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Disforest

Disforest

dis-for′est, v.t. to strip of trees: to disafforest.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Dishonest

Dishonest

diz-on′est, adj. not honest: wanting integrity: disposed to cheat: insincere: (Shak.) unchaste.—adv. Dishon′estly.—n. Dishon′esty. [O. Fr. deshonneste, des—L. dis, neg., honneste—L. honestus, honest.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Disinterested

Disinterested

dis-in′tėr-est-ed, adj. not interested or influenced by private feelings or considerations: impartial: unselfish, generous.—adv. Disin′terestedly.—n. Disin′terestedness.—adj. Disin′teresting (obs.), not interesting. [Corr. of disinterest = disinteress'd, O. Fr. des—L. dis, neg., interessé, interested in. See Interest.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Egestion

Egestion

ej-est′yun, n. the passing off of excreta from within the body.—v.t. Egest′, to discharge.—n.pl. Egest′a, things thrown out, excrements.—adj. Egest′ive. [L. egerĕree, out, gerĕre, to carry.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Elder

Elder

eld′ėr, adj. older: having lived a longer time: prior in origin.—n. one who is older: an ancestor: one advanced to office on account of age: one of a class of office-bearers in the Presbyterian Church—equivalent to the presbyters of the New Testament.—n. Eld′erliness.—adj. Eld′erly, somewhat old: bordering on old age.—n. Eld′ership, state of being older: the office of an elder.—adj. Eld′est, oldest. [A.S. eldra, yldra, comp. of eald, old.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Enforest

Enforest

en-for′est, v.t. to turn into forest.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Ewest

Ewest

ū′est, adj. (Scot.) near.

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Explicit

Explicit

eks′plis-it, n. a term formerly put at the end of a book, indicating that it is finished. [Contr. from L. explicitus est liber, the book is unrolled.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Foremost

Foremost

fōr′mōst, adj. first in place: most advanced: first in rank or dignity. [A.S. forma, first, superl. of fore, and superl. suffix -st. It is therefore a double superl.; the old and correct form was formest, which was wrongly divided for-mest instead of form-est, and the final -mest was mistaken for -most.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Hep

Hep

hep, interj. a cry said to come down from the Crusaders' time, often the cry of the mob in an outrage on the Jews—more probably an abbreviation of Hebrew than formed from the initials of Hierosolyma est perdita=Jerusalem is destroyed.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Hocus-pocus

Hocus-pocus

hō′kus-pō′kus, n. a juggler: a juggler's trick.—v.t. Hō′cus, to cheat: to stupefy with drink: to drug:—pr.p. hō′cussing; pa.p. hō′cussed. [The meaningless gibberish of a juggler—no reference to 'hoc est corpus.']

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Honest

Honest

on′est, adj. full of honour: just: the opposite of thievish, free from fraud: frank, fair-seeming, openly shown: chaste: (B.) honourable.—adv. Hon′estly.—n. Hon′esty, the state of being honest: integrity: candour: a small flowering plant, so called from its transparent seed-pouch: (B.) becoming deportment: (Shak.) chastity.—Make an honest woman of, to marry, where the woman has been dishonoured first. [Fr.,—L. honestushonor.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Immodest

Immodest

im-mod′est, adj. wanting restraint: impudent: forward: wanting shame or delicacy.—adv. Immod′estly.—n. Immod′esty, want of modesty.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Inner

Inner

in′ėr, adj. (comp. of in) farther in: interior.—adjs. Inn′ermost, In′most (superl. of in), farthest in: most remote from the outward part.—adv. Inn′ermostly. [A.S. in, comp. innera, superl. innemestinne-m-est—thus a double superlative.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Interest

Interest

in′tėr-est, n. advantage: premium paid for the use of money (in Compound interest, the interest of each period is added to its principal, and the amount forms a new principal for the next period): any increase: concern: special attention: influence over others: share: participation.—n. (Spens.) In′teress, interest, concern.—v.t. to concern deeply.—Equitable interest, such interest as is protected by courts of equity, although it might not be at common law; Landed interest (see Landed); Vested interest, an interest thoroughly secure and inalienable, except for public use and upon compensation.—Make interest for, to secure interest on behalf of. [O. Fr. interest (Fr. intérêt)—L. interest, it is profitable, it concerns—inter, between, esse, to be.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Interest

Interest

in′tėr-est, v.t. to engage the attention: to awaken concern in: to excite (in behalf of another).—adj. In′terested, having an interest or concern: affected or biassed by personal considerations, self-interest, &c.—adv. In′terestedly.—n. In′terestedness.—adj. In′teresting, engaging the attention or regard: exciting emotion or passion.—adv. In′terestingly.—n. In′terestingness.—In an interesting condition, in the family way. [From obs. interess—O. Fr. interesser, to concern—L. interesse.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Is

Is

iz, third pers. sing. pres. of be. [A.S. is; Ger. ist, L. est, Gr. esti, Sans. astias, to be.]

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Late

Late

lāt, adj. (comp. Lat′er; superl. Lat′est) slow, tardy; behindhand: coming after the expected time: long delayed: far advanced towards the close: last in any place or character: deceased: departed: out of office: not long past—also adv.adj. Lat′ed (Shak.), belated, being too late.—adv. Late′ly.—n. Late′ness, state of being late.—adv. Lat′er.—adj. Lat′ish, somewhat late. [A.S. læt, slow; Dut. laat, Ice. latr, Ger. lass, weary; L. lassus, tired.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Latest

Latest

lāt′est, adj. superl. of late.

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Long

Long

long, adj. (comp. Long′er; superl. Long′est) extended: not short: extended in time: slow in coming: tedious: far-reaching.—n. (prosody) a long time or syllable: (coll.) the long summer vacation at the English universities, termed 'the Long.'—adv. to a great extent in space or time: through the whole: all along.—v.i. to desire earnestly.—adv. Long′-agō′, in the far past.—n. the far past.—n. Longanim′ity, long-suffering, endurance.—adj. Longan′imous.—ns. Long′boat, the largest and strongest boat of a ship; Long′-bow, a bow bent by the hand in shooting, called long as distinguished from the cross-bow.—adj. Long′-breathed, able to continue violent exercise of the lungs for a long time.—n.pl. Long′-coats, long clothes, worn by infants.—adj. Long′-descend′ed, of ancient lineage.—n. Long′-doz′en, thirteen.—adjs. Long′-drawn, prolonged; Longeval, Longevous (-jē′-), of long or great age.—ns. Longevity (-jev′-); Long′-field (cricket), a fielder placed near the boundary on the bowler's side; Long′-firm, the name given to a company of swindlers who obtain goods on pretence of being established in business, and then decamp without payment to do the like elsewhere; Long′hand, writing of the ordinary kind.—adj. Long′-head′ed, having good intellectual powers: sagacious.—ns. Long′-head′edness; Long′-hun′dred, a hundred and twenty.—adjs. Lon′gicorn (-ji-), having long antennæ; Longimanous (-jim′-), long-handed; Longimet′ric.—ns. Longimetry (-jim′-), the art of measuring distances; Long′ing, an eager desire, craving, esp. of the whimsical desires sometimes felt in pregnancy.—adv. Long′ingly.—n. Longinquity (-jinq′-), greatness of distance.—adj. Longipen′nate (-ji-), long-winged, as gulls.—n. Longiros′ter (-ji-), one of a family of birds having a long, slender bill, as the snipe.—adjs. Longiros′tral, Longiros′trate (-ji-), having a long bill or beak; Long′ish.—n. Lon′gitude (-ji-), distance of a place east or west of a given meridian: distance in degrees from the vernal equinox, on the ecliptic—adj. Longitud′inal, pertaining to longitude or length: extending lengthwise.—adv. Longitud′inally.—n. Long′-leg (cricket), see Leg

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Low

Low

lō, adj. (comp. Low′er; superl. Low′est) lying in an inferior place or position: not high: deep: shallow: small: moderate: cheap: dejected: mean: plain: in poor circumstances: humble.—adv. not aloft: cheaply: meanly: in subjection, poverty, or disgrace: in times near our own: not loudly: (astron.) near the equator.—adj. Low′-born, of mean birth.—ns. Low′-church, a party within the Church of England minimising sacerdotal claims, ecclesiastical constitutions, ordinances, and forms, holding evangelical views of theology:—opp. to High-church; Low′-church′ism; Low′-church′man.—v.t. Low′er, to bring low: to depress: to degrade: to diminish.—v.i. to fall: to sink: to grow less.—adjs. Low′er-case (print.), kept in a lower case, denoting small letters as distinguished from capitals; Low′er-class, pertaining to persons of the humbler ranks.—n. Low′ering, the act of bringing low or reducing.—adj. letting down: sinking: degrading.—adj. Low′ermost, lowest.—ns. Low′land, land low with respect to higher land; Low′lander, a native of lowlands; Low′-life, humble life; Low′lihead, Low′lihood, a lowly or humble state; Low′liness.—adjs. Low′-lived, vulgar: shabby; Low′ly, of a low or humble mind: not high: meek: modest; Low′-mind′ed, moved by base or gross motives: vulgar; Low′-necked, cut low in the neck and away from the shoulders, décolleté.—n. Low′ness.—adjs. Low′-press′ure, employing or exerting a low degree of pressure (viz. less than 50 lb. to the sq. inch), said of steam and steam-engines; Low′-spir′ited, having the spirits low or cast down: not lively: sad.—n. Low′-spir′itedness.—adj. Low′-thought′ed, having the thoughts directed to low pursuits.—n. Low′-wa′ter, the lowest point of the tide at ebb.—Low Latin, a term often applied loosely to the Latin spoken and written after the fall of the Roman Empire, as well as during the Middle Ages; Low Sunday, the first Sunday after Easter, so called in contrast to the great festival whose octave it ends; Low wines, the weak spirit produced from the first distillation of substances containing alcohol.—Lie low, to keep quiet or hidden. [Ice. lágr, Dut. laag, low; allied to A.S. licgan, to lie.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Mass

Mass

mas, n. the celebration of the Lord's Supper or Eucharist in R.C. churches, also the office for the same: a musical setting of certain parts of the R.C. liturgy: a church festival or feast-day, as in Candlemas, Christmas, Martinmas, &c.—ns. Mass′-bell, or Sacring-bell, a bell rung during the celebration of mass, at the elevation of the host; Mass′-book, the R.C. missal or service-book; Mass′-priest, formerly a R.C. secular priest, as distinct from those living under a rule—later, a priest retained in chantries, &c., to say masses for the dead: a R.C. priest generally.—Mass for the dead, a funeral mass for the faithful in Christ, to hasten their release from purgatory; Conventual mass, a mass for the general community of a religious house: a mass at which special remembrance is made of pious founders and benefactors; Dry mass, or service, a rite in which there is neither consecration nor communion; High mass, a mass celebrated with music, ritual, ceremonies, and incense; Low mass, the ordinary mass celebrated without music and incense; Midnight mass, that mass which is said at midnight on Christmas-eve; Private mass, any mass where only the priest communicates, esp. in a private oratory; Solemn mass, a mass resembling a high mass, but without some of its special ceremonies; Votive mass, a special mass over and above those ordinarily said for the day, for some particular grace or purpose, and provided by some individual. [A.S. mæsse—Low L. missa—L. missus, mittĕre, to send away, from the phrase at the close of service, Ite, missa est (ecclesia), 'Go, the congregation is dismissed.']

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Modest

Modest

mod′est, adj. restrained by a sense of propriety: not forward: decent: chaste: pure and delicate, as thoughts or language: not excessive or extreme: moderate.—adv. Mod′estly.—n. Mod′esty, humility: purity of thought and manners: becoming behaviour: chastity, purity: moderation. [Fr.,—L. modestusmodus; a measure.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pectoral

Pectoral

pek′tō-ral, adj. relating to the breast or chest.—n. armour for the breast: an ornament worn on the breast, esp. the breastplate worn by the ancient Jewish high-priest, and the square of gold, embroidery, &c. formerly worn on the breast over the chasuble by bishops during mass: a pectoral cross: a pectoral fin: a medicine for the chest.—adv. Pec′torally.—n. Pectoril′oquy, the sound of the patient's voice heard through the stethoscope when applied to the chest in certain morbid conditions of the lungs.—Pectoral fins, the anterior paired fins of fishes; Pectoral theology, a name sometimes applied to the theology of those Christians who make much of experience and emotion, as themselves guides to a knowledge of divine truth—in Neander's phrase, 'Pectus est quod facit theologum.' [Fr.,—L. pectoralispectus, pectoris, the breast.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Probatum est

Probatum est

prō-bā′tum est, it has been proved. [L., 3d sing. perf. indic. pass. of probāre, to prove.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Protest

Protest

prō-test′, v.i. to bear witness before others: to declare openly: to give a solemn declaration of opinion (against).—v.t. to make a solemn declaration of: to note, as a bill of exchange, on account of non-acceptance or non-payment: (rare) to call as a witness: (obs.) to publish, make known: (Shak.) to vow.—n. Prō′test, a solemn or formal declaration, esp. in writing, expressing dissent: the noting by a notary-public of an unpaid or unaccepted bill: a written declaration, usually by the master of a ship, stating the circumstances attending loss or injury of ship or cargo, &c.—adj. Prot′estant, protesting: pertaining to the faith of those who protest against the errors of the Church of Rome.—n. one of those who, in 1529, protested against an edict of Charles V. and the Diet of Spires denouncing the Reformation: a member of one of those churches founded by the Reformers: one who protests.—v.t. Prot′estantise.—ns. Prot′estantism, the Protestant religion: state of being a Protestant; Protestā′tion, an act of protesting: a solemn declaration: a declaration of dissent: a declaration in pleading; Prot′estātor; Protest′er.—adv. Protest′ingly. [Fr.,—L. protestāri, -ātus, to bear witness in public—pro, before, testāritestis, a witness.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Proud

Proud

prowd (comp. Proud′er; superl. Proud′est), adj. having excessive self-esteem: arrogant: haughty: having a proper sense of what is becoming: daring: grand: ostentatious: giving reason for pride or boasting.—n. Proud′-flesh, a growth or excrescence of flesh in a wound.—adjs. Proud′-heart′ed (Shak.), having a proud spirit; Proud′ish, somewhat proud.—adv. Proud′ly.—adj. Proud′-mind′ed (Shak.), proud in mind.—n. Proud′ness, the state or quality of being proud: pride.—adjs. Proud′-pied (Shak.), gorgeously variegated; Proud′-stom′ached, of haughty spirit, arrogant. [A.S. prut, proud, prýte, pride.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Prowess

Prowess

prow′es, n. bravery, esp. in war: valour: daring.—adj. Prow (arch.), brave, valiant:—superl. Prow′est. [O. Fr. prou (Fr. preux), perh. from prod in prodesse, to do good.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Pure

Pure

pūr, adj. (comp. Pur′er; superl. Pur′est) clean: unsoiled: unmixed: not adulterated: real: free from guilt or defilement: chaste: modest: mere: that and that only: complete: non-empirical, involving an exercise of mind alone, without admixture of the results of experience.—n. purity.—adv. quite: (obs.) entirely.—v.t. to cleanse, refine.—adv. Pure′ly, without blemish: wholly, entirely: (dial.) wonderfully, very much.—n. Pure′ness.—Pure mathematics (see Mathematics); Pure reason, reason alone, without any mixture of sensibility; Pure science, the principles of any science considered in themselves and their relation to each other, and not in their application to the investigation of other branches of knowledge, as pure mathematics, pure logic, &c. [Fr. pur—L. purus, pure.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Rash

Rash

rash, adj. (comp. Rash′er; superl. Rash′est) hasty: headstrong: incautious.—adj. Rash′-embraced′ (Shak.), rashly undertaken.—ns. Rash′er, a thin slice of broiled bacon, perh. because quickly roasted; Rash′ling, a rash person.—adv. Rash′ly, precipitately.—n. Rash′ness. [Dan. and Sw. rask; Ger. rasch, rapid.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Reafforest

Reafforest

rē-af-for′est, v.t. to convert anew into a forest.—n. Reafforestā′tion.

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Reforest

Reforest

rē-for′est, v.t. to plant again with trees.—n. Reforestā′tion.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Rich

Rich

rich (comp. Rich′er, superl. Rich′est), adj. abounding in possessions: wealthy: valuable: sumptuous: fertile: full of agreeable or nutritive qualities: affluent: productive, as a rich mine: costly: mighty: ruling: ample: of superior quality: luxurious: of great moral worth: highly seasoned or flavoured, as rich pastry: bright, as a colour: full of harmonious sounds, as a rich voice: full of beauty, as a rich landscape: of a vivid colour: extravagant, as a rich joke.—v.t. (Shak.) to enrich.—v.i. to grow rich.—v.i. Rich′en, to become rich, or of higher quality of any kind.—adj. Rich′-left (Shak.), left with much wealth, richly endowed.—adv. Rich′ly.—n. Rich′ness, wealth: abundance: fruitfulness: value: costliness: abundance of imagery. [A.S. ríce, rich; Ger. reich, Dut. rijk, Goth. reiks.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Short

Short

short, adj. (comp. Short′er, superl. Short′est) not long in time or space: not tall: near at hand, early in date: scanty, lacking, insufficient: in error, deficient in wisdom, grasp, memory, &c.: narrow: abrupt, curt, sharp, uncivil: brittle, crumbling away readily: not prolonged in utterance, unaccented: (coll.) undiluted with water, neat: falling below a certain standard (with of): of stocks, &c., not having in possession when selling, not able to meet one's engagements, pertaining to short stocks or to those who have sold short.—adv. not long.—n. a summary account: a short time or syllable: whatever is deficient in number, quantity, &c.: a short sale, one who has made such: (pl.) small clothes, knee-breeches: the bran and coarse part of meal, in mixture.—ns. Short′age, deficiency; Short′-allow′ance, less than the regular allowance; Short′-and, the character '&,' the ampersand.—adj. Short′-armed, having short arms, not reaching far.—ns. Short′-bill, one having less than ten days to run; Short′-cake, a rich tea-cake made short and crisp with butter or lard and baked—also Short′-bread (Scot.): (U.S.) a light cake, prepared in layers with fruit between, served with cream; Short′-cir′cuit (electr.), a path of comparatively low resistance between two points of a circuit.—n.pl. Short′-clothes, small clothes, the dress of young children after the first long clothes.—v.t. Short′-coat, to dress in short-coats.—n.pl. Short′-coats, the shortened skirts of a child when the first long clothes are left off.—n. Short′coming, act of coming or falling short of produce or result: neglect of, or failure in, duty.—n.pl. Short′-comm′ons (see Common).—n. Short′-cross, the short cross-bar of a printer's chase.—adjs. Short′-cut, cut short instead of in long shreds—of tobacco, &c.—also n.; Short′-dāt′ed, having short or little time to run from its date, as a bill.—n. Short′-divi′sion, a method of division with a divisor not larger than 12—opp. to Long-division.—v.t. Short′en, to make short: to deprive: to make friable.—v.i. to become short or shorter: to contract.—n. Short′-gown, a loose jacket with a skirt, worn by women, a bed-gown.—adj. Short′-grassed (Shak.), provided or covered with short grass.—n. Short′hand, an art by which writing is made shorter and easier, so as to keep pace with speaking.—adj. Short′-hand′ed, not having the proper number of servants, work-people, &c.—ns. Short′hander, a stenographer; Short′-horn, one of a breed of cattle having very short horns—Durham and Teeswater.—adj. Short′-horned

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Subcelestial

Subcelestial

sub-sel-est′yal, adj. under the heavens.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Supercelestial

Supercelestial

sū-pėr-sel-est′yal, adj. situated above the firmament or vault of heaven.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Under-honest

Under-honest

un-dėr-on′est, adj. (Shak.) not quite honest.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Unhonest

Unhonest

un-on′est, adj. (obs.) dishonest, unchaste.—n. Unhon′esty.

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

Utmost

Utmost

ut′mōst, adj. outmost: farthest out: most distant: last: in the greatest degree: highest.—n. the greatest that can be: the greatest effort. [A.S. útemest, formed with double superlative suffix -m-est from úte, out.]

— Chambers 20th Century Dictionary

jehovah's witness

jehovah's witness

A member of the jehovah's witnesses belief and faith.

— Editors Contribution

kingdom hall

kingdom hall

A building or place where members of the jehovah's witnesses gather for fellowship and worship.

— Editors Contribution

fundamentalism

fundamentalism

Fundamentalism, this word's semantic meaning can only be relevant to the degree of understanding of a current social intellectual domain. This innate didactic sense has been proven by the ability of newer generation capacity to resolve ancient metaphysical problems. Therefore, what was fundamental to old generations may not be fundamental to modern current intellectuals.

— Editors Contribution

Omnism

Omnism

Omnist derive from Omni-Theist- It is not a Religion, but the combining of the Religious and Non-Religious through the Epistemology of God's literal Writings, the 10 Commandments.

— Editors Contribution

Omni-theist

Omni-theist

You Cannot believe in all religions, because the 3 major religions(Judaism, Christianity and Muslim) Prohibits you from worshiping any other God other than Jehovah God, because it's part of his literal Writings, The 10 commandments.

— Editors Contribution

impeach

impeach

To right and authority of a judicial system to summon a member of government, member of parliament, member of a legislature, council member, head of state, prime minister, vice president or president of a country to a court of law or tribunal where there is accurate data, evidence and facts that a vital or important governmental choice or decision was made by that person's personal choice rather than a choice that reflected the collective expression of the will of the electorate, citizens and people of the community, region or country they represented in that specific moment of time or the governmental choice or decision should have been based on transparent and just data, evidence, facts and intelligence to justify the choice or decision and therefore had a significant effect on the electorate, citizens and people after that specific governmental choice or decision was made.

— Editors Contribution

impeachment

impeachment

To right and authority of a judicial system to summon a member of government, member of parliament, member of a legislature, council member, head of state, prime minister, vice president or president of a country to a court of law or tribunal where there is accurate data, evidence and facts that a vital or important governmental choice or decision was made by that person's personal choice rather than a choice that reflected the collective expression of the will of the electorate, citizens and people of the community, region or country they represented in that specific moment of time or the governmental choice or decision should have been based on transparent and just data, evidence, facts and intelligence to justify the choice or decision and therefore had a significant effect on the electorate, citizens and people after that specific governmental choice or decision was made.

— Editors Contribution

self-control

self-control

The ability to control one's own action, behavior, feelings, emotions, reaction, response, thoughts and will.

— Editors Contribution